The East Carolinian, January 12, 1982






Presidents
The Best and the Worst
Page �
1982
Free Flick Preview
Page 6
Basketball
�Pirates Impressive In Win
�Richmond Scores ECAC Upset
Page 9
ttfoe
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 31
Tuesday, Januar 12, 1982
(ireenville.N.C.
12 Pages
Howell Interim Head
Interim Chancellor Dr. John Howell
By DIANE ANDERSON
Dr. John Howell, professor of
political science a! last Carolina
University, has been named interim
chancellor for the school until a per-
manent replacement is chosen for
Chancellor Thomas Brewer who
resigned last September.
ewer has been granted a leave
of absence until June 30, when his
resignation takes effect.
The announcement was made last
Friday, and Howell took over as top
administrator of the university
Monday morning. The appointment
was approved by the UNC Board of
Governor's personnel committee
after a recommendation by Univer-
sity of North Carolina President
William Fridav.
Ashley Futrell, chairman of the
ECU Board of Trustees, was quoted
as saying, "We've got an excellent
man. John Howell commands the
respect of the people of the
areathe students, faculty and staff
and friends of the university. He's a
good man
"I was pleased to be the one who
was chosen to do it Howell said
regarding his appointment.
"The job is primarily a job of see-
ing the university through this tran-
sition from one chancellor to
another, and that means that I am
not going to start any major changes
because I wouldn't be here to finish
them he said.
"That doesn t mean, though, that
I wonl move ahead with thinus
he explained. "There are some
things that have been in the process
for some time and thev are inst com-
ing up now. They need to be com-
pleted. 1 won't be just sitting here
doing nothing. I will be moving
ahead with things
According to Howell, he is not a
candidate for the permanent
chancellor position. "1 didn'i app-
ly he said, and "I didn't appiv last
time when Dr. Jenkins retired
"Taking it temporarily is dif-
ferent from taking it permanent-
ly, "he said.
Dr. Howell. 59 veais ol age, is in
his 25th year at ECU. He tirst came
to the university as an associate pro
fessor in the social studies depart-
ment, and has since been provost
COLD! Arctic Air Mass
I nsiri) Prr Inft-rnglionai
Nort arolinians statewide
shivered in record cold weather
Monday, that strained utilities, iced
roads, Jelaved school openings and
ll made staving outdoors
I
(ape Hatteras, Wtlmingron,
Raleieb-Durham and AshevilTe set
record lows tor the date, while the
op Grandfather Mountain
near Linville had the coldest reading
in its 27-year history: 27 degrees
below zero. Northwesterly winds
were pushing that cold air at 50
mph.
Temperatures and winds were
more moderate everywhere else, but
condition" -rifl were fierce.
Thermometers in the Macon
C ountv town of Highlands dropped
to minus 13 degrees, while West Jef-
ferson had minus 12 degrees and
Boone dipped to 11 below zero.
Asheville's low of 6 below zero
was seven degrees under the old
record for a Jan. 11 and just one
degree short of the city's all-time
coldest reading, the National
Weather Service said.
Further east, the other record-
setting cities checked in at 4 degrees
in Raleigh-Durham, 8 in Wilm-
ington and 12 at Cape Hatteras.
Considering the gusts that accom-
panied the frigid air, every part of
the state experienced below-zero
wind-chill conditions.
National Weather Service
forecasters predicted the arctic high
pressure that clamped a frigid hold
woulkd continue through Tuesday.
More moderate weather is expected
after that.
Front Page Story Remains A Mystery
Bv 1IKK MICHES
sijm Mrttti
In the Dec. 8 edition of The East
a controversial story an-
the resignation of the
mer directoi ol advertising,
. - t , was pi inted.
� ei -v resulted not so
from the content of the article
" �' ' om the fact that the story's
origin remains a mystery.
According to several sources on
the newspaper staff, a story about
campus construction was supposed
to appear at the top of the front
page.
"When I left, between 1:30 and
quarter-to-two the morning of the
eighth, the front page was fine
said Tom Hall, the news editor.
SGA Adopts Loan
Program Policies
By JIMMY DuPREE
ManaK'HK r diior
After an eight month absense the
Student loan Fund will return to
operation Jan. 18 under policies
adopted Monday by the SGA
Legislature. The program was
suspended by the 1981 summer
legislature so a survey of its effec-
tiveness could be taken.
The resolution concerning
reinstatement of the loan fund was
discharged from the Student
Welfare Committee Nov. 30, but
the policies governing the program
were not ready to be presented to
the legislature.
"(The policies were) more or less
a compromise to get the loan system
back into operation said Speaker
Gary Williams. "This was probably
the best product we could have
Students may obtain the loan only
once during each semester according
to the policies. An proposed amend-
ment offered by Russell Overman
would have allowed two loans per
term, but it was defeated by a 13-9
margin.
"Are we in the banking business
or the student service business?"
asked treasurer Kirk Little. "We ex-
amined everything that had come
before us. In the past some students
had used the system as a revolving
checking account
"At about 12:30 the next after-
noon, when 1 tnst saw the issue. 1
couldn't believe it
Hall says lie then called the
newspaper office, but there was no
answer. Later that afternoon. Hall
found the original construction
story on a light table in the lav mil
room at the newspaper office.
However, when he went to check
the original paste-up sheets, winch
are returned with the published
newspapers. Hall noticed that the
Foster story had been removed.
The article on Foster's resigna-
tion, which contained extensive
quotes from Foster himself, was
highly critical of The Last Caroli-
nian's editor in chief, Paul Collins,
calling him hot-tempered and
"unbusinesslike
Collins, who was at home when
the paper was published, said he was
shocked upon seeing the storyI
just can't believe that someone
would go to that length to defame
someone else he said.
"Most of the 'facts' in the article
were completely untrue Collins
continued, "and even those
statements which resembled the
truth were highly distorted
Although the director of campus
security labelled the incident as a
problem among "a bunch of kids"
and said that he could not see
any way there can be any criminal
action Collins originally planned
to take action against the
"prankster" through the SGA
honor council.
However, since Foster has resign-
ed and subsequently left Last
Carolina, Collins said he would no
longer pursue an honor council in-
vestigation.
"1 must admit, 1 was upset when
Channel Nine referred to the whole
incident as a prank Collins con-
tinued. "To me, when someone
takes a deliberate stab at me and the
newspaper, that goes a bit further
than a mere jest. This was not
something done in fun.
"I don't object to constructive
criticism Collins asserted. "I have
to expect it. What 1 do object to is
being defamed
The cold triggered record
demands for electricity from
Carolina Power ' I ighl Co. and
Duke Power Co. C Pi . plagued by
generating problems with some of
its coal-fired plants, had to trim its
voltage by 5 percent and appeal to
customers to conscrv e
CP'I spokesman Mac Harris said
the biggest difficulty was the loss ol
a 685-megawatt generator at Rox-
boro.
The utility normally would bin
extra power from other utilities.
Harris said, but the cold weather
along the entire Last Coast left each
utility with little or no extra elec-
tricity to spare.
Despite the appeal to conserve,
the utility at 8 a.m. recorded a peak
demand of 6,602 megawatts, eclips-
ing the old record of 6,402
megawatts set Jan. 13, 1981.
Duke Power Co. also set an all
time record of 11,145 megawatts
that same hour.
The strain proved too much for a
Duke substation in Charlotte. It
broke down. leaving 6,000
customers without electricity tor
three hours.
Another 1,000 residences in
Greensboro suffered outages, as did
about 200 Forsyth County
customers.
Many schools delayed the start of
classes or cancelled school because
of a lack of heat or frozen water
pipes.
The Dare County Sheriff's
Department said about three-tenths
of a mile of N.C. 12 north of Avon
was covered with a sheet of ice. The
state Highway Patrol also found icy
conditions in Ashe, Watauga and
Newspaper Awarded
First Class Rating
The Last Carolinian has received
a First Class rating from the
Associated Coliegiate Press (ACP)
tor the 1981 spring semester, Editor
in Chief Paul Collins announced
Mondav.
The newspaper received marks of
distinction in three of the five
categories rated by the ACP in-
cluding writing and editing, opinion
content and design.
In the judging. The East Caroli-
nian received 3,435 points with
3,100 needed for a First Class
rating. First Class is the highest of
the four basic categories the ACP
uses in judging newspapers. Papers
that receive marks of distinction in
at least four areas are also rated All
American, the highest award given
by the ACP.
"We're proud to have been given
a First Class rating Collins said.
"It we had received just one more
mark of distinction, the paper
would have been All American. I
think The East Carolinian is
something everyone at East
Carolina can be proud of
Among the comments made by
the judge was: "The East Caroli-
nian is, overall, an impressive
newspaper. It is well-written and
presented in an attractively designed
package
c. . W��o �yCHAP OURLEV
Students unpack their belongings and get settled in as they return to school for the spring semester.
and vice chancellor for academic af-
fairs, dean of the graduate school,
dean of the college of arts and
sciences, and chairman ot the
political science department.
"I have been hue for a long time.
I know all the people Howell said.
"It's not as if I am starting out on
something I see as a great pro-
blem
Once his duties as acting
chancellor are completed, Howell
sas he will return to teaching and
research.
I)r Howell's wife, Gladys, is a
professor in the department of
sociology and anthropology. Sue
will he on leave as long as Howell
holds the position of acting
chancellor.
State
Alleghany counties.
Two North Carolina men are
heheved to have died of exposure
about the time the cold wave began
Sunday. In Asheville, James Diane.
65, was found dead outside his
home. And in High Point, Willie
Meet, 41. was found dead behind a
furniture store.
In rural Wake County. 11 people
bundled up toghether under blanked
in an unheated home.
"We don't have any wood, no
heat in the house. Young kids are
here Anne Bethel said. "The
wood just ran out. We just bought it
Friday
Winston-Salem's Crisis Control
Ministry saw a dramatic increase in
calls for emergency help to pay
heating bills. A spokeswoman
estimated the ministry spent about
SI,400 last weekend on fuel
assistance for about 30 applicants.
In the same town, the Lighthouse
ministry took care of 91 indigents
Sunday night instead of the usual
75. All three of Charlotte's transient
facilities were filled, as was the
Raleigh Rescue Mission.
Plumbers reports a massive up-
surge of businesses as water pipes
froze, while service stations were
equally busy rescuing autos whose
batteries had failed to stay charged
in the cold.
More than 70 school buses in
Charlotte failed to start Mondav
Yearbooks
Now Being
Distributed
The 1981 Buccaneers are here.
Amy Picketl, editor of the East
Carolina yearbook, said Monday
that the yearbooks were delivered
on Dec. 23. She and her staff began
distributing the books on Jan. 8.
According to Pickctt. 40 percent
oi the books were given out Fridav,
the first day of drop-add.
"Between 2500 and 2600 books
are left Pickett said.
The Buccaneer, funded by stu-
dent fees, can be picked up free of
charge by all full-time students.
Part-time students must pav $5 for a
v cat book.
I iie yearbooks are only available
in The Buccaneer office this year,
Picketl said; there will be no other
distribution sites. The office is on
the second floor of the Publications
Building.
Students must present their ECU
identification cards in order to
receive a yearbook. Freshmen or
transfer students who did not pay
the fees that funded the yearbooks
mav buy a copy for $10.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12. 1982
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
m the announcements column
pifMse send the announcement (as
t'f as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Carol'
man in care o the news editor.
Ttvre is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited
1 he deadline tor announcement
iri-ipm Friday tor the Tuesday
paper and 5pm Tuesday tor the
Thursday paper
the spate is available to all
ampus organizations and depart
menrj
SKISNOWSHOE
nowshoe, W VA , Spring
PHVE tISO PHVE 115t
n credit Contact Ms Jo
-s 05 Memorial Gym,
S7 MtOO lor information Deposits
i. i-pieo on January 76 at 4
� v.emonal Gym 106 Call
this date to reserve your
i mi'ed space s available
NAACP
, Ot the NAACP
� i-mbership cards are in Please
I Jackie Rowe at 904 Cie
menl '52 8440 tor your card
INTERNSHIP
i os tumors and seniors
("ironed m a North
. oiieqe or North Carolina
lenrs attending an out of state
:h "ave until February 17 to
. lot 'he institute ot Govern
Summer Internship Pro
n s'ate government
'y tour students will be
, V d Bv an advisory commit
�r i' to participate in a living
earning internship in North
Carolina state government
, ted by the institute of Govrn
�� The Institute of Govern
menl "items will work from May
ouqh July 30
�(n'i w.ii work 40 hourseach
� n a responsible position in a
;ta�e department, participate n
iq ductional seminars and
. paid approximately $150 per

