The East Carolinian, December 8, 1981






�be ISant (Earnlmfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
THF FAST CAROLINIAN
Vol. 58 No. 30
Tuesday. December 8, 1981
Greenvllle,N.C.
10 Panes
Foster Resigns Due To Unbusinesslike Procedures
Chuck Foster, formei Advertising
Director of the Fast Carolinian,
resigned today due to what he calls
lack of respect tor the editor in chief
Paul Collins and because of the un-
businesslike manner in which the
paper operates
Foster had been with the papei
for almost two years, working solely
in the advertising department. He
worked his way up from salesman to
technical supervisor, then to Direc-
tor o Advertising in April oi 19K1.
Foster states, worked very haul
for this paper and. during the sum
mer, 1 worked entirely by myself
straightening out the billing pto-
cedure and getting ready foi the new
year. If people want to check my
record, it shows that during my
tenure as director we had more ad
revenue than ever before, surpassing
all the old totals for the months of
June, July, September, and Oc-
tober. At the time of my demotion
m revenues were up by 20 percent
ovei last eais totals
What was the reason behind Mr.
Collins living to fire you in Oc-
tober8 "He was angry, because 1
was running my department the way
it states in the operations manual,
and not the way he wanted to see it
run Plus Mr. Collins was jealous of
the fact my department ran
smoothly. while he couldn't even get
qualit.cd wniers or typesetters to do
the work of other departments. I
also questioned Mr. Collins'
editorials, because they were never
the view of the paper as a whole,
just Mr. Collins' feelings. If people-
read the editorials, they will see
what I am talking about. He is the
only political science major who can
go over and watch an S.G.A.
meeting and not know what is going
on, then he has the nerve to write an
editorial about our campus leaders
calling them stupid, incompetent,
and lazy. Maybe Mr. Collins should
look in the mirror
Chuck, you are leaving one of the
highest paid student jobs on cam-
pus, and it was said the reason you
kept your job the first time was
because of the money. Don't you
need the money" "I would be crazy
to say 1 didn't need the money, but I
feel that this job is not worth the
time and trouble Mr. Collins has
made it
Has Mr. Collins ever broken rules
of the personnel policy0 "As a mat-
ter of fact, YES. This is ihe straw
that broke the camel's back. On the
night of Nov. 18, Mr. Collins and
some of his buddies went out and
celebrated his medical drop for the
semester. After drinking a little, Mr.
Collins came up to the office with
alcohol (which is cause for im-
mediate firing), began looking over
the paper and noticed that a par-
ticular page was not right. Instead
of calling the editor of that section.
Mr. Collins went into a rage, picked
up a chair and smashed it against
the wall breaking the chair and put-
ting a big hole in the wall.
(Destruction o newspaper property
is also a reason for immediate fir-
ing.) 1 will not work where this type
of double standard is in use, because
it is not fair to the newspaper or the
people that work there
Do you have any regrets working
for The Fast Carolinian" "No, I
have met a lot oi nice people and
worked with some very talented in-
dividuals. The money was nice, too.
The only regret 1 have is saving 1
worked for Paul Collins, because 1
should have been able to see
through him before 1 ever started
workmoHim��mmmtmmmmm
Heat In Library Causes Complaints
B PATRICK O'NEII 1
siuif v rilffi
Anyone using the Joyner I ibrary
to prepate for their finals oi to write
term papers may be surprised when
they come up to the front dooi - on a
cold nigh; to see them ajar. Once
you get inside, however, you
understand whv.
remperatures in the horary fre-
quently range around 90 degrees
and complaints have come trom
many who spend time there, from
students on up to Dt I A. Brunelle,
director o library services.
"I can verify thai the building has
been terribly warm states
Brunelle. "Mv staff suffers from ii
more than anyone else
Many students have used stronger
words to express theii dissatisfac-
Death
Penalty
Opposed
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
stafl Ml rilri
(Editor's ote. This article ex-
plores the negative viewpoints on
capital punishment.)
"His bodv lurched. His hands
began contracting. Both hands turn-
ed blue, especially neat the finger-
tips. 1 stood in mv chair and saw
smoke from Spenkelink's calf. A
few inches below the cuff, there was
a three-inch wound. It looked as it
his skin had split, but there was wo
! ),id expected to smell burn-
ing flesh but thankfully I didn't
I hese were the words of reportet
rhomas E. Slaughtei after witness-
ing the death by electrocution ol
in Spenkelmk in Florida on May
25, 1979.
Spenkelmk was the first person
uted against his will since the
Supreme Court reinstituted the
death penalty in 1976 and only the
second to die since 1965. Since then
the total number of executions in
ie United States stands at four.
( ontroversy surrounding the
capital punishment issue has been
increasng and people both pro
and con � are speaking out in large
numbers. Nevertheless, both sides
seem to feel a return to greater use
ol capital punishment is inevitable.
Strom Thurman, the Republican
lator from South Carolina, is try-
ing to get a federal capital punish-
ment statute passed in the Senate
and many courts are movng ahead
faster with capital cases.
Outcry opposing the death penal
ty has been particularly strong from
different religious leaders and trom
organizatons working on civil liber-
ties and justice issues.
turn. Jeanne Dailey, an FA U
marketing student, said upon enter-
ing the building, "It's unbearable,
like right now I immediately take
ofl my coat and roll up my sleeves
�'It's so hot it's putting me to
sleep noted psychology student
Rickey I ewis.
�It's terrible, you come in here
and take o your jacket, then your
sweater, and it's still hot in here
stated an angry Michael Coleman, a
SI AP major. "1 wouldn't be sur-
prised if 1 saw peole streaking in
here
"Whv don't they turn the heat
down?" added a confused Evelyn
Jackson, ECU accounting major.
Ihe answer to that question, ac-
cording to Larry Snyder, ECU plant
engineer, is "there is no heat turned
on in the library. It's self-generated
heat that they're complaining
about
Snyder claims that the huge
amount of heat generating devices,
the lights, the people's body heat.
and the books are the reason lor the-
high temperatures.
"The heat's off added ECU air
conditioning supervisor Bob
Sprinkle. "That lighting puts out
right much heat
Both men claim the air condition-
ing system is the reason for the high
temperatures. "The mechanical
heating system is broke said
Snyder. "The chiller (a device made
of several hundred copper tubes) is
nearing its 20th year and has to have
some major repairs
Snyder claims the work presently
being done by an outside contractor
will repair the chiller and alleviate
the problem within a few days.
When questioned, librarians at
the front desk refused to comment
on the situation, but an official
statement logged in the library
record book dated Dec. 7 reads: The
heat has been turned off. Men are
working on the machinery and we'll
have no heat or cooling until they
finish.
Despite this statement the library
temperature stood at 80 degrees and
loud motors on various machines in
two rooms marked 'Mechanical
Room' were running.
Ralph Scott, associate professoi
of library services, was not convinc-
ed that there was no heat on. 'My
brain tells me that if the windows
are open, it's 30 degrees outside and
90 degrees inside - the heat seems to
be on he stated. "I could be
wrong, it could be that we have
generated a new energy source (our
body heat)
Scott pointed out that a student
faculty Evaluation of 1 ibrary Ser-
vices 1979 reported 22 out o 2 peo
pie surveyed rated the heating and
air conditioning systems from fail
to poor. On Monday night the con
sensus from everyone in the library
seemed to be unanimous:
"terrible
Brunelle noted that the change in
temperature and humidity also cans
ed a great harm to the books. "The
high heal speeds acidification ol
books and leads to the decomposi-
tion of the paper he noted
��We've had mold on books in the
stacks at various times he con-
tinued.
Brunelle mentioned that opening
windows in the library wouldn't
help the heat problem very much
"because the windows are so small"
and it also creates "a real theft pro-
blem" when people throw
out the windows and steal them
A group of reference librai
agreed that the problem oi excessive
heat had been around since the
library building was built in 1974.
"It's always been like this" was one
comment.
Another offical said that "S
Regulations force us to take a short
term solution" to problems because
See HOT, Page 2
Parking Deck Proposed
. . t. Ph.i�i �) ,m prrn�s�.
4 77 The Season
Studying for final exams and the traditional Christmas tree make their
annual appearance at Mendenhall Student Center.
death row prisoners wno are at-
tempting to extend their appeals.
Clark pointed out that most
developed nations, including all of
western Europe (most recently death
by guillotine was abolished under
Mitterand in France), have stopped
using capital punishment. "The
freer societies do not kill- it's the
countries that are in the throes of
established authoritarian govern-
ments that do Clark mentioned
A noted opponent of the death
penalty has been former United
States attorney general Ramsey
C lark. "1 think the death penalty is
probably as accurate a measure of
our humanity as any we have
( lark said in a telephone interview.
It asked simply - are, we killers?
Our government and our society
haves chosen to kill
Clark gives a good deal of his
time to organizations trying to rid
the nation of capital punishment.
He also gives legal assistance to
See CAPITAL, Page 3
By MIKE HUGHES
SUM Wftttl
I en o'clock.
I ate for class � again and no
parking spaces in sight. "Why can't
this school provide enough places
foi everyone?"
Such is the plight on many occa-
sions for the ECU students, faculty
and staff who commute to and from
campus every day.
However, there are currently
three proposals aimed at alleviating
the campus parking problem which
are under consideration by the ECU
Planning Commission.
Titled "Summary of Proposed
Circulation and Parking Plan Alter-
natives for East Carolina Universi-
ty a Kimley-Horn and Associates
parking and traffic study was
reviewed by the Planning Commis-
sion on August 17.
The report takes into considera-
tion the benefits and problems of
each proposal � added parking
spaces and subsequent costs to
students.
Proposal one. which recommends
a new parking deck be built over the
Utility Center Building, would
represent approximate'v a
10-percent increase in campus park-
ing area, adding 350 spaces.
However, the Kimley-Horn study
indicates that the parking space re-
quirements for the remodelled
McGinnis Auditorium will be ap-
proximately 300, while the Wright
Auditorium facility will require 650
spaces.
The estimated cost for the park-
ing deck would be $2,137,500, or
approximately $4,600 per space and
would burden students with addi-
tional fees.
Alternative two of the Kimley-
Horn study suggests the same size
parking deck (350 spaces) be con-
structed over the existing lot along
the north side of Ninth Street,
like the first alternative.
however, proposal two would not,
in the opinion of the Planning Com-
mission Task Force in any way
serve the future program needs ol
McGinnis and V i ighi
auditoriums
In addition, the task torse claims
that "it would increase approx-
imately 10 percent the available
campus parking spaces at a very
high cost
The total cost for the latter park-
ing deck would be approximately
$2,062,500, the Kimley-Horn study
showed.
The third alternative suggested bv
the study � the proposal which was
recommended bv the task force �
provides for a campuswide bus shut-
tle system, either 25-passenger,
small buses or 15-passenger vans
operating throughout the day.
The cost oi the proposed bus
system, including four buses, eight
shelters, parking lot surfacing and
miscellaneous costs, is estimated at
$678,000, while the total expense foi
the van system would be around
$390,000. '
These passenger vehicles would
circulate from the School o Allied
Health and Social Professions to the
parking areas near the Regional
Development Institute and would
include service to the College Flill
and Central Campus areas
According to the task force, altei
native three represents the most
desirable solution
The task force states that the bus
shuttle proposal "would result in
added costs to the university student
amounting to only one-third of
those costs required in the report's
alternative one proposal
In addition, the Kimley-Horn
study claims that the bus shuttle
system would lessen the traffic m
the main campus area bv promoting
"the development of the outei or
perimeter parking concept Thus,
commuters would park in lots ott
campus and would be shuttled to
main campus.
Other suggestions by the task
force include enlarging the existing
parking lots at the Helk aiI W illis
buildings, adopting a color-coded
system ol parking ones or lots a
redesigning several parking lots and
bays around the cam
Ihe task force als csts the
consideration ol a multi-vehicle
registration system, which allows
one "registration dev ice (card)" to
be purchased foi use bv .is many as
six vehicles.
This system has been put
at West Virginia I niversity and is
intended to encourage carpooli
foi commuters.
Also undei consideration
planning commission are cei
revisions in the Fc I 1 raffic Or-
dinance. I hese regulations were last
revved in January 19 "N
Sta;e statute requires thai any
change or amendment in the or-
dinance must be approved bv the
Board ol Fruste
Vice Chancelloi foi Student I ife,
Elmer Meyer Jr recently contacted
the members of the Ad Hoc Com
mittee to Revise rraffic Regulations
and urged them to submit then
recommendations foi changes by
April 5. 1982.
The committee will review several
regulations, including the trattic ap-
peals system, adequacy ol the cui
rent parking decal system, future
reserved-parking lots, night restric-
tions and parking area designations
The
Announcements 2
Opinions4
Campus Forum�
Entertainment6
Sports
Classifieds0
c-

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t . ��
4
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from all of us to all of you
�t�t&.






