The East Carolinian, December 3, 1981






Mike Cross
The Smoothness And Wit
Of An Old-Time Auctioneer
Page 5
Basketball
Pirates Heading West To
Challenge Missouri's Tigers
Page 10
Ehe
(Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 29
Thursday, December 3, 1981
Greenville, N.C
12 Paes
WZMB Ready To Air
Pnoto Bv GARY PATTtRSON
"All positions are filled and we"re read lo go aid Sam Baruick, general manager of WZMB. I nfortunateh a
fauh transmitter has prevented ihe station from airing until next semester.
By DIANE ANDERSON
A�tstaat Siewi KdJIor
WZMB, East Carolina's long-
awaited radio station, will
"hopefully go on the air the first.
week of classes next semester ac-
cording to the station's general
manager, Sam Barwick.
"We would have been on the air
three weeks ago if it had not been
for our transmitter, which was not
putting out enough power. We had
planned to go on the air on Mon-
day, Nov. 2, but we are making our
final preparations. Our staff has
been trained, and 1 think it looks
pretty good Barwick said.
The station is licensed to put out
150 watts of power, but the faulty
transmitter was only putting out 100
watts, according to Barwick. "We
sent it back to the company. They
are going to fix it and return it to
us
When WZMB does get on the air,
the bulk of the station's programm-
ing will be rock and jazz music.
"We're going to play a lot of
classics said Barwick. "It is going
to be about 20 percent jazz. We are
also going to have a three-hour jazz
show a week he continued.
The station will present a campus
call-in show. "We are going to pre-
sent certain issues, and people wiH
call and express their views.
Hopefully students will call in and
voice their opinions in a responsible
manner
A religious program will be
presented for one hour on Sunday
mornings and will deal with certain
topics such as world hunger. This
program will also include pro-
gressive jazz music.
A news program called "Rip and
Read" will also be presented. Ac-
cording to Barwick, it consists of
"weird news, off-the-wall news that
you don't read in your average
newspaper
Other programming will include
three hours of classical music on
Saturday and Sunday mornings, a
two hour new wave show twice a
week, five minutes of news eight
times a day, and a "campus
billboard" with informative infor-
mation about activities on campus.
"We are going to start out with
very basic programming. We arc do-
ing something that has never been
done before on this campus in re-
cent years. We can't come out with
See WZMB, Page 2
Fewer Break-Ins At Thanksgiving
By GREG RIDEOl'T
Staff Wnlrr
The police blotter this week is ex-
tended to include the reports Nov.
IS through Dec. 1. The Thanksgiv-
ing holiday break produced fewer
break-ms than usual, according to
one university policeman. The
following are dorm reports and
related incidents.
Nov. 18. 7:50 a.m. � John E.
Paulos of 340 Jones was found in
violation of hte visitation policv in
Fletcher. 10:20 a.m. - Cliffon
Anderson of Thorpe Music Com-
panv repotted a breaking and enter-
ing ol a vending machine in Clement
Dorm.
Wov. 19. 12:15 a.m. � Nathaniel
McGuire of 206-A Scott was accus-
ed of possession of firearms on cam-
pus and wreckless driving. 9:45 a.m.
� Christopher Esworthy of 372
Jones reported that his vehicle had
been vandalized while parked in the
14th and Elm Street freshman lot.
12:50 p.m. � Thomas N. Baker
reported the breaking and entering
and theft of items from his locker
on the third floor of the Art
Building. 3:05 p.m. � Joe N. Essick
of 408-A Scott reported the larceny
of a watch and class ring from his
residence. 4 p.m. �L Artie E. Ver-
non of 307-A Scott reported the
larceny of his watch from a practice
room of the music building. 2:40
p.m. � Barbara Ewlaine Hoffman
of 514 White reported the larceny of
$27 from her room. 5:15 p.m. �
Susan Elizabeth Roberts of 370 Cot-
ten reported the larceny of her bicy-
cle from the west side of the
doromitiory. 10:30 pm. �
Rudolph Alexander, director of
Mendanhall Student Ceenter,
reported the larceny of a record
album and tape from the center.
Nov. 20. 1:15 a.m. - Jeffery A.