lents -nterested in the pro
� v,ir sc; ure a brochure an
) ��. program and a State
N irth Carolina application from
itlege or university place
. iff M ocai Job Service of
� � Abi t" description of possible
-� cs are available in col
. . �, rtt ntfices
fS ntprested in the in
Of Government program
nail a" application to the
���� erf Government, Knapp
. osvA The University of
N � aroima. Chapel Hill, North
a 27514 by February 12,
i ants will be accepted
' respect to race, sex color
11 lal origin, religion, or han
II . Cherry a student ot
� Carolina University, served
Institute ot Government m
State government during
l 10S1
TRAFFIC
The Greenville Traffic Commis
sion will meet at 10 X am m the
third floor Conference Room of the
Community Building on vVednes
day. Jan 13
UTILITIES
The Board of Commissioners of
the Greenville Utililties Commis
sion will meet m regular session at
7 30pm Tuesday. Jan 12, m the
Board Room of the Utilities
Building
DR. MARTIN LUTHER
KING, JR.
The ECU Chapter of NAACP is
sponsoring a program saluting
this great individual's birthday
and recognition ot this day as a na
tional holiday The program is to
be held January 15. l�B2 beginning
at 12 noon in tront of the Student
Supply Store Play a role m mak
ing this day a success1 After an he
did it for the cause and paid the
price! For further details, call
757 6942
RECNITE
Repeating last years success.
the Student Residence Association
is sponsoring Residence Hall Rec
Nite at Memorial Gym on Jan 13
from 7 9pm Presented by in
tramural Services and Residence
Life the evening ot tun will
feature a demonstration of Belly
Dancmg lor fun and exercise, an
exhibition ot Aerobic Dance exer
cise i Jazzercisel. using the weight
room tor maximum effect, anti a
special presentation ot self
defense techmgues
Free play in basketball
volleyball badminton ano simmm
mg will be available alona with
free retreshmems. so come on
down and revitalize that wasted
Christmas New Years body' SRA
taids reauired
NEW YORK
The East Carolina Un.vers'y
Student union Travel Committee
s offering a fantastic spring break
alternative at an unbeatable price
six days in New York City The
trip will run from March 5 thru
March 12 The cost of the tr.p is as
follows Single occupancy
S2S9 00 Double occupancy
S185 00 Triple occupancy
S15v 00 Quad ocupancy SI45 00
included m the price are the
following roundtrip transporta
lion via torty six passenger buses
and hotel accommodations at 'he
Hotel Edison The registration
deadline is February 22 and reser
vations can he made at the Central
Ticket Office located in
Mendenha'l Sludent Center
SIGMA BIG BROTHERS
There will be a meeting of an
Sigma Big Brothers on Thursday
Jan 14 at 6 30 a' the house AH
j c � �
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday, February
20. 1987 Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to
Educonal Testing Service. Box
966 R. Princeton, NJ 08540
Registration deadline is January
21. 1987 Registration postmarked
after this date must be accom
panied by a 15 non refundable
late registration tee
ECU COACHES
All of the ECU head coaches will
be m the lobby of the Students Sup
ply Store to meet all students,
faculty, and staff at 10 30 11 30 on
Wednesday. January 13 We look
forward to meeting you!
ATHLETICS?
Come Oin the Student Athletic
Board (SAB) this semester and
become involved with meeting the
athletes and coaches of men and
women s basketball, men and
women's track, men and women's
tennis, men and women's swimm
mg, golf, baseball, and softbail
Our first meeting will be on
Wednesday. January 13 at 5 p m
m Minges Coliseum, Room
142143 It unable to attend please
call Kitty Kinane. President,
752 8549 or Pam Holt, Advisor
757 6417 for more information
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from
students who are interested in
becoming PERSONAL CARE AT
TENDANTS to wheel chair
students We will employ those
who nave a desire to assist m
dividuais with their activities ot
daily living
For details concerning duties
and compensation contact C C
Rowe Coordinator. Ottice of Han
dirapped Student Services 212
Wh.chard Building. Phone 757 6799
ARTISTS
Artists! The Seventh Annual
Rebel Art Show, sponsored by the
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and Wine
Co . is coming up to give you an op
portunity for recognition as will as
prize money All registered ECU
students may e'lter a maximum of
two pieces in any of the following
categories Painting, Sculpture.
Ceramics, Drawing Photography.
Design (metal, fiher. or wook).
Graphic Art and Illustration Plan
to bring your best work on Friday,
Jan 77, 1987 to the conference
Room in Jenkins Fine Art Center.
ECU
PAGEANT
North Carolina Southern Beau
ty The search is on for contestants
ages 4 77 years old. each age divi
sion limited deadline March 1.
1987 Pageant will be heio �pr.i 16
and 17 For information send a
stamped address envelope to N C
SOUTHERN BEAUTY
PAGEANT. P O Box 5437.
Greensboro N C 27403
NTE
The National Teacher Exarmna
tions will be offered at Eas'
Carolina University on Saturday
February 70. 1982 Application
blanks are to be comple'ed and
mailed to the Educational Testing
Service, Box 966 R. Princeton NJ
08540 to arrive by January 18
1982 Application blanks are �tV
available at the Testing Center.
Speight Building. Room 105, Ea�.t
Carolina University
The Easl Carolinian
Vri ttn tnr i u"7'ii iinnfliimt
IMHT rtJ
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate 120 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville NX.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 7J7 4366. 6367 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
SPORTS CLUB
The first meeting of 1982 tor the
Sports Club Council will be held
Wed Jan 20at4pm ui Memorial
Gym. Room 105 Each sports club
recognized by the Department tor
Intramural Recrea'iona' Services
is required to nave a rrpresen
tat've m attendance This meeting
is of jtmosl imporiance to each
c'ub Agenda cms include
facility fields uvtoe alii cation.
spr ng srhedu'es apt' va' d'Sac
provai. budget prootems lot cer
tain clubs anc c'jb upda' s
HANDBALL
9ACQUETBALL
A challenge court system wli oe m
effect on court no 2 trom 8 15 pm
to midnight on Tues . Thurs ano
Sat mghts A blackboard has been
provided on me observation dei �
level to establish ct'aiienqe pcsi
t i O n s
ART SHOW
The Seventh Annual Art Show
will be from Jan 76 to Feb 5, 19S7
m the Greenville Museum of Art
All ECU artists are encouraged to
prepare their best work to submit
Friday. Jan. 22. I9t2 to the con
ference room in the office of
Jenkins Fine Arts Center. ECU
Cash prizes, provided by the Attic
and Jeffries Beer and Wine, Co
will fange from S10 for Honorable
Mentions to $100 lor Best m Show
PIRATE SPORTS
Would you enioy meeting our
ECU coaches and athletes,
assisting in promoting your
favorite sport, meeting visiting
teams, coaches, and recruits, and
feeling a part of Pirate
Sports come to a Student Athletic
Board (SAB) meeting on Wednes
day, January 13 in Room 142 '43
Mmges Coliseum at 5 p m or call
Pam Holt at 757 6417
ICE CREAM EATING
All campus organizations during
the half time ot our Pirate and
Lady Pirate basketball games on
January 14. IS, and 16th, Heart s
Delight, Subway Sportsworlo and
Paniana Bob's in coordination
with the ECU Athletic Dept will
sponsor an ice cream eating con
test with numerous 1st 2nd and
3rd place group prizes Call Pam
Holt at 757 6417 lor more inlorma
tion
GYMNASTICS ROOM
UTILIZATION
The gymnastics room located in
Memorial Gymnasium is open to
students, faculty and staff each
Mon -Thur trom 6 30 p m to 8
p m Members of the university
community are invited to utilize
the gymnastics equipment and ex
i-rcise area under the guidance ot
qualified instructors during these
ti me per lOds
SPORTS CLUB
The first meeting of 1982 tor the
Spnrts Club Council will be held
Wee Jan 20 at 4pm m Memorial
Gym Room 105 Each sports club
recognized by the Department tor
intramural Recreational Services
is required to nave a represen
tative m attendance This meeting
s ot utmost importance to each
club Agenda items include
lacii '� fields usage allocation,
sprino. schedules approval disap
provai budget problems tor cer
'am clubs and club updates