7
TW I-AS! C AROl INI N
DlClMBt RS. I8I
Announcements
COOP
The Co op Ottice, located in 313
Rawl currently has 0b openings
for Spring Semester '82 witht he
following agencies interested
students are urged to apply today '
Genera' Accounting Office in
Vira.nia Beach VA Business
maiors Mriftl 2 V GPA s or above
who have completed approximate
ly 7 hurs duniors1 should apply
Burroughs Corporation Com
puter Science and accounting ma
lors placement may be in
Charlotte NC. Atlanta GA or other
Burroughs Corporation worksites
Student may request placement .n
specific areas throughout the U S
Social Security Administration
in Baltimore, MO Recruiter will
be on campus January 28 to inter
view computer science and math
majors Interested students
should stop by the office to com
plete necessary forms.
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
romantics
4 fan gets into the music at the Romantics
concert Sunday night at the Attic.
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Honor
Society will be having a Christmas
party for the residents at Green
ville Villa nursmg home on t-r,
.1,1, rv ember n at p m ah
members are encouraged to par
ticipate and meet in the lobby at
Mendenhali Stua?it Center at 6 30
p m
CO OP MEETING
All students who will be on Co op
work assignments during spnnq
semester should attpnd a meeting
Thursdasy. December to at 4 p m
in 304 Rawl This includes students
returning tor a second or third
work term as well as students
reorting for their first work
assignment Students who have a
time conflict should contact the
Co op Office immedia'ely
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na
t.onai Honor Fraternity is pleased
to announce the induction of 13
new brothers Jacky Boys Sherry
Conran, David Cook, Lyle Eist.
Tonda Maggard. Cathy McGr.M
Harion Neal Tim Oakley, Pa'ge
Prevatie Carl Rowe. Guy Sheets
Becky Tallev and Cathy Williams
CONCERT
Jerry Blackiaw. entertainer anct
musician from Raleigh, will be
performing th.s Saturday n.aht
Dec 12 The concert will be m the
2nd tloor auditorium of
Vcndenhall starting at 8 p m
There will be aSO admission fee
l qht refreshments will be served
Jerry's tapes and albums will be
on sale Sponsored by Inter
Varsity Christian Fellowship
GRE
The Graduate Record Examma
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday
February 6. 1982 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service Box 96 R, Princeton NJ
08S40 Applications must be
postmarked no later than
December 31, 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center Room 105, Speight
Building
AHPAT
The ALhed Health Professions
Admission Test will be ottered at
East Carolina University on Satur
day January 16 1981 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Psychologic al Corp
304 East 45th Street, New York
NY 10017 to arrive by December
11 1981 Appiu ation blanks an-
also available at the Tes'mo
Center Speight Building
Room 10S ECU
FINANCIAL AID
MEETING
The Student F nanc ial Aid Ol
tice will conduct a meeting on
Wednesday. December 9 m Hen
drix Theatre. Mendenhali SH
Center Due to limited space thi
meeting will be he i' � i n
4pm All persons inten Sled " ap
plying for financial air! foi me
1982 83 school year are stroi-ql,
encouraged to attend
NTE
Tin National Teacher Examma
tions wiil be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
February 0 1982 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed in the Educational Testing
Service, Box 966 R Princeton. NJ
08S40 'ii arrive by January 18
1982 Application blanks are also
available a' the Testing f enter
Speight Bmlding Room (OS East
Carolina University
GMAT
; i , ��� Manag � � Ad
mission Test iGMAT) will ht
lered at t asi Carolina universe r
on Saturday lanuary 23 1982 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to GMAT
Educational Testmg Service. Box
966 R Princeton NJ 08540 Ap
plications mus' or postmarked no
later than December 71 1981 Ap
plications ma be obtained trom
the ECU Testing Center
Room 105. Speight Building
ART SHOW
The Seventh Annual Art Show
will be trom Jan 26 to Feb 5 1982
in the Greenville Museum of Art
�"�II ECU artists are enc ourageo to
prepare their best work to submit
Friday, ian 22. 1982 to the con
terence room in the otfice of
Jenkms Fine Arts Center ECU
Cash pr.jes. provide I I , " � Ml
ano Jeffries Beer and w.n.
aiII tange trom ilO tor Honor
Mentions to 1100 fr'r Bes' in SI
Hot Library Causes Discomfort
Continued From Page 1
the initial high cosl in the short
range will angei officials and tax-
payers. In other words, a solution
that will have lime range success and
cost a lot less money will not be
opted for. "And this results in
higher costs in the long
rangestated the official.
"1 really hate to comment on this
"Mated another anonymous source
who claimed that "beaucrac) and
narrow application procedures tor
funding limits incentive for energ)
saving and rewards more highly visi-
ble projects. � There are no rewards
for conservation
According to Brunelle, ECl
maintenance people get !ov
salaries" and are overworked,
which makes it hard for ECU to at-
tract good mechanics. "They lose
money, bv coming to work for us
he concluded.
Brunelle said he wasn't angry or
mad over the situation and that he
didn't "think there were anv
villians" at work here. He fell il
was just a problem of balance and
regulation between the heal and air
conditioning units.
On the other hand, students were
very angry and wanted the problem
taken care o. "It was the same wa
last yearsaid Occupational
Therapv Student Theresa Dulski.
High iunion costs and a general
feeling that conservation of energy
should be important are some o the
ABORTIONS
l M weefc termrnrrum
Appt's. Made 7 Day
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800-321-057S
SP0RTSW0RLD
m3iSL- S3
Curr vd�V�ra3EJU �
medical ��et� T mtm
compete for nv�rtl NiWr�d
Air Pore lOailai!�!���"����
it HoiarVi'O ��� �� b �����
ed to �hde�f� Ktii lw
medical Khoot �� ���"����
or at me be�inrin� of t�r
lophmore ye�r Th� tcneUr
in.p provides tor tuitiow.
boo, lob fro � "ove-
rwent. p�o� � 5� mtmmt
allowance inve������ ��s
Imanciat altornatlvo to t
rug cost o� mr.�f oduca
tion Contact:
U S � t MHITK
'�OPEUIOM
� CC�UIT1M0
Suits �(�. nss MAVAMOM.
lALf IOH k.C ItM
aOMCCOti.gCTm�ilWI�
ECU
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104 E. REDBANKS RD.
756 6000
f$&J
Gandalp's
(919)756 7235
concerns of the students. "I think
that since we supposedly have such a
good technology department here
that there could be something done
to alleviate the problem of my tui-
tion dollars, in the form of hot air,
trom blowing out the library
doors stated Mark Kemp,TCI
English major.
Scott felt that the needs oi the
students should take priority at all
times. "The students should have a
comfortable place to studv he said
"if you're trying to learn, you
should work hard but not have to
sweat it out
With final exams beginning and
the end o classes already here, it ap-
pears as if the students will have to
wait until next year for comfort.
Human
Rights
Week
10-17
������
������� 15
AEO
On Tuesday. Dec 8 thwe will be
a bar b que tor an aed men bers
at Dr Ayer s house The o.nner
will start at 6 p m All interest
attending should sign up on the list
outside Dr Ayer s offir eHripm
Monday. Dec 7 Maps of how to
get to the Ayer's residence art-
awailable in the Chemistr Off.ce
REFRIGERATORS
SOA Refrigerators rented this
� rill should be returned to the loca
tion from which they were �
on Dec 9 and 10 between the hours
of 10 a m and 4pm E xtendeo ot
fice hours for deposit returns of
rental for spring semester will be
from 10 am to 4 p m on Dec 4
ancj 10 and trom 1? a m to 4 p m
on Dec II and 14
PCAT
The Mnarrnac 1 College AdmrS
Sion Test (PCAT) ewill be offered
at East Carolina University on
Saturday, February 6. I'8J Ap
pi ition blanks Art- to be com
pieted and mailed to Pharmacy
College Admission Test, P O Box
3540 Grand Central Station New
York, NY 10163. to arrive by
January 9 I982 Application
blanks are available in the ECU
Testing Center Poom I0S. Speight
Buildina
REBEL PROSE
CONTEST WINNERS
Congratulations Winners of the
Prose Contest sponsored by the
Rebel. The Attic, and Jeffrey's
Ame St Beer Co They are First
Place. Rugby s Feather by
Tneresa Williams Second Place.
'The Master Magician" by Doug
Smith Th.rd PI�C� Full Time
Hero by Norr.s Hoggard and Two
Honoraries Commi Hmerf by
Eleanor Weather and Good Mor
rmg Mr B Or Kyle mman A r
ners a 'acted as t
and hi" the may pick up their
US
SKISNOWSHOE
Snowshoe W VA , Spr.nu
Break PHYE 1 ISO PHYE 11SI
or go non credit Contact Ms Jo
Saunders ?0S Memorial Gym
lb! 6000 for information Deposits
will be ac ip'i : "i 'an jar .
p m in Memorial Gym 108 Can
room i im.tec; si aoie
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from
students who are interested in
becoming PERSONAL CARE AT
TENDANTS to wheel chair
students We will employ those
who nave a desire to assist in
dividuals with their activities of
daily living
For details concerning duties
and compensation contact C C
Pimi' Coordinator. Office of Han
dicapped Student Services 21?
Whichard Building Phone 757 67W
P.E MAJORS
Ail students who plan to declare
pnysn ai education as a ma.or Our
,ng the spr.ng semester or who in
tend to student teach dur.ng the
spring semester should rerx" I
M.nges Co'seum at 10 a m on
Wednesday Dec 9 tor a motor ano
physical fitness test Satisfactory
performance on th.s test is re
quired as a prerequisite for of
ficial admittance to the physical
education maior program More
detailed information covering the
test is available by calling
757 6442
ATTENTION
All Fan Semester Graduates
�nber to pick up yOur cap
ano gown from the Student Supply
store before leaving school Trese
may be picked up in the Student
Supply Store Dec 8 9 and 10
These Keepsake gowns are yours
to keep providing the $10 gradua
tion fee has been paid For those
. . ring the Masters Degree the
J!0 fee fapv for your cap and
gown but :tere is an extra fee of
l 1 ?S tor your hood
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday February
20 198? Application blanks are to
oe completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service Box
366 � Pr nceton. NJ 08540
Registration deadline is January
21 198? Registration postmarked
this date must be accom
pan.ed by a $15 non refundable
:a'e registration Kc
IVCF
Come fellowship and pra.se God
with us 7 30 p m We
Dec 9 at the Method
Center on 5th street
ARTISTS
Artists' The Sevenw Annua
Rebel Art Show sponsored by IfM
Att.r and Jeffrey's Beer and W.n.
Co is roming up to give you an op
porlun.ty for recognition as
prue money All registered ECU
students may enter a maximun
two pieces m any of the loll
categories Painting, Sculpture
Ceramic s Drawing. Photog' �( I
Design imetai fiber or
Graphic Art and nius
to bring your best Krort
Jan ?? 198? to the
Room in Jenkms Fine An I
ECU
SCULPTURE
t ot si ulptore .1
alternat.ve exhibition si
si uipture by the sc uip'ir-
ment will b l' ���.��� I Wed
Dec 9 I Reading Day LOI
at 506 Evans St a' " �
'heatre
EBONY HERALD
The Ebony Herald nee v t
for news arts and people V
if you have interests in Ihe
and bas.c writing skills. P
piy with Media Board tea
Monday through Friday �an-
5pm Leave name ano phone
number
I he Kast Carolinian
Puocsneii every " msoay ��
,4, during
. �, Wednesday
. summer
� as' Car'iii" a
newspaper � Ea
, � �. rs � ,
1 and Cur
by the stuaentt I
, '�
Subscription Pte S70 yia v
The East Caro'iniar i
jr located m the Old
Binldinq on the campus ol EC -j
Greenville. N C
MASTER
� The FT a' ��
Bu-idig f
NC '834
T.�phone 757 61 UI W
Application to ma'1 ' H
class postage rates is peno-u
Gieenville. North Carolina
TarLanding Seafood
Restaurant
Pizza inn
BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
MonSun.
Mon. & Tues.
WEDNESDAY
SPAGHETTI DAY
11:30-2:00
6:00-8:30
All you can eat
Special Gccd Phcne758-0327
LARGE PORTION
OF SPAGHETTI,
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Tuesday,
Wednesday
and
Thursday
This Week
Bob Hearing - Manager
Crois Green Street Bridge
Take left at 1st Light
Located one block down on left
&
Hwy 264 Bypass, Greenville
Congratulations,
ECU!
is a success
The Pirates
Won the Game Dec. 7
Many thanks to our sponsors of Minges Mania
MHH ��� mm i
Op
nnlinul
specifically S(
Union, Iran,
a rics i
pun.
COO'
r ���
the interna
Fellowship ol
are currently
row
there's a
the d
to P. �
ties.
Jei
and
pun