Perry of 103-B Belk was found in
violation of curfew regulations in
Clement Dorm. 12 p.m. � William
L. Logan of the School of Medicine
reported the larceny of an "Apple II
Plus 32 K " computer and disk drive
from the Health Sciences library of
Pitt Memorial Hospital. (Joe
Calder, Director of Security, asks
anyone who ha aa information
concerning this theft to contact the
Security Department. There is a
reward offered for information
leading to the arrest and conviction
of the individual responsible for the
crime.) 3:10 p.m. � Christopher
Borwell of 140 Jarvis reported the
larceny of his bicycle from the west
side of the dormitory. 11:35 P Larry
Raynor, second floor RA of Belk
dorm, reported subjects having a
keg in suite 205 of Belk.
Nov. 21. 3:50 p.m. � An
anonymous caller reported that
room 276 of Jones Dorm had been
vandalized. 8:30 p.m. � Michael
L ee Biggerstaff of 140 Jones was ar-
rested for alleged possession of
stolen property.
Nov. 22. 2:20 a.m. � Charlie
Phillips Taylor of 109 Jones
Election Invalidated
B MIKEHlGHES
suff Wnicr
In the wake of turbulence over the
selection of a permanent student
government president at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at
Greensboro, yet another election
has been invalidated.
Following the recent resignation
of the school's president, David
Miller, the fifth such election took
place. However, shortly after the
results were tabulated, SGA Vice
President Rusty Weadon admitted
his intention to manipulate election
results.
Soon after Weadon's confession,
he resigned, reading a statement to
the Senate. Later in the evening, the
Senate voted to rule the election
results invalid.
I ast spring, three elections were
held, none of which gave a clear
margin to any candidate. Finally, in
September, Miller emerged as victor
over opponent Brian Berkley.
Miller spent a total of eight days
in office, as he and another UNC-G
student, Darius Davis, were arrested
later in the month on charges of
false pretense. After taking a
month-long leave of absence, Miller
ECU Admissions
Director Resigning
A
Ml V(�i Bureau
Walter M. Bortz, director of ad-
missions at East Carolina University
for the past two and a half years, is
resigning effective Jan. 31 to accept
a similar post at the University of
Hartford in Hartford, Conn.
Bortz' letter of resignation to Dr.
Robert H. Maier, Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs, brought ex-
pressions of dismay and regret from
top ECU officials.
"Mr. Bortz has done an outstan-
ding job for East Carolina Universi-
ty Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer
said. "He has implemented new
ways of getting the university's
message to prospective students and
thanks to him and the dedicated
staff of the Admissions office, the
freshman class was slightly larger
than last year's. He will be missed at
the university but I am sure he will
do the same outstanding job for the
University of Hartford
Maier said "We have been for-
tunate in having the services of so
capable a person as Walter Bortz in
our continuing efforts to make the
quality education at East Carolina
University available to our young
people.
"Mr. Bortz has enhanced this
university during his stay with us
and we regret his departure. We will
miss him, and wish him well for his
future Maier said.
See BORTZ, Page 3
reported damage to his vehicle park-
ed west of Jones Dorm. 10:50 a.m.
� Cpl. Willis reported the breaking
and entering and larceny from a
vending machine on the first floor
of the Biology building. 4 p.m. �
Mark A. Rosenburg of Jones
reported the larceny of four chrome
rims from his vehicle while it was
parked in the 5th and Reade lot.
Nov. 23. 6:20 a.m. � Alicia
Karen Lloyd of 321 White and
Wilheim Carl Meinhardt, a non-
student, were found in violation of
the visitation policy in the dor-
mitory. 12:35 p.m. � The in-
tramural office reported that a male
was in the duct in the women's
dressing room in Memorial Gym.
3:45 p.m. � Wendy O. Wallace of
611 Fletcher reported the larceny of
her bicycle from the east side of the
dorm.
Nov. 24. 3 a.m. � Geroge P. Lea
was found in violation of the visita-
tion policy in White lobby. 1:45
p.m. � Michael K. Rogerson of 353
resigned the position.
With the fifth election declared
invalid, another election was slated.
Nine candidates filed for the posi-
tion, thus making the possibility
great that no single person would
gain a majority of votes.
If no candidate captures a majori-
ty of the student vote, a seventh
election will be held, according to
the Carolinian, the student
newspaper at UNC-G.
Weadon admitted to the Senate
that he held about 50 ballots with
the intention of fixing the election.