J
Bring your announcements to THE EAST CAROLINIAN �
We Will Be Glad to Print Them For You
FREE OF CHARGE
I Beautiful Fantastic UNBELIEVABLE
�' :�
I �
J Completely Remodeled
I AND STILL MORE TO COME
�:�
1
8
s
V.
�.
a!
WHERE;
University Dining Services
� JONES CAFETERIA
� GALLEY SNACK BAR
(Located 9th Level Jones Dormitory)

Come by and see us.
MEAL PLANS NOW
ON SALE.
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of Ihese advertised Hems is requited lo be readily available lor sale at or
I below the advertised price m each A4P Store eicept as specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU WED JAN. 13, AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
DYNAMITE DOLLAR
SALE! ���
s2S&
A&P QUALITY FRESHLY
4 Ground
Beef
5 lb. roll
pkg.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF�WHOLE
Boneless Shoulder
Roast
(18 Lb. To 24 Lb. Avg.)
Cut Free Into Steaks
and Roast!
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE BONE IN Cut Free Into
Bone In New York
Strip Steaks
(16 To 20 Lb. Avg. Wt)
New York
Strips
EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM COUNTRY FARM
Equal Number
End and
Center Slices!
14 Sliced
Pork Loin , rr�
lb.
ANN PAGE
Savings
�Cream
Style
�Whole
Kernel
Golden Corn
00
3 1
16V202. i
cans m
PURE VEGETABLE
Wesson Oil
24 oz.
btl.
1
00
DONALD DUCK
Orange Juice
Save
49�
64 oz.
ctn.
1
IN QUARTERS
Save17on3Pkgs.
Shedd's Spread
�� ��� � 3 Pkgs
3 100
FROZEN�SAVE 29
ALL NATURAL
TotmO'S PiZZa Breyer'S Ice Cream
Canadian Bacon
Pepperoni
Hamburger 12
Sausage pkg
EXTRA ACTION
Tide Determent
V2 gal.
3 ctn.
2
00
Save 99
49 oz.
box
1
Pepsi-Cola
Diet Pepsi-Cola
Mountain Dew
Sunkist Orange
Litre
Plastic
Bottle
mm Bottle Jr �w t
Del Monte
Catsup
32 oz.
btl.
89?
BARBASOL
Shave Cream
� Regular
� Menthol
�Lemon-
Lime
211oz. I
cans
00
EFARV
FRESH WITH QUALITY
U.S. 4 EASTERN GROWN ALL PURPC
White
Potatoes
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Dole
Bananas
S$�8$C8$a$SSiKi��$fS:�-8
T
SSfcsfeeasvrS, ��v -h�$�
'��-�� ��� ��mm'm tgu4in0 �'
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Welcom
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
Jan 16 1982
Back to the Books
AOVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale
m each Kroger Sav on,
except as specifically
noted in this ad If we do
run out of an item we will
offer you your choice of
a comparable item when
available reflecting the
samsavings or a rain
check which will entitle
you to purchase the
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3ttr �aat (EarolittUm
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Con.ins, ,�,�,���,
Jimmy Dupree, nem-
Ric Browning, onm �Mn, Charles Chandler. "� ��"
Chris Lichok. 8b,w ����� Tom Hall. ,� e�
Ai ison Bartel. Pr,iMon itav Steve Bachner. ������ �y�u,
Steve Moore, (mm mw William Yelverton. s,w, ���,
January 12, 1982
Opinion
Page 4
Happy New Year
.4 Few Resolutions For ECU
What New Year's resolutions did
you make this year, and how many
of them have you broken already?
Well, it still is not too late to make
some additional resolutions and
stick to them. In that vein, we
would like to make some sugges-
tions.
First of all, an easy one. Pro-
fessors can resolve not to give any
tests on Fridays and to cancel class
on days preceding holidays.
Students, in turn, can vow to attend
class regularly, work harder and
really get something out of their
educations.
The varsity cheerleaders could
resolve to refrain from practicing on
the second level of Minges while
there is a Lady Pirate basketball
game in progress. Let's not forget
the jayvee unit, who could easily
find accommodations other than
seats in the stands.
The chancellor selection commit-
tee can resolve to choose the best
possible successor for Dr. Brewer by
keeping an open mind and bringing
as few prejudices to the selection
process as possible. Interim
chancellor John Howell can do his
best to bring the university com-
munity together again in the wake
of rifts created in recent months.
The Campus Police can resolve to
think before they tow.
The bars downtown can resolve
DOONESBURY
not to raise the price of beer for the
remainder of the year.
The SGA can resolve to be more
calm and deliberative as befits a
body of its stature and importance.
On the sports scene, Dave Odom
can resolve to bring, by hook or by
crook, a seven footer to ECU. And
Ed Emory can resolve to say
"Carolina" instead of "Kerlina
By the way coach, your All-
America's name is "Robbins" not
"Robinson
Rudy Alexander can resolve to
buy new Christmas decorations for
Mendenhall to replace the current
ones which have widely been
described as tacky.
The Student Union can resolve to
bring the Rolling Stones to Minges
Coliseum.
Everyone can resolve to do
something to make ECU a better
university, a place we can all be pro-
ud of.
And we at The East Carolinian,
what can we resolve? We can
resolve to be more sensitive when we
criticize someone and remember
always to offer posible solutions for
the problem.
We can also take a few extra
minutes to be sure of what we say
and do, but that is something
everyone can do.
Happy New Year.
by Garry Trudsau
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- Campus Forum
Bushbecks Thankful For Support
In August, our son Chuck Bushbeck,
while in preseason camp and looking
forward to playing his final year of col-
legiate football at East Carolina Univer-
sity, as stricken by Hodgkins Disease.
From that moment on, mere words will
never be able to describe the many,
many acts of support, friendship and
humanity unselfishly extended by the
wonderful people of ECU, the City of
Greenville and the State of North
Carolina.
It is honest to say that without you the
feeling of apprehension and helplessness
we felt as parents would have been
almost too much to bear when our son
decided to remain at the university. Our
worst fears proved to be unfounded
when the people of Greenville opened up
their hearts in the most generous
demonstration of love we have ever ex-
perienced.
Coach Ed Emory and his beautiful
wife Nancy, were Chuck's parents away
from home. We could have done no
more for our son than they did. They are
two of the most gracious, giving people
it has been our good fortune to meet.
May their efforts at ECU be rewarded
with much deserved success.
We would also like to express our ap-
preciation to the ECU coaching staff,
sports medicine people, Pirate team-
mates, fellow students, doctors and
nurses who attended Chuck and all the
other wonderful people in the great state
of North Carolina we never had the op-
portunity to meet. God bless you.
Chuck is a determined young man and
has pretty much accomplished what he
has set out to do in his life. We feel that
he will make his friends in North
Carolina proud of him, as we have
always been.
We would like to conclude by saying
that we will never forget you for your
kindness.
Mr. & Mrs. CHARLES R. BUSHBECK
Buccaneer Errors
When my husband Steve and I agreed
to do an interview with the Buccaneer
last spring, we asked that the story be
available for us to read before the article
was printed in the yearbook because of
our fears of misrepresentation. We were
never consulted before the printing of
the article; we thought perhaps they'd
dropped the story.
What was printed in the Buccaneer
about our life together in the dorm and
our opinion of my job was a definite
misrepresentation. Being married and
living in the dorm can be, as the article
states, "Hardly The Honeymoon
Suite But during the hour-long inter-
view we talked about several positive
aspects of our situtation that were never
brought out in the article.
The article makes it sound as if 1 am
an unsacrificing person who thinks only
of my I own needs, not those of the
students. Steve and I are grateful to the
university for the opportunity to live on
campus. We know what it's like to pay
off-campus rent rates and utility bills.
Our situation in Slay has made it possi-
ble for us to continue our education. As
for my job, life in Slay isn't bad at all.
True, it is a single's environment, but I
have good friends here and get personal
fulfillment out of my job. There are in-
conveniences in any job. That's reality. I
am paid to be available. It's true that
sometimes we don't answer the door �
but this is not irregular for any staff per-
son. When you are a staff person you
are still responsible for your grades and
personal life and naturally this can be
complicated with a live-in job. But let
me reassure my superior and the
residents of Slay that my availability to
them is in no way endangered. I have
handled emergencies at many hours of
the day and night and don't want
anyone to be misled. As they say, don't
believe everything you read!
We also noticed the Buccaneers
coverage of the ECU music department
and the famous Marching Pirates did
not extend past Steve's T-shirt in our
picture.
PHYLLIS BARBOfk
Senior, Arts Administration
Worthy Newspaper
Typically, it requires outrage to drive
a person to write to a newspaper. But
enough quality can also be forcing.
Beginning with your decision to run the
Doonesbury strip, you've made The
East Carolinian this semester a worthy
university newspaper.
Here are some examples of what 1 lik
ed: the editorial defending free spec
the cartoon showing the chancellor and
the football coach sitting on a park
bench studying the help-wanted ads,
lively letters to the editor page and the
coverage of. campus actions on seuous
world issues � hunger, human
the arms race.
This letter is by convention addreed
to the editor, and he certainly deserves
credit. But as I go over what has left the
good taste, I am reminded of the old �
but often ignored � fact that any big
undertaking depends on many people
working together. Thank you all.
EDITH WEBBER
English Department
Correspondence
I am incarcerated at McCain prison in
McCain, N.C. I am very lonely and need
someone to write. I have family, but
they don't write. I am 25 years old, 5'
7 weigh 135 pounds, and have brown
hair and hazel eyes. I would appreciate
letters from any ladies that care. Thank
you for your help.
PAUL CANADY
P.O. Box 58
McCain, N.C. 28361
Questionable Practices Haunt Alexander, Travel Committee
By CHARLES M. SUNE
Anytime a student challenges the integri-
ty of a university official, doubts im-
mediately arise as to the validity of the
charges. This is as it should be since in our
society one is presumed innocent until pro-
ven guilty. However, that benefit of doubt
is not the result of presumed innocence but
the assumption ihat a student is generally
uninformed, making any charges of
wrong-doing invalid.
I find myself at a disadvantage not
because I am uninformed � such is not the
case � but because I am only a student in
the minds of those at this university who
possess the power to bring about change.
Those with authority may desire to ignore
their responsibility � not because they are
uninformed � but because it is a student
who has made the charges.
Having been active in the Student Union
for the last four years as president and as
chairman of the Major Attractions Com-
mittee, I have had a close working relation-
ship with Rudolph Alexander, associate
dean of students and executive director of
Mendenhall Student Center. I realize that
my involvement qualifies me as a compe-
tent judge and at the same time may dis-
qualify me because I may have been so
closely associated with Alexander. In spite
of these possible qualifications or dis-
qualifications, the facts shall remain clear.
It is up to those who read this column to
decide if my interpretation of the facts is
accurate.
Two months ago I began what was to be
a series on the public record of Rudolph
Alexander. The inital installment, "
'Rudygate' � Trip Funds Questioned" ap-
peared Nov. 17, 1981. In that column I
questioned a trip made by Rudolph Alex-
ander and his girlfriend, Sara Henderson,
to New York City in 1978. Although I feel
I covered the subject of that trip
thoroughly, a letter to the editor by Bill
Martin in the Dec. 8, 1981 edition of The
East Carolinian may have confused a
number of readers. One more word about
that column and I will move on.
Alexander, according to two university