len
Ale
(I PI
pro
Hea
SAN rR.A
(I PI) -
Hear
a m e
rortsi
napped her bi
?eared 'he F
her but !
missed
!unities '
In
-k,
Thing M
vd'd
feared the S
L1 b e r a'

1 aiet. ar.c
on tele

in w h
mem be'
she remainec
because sh
"the FBI �
me, if ihe c
Ms H
counts thai
forcement
missed sevei
to catch her
19 months s
objec
tensive sear
lion's histor
Bill
190
M I r.
Richts Da
in recog
da the I nil
rat i tied the
Rights 190
will be he!d
He, 15. at
the Willis Bi
Sponsorei
The Ieaguc
olers and
mIc Pin a
the N C CN
Union, the
will feature
b Willis P
of Durh
associate iu
N i Court
panel
presenting
legal and hi
aspect- ol
Rights will
eluded. Th
invited
A gradu
UNC-Chaj
School
Whichard
pointed to t
Appeals bs
Hunt in Sel
1980. He i
member of
House of
tatives and!
Senate. H
serves as c
the Citizer
sion on Alt
Incarcerate





THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 8. I98j
V
l( jroliman
�1�' �10�
t

Opponents Call Capital Punishment inhuman'
Continued From Page 1
specifically South Africa, the Soviet
Union, Iran, Chile, and Argentina
as countries still employing capital
punishment.
According to Mike Jendrejcvk,
coordinator of PAX (People
Against Executions), a project of
the international organization
Fellowship of Reconciliation, there
are currently 891 people on death
row in the United States. "But
there's a reluctance on the par! of
the courts and the public to return
to mass executions as in the thir-
ues he said.
Jendrezejezyk said the "finality"
and "inhumanity" of capital
punishment � as well as "the
possibility of an innocent person be-
ing executed" � as the reasons for
(his reluctance.
Jendrzejczyk called the death
penalty "a simple solution He
noted that "FBI statistics say that
three-fourths of the 20,000
homicides each year are crimes of
passion and not likely to be deter-
red" (by capital punishment).
Deterrence seems to be the key
work for those supporting capital
punishment. Henry Schwarschild,
director of the American Civil
I iberties Unions Capital Punish-
ment Project, staled that "the
evidence is massive, cumulative and
overwhelming that the death penalty
in no way deters murder
"The states that have the lowest
homicide rates tend to be those that
do not have the death penalty ad-
ded Jendrzejczyk. The correlation
between the death penalty and
deterrence is the opposite of what is
pubhcallv believed he continued.
Jendrzejczyk used Georgia as an
example noting that despite the
highest number of executions of any
state, Georgia still has one of the
highest homicide raic in the coun-
try.
"The death penalty is fundamen-
tally outrageous stated Schwarz-
schild. "The only lesson that it
teaches is that the killing of human
beings is an acceptable answer to
some kind of problem. That is a
destructive, lethal lesson for a socie-
ty to impart on our members
Schwarschild mentioned that 45
percent of the inmates on death row
are minorities. "The institution of
capital punishment has always been
an issue of extraordinary, dramatic
racial descrimination he said.
"Historically, it's been true that
those who are poor, uneducated or
minorities tend to recieve the death
penalty added Jendrzejcyk.
Since capital punishment is legally
a state matter, there can never be
any mandaniory guidelines on a na-
tional level, he said. Guidelines are
difficult to set because of the uni-
queness of each individual case. Ac-
cording to Jendrzejczyk, many
times a person in the wrong place at
the wrong time will receive the death
sentence for a crime that would only
get a life sentence in another state.
Recent studies also concluded
that a black who kills "a white per-
son was nine times out of ten" more
likely to receive a death sentence,
said Jendrzejczyk. "The opposite
was true if the victim is black he
added.
Schwarzs-hild pointed out that
capital punishment was receiving
greater support lately. "I don't
believe the courts are getting more
liberal � society seems to be shif-
ting back n the other direction
(toward more use of the death
penalty), he said. "We're sentencing
people to death at the rate of 150 per
year
"There's a real public fear of
violent crime Jendrzejczyk said.
He mentioned the need for more
programs designed to help the
families fof the victims of violent
crimes. A group called "Victim's
Families For Alternatives to the
death Penalty" is one such group
working in South Carolina.
"It's an illusion that it's (capital
punishment) a solution to the pro-
blem noted JendrzejczykIt's
easier to put a handful of people to
death then deal with the underlying
causes of crime He mentioned
control of hand guns, dealing with
poverty and high unemployment, as
well as "wide�scale reform of the
prison system" as possible solu-
tions.
"The abolition of the death
penalty is a first solution to our pro-
blems added Schwarzschild.
"How can we teach anyone the
value of life by taking anothers life
away?" added Clark. "If we can
kill how can we tell others they
shouldn't?"
"Our country should stand for
something we should stand for
something we must stand for
life " said Clark. "The abolition of
the death penalty is a major
milestone in the long road up from
barbarism
Schwarzschild urged people to
make their views public and known
in any way they can. East Carolina
students should let their political
leaders know how they feel, then
stick to it and persist. He mentioned
working through fraternities, clubs,
churches, and careers as a means of
influencing public policy. Clark also
urged students to "organize and
persevere to get the United States
out the camp of killers or other
nations using capital punishment
"It's important for all ot us �
particularly young people building
an education such as you get at East
Carolina � to stand for something
and participate in the struggle for
freedom, justice, and peace said
Clark. "A society built on love that
wants to live in freedom and dignity-
would never kill
Alcohol Not A 'Preventive' Medicine
WASHINGTON
il PI) Several studies
in recent years have in-
dicated that moderate
alcohol drinking has a
protective effect
against heart disease. A
new report from
Milwaukee shows this
doesn't work for binge
drinkers.
The researchers from
the Medical College of
Wisconsin found that
drinkers who did more moderate
periodically consumed regular drinkers,
more than their usual But Dr. Harvey W.
amounts of alcohol ex- Gruchow. a biostatisti-
penenced significantly cian, and public health
higher levels of blood specialist Erica Wex-
vessel blockaee than man levin said the in-
Hearst Says She Feared Death
SAN FRANCISCO
( U P1) � Patricia
Hearst said she became
a member of the ter-
rorist group that kid-
napped her because she
feared the FBI would
kill her but authorities
missed several oppor-
tunities to capture her.
In her long-awaited
book. "Every Secret
Thing Ms. Hearst
said she originally
feared the Symbionese
Liberation Army,
which kidnapped her in
1974, would kill her.
I aier. after watching
ori television the 1974
1 os Angeles shootout
in which six SI.A
members were killed,
she remained a fugitive
because she believed
�'the FBI would kill
me, if they could she
says
Ms. Hearst also re-
counts that law en-
forcement officers
missed several chances
to catch her during the
19 months she was the
object of the most in-
tensive search in the na-
tion's history.
Once, in San Fran-
cisco, firemen dragged
hoses through the
apartment Ms. Hearst
shared with Sym-
bionese liberation Ar-
my terrorists to get at a
fire in their backyard.
The blaze developed
in a mattress where
William and Emily
Harris had been ex-
perimenting with
detonation devices to
be used in bombs for
blowing up police cars.
Ms. Hearst hid in the
bathroom and Mrs.
Harris told the firemen
that boys smoking
cigarettes were to
blame.
'�When they left,
everyone thought it was
hilarious firemen in
our safehouse while the
whole FBI was out
searching the streets of
America for us
In another instance,
Ms. Hearst and Steve
Soliah, a key SLA
figure were rescued
while on an outing in
Ms. Hearst's home
county when seeminglv
unable to ascend a
steep cliff from a
secluded beach.
Three sheriff's
deputies passed the
couple a line, and "all
during the rescue one
deputy was taking pic-
tures for their in-house
magazine
While lectured bv the
deputies. Soliah kept
fingering a camera case
in which he kept a
14-shot Browning, and,
according to Ms.
Hearst, was prepared
to start shooting.
Just released by
Doubleday Co
"Every Secret Things"
is an autobiographical
account in which Ms.
Hearst admits involve-
ment in police car bom-
bings and three bank
robberies. In one of the
robberies a woman was
shot and killed.
Ms. Hearst was
granted immunitv in
two of the robbery
cases by Sacramento,
Calif authorities
because of secret
cooperation after her
arrest in September
1975 on charges of in-
volvement in the third.
As ;or the murder, Ms.
Hearst said she was
outside the bank where
it occurred.
Now 27, Ms. Hearst
is married to her
former bodyguard, a
policeman, and lives
quietly in a San Fran-
cisco suburb with their
6-month-old daughter.
The newspaper
heiress was kidnapped
Feb. 4, 1974. by the
Harris couple and other
SLA members but
eventually joined their
cause. She served a
prison term for a 1974
bank robbery in San
Francisco that was
commuted in 1979 by
President Carter.
creased risk of other
health problems that
have been linked to
drinking must be
weighed against any
benefits alcohol may
nave for coronary heart
disease.
"Perhaps the most
reasonable recommen-
dation, based on cur-
rent knowledge, is that
moderate regular
drinkers with no
evidence of cancer, G.
I. (gastro-intestinal)
tract disease, liver
disease or proneness to
alcoholism, should not
be encouraged to stop
drinking they said in
the report in the
November issue of the
medical magazine
"Primary Car-
diology "
"Heavy binge
drinkers, however,
should be warned of
the possibly increased
risks of CHD (coronary
heart disease) and other
diseases associated with
higher alcohol con-
sumption levels
In addition, the
researchers said that in IJ
advising patients, doc-
tors should consider the II
effect of alcohol on
heart disease in relation
to the
"better-established risk
factors for developing
this disease" such as
cigarette smoking and
high blood pressure.
"Certainly these fac-
tors have been found to
exert influences on the
development of CHD
that are much stronger
than the effects of
alcohol in preventing
it
The new findings
were based on studies
of over 2,500 male pa-
tients in Milwaukee
who underwent an
X-ray examination that
outlines the arteries and
shows any obstructions I
to blood flow. All of
the patients had some
degree of artery disease
and thus were not
representative of the
general population.
DtmukBhShg
F MONOGRAMS
UNLIMITED
Get Your Sweaters & Shirts
Ready for the Fall.
Co-Ed Outlet
Located next to Plitt Theatre
Mon. Sa4. 10-9 Call 335-2424
I
i
i
Bill Of Rights
190 Years Old
FOR THOSE VMO
BELIEVE IN MIRACLES
HI Sf�- H�rr�u
A special "Bill of
Rights Day" program
in recognition of the
dav the United States
ratified the Bill of
Rights 190 years ago
will be held Tuesday.
Dec. 15, at 8 p.m. a
ihe Willis Building.
Sponsored by ECU,
The League of Women
Voters and the Green-
vile Pitt Area Unit of
the N.C. Civil liberties
Union, the program
will feature an address
by Willis P. Whichard
of Durham, an
associate judge of the
N.C. Court of Appeals.
A panel discussion
presenting political,
legal and humanitarian
aspects of the Bill of
Rights will also be in-
cluded. The public is
invited.
A graduate of the
UNC-Chapel Hill
School of Law,
Whichard was ap-
pointed to the Court of
Appeals by Governor
Hunt in September of
1980. He is a former
member of the N.C.
House of Represen-
tatives and the State
Senate. He currently
serves as chairman of
the Citizens Commis-
sion on Alternatives to
Incarceration.
Others participating
in "The Bill of Rights
Day" program include
Dr. Patricia Dunn,
president of the League
of Women Voters and a
member of the ECU
Department of Health.
Physical Education,
Recreation, Recreation
and Safety faculty.
Mil UBS
inin n pip
Rhea Markelo, also
of the Greenville
League of Women
Voters; Dr. Tinsley
Yarbrough, chairman
of the ECU Depart-
ment of Political
Science; Hugh Cox, a
Greenville attorney and
legal counsel to the
Greenville chapter of
the Civil Liberties
Union; and Lauretta
Lewis of the ECU
Department of Social
Work and Correctional
Services will participate
in the pane! discussion.
Coordinators for
"The Bill of Rights
Day" program are
Dunn and professor
William Byrd of the
ECU Department of
Community Health.
The original ten
amendments of the Bill
of Rights were passed
by Congress on Sept.
25, 1789. The bill was
ratified by the states on
Dec. 15, 1791.
J.D. Dawson
Co.
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville Location
YOUR CATALOG QIFT STORE
AND A WHOLE LOT MOREII
Support the
March of Dimes
�MMB� D��CTS KXJNOAnONBMBBMI
Special gifts
for
Special People.
Including
Fresh nut mixes
Herb teas
Ginseng products
Ananda scented body oils
Handmade silk boxes
Cookbooks
Teapots
Potpourri
Carafection candy
Rainbows
Rivergate Shopping Canter
Greenville, N. C.
Monday-Friday 10 a.m. 'til 8 p.m.
Saturday 10a.n 'til 5 p.m.
758-6264
J.A. Uniforms Shop
All types of uniforms at reasonable
prices Lab coats, stethoscopes, shoes,
and hose. Also - used ECU nurses
uniforms. Trade-ins allowed.
Locatedl710W.6thSt.
off Memorial Drive
Near Hollowelt's Drug and old hospital.
ENJOY CHRISTMAS
SHOPPING!
azeSo
gifts & decorative accessories
614 Arlington Blvd.
open Mon-Sat. 10 to 6:30 until Chriatma
J&-J
LACOSTE
V