However, he claims that the ballots
were never used and have since been
destroyed.
In reading his resignation to the
Senate, Weadon stated, "What I
would have done by using these
ballots destroys the entire purpose
of having elections
With the student government
lacking its two highest ranking
elected officials, the Senate, in ac-
cordance with the SGA constitu-
tion, appointed Diedra Smith,
former president pro tern, as acting
vice president until the end of the
current semester. However, the
Senate implied that no special elec-
tion for the vice presidential office
will be held.
After the appointment, Smith
said that she and the rest of the
government will do everything
we can to regain the trust of the
students
Jones reported the larceny of his
bicycle from the east side of Jones
dorm. 6:15 p.m. � A male student
reported being assaulted in the
Aycock gamcroom. 10:15 a.m. �
Stephanie Lynn Martin of 710 Flet-
cher reported the larceny of her
class ring from the seventh floor
bathroom of Fletcher Dorm. 11:40
p.m. � officer Gurly reported the
larceny of the house telephone from
the lobby of White Dorm.
Nov. 25 10:20 a.m. � Tom N.
Baker reported the breaking and
entering of his locker from the
Jenkins Art Building and the
larceny of art supplies. 12:05 p.m.
�Carol D. Tait of Jarvis reported
the larceny of her rings from her
room.
Nov. 27. 5:35 p.m. � Roger
Wayne Creech of 133 Jarvis Dorm
was arrested for breaking and
entering and larceny by Officer
Hales. He was found in Room 1
Jarvis while the dorm was closed for
the holidays. In his possession the
officers found jewlery belonging to
residents of Jarvis Dorm. In-
vestigator McAbee would like those
students believing this to be their
property to come and identify it.
Nov. 28. 1:30 a.m. � Lt. Suggs
reported that the telephone booth at
the intersection of 10th street and
College Hill Drive had been van-
dalized.
Nov. 30. 1 p.m. � Winton H.
William reported the larceny of
books from his locker of the Jenkins
Art Building.
Dec. I. 12;05 a.m. � Officer
Anderson reported that the cover of
the receiver of the phone in Belk
lobby had been stolen. 2:30 a.m. �
Officer Anderson reported that two
wehicles registered to dorm
residents had been vandalized while
parked in the Jones parking lot.
1:50 p.m. � Jane E. Heilman
reported the larceny of books and
art supplies from his locker of the
Art Building.
ly OAY f�ATT
According to Amy Pickett, editor of the Buccaneer, the 1981 yearbook will begin distribution on Jan. 8.
Buccaneer Distributed Jan. 8
By PAUL COLLINS
l diltir in Om
The 1981 Buccaneer is scheduled
to arrive on campus Dec. 16 or 17
but will not be distributed until the
spring semester, editor Amy Pickett
said Wednesday.
"We'll start distributing the book
on Jan. 8, which is drop-add day.
We'll have a place set up in
Memorial Gym so students can pick
up the boo, as they leave she ex-
plained.
Pickett said graduating seniors
will be allowed to pick up their copy
if the book arrives before the end of
the exam period, but added that
those who cannot may obtain a copy
by sending a letter to the Buccaneer
office along with $2.50 to cover
mailing costs.
Anyone who was a full-time stu-
dent during either semester of the
1980-81 school year may pick up a
book. An East Carolina ID or a
driver's license is needed for iden-
tification. Eligibility will be checked
by a computer printout, Pickett
said.
Part-time students can purchase a
book for $5; the fee is $10 for
freshman.
"The book was supposed to ship
on the twelfth, but due to numerous
proof corrections the plant was hav-
ing difficulties meeting the original
shipping date Pickett said. She
added that the book will now be
shipped sometime before Dec. 15.
Pickett and Craig Sahli, a former
Buccaneer editor, went to
Clarksville, Tenn. from Nov. 18 to
23 to correct the final set of proofs.