administrators that I have spoken with,
now claims to have received permission to
make exceptions to Student Union policy
and that Bill Martin, then chairman of the
Travel Committee, gave him permission.
In order to understand why this excuse or
justification is not valid, there are a
number of facts that need to be noted.
First, Travel Committee bylaws do not
authorize the chairman to make exceptions
to written policy. Although Martin may
have indeed given Alexander permission to
take his girlfriend at student expense to
New York, he never had the authority to
make such an exception. Alexander is
aware of this since he helped write the
committee bylaws. Only the full Travel
Committee can authorize exceptions to
policy and the committee minutes from
1978 show that no exception was ever sug-
gested, much less authorized.
Although there may be occasions when
time limitations require the chairman and
committee advisor to make decisions on
the committee's behalf, this was not such
an occasion since the deadline for register-
ing for the trip was Oct. 16, 1978 � more
than a month before the trip took place.
Prior to the Christmas Break, I made an
appointment to interview Alexander con-
cerning decisions related to his public
record. The interview lasted about two
minutes, with Alexander refusing to
answer any of my questions. According to
Alexander, his refusal was based on his at-
torney's advice. If I had had the oppor-
tunity to interview Alexander, I would
have asked him about:
The 1977 Florida Trip: On this trip
Alexander took his daughter Christy.
Alexander paid only for her bus fare.
Because Christy stayed in his complimen-
tary room, Alexander apparently felt no
need to pay the Student Union anything
for her accommodations.
It is probable that there are some who
see nothing wrong with an administrator
taking his daughter on a student-sponsored
trip and keeping her in his complimentary
room. Some might say that it did not cost
the students anything. However, Christy
Alexander received a trip that would have
cost anyone else at least the double oc-
cupancy rate. Because Rudolph Alexander
was her father, Christy Alexander was able
to go to Florida for bus fare. The trip itself
is small potatoes compared to the student
trust that was again violated.
In his many roles, including adviser to
the Travel Committee, Alexander has been
vested with a student trust. I question
whether or not his decision was ethical. 1
would have liked to ask him his thoughts
on the subject.
The 1977, 1978, 1979 &
1980 Association of College, University
and Community Arts Administrators
(ACUCAA) Trips: On at least two of these
trips, Alexander saw Broadway plays and
was reimbursed by the university. He
"previewed" plays for future "possible
booking Considering the university does
not now, and particularly did not earlier,
have either the facilities or financial sup-
port necessary to book such plays, one has
to ask why they were "previewed" for us.
Also, it is unusual for a man who prides
himself on documentation not to have
reported his "findings" to the proper
organizations � in one case the Student
Union Theatre Arts Committee and in
another case the Mendenhall Program Of-
fice. According to the former adviser of
the Theatre Arts Committee, he made no
report of his findings to her. 1 suspect his
intentions were never to book anything
since there is no correspondence in his files
with agencies inquiring about the plays.
Additionally, just because a play is on
Broadway does not mean it will tour.
Alexander refused to supply me with a
copy of his 1980 ACUCAA travel report.
though N.C. General Statute 132-6 re-
quires that he do so. I therefore have no
idea if he "previewed" any more plays for
us last year. Also, I wonder if he
"previewed" any plays for us at the
ACUCAA Conference last month.
Mendenhall Staff Turnovers: Within the
last year, three major staff positions have
been vacated � one position twice. Last
year, it cost $2,000 and six months
research time to fill a position with a star
ting salary of $11,940. The shocking thing
is that the position � assistant program
director � was vacated again last month.
After discussing the turnover matter
with three of the the four former staff
members, 1 have found that the departures
were not due to career advancement alone
but also to Alexander's ques.ionable
leadership. In addition, according to
sources at Mendenhall, there mav be other
departures within the next six months.
Those departures, likewise, are at-
tributable in part to Alexander. I would
have liked to ask Alexander if he knew why
it took so long and cost so much to fill the
assistant program director's position.
Also, I would liked to have asked Alex-
ander if he knew why there has been the
sudden staff exodus, but unfortunately
those questions remain unanswered.
Every public official has to be accoun-
table for his actions, and Alexander is no
exception. Although it is his prerogative to
refuse an interview, as a publ official he
is considered to be public property.
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IHfcE VSTCAROl INIAN
l-M XtO 12. IV82
'V
Jnve
The
eech,
� and
P3r k
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id the
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big
rle
BBER
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n 1
re
iave no
for
if he
at the
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m have
:e t ast
nths
ar-
rting
uograrn
month.
matter
itaff
frartures
n aloni
able
ing to
Ihe other
months
lare at-
1 would
lew w hv
i fill the
osition.
Cd Alev
een the
hwnately
Id
laccoun-
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tiual he
rtv.
Nixon, Carter Among 10 'Worst' Presidents
CHICAGO (l PI)
Harry Truman and
Dwighi Eisenhower
ranked among the best
presidents and Richard
Nixon and Jimmy
Carter among the worst
in a survey of historians
and political scholars
The sure, con
ducted for the Chicago
Tribune Magazine and
published Sunday,
rated the 10 best and 10
worst presidents.
The current and 40th
commander-in-chief.
Ronald Reagan, was
not included in the
survey because he is on-
ly in his first year of of-
fice.
Abraham L incoln
was the choice as the
best president, George
Washington was se-
cond. Franklin
Roosevelt. third;
Theodore Roosevelt,
fourth; Thomas Jeffer-
son, fifth; Woodrow
Wilson, sixth; Andrew
Jackson, seventh;
Truman, eighth;
Eisenhower, ninth; and
James Polk, 10th.
In the worst
category. Warren Har-
ding was first, Nixon
second; James
Drinking Increases
G !1 SVII.l E. 1 la a PS -
More college students are drinking
-�: before, and one-
ick �- in the country
are pro � � . a new siud
' �� ' :rsity ol Florida
- id 88 percent
a students ques-
, highest ever
the college-age
According to
of the 1.020 1 i.
tioned now drii
recorded amoi
population
�Kuit a thud ol those student
drinkers, moreover, are "problem
dr inkers making alcohol abuse on
campuses "one of the greatest
eal pi " . country
-� SU1 '� c l .
T studx . firms what has
tn assun for a long
� D . � Gonzalez,
�� ' - ' a us lcohol ln-
Cei Florida and
-i k- BA( -
CHLS (Boos Mcohol on-
( nc the 1 lealth of
� Studeni � I "A significant
idents are pro-
kers, ai d the amount is
. al the time
Gonzalez add the study also con-
firmed the impression thai college
students as a group drink more than
other sectors of the populace.
In the 1950s, about 70 percent o
the nation's college students drank.
compared io around 80 percent in
the sixties and seventies.
"We vvant to focus on how to
drink rather than whether or not to
drink he says. "We want the ma-
jority of drinkers, who are responsi-
ble, to lend their support and advice
to their peers who are having pro-
blems with alcohol
Alcohol abuse among students
ususally shows up when a student
misses classes because of hangovers,
forgets what happened the night
before, skips classes, attends classes
while drunk, drinks alone, or tn-
cessantly drinks to the point of in-
toxication.
Furthermore, nearly 80 percent ot'
all campus vandalism is related to
alcohol drinkin? Gonzalez reports.
About 70 pet con. 01 the generai
population indulges, while nearly 90
percent of the campus population
drinks alcohol. Gonzalez savs.
Acting Director
Of Admissions
Appointed
Il Ntus Bureau
Susa I
" qim-
' I ad-
effect Feb.
I.
I � : a pp untment
linth
H.
1 i ce cl ancelloi
affairs,
i a n c e 11 o r
B. Brewer.
McDa a ill succeed
vA dtet M Bortz, who
to become
direci �t at
: Hart-
Hari ford.
Dr. McDaniel will
nue to serve as
toi ol Summer
School, Maier said. She
faculty rank as
11 . Iessor ol
a d has held
appoint rneni s ol m-
'nsibilitv
in the Division o 1
lemic Affairs, in-
i
a s associate � i e
icellor ' s
She has served on
committee sit v. 1 912 as
a faculty represe ita c
and later as ex-ofticio
rcpiCiCiuauy c of e
division ot academic
affairs.
"lot years, Dr.
McDaniei has served on
our L niversitj Admis-
sions Committee and
has acted as the
Academic Affairs ad-
ministrative liaison
with our Admissions
( r fice Maier said.
"She is totally familiar
with our Admissions
Office operation and is
very well qualified to
assume this key respon-
sibility. We feel for-
tunate in having the
services of such a
capable and experienc-
ed administrator to
assume the duties of the
acting Director of Ad-
missions
A native of Kansas,
McDaniei earned her
bachelor's and master's
degrees in biology and
oology at Kansas State
University and received
the PhD in zoology and
botany. from the
University of
Oklahoma in 1966. She
joined the ECU faculty
as assistant pn. ssor
of biology in 1967.
0
0
0
0
Welcome Back
We Missed You!
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0
0
0
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Buchanan, third;
Franklin Pierce,
fourth; Ulysses Grant,
fifth; Millard Fillmore,
sixth; Andrew
Johnson, seventh;
Calvin Coolidge,
eighth; John Tyler,
ninth and Carter, 10th.
The Tribune sent
questionnaires to 49
leading historians and
political scholars across
the country in
November.
The presidents were
judged on their leader-
ship qualities, ac-
complishments and
crisis management,
political skill, appoint-
ments and character.
One respondent in
the survey, Columbia
University Professor
Henry Graff, said,
"The context in which
a judgment of the
presidents is made is
constantly shifting,
reflecting much more
than simply lengthen
ing of the list of the
chief executives
A similar poll was
conducted by Arthur
Schlesinger Sr. for Life
Magazine in 1948 and
the New York Times
Magazine in 1962. Lin-
coln, Washington and
FDR were also rated
high in those surveys.
But Eisenhower, who
did not make the top 10
in the 1962 poll (the
earlier poll wa,s before
his presidency), reach-
ed the No. 9 spot in the
Tribune survey.
"I'd put Ike rather
high Indiana Univer-
sity historian Robert H.
Ferrell told the
Tribune, "because
when he came into of-
fice at the head of an
only superficially
united party � a party
so hungry that it could
McDaniei
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taste almost anything
political, he had to
organie that
heterogeneous group
and get it to cooperate,
which he did admirably
� with all those keen
political instincts of
his
Respondents seemed
to agree the best
presidents in the survey
were men sith "a vi-
sion
"The best presidents
have been strong
political leaders with a
vision, if not a com-
plete program, of
where they think the
country should go to
preserve, protect and
sometimes advance the
liberty and rights of all
people Robert V.
Remini, history pro-
fessor at the University
of lllinois'said.
"The worst
presidents have usually
lacked this vision he
said. "They simply
drifted or were so inept
in their relations with
the people and Con
gress as to frustrate any
effort toward achieving
then goals
Although he's
the father of
our countrv,
George
Washington
lost out to
Abraham
Lincoln as the
United States'
best president.
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in the Georgetown Shops
(previously Sharpe's Formal Wear)
WE SPECIALIZE IN:
�Thesis & Bound Publications
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Sat. 9 2
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RUSH pm KAPPATAU