V
tACcSFriff?
THE CHOICE OF CHAMPIONS
The tradition ot a Laeotte1. There's more to it
than ju�t tha alligator emblem trademark. Thb
Izod Lacostehirt i� engineered of pura cotton
to breatha and stratch with you. lt� ribbad collar
and cuffs to �tay naat. And its extra-long shirttail
keep, it in on. position whan you changa yours. Tha liod
Lacoste 2-button placket front shirt. Make it your choice, too.
S.M.L. XL. $16.88
BLOUNT-HARVEY
Downtown & Carolina East Mall
Style 2068
t







QUre last Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, cmmrku ��
Jimmy DuPREE, iMm�ftv
Ric Browning, orArim Charles Chandler, sp��td,tor
Chris Lichok. su�w� mm Tom Hall. en�
Al ISON BARTEL, FtartfM Abna STEVE BACHNER. EMrrMiMWM EtfH
Steve Moore. c�m �w Karen Wendt. �
December 8. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
ECU Problems
Strength In Numbers Needed
Turmoil at East Carolina Univer-
sity? We should be used to it by
now.
Perhaps the most memorable
political victory this university has
ever gained was the addition of the
medical school, which recently
graduated its first class into the pro-
fession. Chancellor Emeritus Leo
Jenkins will long be remembered for
his unyielding devotion to this
cause; it is not easy to get the state
legislature to approve a proposal
which other state supported institu-
tions oppose.
Picking up a copy of a newspaper
these days tends to bring fear to the
minds of ECU faithfuls who have
read in recent months: of a
chancellor's controversial term of
office and subsequent resignation,
of allegations that Pirate football
coaches spied on UNC's practices,
of speculation the head football
coach would be dismissed, of the
chance ECU will be dropped to
Division I-AA status by the NCAA,
et al.
The final dilemna of this lists
turns out to be little more than
speculation by a group of
"informed" sportswriters �
speculation which will give further
ammunition to rival recruiters of
this region. No doubt other schools
such as those of the Atlantic Coast
and the Southestern Conferences
DOONESBURY
would be delighted to see one of
their competitors "fall from
grace
Nonetheless, ardent supporters of
ECU promote excellance of educa-
tion, the arts and athletics. The
"Minges Mania" campaign en-
couraged 3,100 spectators to the
coliseum to witness the Pirates vic-
tory over Campbell. Admittedly a
crowd of this size would not be par-
ticularly impressive to ACC
representatives, but it's quality and
not quantity which is most impor-
tant.
Lady Pirate basketball has gained
a regional and national image of a
scrappy, never-say-die team.
Perhaps the entire university can
take a lesson from this.
There is much to be said for the
old addage, "there is strength in
numbers
East Carolina is not as big in
terms of enrollment as many other
schools in this region.
East Carolina is not as financially
"well off" as other schools.
The best place to look for the
answer to a problem is tne source �
the students, faculty and alumni.
When you take a break from stu-
dying for exams or while you're
home for the holidays, take a mo-
ment and ask yourself, "What can I
do to improve the image of East
Carolina University?"
by Garry Trudeau
SCHOU-S
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HO'OKAt
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ttlBLUX?
I
r Campus Forum
Prison Letters
I'm a very lonely prisoner and I
desparately need the friendship of a
woman. It has been four long years since
I've had my freedom, and due to that
I've been unable to find the friendship
that I'm looking for. If you can help me,
I would appreciate it.
Here's a brief description of myself:
I'm white, 28 years old, 6-2, 175 pounds,
brown hair and my eyes are hazel green.
I'm serving 20 years to life for second
degree murder
Thank you for any help that you
possibly can give me.
JOHNNY LEE LEWIS
P.O. Box 58
McCain, NC 28361
I am incarcerated in a North Carolina
Prison. I am serving an eight year (8) to
ten year (10) prison sentence for the
Crime of "Common Law Robbery
I would appreciate your help if you
would post my name and address in your
University paper in regards to a student
or students that would correspond with
me.
If there are any students that are ma-
joring in criminology and wish to corres-
pond I will be more than happy to cor-
respond back and answer any and all
questions pertaining to my life and crime
while I was in the "outside" world, bet-
ter known as Society.
ALLEN LEE FEGLEY
P.O. Box 58
McCain, NC 28361