She said that she and he' staff
were afraid the quality of the book
See YEARBOOK, Pate 3
I

MtaMMnM
J





I HI t ASTCAROl INIAN
IJI O MM K 3, 1981
Announcements
CO-OP
The Co op Office, located m 313
Hawl. currently has iOb openings
?ot Spring Semester 82 witht he
following agencies interested
students are urged to apply today'
General Accounting Office in
Virginia Beach VA Business
maiors with 2 9 GPA's or above
ho nave completed approximate
ly 75 hurs duniors should apply
Burroughs Corporation Com
puter Science and accounting ma
(O's placement may be in
Charlotte NC. Atlanta GA, or other
Burroughs Corporation worksites
Student may lequest placement in
specifk .ireas throughout the U S
t ll secun'v Administration
in Baltimore MD Recruiter will
r. an , ampus January 28 to inter
vie lODutei science and math
maiors mteres'ed students
should stop by the office to 10m
piov necessarv forms
HOME EC
Phi UpsMon Omicron (Home
'lies Honor Society) and the
�1 Dete'ic Association in
t 'os �ou to have a cup of coffee
and see an the bakeo goods ano
ifts we will be selling at our
Chi istmas Ba:aar It will be held
-i1ci� Dec from 10 a m 4
p m m the Home Ec s VanLan
dnqham Room Please plan to
stop h
BAZAAR
A Christmas Baiaar featuring
homemade crafts and bakea
goods, will b held on Monday, Dec
? from 10 a.m to 4 p m in the Van
Landingham Room of the Home
Economics funding The bazaar is
sponsored by Ph. U and the Stu
dent Dietetic Association
SLC
lheECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
covered dish supper and meeting
on Sunday at the Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Multi Purpose Room
The supper will begin at 6 p m
with a short business meeting and
captioned film to follow
The meal and meeting are open
to any interested student, faculty
member or a member of the com
munity You do not need to know
Sign Lanquage to attend but
students who are taking sign
language classes or who have
taken them m the past are en
couraged to attend The purpose of
the SLC is to allow sign langugage
students and hearing impaired
students and community
members to socialize and develop
communication skills
We hope to see you there
PRC SOCIETY
PRC Fieidwork presentations on
Fri Dec 4. from 2 to 4 p m
Presentations will be given in
Brewster B 305 The PRC Society
is also having Wine and Cheese in
honor of its graduating seniors and
a Christmas party on Friday Dec
4 from 4 30 to 6 30 m the lounge of
the Home Economics building
SCULPTURE
A lot ot sculpture an all day
alternative exhibition space ot
sculpture by the sedpture depart
ment will be presented Aednesday
Dec 9 i Reading Day ' Location is
at 504 Evans St at the old Park
Theatre
CERAMICSGUILD
The Eighth Annual Ceramics
Guild Exhibition and Sale ot func
tional pottery and clay sculptural
forms will be held December 3 and
4 (Thursday and Friday) from 9
am til 5pm This year's location
is the Mam Entrance Lobby in the
LeoW Jenkins Fine Arts Budding
on East Fifth St All proceeds
benefit the Ceramic Guild's pro
grams for lecturers, workshops
and symposiums All work is
original and hand made in this
event which has become an East
Carolina Community holiday
tradition
Further information is available
from Ms Linda LeMar, President
or Charles Chamberlain, Faculty
Advisor ECU Art School 757 6665
8 12 mornings
EBONY HERALD
The Ebony Herald needs writers
lor news, arts and people sections
if you have interests in these areas
and basic writing skills, please ap
ply with Media Board secretary
Monday through Friday, 9am
5pm Leave name and phone
number
AUDITIONS
Auditions tor Stephen B Fm
nan s production of Neil Simon s
BAREFOOT IN THE PARK will
be held at the Methodist Student
CEnter (5th nad Holly Streets) on
Friday Dec 4 at 7 30 p ,m and
Saturday Dec 5 at 2 00 p m The
roles of Cone (young newlywed).
Mr Velasco a Bohemian'
Tolephon man and Delivery Per
son are still open everyone is m
vited to participate BAREFOOT
IN THE PARK is the second pro
duction ot Mr Finnan's develop
ing little theatre organization and
will open February 24 For further
information, please call Mr Fin
nan at 757 3546
LET'S GET PHYSICAL
The "physical" ECU Team
Handball Club wilt meet Thursday
Dec 3 at 3 30 pm in 105 Memorial
Gym Plans for next semester will
be discussed All interested per
sons should attend
BLESS YOU
God bless you all during the hoii
day! Why? Because with the help
of Jesus. I am able to love
EVERYONE
PRCMEETING
The Parks Recreation, Conser
vation curriculum and
Cooperative educaton are conduc
ting a meeting tor all PRC maiors
and PRC general college students
who are interested in obtaining
summer employment in their
field The meeting will be held on
Thursday, December 3 at 6 30
p m in 244 Mendenhall
MEN WANTED!