GAMMA ETA CHAPTER
fiifi iRappa (Eau
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
�109 ELIZABETH STREET
i
iP
JtV z-
- r?��.o5
23
The Brothers and Little Sisters ot Phi Kappa Tau would like to extend an invitation to all in-
terested men to meet and party with us during our three nights ot rush. Phi Kappa Tau holds
an outstanding reputation for athletic ability, campus involvement, academ.c achievement,
and social enjoyment. We feel quite confident that vou w.ll see these fine qualities in which we
take great pride. We look forward to your visit to our chapter house and urge that you visit the
other ten fraternities on campus as well c
sincerely
THE PHI KAPPA TAU'S
M�.AJrwJaAN 18th - PLAYBOY BUNNY PARTY
TUES. & WED. - PARTY HARD WITH THE 0KT'S
'Meet the Coaches
ECU coaches of various sports
will be in the soda shop and
bookstore on Jan. 13 from 10:30
a.m. to 1 1:30 a.m. Stop by and
get acquainted.
Student Supply Store
Wright Bldg.
East Carolina University
f
�f





THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Entertainment
JANUARY 12. IV82 P�� h
ECU Summer
Plays Should
Bring 'Em In
1 he last Carolina Summer
I heat re is coming back in 1982 with
big Broadway musicals in a newly
renovated multi-million dollar
theatre center that will serve the en-
tire play-going community in
eastern North Carolina, marking
the return of one of the state's
largest and most popular theatre
companies.
Producei Director Edgar I oesstn
of liast Carolina University has an-
nounced productions for July, 1982
ol Grease, Shenandoah, Cabaret
and She lnes Me. Grease, the
longest running musical in Broad-
way history, will play in McGinnis
rheatre July 5-10.
This rock-rollicking stage
ev oca ton of high school
shenanigans in the late SO's has
played to Standing Room Only in all
the theatre centers around the
world.
Shenandoah. an old-fashioned
Civil War charmer that ran in New
York for over a year and garnered a
number of Tony Awards, is schedul-
ed tor six performance from July
12-17.
Immediately following will be one
o the most popular and and
belaureled musicals of the century:
Cabaret. This play has been
honored with the New York Drama
Critics' Circle Award, The Outer
Critics' Circle Award, The Tony
Award, The Variety Poll of New
York and The Plays and Players
Award � all for the Best Musical of
the Season.
July 26-31 are the performance
dates for She loves Me, still
another Best Musical of the Season
and Tony Award winner that ran in
New "y oi k for over 300 perfor-
mances. This musical has so many
songs that it took two IP records to
contain them in the original cast
album
During its 13 years, the ECU
Summer Theatre has given lavish
treatment to 52 major musicals and
a score o' plays. Over a quarter of a
million people have seen the shows
which played to an average of 87
percent capacity.
After a period of several years
See NEWLY, Page 8
Rare Earth' Performing At The Attic This Wednesday Night
Early '70s crowd pleasers Rare Earth, reunited after more than six
years, Hill perform Wednesday night at the Attie in downtown Green-
ville. In its day
Celebrate" and
the band recorded such hits as
Born to Wander
I Just vanl lo
Trudeau Writes Of Affair With Jack Nicholson
rORONTO I PI - Margaret Trudeau, the Canadian
Mime minister's estranged wife said today in her new
�k that lack Nicholson was the 'Must real rival" to
her husband bul the actor left her for another woman
after a brief, torrid affair.
In an excerpi from her biography published in the
Toronto Si
itionship
appeal was
i Mrs Trudeau also discussed a drug-filled
with rock musician Tom Sullivan, whose
is
"extreme vouth.
In the follow-up to an earlier book about her
escapades. Mrs. Trudeau said she left Prime Ministei
Pierre Trudeau in 1977 after choosing "independence
over marital vows
Mrs. Trudeau. the mother of three boys who are be-
ing raised by Trudeau. described the prime minister as
"mean about money" and said every night for two
years before the separation she whispered to herself
"Pierre, please give me a divorce
Truffaut's 'The Last Metro' Running Wednesday Night
Top photo: The east of cult favorite King of Hearts. Bottom: Gerard Depardieu and Catherine Deneuve in a
scene from Erancois Truffaut's critically acclaimed film The Last Metro, playing this Wednesday at 8 p.m.
The first of five excerpts from her book Conse-
quences, to be published Jan. 30, focuses on her 1978
trip with Sullivan to London at the invitation of British
publisher John Marqusee, who wished to discuss her
writing.
Mrs. Trudeau said she was drawn to the 23-year-old
Sullivan's "extreme youth" after leaving French
bottled-water-magnate Bruce Nevins in New York
because he was "a confirmed bachelor
"As a rock musician he was offering me a glimpse ol
another culture, one laced with drugs and sex wrote
the woman who ended Trudeau's bachelorhood in 1971,
when he was 51.
"There were many times when 1 would have liked to
blame all mv mistakes on cocaine41 can't in alt truth do
that she said, adding that her consumption of drugs
led her to become "a manic depressive.
While in london, Mrs. Trudeau met actor Jack
Nicholson � "the first real rival to Pierre
However Nicholson was in love with another woman
and the romance ended, although she said that on their
last evening together "we made love all night
The brief affair left her "crushed" and feeling like a
"fool The woman, 29 years younger than Trudeau,
said "1 wanted him badly she maintained, "but !
didn't need him
In a 1979 interview she had discussed romantic in-
volvements with actor Rvan O'Neal, singer I.ou RawK
and a friendship with Sen. Edward Kennedy. Kennedy
denied anv roma ntic involvement with Mrs. Trudeau
In her earlier book. Beyond Reason she wrote o he:
split with rrudeau after making headlines by befnen
ding the Rolling Stones.
The 32-yeai -old Mrs. I rudeau was last reported living
with Ottawa businessman Jimmy Johnson who runs a
furniture store When asked last ear about mart
she replied We're still both married, each o( us
children we're trying to bring up
'Barefoot9 Cast
Producer Director Stephen B. Finnan has completed
final casting for the second in his series ot little theatre
productions, Neil Simon's comedy, Barefoot in the
Park.
See LOCAL, Page 7
Spring Film Fare
Free Flicks Rich In Variety
ByJOHNWEYLER
Slarr Whirr
Werewolves, Victorian temptresses, juvenile delin-
quents, France, Germany, Australia, Russia, Sylvester
Stallone playing Soccer, Paul Newman playing hockey.
Alan Alda, Charlie Chaplin, Malcolm McDowell.
These are only a few of the sights ECU students and
faculty have to look forward to, courtesy of the Student
Union Films Committee. This semester's cinematic line-
up consists of a combination of recent American
movies, current and classic foreign films, the avant
garde and the unusual.
The Popular Film Series is composed of box-office
triumphs. Last year's biggest hit, Raiders of the Lost
Ark, isn't available yet, but the second biggest hit,
Superman II, is. The Man of Steel's exploits will be
shown Jan. 14-16, followed by The Four Seasons (Jan.
21-23), Alan Alda's tribute to friendship. The next
weekend (Jan. 28-30) will be enlivened by Fxcalibur,
John Boorman's bold retelling of the tales of King Ar-
thur.
One of the strangest developments in cinema in 1981
was the werewolf craze, which included An American
Werewolf in London (Feb. 18-20) and Wolf en (April