I guess 1 should introduce myself to
you! Mv name is Doug, white male, 24
years old (1-26-57), 6 feet tall, 225 lbs
sandy brown hair (parted and
feathered), blue eyes.
I play guitar, (various types of music),
water ski, hunt, fish, swim, go camping,
cook, write poetry, read. 12 years of
school, 1 year credit at Appalachian
State (Major-Liberal Arts). Religion
(Lutheran).
I'm currently incarcerated for armed
robbery, a drug induced crime. I've 28
to 30 years, get out in January of 1984. I
would really appreciate someone writing
to me if they like. 1 enjoy talking to peo-
ple! Thank you for your help!
DOUG DEAL
P.O. Box 58
McCain, N.C. 28361
Mtxiv maa Jfrom ftht &taff 0i Che Cast Carolinian
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W
'Library Silence" Course Needed
By KIM ALBIN
As a rule, I tend to revere those members
of the ECU community who are valiant
enough to act as our administrators. 1 find
it difficult to keep myself from genuflec-
ting a little when Dr. Elmer Meyer walks
by, and Dean James Mallory has certainly
earned a great deal of my esteem.
But from the less-than-ideal conditions
in evidence on this campus one can only
assume that administrators are �after all
� only human, and sometimes they need
us to point out the failings of the system.
Therefore, I would like to propose a new
required course for all future
undergraduate students. This course, I
feel, would be of great benefit not only to
the incoming freshmen who have to take it
but to the entire population of this cam-
pus. It is Library Silence 1000.
The course description could read: an in-
vestigation into the modes of such
muteness as in required in all public and
private libraries, with special emphasis on
the topics of group meetings in libraries
and the penalties of non-compliance with
established standards of silence.
This idea suggested itself to me recently
when I read a statement made by Dr.
JoAnn Bell, director of the Health Science
Library (HSL). When asked about obtain-
ing some separate study rooms on the first
floor of the Belk Building for those poor,
displaced health professions majors to
study in during exams, Dr. Bell said,
"Students tend to talk unless supervised
No kidding.
Come on, Dr. Bell, the fact that students
tend to talk in the library is hardly a news
bulletin to anyone who has ever visited one
of our libraries, but what does "unless
supervised" suggest � that supervision is
going on at the Health Science Library?
Now that would be news, because we do
not have any such supervision at Joyner.
While 1 am not requesting supervision
for myself or for any other student who
studies in the library, I am imploring all
members of this campus to look for solu-
tions to the noise problem there.
This is not a new campaign. In the past
many students have written to this
newspaper to comment on the
pandemonium which occurs in our
libraries at exam time. In the past nothing
has changed, and students like myself who
have truly wanted to study have found it
easier to do so in MacDonaid's than in the
library. (I should point out here that Mac-
Donald's even sells coffee and has more
ashtrays than Joyner Library.)
The hubbub at Joyner starts early in the
day at exam time and peaks in early even-
ing when all those groups of business ma-
jors (the worst offenders) come in to work
on their final projects together. In every
business course I have taken it was sug-
gested that groups of us meet at the librar
to work on our final projects. Soon after
they come in, the noise level reaches its
zenith, and one can barely make out the
next table's calamitous conversation above
the din.
The only vindication 1 can grant to those
who insist on talking in the library is that.
as college students, we are accustomed to
being encourged to talk at all times. Let's
face it; people are always asking us ques-
tions. Talking in the library is a means of
actualizing little intellects, and what bolder
means is there than asserting one's own
budding truths in rooms containing books,
the products of the world's greatest
thinkers? We are not conditioned to regard
silence a virtuous state.
This is why I believe that Library Silence
should be taught in every department
our university. Students taking the course
could be admonished daily until they are
sufficiently humbled to respect, if not their
fellow scholars, at least the buildings
which house mankind's collection o
literary genius.
We should all participate in making
Joyner Library a pleasant place in which to
study. This is especially important this year
because none of us will want to study in
Mendenhall with all that tacky plastu
greenery hanging around.
Is Moral Majority Political?
By JOSEPH OLIMCK
Upon learning that Jerry Falwell Jr. had
responded to my column. "Moral Majori-
ty: Threat To Freedom I was overjoyed.
However, when I read Mr. Falwell's col-
umn, 1 was astonished; either Mr. Falwell
does not know much about his father's
organization, or he does not want people
to know the truth about it.
Although the Moral Majority claims to
be a political group, it is very hard to
classify it as one. Even though the Moral
Majority is composed of people from
many different religions, most of them
seem to belong to some variation of the
Christian faith. With this common factor,
it seems impossible that religious ideals
and morals do not dominate the Moral
Majority influencing and controlling it's
actions.
Lou Barnes, head of the California
Moral Majority, affirmed the religious in-
tent of the Moral Majority in a comment
made in US News & World Report: "We
have a religious mandate. We must return
to broad principles of Biblical Law to
restore order to our society Such intent
makes the Moral Majority more of a
religious group than a political group.
In US News & World Report, H.
Lamarr Mooneyham, North Carolina
Moral Majority Director, said, "The goal
is to reduce circulation of materials judged
objectionable in favor of those described
as 'pro-family, pro-life, pro-American,
and pro-Bible
Judging what is objectionable and what
is 'pro-family, pro-life, pro-American, and
pro-Bible' depends on one's viewpoint. As
a minister, Mr. Mooneyham is definitely
influenced by his religion, and it seems like
he would run his chapter of the Moral Ma-
jority in a manner that would make it a
religiously based organization, trying to
rid North Carolina of things that don't
agree with it's religious morals.
After all, Mr. Mooneyham is in favor of
pro-Bible material; to determine what is
pro-Bible, he and his followers would have
to use their religious interpretation and
judgement. Thus, it can be infered that
religion is a key part of the Moral Majori-
ty, if not the main part.
Really, what gives Mr. Mooneyham and
his chapter of the Moral Majority the right
to determine what is objectionable and
non-objectionable for other people?
Speaking of the Moral Majority, Mr.
Falwell says, "They believe � and with
good reason � that most Americans agree
that pornography and sex on TV simply
lead to a general decline of the nation's
morals Yet, only a small portion of the
population actively support the Moral Ma-
jority and groups like it: there are onlv 30
million Americans, involved in the Moral
Majority and groups like it. So, it is not en-
tirely evident that most Americans support
the conservative -eligious groups or agree
with them.
Reallly, if Americans do not want sex on
TV, why do a lot of the top 20 TV pro-
grams have sex in them?
Mr. Falwell claims the Moral Majority
has never singled out a specific television
program for any type of hit list. Yet,
Saturday Review reports, "Now the Moral
Majority is planning boycotts of sponsors
of offensive shows, and it's leader, arc
talking quietly among themselves about
making a bid for a controlling interest in
one of the big three networks
Also, Mr. Falwell claims the Moral NLi
jority has never and will never attempt to
remove any book from any librarv
However, according to US News & World
Report, the Moral Majority has tried to
take books off the shelves of libraries
"Since then (1981) Falwell and others have
issued mass mailings criticizing certain
publications such as the feminist health
book Our Bodies, Ourselves.
Mr. Falwell's reference to public schools
and universities where Karl Marx can he
read and the Bible cannot be read seems
like a rare and extreme case, and it lacks
valid details, like the names of the univer-
sities and schools.
Overall, Mr. Falwell's response to mv
article, "Moral Majority: Threat to
freedom seems more like Moral Majori
ty propaganda than a valid response.
Bloomfield Admired
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
It was love at first sight when I saw the
book: small, with a plain black cover and
white lettering, lying on the floor of the
bookstore with the other music titles. I
picked it up. started reading, and was
grabbed by the prose, gritty and im-
mediate, like a great song on the radio: "I
met Joe Lee Williams in the early sixties in
a Chicago club called the Blind Pig. He
was a short and stout and heavy-chested
man, and he was old even then
1 kept reading, held by the storytelling
verve, the rich social history and dirt-
under-the-fingernails wisdom of "Me and
Big Joe written by the late guitarist
Michael Bloomfield and published just
before his death earlier this year. Big Joe
is, of course, Joe Lee Williams, a hobo and
blues singer who played brothels, bars and
work camps throughout America.
Williams was Bloomfield's teacher when
that scion of Chicago's Gold Coast was
just learning how to play.
Bloomfield � who eventually became
an accomplished musician, working with
Paul Butterfield, Bob Dylan and main
others � was hungry for experience when
he met Williams. So Joe can .d him to see
wizened black blues survivors such as
Lightning Hopkins, Tampa Red, Tommv
McClennan and Jazz Gillum. The latter,
terrified that Bloomfield had come to steal
his songs, met him on a blistering summer
day bundled up in an overcoat and stoking
a raging fire. Gillum had been burned
before by white blues pilgrims.
Many of the old musicians that Bloom-
field met through Williams were like that
� angry, frightened, sick, broke, stripped
of everything but their talent by a societv
that considered them and their main
chance at transcended � if only for a mo-
ment � the conditions that made them
have to pay.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Other Opinion
� Campus Forum
Former Committee Chairman Offers Other Viewpoint
I have read the recent editorial of
No. 12
in
The East Carolinian
newspaper regarding Mr. Alexander and
the New York Trip in 1978. I was chair-
man of the Student Union Travil Com-
mittee that year.
1 want to make two statements about
the facts in the editorial. Many times the
committee chairman and the advisor
take care of committee business between
themselves This was the case in 1978.
we had two complimentary rooms from
the hotel. 1 decided I did not wish to stay
in a room by myself. We had a com-
plimentary room with no one in it. It
was decided Ms. Henderson could use
the room. It should be noted that Ms.
Henderson bus trip fare was paid for.
1i Alexander executed all of his
duties as trip adviser while in New York.
He checked the people in when we arriv-
ed at the hotel. Mr. Alexander arranged
detinue times to be available for student
questions, if they had a problem while in
New York.
BILL MARTIN
Chairman, 1978 Travel Committee
Fuller
sometimes ou are just in the right
place at the right time. I was last
Wednesday. While walking through
Mendenhall Student Center 1 saw R.
Buck minster Fuller sitting alone signing
copies of his latest book. The Critical
Path.
I spoke to him and told him how
much 1 had enjoyed his lecture the
previous night. He thanked me.
Nelluena Eustler who was his host and
escort for the day encouraged me to talk
to him. Through some unfortunate over-
sight the book signing arranged by the
ECU bookstore had not besen publiciz-
ed and no one knew he was there. Mrs.
Eustler was embarassed. This was the
final straw. On Tuesday night Dr. Fuller
was greeted in Greenville and told that
his motel reservations were in Kinston �
35 miles away. This might have been ex-
cused because of the Annual Tobacco
1 estival. Reservations in town are hard
to get. However, after his lecture and a
reception, when Dr. Fuller was taken to
the Holiday Inn in Kinston it was
discovered that his reservations had been
cancelled. They had not been guaranteed
for after midnight.
Dr. Fuller was understandably in-
sulted. He is an international figure and
is not accustomed to being treated so
carelessly. Administrators in
Mendenhall say that the mixup was the
fault of Holiday Inn. 1 was told that the
program committee did everything it
was supposed to do. I hope however that
Dr. Fuller will receive an apology from
ECU. He deserves one.
Mrs. Eustler who took Dr. Fuller into
her own home after the hotel foul-up,
invited me to lunch with Dr. Fuller,
Keats Sparrow, and herself and to see
Dr. Fuller off at the airport.
ECU has not earned a completely
black mark with their distinguished
guest. Dr. Fuller remarked that he has
rarely had such an excellent audience.
Hendr-x Theatre was full and the rapt
audience hung on every word from a
thinker who must rank with Pythagoras,
Galileo, and Da Vinci. Dr. Fuller is 86
years old and he will probably not return
to ECU. Those who missed hearing him
missed a rare and wonderful experiern-
ce.
MICHELLES. BENNETT
Junior, Community Arts Mgmt.
SLAP
Numerous student and colleague
friends of mine have asked me the
following questions regarding the
Health Affairs Library postponed move
(see Dec. 1 issue):
1) Did you have anything to do with
the SLAP student's activities regarding
the move?
2) How do you feel about the issue?
My responses have been as follows:
1) I had absolutely nothing to do with
the SLAP student's activities. Nor did
any of my colleagues I am happy to say.
My colleagues and 1 did support their ac-
tivities, however, as we perceived their
concerns legitimate. It was the SLAP
students, among others, who successful-
ly instigated the protest and ultimate
postponement.
2) The last time 1 was as proud of a
group of ECU students was in the fall of
'69 during the Moratorium Day ac-
tivities. I am very pleased to be a pro-
fessor of the SLAP graduate students
who engaged in self-generated intelligent
problem solving. 1 also respect the ECU
administrators, Jo Anne Bell included,
who were genuinely responsive to a
sincere academic request despite the
hardships placed upon them in postpon-
ing the library move.
HAL J. DANIEL 111
Professor
American Life
Alexandra Renner's interview is in-
teresting for its' portrait of the German
way ot life, but I find it limited in its'
portrayal of American life. She in fact,
generalizes, and 1 object to the criteria
she uses to evaluate America.
In her interview. Ms. Rennei sees the
American people as not being very con-
cerned with "problems although she
doesn't elaborate on the word beyond
civil rights. She states that they are also
more liberal. 1 am not sure what open-
mindedness has to do with liberal posi-
tions, it any at all.
"Here, not main care refers to
America's alleged foreign isolation
policv. This is ironic because it you look
at political. World Historv. after WWII.
a major movement is directed at getting
West Germain back on its' feet, produc-
tive and independent. Of course I'm
referring to the efforts of NATO, of
which the United States belongs to and
aUo to the considerable efforts ot Sec.
ot Si ale. Dean Acheson.
Ot course one can argue, but this is
1981, and to that I replv � look at the
foreign aid budgets, the summit con-
ferences and peace talks in the Middle
East, as well as the wealth ot American
religious organizations working
thoughou! Latin America and other
I DC countries. What was 1 doing trick
or treating for UNICEF, all those years?
One of the nicest things about the
United States, is its diversity. The South
is completely different from the North,
as well as the East coast from the West.
Not many nations can boast of the
cultural exchanges that occur daily
within the States. The opportunities here
for everyone, whether they are a citizen
or not, are unlimited and it is these op-
portunities which help fight against pre-
judice attitudes.
"Everybody runs around wearing the
same thing preppy clothes. "People
here are such fanatics" and "narrow
minded These are clear examples of
generalizing, which leads me to believe
that maybe Ms. Renner hasn't seen
much of America, or of Greenville for
that matter. I know for a fact, that if
you walk into the Drama dept on cam-
pus, not everyone will havr on preppy
clothes. How can you say people are
fanatics over sports, when by your own
admission, you do not understand foot-
ball Don't you think its' a narrow-
minded view to attribute people's
narrow-mindedness to soap operas.
1 like reggae and jazz too and Green-
ville is certainly not the mecca for the
fashion world, but then, all of America
is not Greenville.
1 think that there's a basic philosophy
within the United States which is the
backbone o' the Constitution, and thus
the Government, which invades all
American way o life and that if you are
not aware of this, you do not understand
the choices and reasoning of its' people
and programs within America. In-
dividuals coming together, working, but
maintaining their individuality is a high
prioritv. I think if you judge a system.
you should judge it after a full study,
and b its' own goals and philosophies,
because alter all. that's what it sets out
to accomplish. You may disagree with
the latter, but you can only judge it bv
the former.
In the und ot her antcle, Ms. Renner
says she can't sav whether "she likes it
here or not Well to everyone who read
the article, I think it was pretty clear to.
Whether she intended it or not. The
question is, why if you are so unhappy
with life here, would you consider grad
school here?
CATHERINE VOLLMER
Senior, Drama
Whittington
I have just learned of the Reverend
Jim Whittington's contribution to the
East Carolina University Athletic
Department and I am astonished. I do
not understand how this person can con-
tribute people's hard earned money to a
cause that has nothing whatsoever to do
with spreading the Christian Wend.
There are so many hungry and homeless
in our country that these monies could
have helped. There are so many genuine
causes where this amount ot money
could have gone to spread the Christian
Faith. 1 am also disappointed in the
Athletic Department and East Carolina
University for accepting such a dona
tion. I wonder how many of the people
that contributed to Reverend Whit-
tington's cause knew their money wa-
going to be donated to East Carolina
University's Athletic Program?
CATHY WH SON
Decorations
Ms. Croft, 1 stand corrected. I
sincerely apologize for any offense taken
bv you and your sisters as a result o my
accusation that you yourselves
decorated each others trees. However,
had 1 known that it was a Fraternitv that
provided such a wondrous arbonal
display, 1 may have refrained from com-
ment, for fear o the discovery of a pig's
head, (or worse) deposited at m
doorstep.
ANNSH1RI 1
Senior, C omputer Science
L
The price
of style
has just come
down!
SILADllW
College Rings now only 084.9S
my
ter,
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iiig
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tripped
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ni
SILADIUM rings produce the brilliant lustre of a fine jeweler's
stainless.
Men's and women's Siladium rings are on sale this week only
through your ArtCarved representative. A visit to the ArtCarved Col-
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rings for the fall. But hurry on over . . . this sale runs for a limited
time only.
DATE:
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t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
DECEMBERS. 191 Pae 6
.�
'Lts Woman:
New Cinematic
Experimentation
Meryl Streep and Jeremy Irons as 20th-century actors in this scene from the new film The Trench lieutenant's Woman.
B KATHYWEYLER
sl�ll Wnlrr
The scene: a windswept English
port town. Waves crash ovei a slick
sea wall as the red-haired, cutcasl
heroine comes face to face with the
sensitive, gentleman scientist.
Sparks fly. Suddenly, we see those
people in a modern hotel room with
different identities. What going on
here?
This is The French lieutenant's
H oman, now playing at last at
Greenville's Buccaneer rheatres.
After months of anticipation.
Greenville audiences are now
privileged to see what all the critics
have been alternately praising and
damning.
The trench Lieutenant's Woman
is adapted from John Fowles' novel
of the same title. The screenplay. by
the renowned Haiold Pinter, turns
the highly romantic story into a
movie-within-a-mov ie. winch is
what many critics have called, at the
very least, a bad move. John
Fowles, however, approved of the
idea, and. though it takes a while to
get used to, the approach does
work.
Basically, the plot ol the movie is
this: a respectably engaged scientist.
Charles Smithson, meets the town
"scarlet woman Sarah Woodruff,
is complete!) swept away by passion
such as Ik- has never known and
forfeits his genteel life tor a night of
ecstasy with this exotic woman. In-
terspersed with the above plot,
which comes directly from Fowles'
novel, is the movie's addition: we
watch the actual filming of The
trench lieutenant's Woman, and
the love affair of Anna and Mike.
the actors playing Sarah and
( harles.
Meryl Streep is nothing short of
glorious as Sarah Anna. Some
critics have questioned her ap-
propriatness for the part, but her
performance contradicts them.
Watching Streep in this film is like
watching an animated, Pre-
Raphaelite painting. So she's not a
classic beauty: who says she has to
be? She brings power and will and
strength to both her characters
which is a darn sight more ap-
propriate than a delicate profile and
See CINEMA, Page 7
Meryl Streep Plays Mysterious Heroine Sarah
By GENE SISKEL
I htllrafo I nhunr
NEW YORK � Can she survive the hype? That's the
big question facing 32-year-old Meryl Streep, who
claims that being billed as "America's greatest actress"
is not as much fun as one might think it is.
Miss Streep, the Academy Award-winning star of
Kramer vs. Kramer and The Deer Hunter, has received
such praise in recent stories in Time. Newsweek, The
VfM- York Times and ife magazines. Now she's winn-
ing acclaim for her performance in the film adaptation
of The French lieutenant's Woman (now playing at the
Buccaneer Theatres in Greenville).
"This is supposed to be every actor's dream Miss
Streep said, "but 1 can't say I'm enjoying it. The praise
is nice, and the ability to pick scripts it provides is
wonderful; but the extreme publicity has to create an ex-
pectation in an audience that 1 can't possibly satisfy.
Some people may even want to see me fail now
Miss Streep's publicist confirmed the actress's con-
cern: "She's worried that journalists and critics are go-
ing to be looking to find fault with her
"The other problem that all of the publicity creates
Miss Streep added, "is that other actors begin to view
you strangely � word of a 'Who does she think she is?'
phenomenon. It takes me about a week in rehearsal to
get rid of that, which is very important because 90 per-
cent of acting. I think, is your collaboration with other
actors. If there is tension among the performers, it will
hurt every performance
So far. Miss Streep's record on film is unblemished.
She has made memorable each of her major movie
characterizations without drawing undue attention to
herself. In other words, we first remembered the
characters she has played, and only later do we note that
they have been played by the same woman. Now that
Miss Streep has achieved star status, however, her chore
of hiding herself in her characters only becomes more
difficult.
Cinema
In person, Miss Streep does not come across as a
grand lady of the theater or of movies. She's a young
woman, and with her long blond hair tied back in a
ponytail, she has a surprisingly freer and easy and fun-
loving manner. Once she was finished with the now-
standard "How are you coping with being called the
greatest?" question, she relaxed and waited to be asked
about her craft. A celebrated 1975 graduate of the Yale
Drama School, Miss Streep loves to talk about acting.
First she agreed that the most common mistake the
general audience makes about acting is to like a perfor-
mance simply because one likes the character being
played. "And I do too Miss Streep said, "but it's not
right What Miss Streep seems to do that is right in
each of her roles is bring a little more dignity and reality
to her characters than we usually get in the movies. Her
characters are interesting women. They could exist, we
think.
For example, the working-class Pennsylvania woman
in The Deer Hunter. Miss Streep gave us a rare portrait
of a woman left at home while her man fought in the
Vietnam War. How good was her performance? Match
it against two other Oscar-nominated Vietnam
"widows" � Jane Fonda and Penelope Milford in
Coming Home � and Miss Streep's character seems
much less self-conscious or theatrical.
Another example: Miss Streep's portrayal of Joanna
Kramer, Dustin Hoffman's estranged wife in Kramer
vs. Kramer. If ever there was a character with the movie
stacked against her, it had to be Mrs. Kramer.
In the film's first scene, Joanna Kramer walks out on
her little boy in a "Me Generation" act of putting one's
self ahead of one's child. L ater in the film she has the
gall to change her mind and to want to take her
traumatized son away from his cute daddy, who has suf-
fered through the film playing breadwinner, daddy and
mommv. And vet we never hate Mrs. Kramer. She
seems to be a realistic character, and if she has faults,
well, at least she's trying to do so something about it.
Those are rich characters; they have a depth that
reveals that more than one thing is going on inside their
heads. One of the techniques Miss Streep said she uses
to give her characters such depth is to withhold from the
audience a crucial piece of information about them. She
also withholds it from the characters' own knowledge
about themselves. This hidden truth about the character
exists only as a Mibrev btrf-M creates a shimmering
uncertainty about the character that makes us want to
know more.
Her revelation ol Joanna Kramer's secret: "I don't
think she ever loved her husband. Tver
Did she ever tell co-star Hoffman her analysis of the
character? "No she said, "and I don't think that
would have been smart. He has to believe I love his
character. That's the kind of character he's playing
Miss Streep's latest characterization, one certain to
solidify he: reputation, is a dual role as both the
mysterious heroine o John Fowles romantic novel The
trench I ieutenant's W oman and the American actress
See STREEP, Page 7
Start Them Up!
Stones Age With Style, Grace
By PAUL COLLINS
MNariai kf
Rock and roll has always been a young man's game.
It was invented by the young for the young. Old rockers
never died because there were no old rockers.
Many died young. Jimi Hendrix, Brian Jones, Janis
Joplin, Jim Morrison.
Others sold out and took their golden oldies to Las
Vegas. Elvis, Chuck Berry, Paul McCartney.
A few struggled on but were never able to find their
old magic. Bob Dylan, The Who, Led Zeppelin.
One, John Lennon, was poised to make a graceful
leap to rock middle age, but a bullet put an end to any
hope of that.
Music
Growing old gracefully was not something rock stars
did well.
Conspicuous in their absence from any of these
categories, however, are the Rolling Stones. Oh, the
Stones have struggled alright, and some would say they
have sold out. One Stone (Brian Jones) even died
young.
But with the release of their latest album Tattoo You,
the Rolling Stones have shed these burdens and made
rock history in the process. Tattoo, you see, is the first
great album ever made by middle-aged rockers.
It marks a renaissance for the group. Critics have
been sounding the death knell for years. And indeed the
group did have moments that made even the bravest fan
faint of heart. Last year's Emotional Rescue was a
disaster. What would have been a triumph for many
groups just didn't live up to Stones' standards or fan's
expectations.
Living up to expectations has always been a problem
for the Stones. They are constantly forced to play "can
you top this Classic albums like Beggars Banquet,
Sticky Fingers and Exile on Main Street only whet the
appetite for more.
For a while they tried to satisfy this need by recycling
their previous work. Originality was thrown out the
window, and it got to the point where they were just
grinding it out. The energy that used to electrify was
gone. Tattoo You, though, changes all this.
The album is, in many ways, a return to the group's
rhythm-and-blues roots but from a new perspective �
the perspective of middle age. Gone is the misogyny that
was a Rolling Stones hallmark. It has been replaced by
the telling tenderness of "Waiting on a Friend
Makin' love and breakin' heartsIt is a game for
youthCut I'm not waitin' on a ladyI'm just waitin' on
a friend
Mick Jagger is no longer the swaggering stud of
"Stupid Girl" or "Under My Thumb but rather the
vulnerable lover of "Worry About You" and
"Heaven The former is a tear-your-hair-out-by-the-
roots ballad in the best Stones tradition; the latter is an
ethereal paean to emotional love. Both reflect a maturi-
ty never before heard in the Stones' music.
Musically, the group is better on this album than it
has been in years. "Start Me Up" is the catchiest Stones
single since "Brown Sugar, XX" and "Slave" is a sear-
ing, hard-assed blues number that makes a mockery of
your "super freaks" and "bad mama jamas
Throughout, Jagger sings like the master he is, and
Keith Richards' guitar is mean � and wonderful �
again. No more "junkie licks" for Keef.
The Rolling Stones seem ready to settle comfortably
into middle age, and as a result they are making great
music again.
Who could ask for anything more?
4 The Idolmaker � Hunts Talent A t Hendrix
Grooming a young busboy for stardom, idolmaker Yinnie Vacarri (Ra Sharkey) teaches Caesare (Peter
Gallagher) a simple dance routine in The Idolmaker, the weekend movie at Hendrix Theatre.
St
Continued Yr
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capture the sal
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on
Streep As 'Lt. 's Woman'
I HI EAST A KOI 1M V � Dt l I Mill K o, IV81
(onlinued From P. 6
playing that part. To
capture the same o'fbet
storytelling technique
employed b Fowles,
screenwritei Harold
Pintei tells two
�cilapping stones in
film adaptation.
In the movie, set
mostly in I nulaiul in
1867, Miss Streep plays
an ostracized young
woman who stands at
the shore of the sea,
claiming to be awaiting
the return of a long-lost
Kuer, a French lieute-
nant. Unmarried and
branded a whore, the
characer of Sarah turns
out to be something
akin to a Venus flytrap
as she helps to make a
shambles out of a
young engaged-to-be-
married Englishman
(played by screen
newcomer Jeremy
Irons), who spots her
one day standing at the
stormy breakwater.
Their strange love-
hate relationship forms
the bulk of the movie,
but their story is inter-
rupted 14 times as the
action switches to
modern times, to a pro
trayal of the similarly
on-again, off-again
relationship of the two
actors playing those
19th-century
characters. Thus Miss
Streep and Irons each
have two roles in the
Cinema Experiment
Continued From Page 6
dainty hands.
iiainiv nanas.
lererm lions portrays Charles Mike with
grand sensitivity. Both roles arc those of
conscience-stricken men. torn between their
sires and then duty. Irons conveys this expertly
a;ul presents a form quite suitable for the love
objeel of Sat.ill Anna.
The tench I ieutenant's H oman is worth see-
il foi no oihet reason than the magnificent
scenery. Director Karet Reis has created a lush
backdrop foi the action of the film, an excellent
reation ol Victorian England unbelievably
accuracy and detail.
1 he outdoor sets are landscapes worth) o
Hoiman Hunt. 1 ven it for some strange reason.
you despise the movie, you are bound to admire
careful detail and beauty o the sets and
costumes and the stunning photography.
some people probablv won't like The Trench
lieutenant's Unman. One point critics have
made is that the film lacks emotional intensity.
While this is not exactly the case, it is difficult to
become involved in the story as it darts back and
forth from the nineteenth to the twentieth cen-
tury. However, Pinter seems to have created,
from Fowles' novel, a film that is more concern-
ed with theme than with character. English ma-
jors will probably quickly pick up on the con-
scious imitation of Hardy, many of whose works
are also more concerned with theme than with
character.
In The trench lieutenant's Woman, then, we
have a film about overwhelming passion and the
sad-but-true unreality of it. If the characters do
not tear at your heart � and they most likely will
� consider the over-riding idea of all-consuming
passion, an intense yearning for something which
can never be. and how out-of-place it appears in
the Victorian world and in the twentieth century.
The trench Lieutenant's Woman is not just a
beautiful and enjoyable film � it might even
make you think.
itncri
sculpture
4N At-r�j4TiVE EXrWiTioM SPACE.
fn� F vAKlS 'ST. fbt-6 Wft THe4T& MT)
ii
mm
nmtm
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film. Miss Streep plays
both Sarah, the French
lieutenant's woman,
and Anna, the
somewhat flighty
American actress who
plays Sarah.
Part of the con-
siderable pleasure of
the film is observing the
similarities and dif-
ferences between the
two love stories
separated by only a
century. Did Miss
Streep develop secrets
about the characters
she plays in The trench
Lieutenant 's H oman?
"Yes she said,
"but I don't think it
would be right if I gave
that away now. I think
the audience ought to
have a fresh crack at
the material. I also pro-
mised (author) John
Fowles that I wouldn't
try to explain Sarah. 1
will say this much,
though. I did try to
play Sarah so that the
audience wouldn't be
sure whether she has
wiiPtHi
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Sti.iti S i� � p � � 4 B .H -
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planned in advance her
every action regarding
Charles (Irons), or
whether she simply acts
out of an impulse in
any given moment. I
hope there is that ten-
sion in the character
For those who
haven't seen Miss
Streep in any of her
wide-ranging,
celebrated roles on and
off-Broadway, her dual
role in The French
Lieutenant's Woman
serves as sort of double
helping of Miss Streep
in repertory. Both
characters glisten. If
the chronologically
more modern character
of actress Anna seems a
bid dull compared with
the tempestuous Sarah,
don't worry � it's in-
tentional.
"Sarah's gestures are
restrained and very
cool Miss Streep
said, "whereas Anna is
more contemporary
with touching her face
and a certain slop-
10
ECU
Student
Discount
on
glosses
piness.
To play the temptress
Sarah, Miss Streep read
the Fowles book and
other literature about
and of the same period.
She studied with a voice
teacher to create an ac-
cent of a Dorset woman
who was rejected by the
community and inten-
tionally lost her accent.
Miss Streep also took
to wearing a corset to
learn restraint in her
movements. And in an
effort to capture the
manipulative side of
Sarah, Miss Streep said
she studied classic
photographs of Orien-
tal geishas.
"The women in
those photographs
strike sort of a distant,
push-pull pose said
Miss Streep, who then
demonstrated the pose
by seemingly pushing
one away with one
hand nd giving a
come-on sign with the
See STREEP, Page 8
PHOTO BY GARY PATTERSON
Romantics Antics
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 8, 1981
f ' 1 f ���
51 04vip AJoki
THAT'S OJCA tfSALOf
Oipror i)frrr7v talk
TDTHf C�CPy 4a)
Streep Becoming Big Star
Continued From P. 7
other. In a crude way
the effect was not
unlike the nightclub
comedian who tells the
audience with one hand
to stop applauding,
while signaling with the
other hand for them to
continue.
Of course, Mis
Streep is much more
subtle about it than
that. If one studies her
closely in the film, one
will see her more than
once say words of re-
jection to Charles while
her eyes say something
quite different. How
does she as an actress
develop such intriguing
dualities?
"If one truly ex-
periences what the
character is experienc-
ing Miss Streep said,
"your face will show it.
At the same time, what
I think makes a perfor-
mance work best is per-
formance, the act of
doing the character for
an audience
Miss Streep has been
performing for au-
diences for more than
half her life. Born June
22, 1949, to a comfor-
table suburban New
Jersey family, she
acknowledges that she
has led a mostly charm-
ed life. Following an
awkward childhood in
which she now claims
she had an old face that
made her look more
like one of her teachers
than her classmates, the
teenage Meryl actively
transformed herself
with makeup, clothes
and a bottle of peroxide
into a dazzling high
school homecoming
queen.
Her involvement
with theater didn't
blossom until she
enrolled in an
"Introduction to
Drama" course at
Vassar College, where
her reading of some of
the Blanche Du Bois
lines from 4 Streetcar
amed Desire caught
the attention of her in-
structor, who promptly
cast her in a series of
roles that became the
talk of the school.
Following a summer
of acting, directing and
promoting a variety of
plays for a Vermont
theater group, Miss
Streep enrolled at the
Yale Drama School,
where she promptly
captured the attention
of her professors,
classmates and the New
York critics. Mel
Gussow of the New
York Times has writ-
ten: "Every time I went
to Yale, I looked for-
ward to seeing what
Meryl Streep was do-
ing
By the time she earn-
ed her degree Miss
Streep had a theatrical
reputation that allowed
her to be cast in a series
of productions by in-
fluential producer
Joseph Papp. Her film
work began with a
small role as one of
Jane Fonda's
childhood friends in
Julia.
On a personal level,
Miss Streep suffered a
major tragedy when ac-
tor John Cazale, best
known for his protrayal
of the weak-willed
brother Fredo in The
Ciodfather, died of
cancer in 1978. She and
Cazale had been living
together for more than
two years.
Six months after
Cazale's death, Miss
Streep married sculptor
Donald Gummer. A
year later she gave birth
to a son, named Henry.
"A great nanny" is the
answer Miss Streep
gives when asked how
she is able to raise her
child and maintain her
burgeoning career.
Next on tap for Miss
Streep is the title role in
the film of William
Styron's Sophie's
Choice, in which she
will play a lusty concen-
tration camp victim.
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
&RINC
Of �Y SALES COiNc
401 S.EVANS ST. 0PE9 i00N
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 75
OPfcN9 30-5 30 MON SAT
PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
COUPON
fjS
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ATYOUR
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$Q00 Off Any Large Pizza
O With This Coupon
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1
With This Coupon
2 LOCATIONS IN
2601 E. 10TH ST. 752-4445
305 GREENVILLE BLVD. 756-4320
Offer expires December 13, 1981
fc