The ECU Men's Glee Club is cur
rently recruiting men for the Spr
ing Semester The Glee Club will
be touring North Carolina in
January with a number ot other
appearances scheduled
throughout the semester If you
would like to iom this fine chorus
or only wish to inquire about
future membership please contact
Ed Glenn, Director at the Sc hool of
Music. 757 6331 or at 752 6195 The
Men s Glee Club is open to all men
campuswide and offers one hour
credit per semester The Glee
Club rehearses at 12 00 M W F
Anyone interested in lOining the
Glee Club next semester should
contact Mr Glenn as soon as
possible in order to be eligible tor
the Spring Tour
SEMINAR
The Department ot Chemistry
will present an introduction to
fourier transform NMR with ap
plications to Carbon 13 and other
nuclei by Dr Paul Ellis, Depart
ment ot Chemistry, University of
South Carolina, on Friday, Dec 4,
at 1 p m in room 201. Flanagan
Building
AED
On Tuesday. Dec 8. there will be
a bar b que for all AED members
at Dr Ayer's house The dinner
will start at 6 p m- All interested in
attending should sign up on the list
outside Dr Ayer's office by 5 p m
Monda Dec 7 Maps ot how to
get to the Ayer's residence are
await able in the Chemistry Office
P.E. MAJORS
REFRIGERATORS
SGA Refrigerators rented this
fall should be returned to the loca
tion from which they were rented
on Dec 9 and 10 between the hours
ot 10 a m and 4 p m Extended of
fice hours for deposit returns ot
rental for spring semester will be
from 10 a m to 4 p m on Dec V
and 10 and from 12 am to 4 p m
on Dec 11 and 14
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from
students who are interested in
becoming PERSONAL CARE AT
TENDANTS to wheel chair
students We will employ those
who ravv a desire to assist m
dividuals with their activities ot
daily living
For details concerning duties
and compensation, contact C C
Rowe. Coordinator Office of Han
dicapped Student Services 212
Whichard Building. Phone 757 6799
All students who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
ing the spring semester or who in
tend to student teach during the
spring semester should report to
Mmges Coliseum at 10 a m on
Wednesday, Dec 9 for a motor and
physical fitness test Satisfactory
performance on this test is re
quired as a prerequisite tor of
ticial admittance to the physical
education maior program More
detailed information covering the
test .s available by calling
757 6442
ATTENTION
All Fall Semester Graduates
Uemember to pick up your cap
and gown from the Student Supply
Store before leaving sc hool These
may be picked up m the Student
Supply Store Dec 8 9 and 10
These Keepsake gowns are yours
to keep providing the 110 gradua
lion tee has been paid For those
receiving the Masters Degree the
$10 tee fapy for your cap and
gown but there is an extra fee of
111 25 for your hood
LSAT
the Law School Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday. February
20 1982 Application blanks are to
be completed and mailed to
Educational Testing Service Box
966 R Princeton, NJ 08540
Registration deadline is January
21 1982 Registration postmarked
after this date must be accom
panied by a 115 non refundable
late registration fee
GRE
The Graduate Re ord fc xamma
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday
February 6, 198? Application
blanks art to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service Box 964 R Princeton. NJ
08540 Applications must be
postmarked no later than
December 31. 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center. Room 105 Speight
Building
AHPAT
The ALIied Health Professions
Admission Test will be offered at
East Carolina University on Satur
lay January 16. 1981 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Psychological Corp ,
304 East 45th Street. New York.
NY 10017 to arrive by Dei ember
II, 1981 Application blanks are
also available at the Testing
Center. Speight Building.
Room 105. ECU
NTE
The National Teacher Examma
tions will be ottered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
February 20, 1982 Appli ation
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Educational Testing
Service. Box 966 R. Princeton NJ
08540. to arrive by January 18,
1982 Application blanks are also
available at the Testing Center,
Speight Building. Room 105, East
Carolina University
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test (GMATi will be of
tered at East Carolina University
on Saturday, January 23, 1982 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to GMAT.