15-17). The year also provided employment for out-of-
work Not Ready For Prime Time Players, including
John Belushi in Continental Divide (Feb. 5, 6) and Bill
Murray in Stripes (Feb. 11-13).
More comedy is provided by Dudley Moore in Arthur
(March 19, 20), while the mysterysuspense genre is
well-represented by the Hitchcockian Blow Out, with
John Travolta (Feb. 26, 27), Body Heat (March 26, 27)
and Fvewitness (April 22-24), both of which star
William Hurt. Further thrills are supplied by Sly
Stallone and company in John Huston's action-filled
Victory (April 15-17).
Wednesday nights are reserved for films that show
less popular appeal, but have received critical praise for
their artistry. Especially notable is the winner of the
1981 Academy Award for Best Foreign Film, Moscow
Does Not Believe in Tears (March 3).
Other excellent European efforts include Francois
Truffaut's The Last Metro (Jan. 13), Phillippe de
Broca's 1967 classic King of Hearts (Feb. 17) and David
Hemmmg's Just 1 Gigolo (Jan. 27), which stars the
unlikely pair of David Bowie and Mariene Dietrich.
The current Australian film renaissance is represented
by Gillian Armstrong's My Brilliant Career (April 14);
while American artistry is displayed in The Trench
Lieutenant's Woman, a Victorian saga starring Mervl
Streep (April 21) and Return of the Secaucus Seven.
John Sayles' lovely look at 1960's radicals grown older.
and perhaps wiser.
Wednesday evening Double Features include a mini-
Charlie Chaplin Festival on Feb. 10. Two of the
Tramp's greatest films will be shown: City I ights (1931)
and Modern Times(936).
April 7 features a double-bill devoted to the Snorting
Life: Slapshot (1977), a brutal but humorous examina-
tion of professional ice hockey starring Paul Newman,
and Bang The Drum Slowly (1973), a sensitive study of
a slowly dying baseball player, with Robert De Niro in
one of his early roles.
Future Shock (April 28) is the title for the pairing of
two films about gang violence: Stanley Kubrick's A
C lock work Orange, a bizarre, bloody tale taking place
in Britain in the near future, and Walter Hill's The War-
riors , a stylized saga about New York City street gangs.
More futuristic film fare is offered in a special Science
Fiction Film Festival (Feb. 28). Sci-Fi of the present, the
60's and the 50's will be represented by Outland (1980)
with Sean Country as an outer-space sheriff; 2001: A
Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's intriguing epic from
1968. and The Dav The Forth Stood Still, the classic
film of 1951.
Finally, for the especially adventurous filmgoer, two
Late Shows will be repesented. Heavy Metal (Feb. 5, 6)
is a sexy, very violent animated piece based on the
popular fantasy magazine of the same name; while
Fraserhead (April 2, 3) is beyond description. You'll
have to see it for yourself to believe it.
All Student Union Films will be shown in Hendrix
Theatre in Mendenhall Student Center. Admission is by
Student ID and Activity Card or MSC Membership.
Check The East Carolinian or go to Mendenhall Student
Center and pick up your free film card, poster or Stu-
dent Union calender for show limes.
LcAfcoi
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newly mamc
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o -Vur Cqclcg Th� Rmo lAMj
vfc
W P)))V fjORRi 5
PIC? If A)0�1C ?
i-iz-ri
local Disk Jockey Cast Is
Wife In Simon's 'Barefoot
STUDENT UNION
EAST CAROUNfl UNIVERSITY
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8
l HI I AS I CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1982
Newly Renovated McGinnis Theatre Site
Of Summer's Splashy Broadway Musicals
Continued From Page 6
when the theatre could not produce
major musicals because of inade-
quate facilities, it will now move in-
to the newlv renovated McGinnis
Theatre.
The new facility features 600 seats
with improved sight lines, a
sophisticated computer lighting con-
trol system, 4MX) square feet ol
backstage space (four times the
space before renovation), a 40-line
counterweight fly system, and a
soon-to-open ,600 square foot
scenerv construction building with
newly acquired heavy duty commer-
cial power tools that will facilitate
the job of constructing the elaborate
scenery and properties for the big-
budget shows
Producing large-scale elaborate
musicals requires year round work
for the managerial staff. General
Manager Scott Parker said. "We ex-
pect to have a company of 85 actors,
singer dancers, designers, orchestra
members, technicians, apprentices
and management staff.
"Most of the company will come
from the 10 southeastern states;
however, we have ahead) scheduled
auditions in New York,
Washington, D.C and I ouisvillc,
KY, as well as local and state wide
auditions for the on- and backstage
personnel
According to Loessin, "This is no
small venture. We are committed to
giving the best possible production
of these shows. We already know
the audience wants us back on a
large scale. We have received
wonderful support from the Univer-
sity here, and we have applied for
additional support from the Theatre
Arts Section of the Department of
Cultural Resources in Raleigh.
"We are now very busy seeking
other funding as well. So far we're
very encouraged. All indication are
that eastern N.C wants the big
musicals back and that's what we're
out to produce, even h nei and bel
ter than before
Parker noted, "Initially there
were no plans to begin selling tickets
this far in advance; however, even
before we announced the season to
the general public, orders were com
ing in over the phone. So. we moved
our timetable ahead and made
season tickets available to the public
in time for Christmas
Telephone orders will be accepted
during normal business hours,
Monday-Friday, at 757 6390
SPACE WORLD
GAME CENTER
Welcomes everyone back! Here's our weekly schedule:
MON ; Space World Happy Hour
2 for 1 ALL DAY
TUES : Pmball Special � 2 for 1 on Pinball
WED Gent's Nite
THURS College Night
FRI Ladies Nite
SAT Family Day
SUN Super Sunday
� 8 tokens for $1.00
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ABORTIONS FROM :j 1
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SltS 00 Pre�nny Test, ftirtt.
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Pregnancy Counseling For hi
rn�r information call llj-OUS
(Toll Frit Number
�00 231 ISM) between f AM
and PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St
Raleigh N C
The
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needs an
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Featuring name brand shoes at bargain prices.
Up To 75 OFF regular prices
Bass Steward-McGuire Brouse Abouts
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All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices. Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
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Located 1710 W. 6th St.
off Memorial Drive
Near Hollowell's Drug and old hospital.
FRIDAY AT JJ's
IN CONCERT
IMMY
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of the NIGHTH AWKS
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RHYTHM BAND
Buffet Dining Room
No w Serving
LUNCH
11:00 A.M2:00 P.M.
MONDAY-FRIDAY
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AND
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THE GLENN
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SOUPDEJOUR
HOT DESSERTS
BEVERAGES
$
1.75-$2.75