6th Annual
Kappa Sigma- ELBO
Christmas Party!
Tues Dec. 8th
Lots of Prizes, Gifts & Specials
1st GRAND PRIZE
Two Days all expense paid trip to Wintergreen.
2nd GRAND PRIZE
Your Very Own Pinball Machine
ST. NICK WILL BE THERE AND WE'LL HA VE
OUR END OF THE YEAR T-SHIRT SALE!
START YOUR HOLIDAYS RIGHT TUESDAY
wi
AT THE
;HRISTMASPATY
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DOMINO'S
AOVERTISEO
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
below the advertised price in each A&P Store eacept as specifically
rn this ad
sale at oA
noted 1
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT DEC. 12, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Greenville Shopping Center
Greenville N. C.
FILL YOUR HOLIDAY BASKET WITH.
MERRY GREEN P
SAVINGS
2 in a bag
Limit 2 bags
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
Whole Fryers
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
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ir. 880
PLUMP DELICIOUS
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OQ0
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IN QUARTERS
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PEPPERONI � COMBINATION � SAUSAGE
Mr. P's Pizza
11 V OZ.
pkg.
89
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3 &1
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HOMESTYLE � BUTTERMILK
Ann Page Biscuits
64 oz.
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FLAW OR CRIMCHY
Sealtest
Polar Bars
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FAST ACTION
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166
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ASSORTED
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FAMILY
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SWEET & JUICY (CASE OF 125 ONLY 6.19)
Florida �
Tangelos Zu
WASHINGTON STATE
RED OR GOLDEN
Delicious Apples
RED OR WHITE
Florida Grapefruit
p
SensatioJ
accused of)
members
it out to tl
Being a
get very dl
press t akl
awesome
past week
Carolina
The sit
week' rn