Educational Testing Service. Box
966 R Princeton NJ 08540 Ap
plications must be postmarked no
later than December 21, 1981 Ap
plcaiions may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center.
Room 105. Speight Building
PCAT
The Pharmacy College Adm s
sion Test (PCAT) ewiH be offered
at East Carolina University on
Saturday February 6. 1982 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to Pharmacy
College Admission Test. P O Box
3540 Grand Central Station. New
York. NY 10163. to arrive by
January �, 1982 Application
blanks a'e available in the ECU
Testing Center. Room 105 Spe
Building
CHANGE
iVi would like to ma
aware of a change for Spr in g
� ster 1982 In order to provide
a' least one class meeting during
the drop add period, the last day to
drop add has been extended until
5 00 p m Wednesday January 13
1982
ART SHOW
rht Seventh Annual Ac Show
will be from Jan 26 to Feb 5. 1982
.n the Greenville Museum of Art
All ECU art.sts are encouraged to
prepare their best work to submit
Fr.day ian 22 1982 to the e on
ference room in the office of
Jenkins Fine Arts Center tiCU
Cash prizes provided by the A"
and Jeffries Beer and A.ne Co
will fange from 110 for Honorable
Mentions to 1100 tor Best in Show
ARTISTS
Artists' The Seventh Annual
Rebel Art Show sponsored by the
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and Wine
Co . is coming up to give you an op
portunity for recognition as Will as
prue money AH registered ECU
students may enter a maximum ot
two pieces m arv of the following
categories Painting. Sculpture.
Ceram cs Drawing. Photography
Design (metal fiber or a � �
Graphic Art and Illustration Pan
to bring your best work on Fr day
Jan 2? 1982 to the conference
Room in Jenk.ns Fine Art Center
ECU
ANNOUNCEMENTS
�t you of your organization
would like to have an item printer!
,n the announcements column
please send the announcement as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroi.
man in care of the news editor
There is no charge tor an
nouncements out space is often
limited
The deadline tor announi emen'
Hf, ; 1.1 m Friday or tft Tuesday
paper and 5pm ruesday tor thf
tnursoay papf
The space is available to ai
I dmpus organzatons and depart
ments
The Kast Carolinian


Published every 'jesday and
Thursday dur-ng the aca :�
ins eer, Wednesda-
ing the summer
"e East Carolinian �, the ot
newspaper of Eas'
Carolina University, owned
i ei tted and pubtshed for arc
by the students of Eas1 '
ijniyers.ty
Subscription Rat 120 yean,
The East Carolinian office
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Send a
changes to The East -
Old South Building ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone 757 434 37 �1
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina
c
B

WZMB To Air
In Spring Semester
Continued From Page 1
this big scale of planning. We are
going to keep things very basic and
build onto it. We are also going to
react to the stimuli on campus and
what the people want Barwick
continued.
As far as his staff is concerned, he
is confident that "all positions are
filled and we're ready to go
The staff consists of news director
1 ori Niven, business manager Slater
Burroughs, production director
Warren Baker and assistant general
manager and program director
Llton Boney. This last position was
combined because of the budget
cuts last year, Barwick explained.
There are also 15 disc jockeys,
each with a regular air shift. "Very
few of them have had experience.
but those who don't have experience
have taken some type of course in
broadcasting he said.
"There are several people at ECU
who have experience, but these peo-
ple are not wiling to work for the
campus station because it doesn't
pay anything he continued.
'There are people working for the
staff who have had experience and
been paid before, and I don't know
how they are going to like it
"Hopefully in the future if we do
increase our power and there are
enough listeners in the area we can
become a commercial station and
get some kind of revenue to pay our
DJ's something to reward them for
working Barwick concluded.
He also mentioned the possibility
of giving one credit hour in speech
lab for working at the station.
From The SRA
The Student
Residence Association
is comprised of an ex-
ecutive council, and
representatives from all
residential units here on
campus. The SRA is a
means of providing
communication bet-
ween residence hall
students, student resi-
dent organizations and
the administration.
Dean Fulgum, the
Associate Dean and
Director of Residence
life is the advisor.
The SRA provides an
emergency loan fund
for residence hall
students. They provide
functions such as
Christmas tree trimm-
ings, Concert (Battle of
the Bands during the
spring). They sup-
ported dorms students
during Homecoming by
entering a float in the
parade.