Sports
Green Paces Impressive
Win Over Leathernecks
Rv Kt I X II MH IK

. v
i anme out sir one in i he
! halt1 t I outst. im ed
is the first nine
p iod to take a
!r necks could ne ei
hat 1 he Pirates
naxmuini lead oi 18
re settling for a
i - Western's se�. ond
� the bij
its at i lie
vini.ti i lier v estern 1!
Bij I ghl pow ei
' e falling nisi
I1 K: eMom saui
to K si.lie and fatigue
!ii the I eat her ikv ks'
"1 real! believe we caught them
on a bad night Odom said "1 he
are a fine team I'm sure the) can
and will pla bettei than ihe did
tonight We are trul) thrilled to
have won b this margin ovei such a
fine team
Odom called his team's perfot
mance its finest ol the season.
�"1 think definite!) this was out
best overall effort ol the yeai We
were efficient in almost every area
�s well as we played offensive!)
and we did pla) vetv well 1 think
we played bettei defense
Green, especially, played well
defensiveh Most ol the night he
was assigned to guard Western foi
ward loe Dykstra, who came into
the game as the nation's thud
leading scorei with a 25.S ppg
aerage.
Though Dykstra finished with 25
points he connected on but eight of
2 field gal tries. Ik had been
shooting well ovei 50 percent Irom
the field. In addition, H ol
Dykstra's points came during the
nine minutes that Green was not in
the game
Green's offensive output ol 20
points was well supported Point
guard Ions Byles added lft pom's
and five assists. Centei Michael
Gibson pitched in with a 14 point
effort, wtulc forward Al Mack had
1 3 points.
1 c I shot an impressive 55 2 pei
cent from the flooi en route to vic-
tor)
1 he I'ii ates retui n to action
rhursday, hosting arch rival UN
Wilmington at 7:30 p.m. in Minge?
( oliseum.
Ladv Bucs
Post Upset
Of Virginia
Bv I1MMN DuPRl 1
wuh
i I ;u
in the
Defending A Cav
I ad Pirate Vim Jones (left) defends
against Virginia in Sunday's I.( I upset
of the highly-respected Cavaliers. Jones
scored ten points in the game. She and her
teammates now have their sights set on
tonight's (I nesdav) game at I N(
. i a "It goes to show you . . . out Hill tonight to face the 1 ad) fat
. I � � � Mar to m - ugh games have paid off tor us Heels ol North . arolina in an
said Andruzzi. "To be S"7 wuh the M IV matchup. I defeated
� avaliers with 22 schedule we have and the youth of the Pirates in two -t their threecon-
ind 10 rebounds, while Lewis this team is not that bad. We still tests during the 1980-81 season, in-
and McKane and need balance, but that's coming " eluding an 89 s; victor) in the state
Mel Mai 1 he I adv Pirates �ravel to Chapel tournament
Take Conference Lead
ECU point guard I on Byles moves against Western Illinois.
He scored 16 points in the Pirate win.
ECU Aide Anderson
Named Elon Coach
B H RI I s( H M)I I K
1(1 assistai v
nderson was named head
. 1 iac h at I Ion (
He replaces lern 1
resigned Deeembei 28
Tolle)' - re
the Fit
lured their second 1
championship t
n a 1 ' . '
rolley, ironica
grad . � �
Elon when Red VN
im sevei
tion at Duke
Vnderson's appointment marl
. . .
1 Ion gradual I hi � I
V.Ct ion same 1 �l
Iron; But caw High S
played single wini
1 - (
(. hi istians.
ei the last
has be n u
Foi Wichita Stat I
E I
Anderson's present
�m the Pirate :
' left aft�
former I
. 1 Pal Dye He rei
fensive coordinatoi in 1980
I moty took oer t I
n Dye
: d � son desv
cent ta ai 1(1 as
aching job I've
at there were regi
a communit) that
Anderson explained furthei
he was looking forward to
challenge ol coaching a tw
defending national champ
"following up two
championship seasons won't be
easy he said, "but if 1 .i- cared 1
wouldn't have applied foi the jo
W right
uder�son
lA 11
:
:
season a
l r j 1
more
toward
Spiders Upset James Madison
1
N
ECU forward Mark Mel uurui was
hampered with a hand injury when ihc Jail
semester ended early in December.
McLaurin has returned to the 'irate line-up
since. The 6-6 sharpshooter scored 15 points
in his first I'atne back against I ong Island
and is averaging 6 8 ppg.
Surprising Richmond upset lames
Madison. 56-51, last night to take
ovei the 1 South lead
I he Spiders. 1-0 in the conference
and H4 overall, used 73 percent
first-half shooting to jump to a
25-15 halftime lead
lames Madison, which tell to 2 1
in the league and 9-3 overall, shot
but 28 percent during the tirst 20
minutes.
I he Dukes shot some better in the
second halt, finishing with a 37.3
percent Field goal accuracy Rich
mond, meanwhile, finished with an
impressive 62.5 percent pet tor
mance from the floor.
sharp shooter John Schweitz pac-
ed the Spiders with 17 points. Bill
11 ve added 1ft and Bill Doole) 10
1 inton low lies topped the JMU
scorers with 1ft points Centei Dan
Ruland added 13 for the losers
1 he Dukes only, othet two losses
came against third-ranked Virginia.
Richmond's victory comes on the
heels of dn impressive wm last
weekend over South Carolina.
Earlier in the year the Spiders upset
Atlantic (Oast Conference power
Wake Forest.
"LS
ECAC-South Report
Jfl Shooting (oeold In I oss To Spiders
Old Dominion Hosts Mighty DePaul Saturday
� Pirates To Take On Arch-Rival I N -��
1111 COMING WEEK in the
ECAC-South features just two con-
ference games, but at least two other
majoi non-conference battles will
attract attention.
On Wednesday night Navy opens
its conference season by traveling to
George Mason Mason, 0-2 in the
conference, will be looking to
escape the league cellar. Both teams
have struggled thus far this season.
Navy standing at 5-6 and George
Mason at 4-7.
The only other conference game
has William and Mary traveling to
lames Madison. The highly-
respected Dukes are looking to
bounce back from an upset at the
hands o Richmond Monda) night.
Madison is 2-1 in the conference
while the Indians only conference
game resulted in a loss to I ast
Carolina.
The two big non-conference
games also will be played Saturda)
Old Dominion hosts lop I en powei
DePaul and George Mason hosts
Pennsylvania.
DePaul's Blue Demons will be
looking to avenge the team's only
regular season loss last season 1 he
Monarchs traveled to DePaul last
vear and upset the then-undefeated
and top-ranked Blue Demons.
Penn is consistently an NCAA
tourney team and ptonuses to make
things hard on George Ma K I has but ont game sduted
in the next seven days, hos
rival UNC-Wilmington on 1hurs-
da) Both clubs are yoand
.1 to finish - mow Gametime is 7 ?0 p m in
Mingesoliseum.
1 C sill s WtHNl.s
1 t lit 'Ml Kc. .Mil
St 1
14 �
1 Mis W t 1 K s S( III IM )
111 I.n 14
I in
-
V li.ni.tr. I .inlrri-mt l.imi





10
1IIH AM l AKOI INIAN
I l RN 12, ih:
Several Tracksters
Qualify During
Kodak Invitational
B WILLIAM VI 1 .VERTON
"here wore no victories and not
much jubilation foi East Carolina at
the Eastman-Kodak Invitational in
Johnson City, enn this past
weekend, bin in no wax docs that
mean there was a lack ol success for
Bill Carson's squad.
No Pirate placed in the top five,
but three individual runners and the
mile relax squad qualified fot the
K 4 huioor Championship meet
scheduled for Princeton, N.J in
earlx March.
The IC4A � "the greatest track
conference in the country" says
Carson � is one of the oldest track
conferences in the nation, a con-
ference the Pirates have waited
seven years to be a member ol East
( arolina was admitted in late
Decembet
Qualifying were Ray, Dickerson in
the 600-yard run with a time of
1:11.82, Tim Cephus in the 440 al
4s 22 and Jeff Golden, timed at
s. 4' in the 60-yard dash.
The mile relax squad vxas . locked
at 1:11.82 and consisted of Dicker-
son (49.4), lerrx I ord 4w S), Keith
( larke (48.4) andephus (47 s)
"A t V 15.67) in : he mile relax w as
bad for us Carson admitted, "but
we do shoxx grea potential. We
have been tryni rcconsiruct this
:clax without on au-olt man and
anchor from last season (Charles
Wat kins andarlton Beth. hai e
. m 'his meet shows what's dovui
track.
the road foi us. We are a young
team. I'm prett pleased right
now
Clint Harris was ill and did noi
compete, but he did qualify for the
IC4A meet at the Dec. 5 competi
tion at the University ol West
Virginia by running a 6.37 in the
W) yard dash.
Freshman reny Ford was clocked
m the 440 in a time ot 50.10, follow
ed b Clarke with a time ol 50.28.
In the WH). Shawn 1 aney was tim
ed in 1:12.64 and I awrence I rvin
turned in a tune ol I 1 $.44.
The Pirates compete in the
Florida Invitational at Gainesville
Jan. 16. "We're going to concen
irate oui efforts again on qualifying
tor the IC4A Carson says. "We
hope to see some good things hap
pen m Florida
c arlton Flakier, who did not run
during the fall, has rejoined the
squad this semestei and will com
pete in the Florida Invitational
Freshman Michael Coins should
proxe to be a fine addition to the
learn, t arson s,is, and he will be
competing in the 4 ion relay and
Advance Pick-Up
Of Tickets Available
What In The Was That?(!)
1 ike most college coaches, ECU'S Dave Odom often cannot understand
calls by game officials.
Women Swimmers Down JMU
1 he ECl women's
swim team had a happy
Monday yesterday but
for the Pirate men it
was no more than an
average Blue Mini
day
I he 1 adv Pirates
doxx ned .1 antes
Madison, rW 42, to im-
piove their record to
3-1. 1 he Pit ate men.
though, dtopped a
76-37 decision to
with a time ol 55.22. In
the 100 yatd
backst i ok e Jennifer
laves made the na-
tional cutoff with a
Maine.
The 1 ady Buc win
featured a number ol
outstanding individual
performances. Three
squad members made 1:02.69 showing
national cutoff times.
Sally Collins made the
mark in the 2(K)-yard
freestyle with a time of
1:59.32.
Moria McHugh
made it in the 100-yard
freestyle, coming in
In .in attempt to
avoid conges t ion in
front ot Minges i l
iseum on game nights,
the ECl at h let i i
department is making
tickets to both men's
and w i iii no' . basket
ball games available to
students pnor to the
contest.
Students may pick up
tickets eithei al the
Minges ticket office ot
at ticket booth at
Mendenhall Student
Centei beginning two
days pi ioi to a game,
I i i example, tickets
to this rhursd
men' - game with 1 N(
Wilmington can be
picked up at either
local ion dui ing egular
business houi
St udeni are asl
b) the athletic depart ficials, could be .er
meiii to take advantage advantageous,
of the pre-game pick iy considering the ld
up Doing so, sav ol weathet ol lat
Kelly Paces Women
Tracksters In Event
1 he 1(1 a. mien's from the fina
track team competed in "he top ECl
the 1 ast oasi In � ita i ,000 yai d
tional thi pa si J:0t
weekend, but came V
home with but one top ma
finishet 6
that a i : i ta wa
kellv in the 60 sard
dash, who reached the
semi finals with a 7.4 I'
run In the semis,
though, Kelly
Da
manage only a 7.6 time M K
and wa � ' '
One vaisitv record
was set in the match,
Nan George
establishing a new
mark in the 50-yard
freestyle with a tune of
25.33.
the 400 meters in
ie ouit
loo
I ain
paiL'ii.
1 oi met lead ol! man hai lie
Wat kins is no longei in ,chool, a
Carlton Bell has stopped running
ROOM FOR RENT
206 WhiUington C i n
!arae house conve
nient to hospi'ai ana
� -s ' v $140 00
pei m o "� h -j
utilities. Deposit re
red Can ?S6 63CS
WE SEW
LEATHER COATSl
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grand Av�
USED
TIRES
$10.00
inquire at
Evans Seafood
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
tOtN & R,NC Miju
WW,0f KEV SALES CO ,�' ff
401 S.EVANS ST.
iMfiRMOM MOUSE SOUtMi
PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
CASTING MOTICE