(N A A)
organic
ble realign!
jor
Due to
Football
N AA hai
its current
of m l
meeting pj
narrow
90 and
A criteria '
Meetiv
quiren
sion I-A
�The n
minimum
collegiate
in Div
�The
play at le
bail game
sion I A
-The i
one of
quirementj
The in
more than
per home
mediate pi
To
MORG;
East Carol
tured the 51
the Piratf
Virginia
da � th
door seas
Harris
seconds,
finished f
Charlie
the 400-m
49.4 secor
ed sixth
Keith Oar
Carolina
pared to
seconds.
B
F
UNIV
East C
swimmit
fifth pi;
Penn Stj
ladies bt
while me
ing time
The Ul
was the i
ing the
points
The L
202 pou
the oven
On Fl
swimmer
The ftrl
400-yardl
the teaml
Giovine,
Richards!
the trials!
Other
300-varj
500-yan
women.
Satur
freestyle!
McQuesj
cy Jamej
ed sixth!
and nati
Anotl
400-yar
the Ladi
time ofl
HanneW
and St
record
A





JUh I AST i HOI iM'VN
Sports
Paper Makes Farce Of NCAA Realignment
� i
(lharios
( lhandler
11

s
ECU's Harris Sprints
To Win At First Meet
)J 1 VI
'
1
Bucs Capture
Fifth Place
1 �


'
; '
'
?a Kevin 13.18 HR.i ai id K � � 4K hi, vman, Joe N
I
,
i
Peirsel ,i)d Stan K
u�fifth in Iht 200 I 1:29.55 In thi MX) m 1 Bjorn loha
tinishin and Pen cl r
with a 15 "74
1
v 1 fell in1 h ol VK Hi
here rth in ,Ra . and Da id i in the 2000 1
. j 20 63 lennift i Lives,20 26
'an1 reshman S
finish)

Strong Inside Play
Lady Pirates' Downfall

i
i


I l Miki dibson goes up for two againstampbell
Fan Backing Helps Pirates To Victory
Ml I I M M I 1 KION

� . , 'A
lump.
U-32 will
uled b
. irles Bui H
Our i a 13-1
ihev

I)
M
Mi '
.i t i
CilbsOIl
antj as definitely a factor,
ys Od 'They were -cn
one fr ' a bl
even pers
. � ites" more
II point outburst, makint, "Brown played his hesi game
4 4 w ith 15 minutes to plav
�t
tinned "He was more relax
Brown d in with a layup ofl ed and determined Bruce (Peartree,
a nice pass from Bvles, and Watkins freshman guard) delivered some
N1 . iht added at ling F:a thrilling moments to d He
j N, inu-ls' H i irolina' id U 49 16 with is the best defensive guard w
13:2"? rema tubs m a pressure standpoint '
? i I b respoi ; baskets,
H at d ' ���� I' au had then Iv
i a dm ind wa id rhen the ameb . ailed i
, m fouled point t imeoul. a timeout I
pla � i i smai pa he Pirates is
H . rnainmi ofl I. at th Mountaineei lass
halftimi Odom v 5 to v n , the weekend of
Brit to � i he 18th and 19th





10
I HI I M CAROI IN1AN
DECEMBERS. 1981
Fearless Football Forecast
c otten, Jan. 1
Sugar, Jan. I -
Orange, Jan 1
Rove, Jan. I -
Gatoi. Dec.
Fiesta, Jan.
Bluebonnet,
Peach, Dec.
1 ibert. Dec
- ALABAMA VS TEXAS
GEORGIA VS PITTSBURGH
- CLEMSON VS NEBRASKA
IOWA VS WASHINGTON
- NORTH CAROLINA VS ARKANSAS
I - - PENN STATE VS SOUTHERN CAL
IXv. 31 - MICHIGAN VS UCLA
31 - WEST VIRGINIA VS FLORIDA
30 - OHIO STATE VS NAVY
28
Sun. Dec. lb - OKI AHOMA VS HOUSTON
Hall Of Fame. Dec. 31 � MISS ST VS KANSAS
raneerine, Dec. 19 - MISSOURI VS SOUTHERN MISS
CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Alabama
Georgia
Clemson
Washington
North Carolina
Southern Cal
Michigan
Florida
Ohio State
Oklahoma
Miss St
Missouri
WILLIAM YELVERTON
Asst. Sports Editor
Alabama
Georgia
Clemson
Washington
North Carolina
Southern Cal
Michigan
Florida
Ohio State
Oklahoma
Miss St
Southern Miss
CHUCK FOSTER
Adv. Tech. Supervisor
Texas
Pittsburgh
Clemson
Iowa
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Penn State
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Ohio State
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Missouri
CHRIS HOI 1 OMAN
Alabama
Georgia
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Washington
North Carolina
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Florida
Ohio State
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Miss St
Missouri
JIMMY DuPREE
Managing Editor
Alabama
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Washington
Arkansas
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The Fleming Center has been here for women
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The role is one of public relations The prere
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publishing
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St. Michael's, MD 21663 V w.nrveapohs. Minnesota
SKI
WINTERGREEN
Jan. 4-7$150�� per person
Motorcoach transportation from Greenville
3 nigMs lodging in condominium �
4 persons per unit
�J days lift tickets and 1 night ski ticket
Fully escorted
Meet your friends on the slopes. �reat way to
spend your Christmas holiday
Booking and brochure eveileWe.
QUIXOTE TRAVELS,
INC
ll�oiaart x . r O. Oa 4M
f.rr��.r V PIMM TSO-MM
POINTOPINESCampforGirlsis
looking for female counselors
Check placement office of write
Andrew Rosen 22' Harvard
Avenue Swarthmore PA 19081
EXTRA MONEY up to 5100 000
or more a year paid daily ' Infor
mation application send sell
addicssed stamped envelope to
CaWs Oept G 2 P O Bo� 8254
Greenville nc 27834 00
PERSONAL
EXCELLENT TYPIST will do
term research and thesis papers
articles for publication and disser
tations Reasonable rates Can
;st ii?8
TYPING FOR students pro
tessos etc K.mpie Ounn 101 E
Wr.qht Road Greenville. NC
2'8J4 Call 752 6733 after I p m
PROFf SSlONAL TYPIST wants
t.pinq 'o do at home Ri-asonablc
rates Can 754 3660
EXCELLENT TYPIST prolrs
sional eiperience with any paper
AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOT
BALL The ECU Australian Rules
Football Club continued its
awesome display of success this
weekend by defeating Carolina
72 67 on Thursday The Club then
won the N orfoltc Invitational by
defeating Notre O ame in the
imaK 65 6l The game was not
without incidents however as Lee
Holder was brutaliled m a tree
tor all by three members of the
Fiqhtmg Irish Coach Stanley
Joyner said ol the incident "Its a
disgrace to this great game and to
its millions of fans Dennis
Schronce and Spam Barwick were
named as co MVP winners ol the
tourney Barwick now appears to
be the odds on favorite fo become
the first sophomore to win the
Churchill Cup given to the na
tion s outstanding player ECU.
ranked number two in the nation
and undefeated hosts number 17
Dartmouth at 3 p m Tuesday at
Greene Field This will be the
team s final home game belore
they participate in the East
regionals to be held m Esse� June
tion Vermont the first week in
January Come out and support
the Swashbucklers
LOST SILVER Ladies Watch
Square Frame LaMarque If
found please can Carol 758 8510 or
drop it oil at White Dorm ollice
Thank you
CIRCLE K is an organization
which does projects like bagging
and selling peanuts and
ARE YOU UGLY? II you are, then
maybe I m the guy for you I ve
mated uglies Irom the capitoi
(N C I to the coast (on the beachi
I m wild and tree, so give me a call
at 756 �206 PAUL
DO YOU need a ride to Charleston
WVa or Columbus Ohio or Fort
Wayne IN area lor Christmas' II
so I can take 2 riders willing to
split qas Leaving Friday 12 18 81
at 6 a m Contact D' Chenoweth
at 758 127 after 5 3C p m before
Dec II
FOUND LADIES watch on in
tramural soccer field Can
752 9457 to claim it
RIDE NEEDED Asheviile, N C
Knonvilie Tenn area Destination
Kn during Holidays Will
share eipenses Call Melmda at
756 4533
FEMALE ROOMATE needed
Will consider two males Semi
private room Oakmont Square
Apts V8i 74 a month One third
utilities and phone 133 00 deposit
One hall bath Need bed 756 8328
BOB Have a Merry Christmas I
love you. Lynn
ROOMMATE wanted to share two
bedroom apartment in Tar River
Estates Rent 1115 plus one half
utilities Call John at 757 3766
MALE roommate Apartment one
block trom campus January I
One hall rein and utilities Fur
nished Non smoker 758 6946
HAPPY Twenty Second Birthday
Squeaky Oon t do nothing we
wouldn t do Love V H B and
A J P
BETH Whaddaya say to June 83
The way I figure it. any girl who d
stick with me and the Baltimore
Colts is worth marrying How
about it Mike
WILLY What a weekend George
and Lynn were great hosts and
the road trip may have saved my
sanity And to think I was so close
to being insane, whew In Ihe
future don t tall on any blowing
leaves Smoke a stogie lor the
Watusi and have a great XMAS
Your humble accomplice EDDIE
HASKELL
TO THE PRETTIEST GIRL ON
THIS SIDE OF CAPE
CARTERET Put your head on
my shoulder Wnisper m my ear
Babv now that the term paper
blues are over there are plenty ol
lour leaf clovers out m the tield ot
hie It s Christmas time now
Angel and you light up my hie
You re supposed to be with your
lamily during the Yuletide season
so you made the right choice Oh,
there are plenty ol things to do
during the upcoming three and a
half weeks ol rest and reia�at.on
There s always yardwork Or you
could practice the Gettysburg Ad
dress backwards or in another
language But the number one
priority is spendinq time with your
Mom who from what I have hearc
is one super lady And you certain
ly take alter her I can see
your mom now an bouncy and
smiley and cheerful and wonder
tul. iusi like you Your Chr.stmas
gift is at home right now I know
if s not much (tn my opinion b�j'
it s the thought that counts (which
I know i tn over used term but ,s
very appropriate lor this time of
year You know, it you can �
spend haro earned money on
special people what s the use ol
celebrating Christmas Speaking
ot special you re very special
Love you know who (Who else do
yog know can write like this I
TO RA BG SR LB, OZ and the
whole gang merry XMAS and a
happy new year Love. MIKE
LINCKE Took me a little whne to
get even tor your summertime
postcard antics (I hear ya Swee'
Amy i but I think I ve done a pre'
ly good iob Been swell living wi'i
you even if you are a no ice tray
tilling MF Don t forget to look up
the LEE sisters when you gel to
Gainsviiie But we wouldn t want
you hiding Beau m any dirty holes
nah hah Remember be patient
UMMMM' ' �
FOSDICKS
1890 Seafeti
2311 S Evans St. Ext
754-2011
MOV-II I V-NUI)
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Ml YOl I I 17
$5.95
Tm rs.
TROUT
1 YOl I.VE.47
$3.95
CALL TOLL FREE
800-874-7420
AND GET THAT VACATION
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and efficiencies in FIVE sensational ocean-
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15 Discounts on reeervetkme made by January 15, 1982
� I iK
OlffUSI. Mt8
2025 S Atlantic Av � Daytona Beach Shores. Fla 32018
(904) 257-1950
P. ?
NOW
A VAILABLE
the cube
only
$295
Central News & Card Shop
321 Evans SI. Mall Open 9 to 6 p.m. 7dasaweek
Central Book & News
Greenville Sq. Shopping Center Open 9:30 to 9 7 eyt a week
ECU STUDENTS,
FACULTY, & FRIENDS
Pick up a ticket for a
super special deal at
Griffon Golf & Country Club
FAIRWAY DRIVE � GRIFTON, NC.
Please be our guest for
Cart & Greens Fee � 18 Holes
Only $5.00 � Mon. thru Fri 8a.m. to 5p.m.
VALIDTHROUGH MARCH 31, 1982
Tickets available at Intramural Recreational Ser
vices Olt'ce, 204 Memorial Gym. Ticket entitles voi
to CART and ib holes of golf for only J5 Get youi
tkket today � free Pay $5 when you decic? to play
-Sweaters that
make
man.
STUDYING
LATE?
I I
I Here's a late-night special I
I from SUBWAY: I
I 25
OFF
I ANY SNACK SIZE SANDWICH
I HarrYn cheese, roast beef,
� tuna SUBWAY has the best
I sandwiches for your late-night J
I breaks. Hours coupon
I valid: 11 PM - 2 AM.
I omit on� coupon p�i customer Oft�r good only al parfccipa'ing
Suowoy restaurant and not good in combination �"ln any ottvsr
� OHer expires Dec '0
� Redeem at: 208 E. 5th St.
758-7979
I
I
I
I
?SUB
We've Got More Taste.
I
I
I
I
I
I
teinbeck'flf
M0TS SHOP
f�$1.00 OFF WITH THIS COUPON-
i




i










i


NO W OPEN
SHEAR HAIR DESIGN
LOCATED ON 14th ST. � behind Belk Dorm (within walking distance)
PROFESSIONAL HA1RSTYUNC FOR
MEN and WOMEN
COMPLETE LINF OF PROFESSIONAL HAIR CARE PRODUCTS
OWNERS: TIM MILLS, RANDY HODGES
T





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i

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trt1

i
i��
Oi
u-ns at a Theatre Near You on Decci er 16th Cluck sour local iiovspapc.





�m-
ie time has come to tell the tale.

I ON THE TERRIFYING BEST-SELLING NOVEL BY PETER STRAUB
Oncns at a I heatre Near You on Decen er 16th Check your local newspapers





THE TERRIFYING,
2,000,000 COPY
BESTSELLER
ON
SALE
EVERYWHERE
il
cupn MELVYN DOUGLAS I�HN
ASTAIRE DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS JR. HOUSEMAN
CRAIG WASSON PATRICIA NEALAUCE KRIGE
. . BURT WEISSBOURD u� . JOHN WM � S? D. COHEN
BSWESARDE rcSEE,B.SC.GRlBURT.
DIRECTED BY
If you arenafraid of the d
or strange dre;
or haunted hov
and if you don't believe in gh
on Decembe
you will change your m
JOHN Win a universal picture
JWniN mVll v vi @iqeiS UNIVERSAL CrTY STUDIOS. INC
READ THE PAPERBACK
FROM POCKET BOOKS1
R
UNDlft II MQUlMS �CC0M�TIM
MMM M HOUIT gggMg





I
Y)
I HI rERRlrTINC
2.000.000 v OP
BES1 SI LLER
ON
SALE
IMKYWHl.Rl
v J
LAS

JOHN
IRRANKS, JR. HOI

flv
I

NEAL ALICE KRIGI
�WREN(
HI S
' WHHi l 1
m
R
Rf STRlC TtD
i " �
If you aren't afraid of the dark
or strange dreams
or haunted houses,

and if you don't believe in ghosts,
on December 16
you will change your mind.





Title
The East Carolinian, December 8, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 08, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.168
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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