Audition date:
Greenville M
Jan 13:2 -
' i � ' i
Fletcher F la
'� �
WllUAMSOUfWi VA
Back To School
Special
fclClfR, by Nature's Way
specializing n natural hair cuts tor men A women
Present ECU Student I.D. tor
20o Off Your Next Haircut
Offer good thru Jan. 19, 1982
I
appointments only
Dowatowa Mall 758-7841
Crocs Title
r
Steinbecks Men's Shop
New Year's
Sale
One Group
V Neck Lambs Wool
SWEATERS
$26"
POLO
Ralph ar Lauren
Knit Shirts
NOW
One Group J
Wool & Wool Blend
Trousers
NOW 6
Values to 60 00
�Tweed
Sport Coats$9950
�Corduroy
Suits11200
�Corduroy
Sport Coats$7600
JlgA ALL SALES FINAL!
' Steinbeck's
MEN'S SHOP
Downtown Carolina East Mall Pitt Plaza
oPPimcin's
and
11 DAYS
OF SALE
January 12-Januarv 23
Suits25 50 on
A grou
Spoil Coals25 50"o
Pants25� �
� group "I
Sport Shirts50 �
gi �up ol
Dress Shuts33�'o
� group ol
Velours50�o
�X group �l
LS Knits33�'o 0fi
A ill imp ol
Shoes50a'o uf
A group ol
Sweaters50 on
A group ol
Jackets50 0n
A group ol
Jackets33�'o .�,
A group ol
Leather
Jaekets50 �n
� group ol
Ski Vests33 �
A group ol
luggage50 0�
A group oi
Wool Hats50 on
A uroup of
Sport Vests50 ofi
A group lit
All Weather
Coats25 ,o 50 on
At all of our fine stores
f oARmanb
MENS WEAR
m"� � ���
Downtown Greenville � Monday Saturday � 10 to 5 30
Carolina East Mall - Monday Friday 10 00 tot 00
Saturday 10 00 lot N
Tarrytown Mall Rocky Mount Mon Fn 10 00 to 00
Saturday 10 00 to I 00
OUR BIGGEST "USED"
TEXTBOOK INVENTORY
EVER!
IENCE
WATH


MS
-



f sV
"V.
2i:3fe2fcss
-XN -
'O
Our December Book Buy Back Bonanza has produc-
ed the largest used textbook inventory in the history
of the U.B.E. We've got 20 more used texts in our
store than in Jan. of 1981.
Check Downtown First for all your books and supplies.
SHOP EARLY FOR BIGGEST
SELECTION OF USED
TEXTBOOKS!
Open tonight
until 9:00
U.B.EJ
528 S COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, NC
L
O
7 Gaili
Jug
PRI





le
be ver
ten
:ent
le
ntry
kAO�V
jRG VA

THE EAST CAROL INIAN
JANUARY 12. IW2
11
Holidays Were Both
Up, Down For Bucs
The ECU men's basketball team
tumped to an early lead in the
ECAC-South race ovei the
holidays, only to have that lead
spoiled this past Saturday night.
The Pirates bounced back from
an embarassing 70-57 loss to Duke
on December 22 to claim three con-
secutive wins, two of them in the
conference, to even their record at
5-5 heading into last Saturday's big
game at James Madison.
The three-game winning streak
began on December 30 when the
Bucs picked up a big conference win
on the road, downing George
Mason in a 66-64 squeaker. Tony
Bsles led the way for the Bucs with
16 points. Center Andre Gadd led
Mason with 21 points.
A 70-56 win over Baptist followed
on Januarx 4. Again. Byles led the
way, scoring 15.
ECU went to 2-0 in the I CAC
south and 5-5 overall last Wednes-
day with a 61-58 win ovei William
and Mary. The Indians, fresh off a
loss to top-ranked North Carolina,
lost despite shooting a cusp 58.3
percent from the floor.
The ECU forward tandem ol
Morns Hargrove and Charles Green
paced the Pirate effort, the two
combining for 27 points.
The win over William and Mary
set up a showdown last Saturday
between the two conference leaders.
As it turned out, there was no real
showdown. James Madison went to
2-0 in the league with an impressive
72-50 win over the outmanned Bucs.
ECU was playing without starting
guard Charles Watkins, who was
taking a temporary leave of
absence.
More than that, though, it was
poor shooting that led to ECU'S
first-ever ECAC loss. The Pirates
connected on only 30.9 percent of
their shots. ECU was especially cold
early in the contest, when Madison
took a commanding 18-4 lead.
All-star candidate Linton Townes
paced JMU with 12 points. Three
other Dukes scored in double
Figures. I orward Charles Green was
the onlv Pirate in double digits with
10 points.
ECU's next conference action is
not until January 30 when surpris-
ing Richmond invades Minges Col-
iseum. The Bucs play five non-
conference games, including a
January 23 date at 15th-ranked
N.C. State, before the matchup with
the Spiders.
Classifieds
ECU sophomore guard Mike Fox poured in 29 points to pace
the Pirate jayvee team Monday night. The big performance
by the Raleigh native could not prevent Frederick Military
Academy from taking a narrow win over the Pirate JVs,
though. Most of the points came on long-range jump shots.
FOR SALE
WALKMAN MINI cassette player
Excellent stereo sound Excellent
price Call W 3110
SUPERSCOPE C 104 por
tablecassette playerrecorder.I
single roll away bed, i co. It
refriq Call 752 140
WATERBEDS- DON'T pay retail
lor your heated waterbed, buy
direct Irom mto, and save Buy a
complete 1st quality pine wood
heated walerbed with 15 yr war
ranty tor as V (Queen) tlW
(Kinq) Lawaway available Call
David tor appointment 7S� ?40l
FOR RENT
ROMMAtE WANTED Available
immediately One halt mile Irom
campus S88 per month plus one
third utilities Pool tennis courts
II interested call ?S6 9706 or
7S7 6309
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share Georqelolwn apt (one block
Irom campus I Phone T1 2671
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom trailer 90 per
month plus one halt utilities
pM i,t working student Call
756 4101 alter 6 p m
ROOMMATE WANTED
SI00 month plus share utilities. 1
blocks Irom campus, ww carpet,
lull house privileges, some very
nice extras 7M M44V
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
fM per month plus one hail
utilities Private bedroom Call
Laura at 752 0195
ROOMMTE WANTED: male, lul
ly lurmshed townhouse . central
air and heat, wall to wall
carpetinq, on bus route, one third
rent M2) and one third utilities
Call 757 Mas anytime
3pm
HELP
Wanted
INTERESTED IN makinq mone,
with your lavorite hobby' Use
your phoioqraphic skills lo earn
excellent pay part lime several
�veninqs a month Well
�slablished photographic firm
tow hiring part lime
jhotoqraphers Musi be comlor
table around other people, have
then transportation, and have a
3-im. basic understanding ol the
35mm camera Call 756 5756 alter
PERSONAL
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
typmq lo do at home Reasonable
rates Call 754 M0
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST �lor
term, research, thesis papers, ar
tides lor publication, disserta
tions etc Reasonable rates Call
757 137i
FLORIDA FOR tree' We ne�d
students to sponsor our Sprmq
Trip Break here For mlormation
and interview, call Julie
I 100 368 2006
EUROPE FOR tree' We net a
students to sponsor our Summer
Program here For informal on
and interview, call Adam
1 800 368 2006
ATTN WILSON commuters r.d.
needed daily to and from ECU
Will share expenses Call im
mediately Sherry J4J 30��
(Wilsoni Ride sharing option
LOST LADIES pocket watch
Lost on Jan 7 Great sentimenii
.alue and my parents will kill me
il it doesnl turn up There is a S20
reward Please call Andrea a'
758 1885 Save a lite"
J
2 nd AMdAL
dWML
Carolina Recording Artists
Nicky Harris
Band
Performing Wed. at the
Casablanca Happy Hour.
w.jhm. -Awsy& !�&
Z5
a?
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�Domes �SxxSM-A'l. MM
3A31T Tl' ' h'AQPf &&� -PU77
FJMOO'S PIZZA a-fS
Qf'A OR DUiV�J?f .p "
WiTHl iffiti
BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
MonSun. u .30-2.00 2.69
Mon. & Tues. 6.00-8.30 2.89
WEDNESDAY
SPAGHETTI DAY
i
1&
LARGE PORTION
OF SPAGHETTI,
GARLIC BREAD 1.88
BONUS TRIP TO SALAD BAR
im
Hwy 24 Bypass, Greenville
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
PIRATE COUPON-5 DISCOUNT ON
Any Food Order Regardless of Size
Present this coupon and show
your ECU ID to cashier.
Coupon expires Jan. 31, 1982
Name.
ID no
Amt. Purchased.
HEAVY WESTERN
SIRLOIN
STEAKS
$199
Lb. I
HEAVY WESTERN
T-BONE
STEAKS
GWALTNEY
Coca-Cola Ketchup
2 Liter
Bottle
98 ?
Lb.
sj
FRANKS
99C
HI-DRI
Cold Power
98
32-Oz.
TROPICANA
ORANGE
JUICE
$128
on �
V2 Gallon
Jug
DULANY FROZ.
10-Oz.
BROCCOLI
SPEARS
2 j00
Detergent
PAPER
TOWELS
48
Gt. Roll
Kraft
Gt. Box
Limit one with $10.00 food order.
Mayonnaise
$128
Qt. Jar
Golden
4 lbs.
Bananas
$0C
CHEF BOY AR-DEE FROZEN
PIZZAS
Assorted Varieties
99
&4
Boyardee,
CUP THIS COUPON
PRICES GOOD FROM JAN. 14-JAN. 16 (THURSSAT.)
WHITE STAR
SUGAR
5-Lb. Bag
with this coupon and $10.00 food order excluding specials.
Without coupon $1.SI. Limit one per customer. Expires i 16-12.





BURGER
KING
Enjoy
Trade-mark�
.��
BURGER KING� and COCA COLA
upport LADY PiRATf BASKETBi

5 eta
7

yS-w
gf
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i '


v
o r At
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LflOV Pl-RflTS BH62
Show YOUR Support By Purchasing
a PurpleGold BE RAT hat for
$1.25 at BURGER KING� , 321 Greenville Blvd.
ARI YOU
HUNGRY?
E JSakld order of Reg. sie French Fries
with (he purehase of LADY PIRATE �
BERATS hat.
Please present this coupon before ordering. Limit
one coupon per customer. Void where prohibited
by law.
Offer expires: When supply is gone.
Good only at: Burger King"
321 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, N.C.
This advertisement is sponsored by BURGER KING" and COCA COl A in coopera
tion with flu ECU Athletic Dept.
i





Title
The East Carolinian, January 12, 1982
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 12, 1982
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.169
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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