The SRA Energy
Conservation commit-
tee will be soon in-
itiating a campus wide
energy conservation
contest for the Spring
semester which will be
giving out approx-
imately $400 or more in
prize money to be given
to Energy conserving
dorms.
A major job of the
SRA is to act as a
judicial board for the
students to lobby with
the administration. The
SRA Judicial Appeals
Committee is proud to
state, there has not
been any reason for a
session. This is due to
an outstanding job be-
ing done by the House
Councils.
The SRA would like
to extend a personal
congratulations toward
Kim Cloud as ECU'S
homecoming and
would also like to con-
gratulate Sgt. Singleton
on her new job in
Florida.
The SRA is also
working on a new idea
of having a transit com-
mittee which will be
willing to work for a
better transit system on
campus.
The SRA needs your
input, ideas and help as
it is our goal to make
living at ECU up to
your standards. We
need to know your pro-
blems in order to deal
with them. One thing
we would like to have is
unity in the Residence
halls. Going to House
Council meetings and
participating in discus-
sions is a good way for
you the student to help
us and become involved
in the SRA.
NOW
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IHl lASTC'AROl IMAN
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College Art Collections Center Of Controversy
TUCSON Ariz. (CPS) - Hoping
to add a little visual flair to the cam-
pus. University of Arizona ad-
ministrators recently started
building a $100,000 outdoor
sculpture that will resemble a "giant
stretched spring" when it's done
later this year. Fifty-six percent of
the student body has already said it
didn't like the sculpture. But what
administrators really fear � and ex-
pect � is that vandals will make the
spring a target as soon as it is finish-
ed.
Similarly, a massive outdoor
sculpture resembling a picnic table
at the Northern Illinois Universtiy
has been regularly vandalized and
desecrated since it wwas completed
in September.
These are not, in short, great
times for campus art. While college
art collections have grown to un-
precedented size, variety and value,
they'e lately become centers of
controversy and major attractions
for vandals and thieves:
�Someone stole over $50,000 in
Oriental and Indian artwork from
the Unvierstiy of Colorado museum
in 1979. At the same time, the
Universites of Rochester, Arkansas
and Missouri, among others, also
suffered major art thefts.
�Last year vandals tore up a pair of
outdoor statues on loan to the
Universtiy of New Mexico, and
threw them into a nearby pond. The
works, designed by sculptor William
King, are now in storage to prevent
further damage.
�There have been so many paintings
stolen from the Universtiy of
Massachusetts-Amherst that art
students are now reluctant to
display their works at the school's
Fine Arts Center.
� In what was perhaps the biggest art
theft ever from an American
museum, over 330 pieces of artwork
cumulatively valued at $1 million
were lifted from the Lowie Museum
of Anthropology at the University
of California-Berkeley.
"Security is definitely a pro-
blem says Dr. Peter Bermingham,
director of the University of
Arizona Museum of Art. Besides
the uproar over the giant spring, the
university has weathered the theft of
$1300 in gold artwork from the stu-
dent union a year ago.
"But what do we do?" Berm-
ingham asks. "Circle our wagons
and not move?"
"Curators, he explains, try to
keep moving despite student con-
troversy, vandalism, occasional
thefts and an ever-increasing
number of art-pieces that creat a
ogistical nightmare of record-
keeping and security efforts.
"When I came here our records
were a disgrace Bermingham
recalls. "Over the years the school
has had various collections of art
dumped on it, but it was never ade-
quately registered and recorded
Recording them has brought
some surprises. Bermingham says
one collection valued at $250,000
was actually a group of forgeries
worth less than $200.
University of Texas-Austin of-
ficials still can't find an improperly-
catalogued collection of Rembrandt
etchings that were first missed two
years ago. Officials now aren't sure
they ever really owned them.
"For all we know, they could be
out on loan somewhere and turn up
one of these days muses Andrea
Norris, curator of the university's
Arthur M. Hunnington Art Gallery.
"It's still a mystery she says.
"But I can say that today we keep
much better records of our collec-
tions. It couldn't happen again
Most campus art curators deny
such incidents mean they're doing a
bad job.
They argue that few campuses
were designed to handle large,
valuable art collections. No one,
moreover, took the growing collec-
tions seriously enough to build pro-
per facilities until recently.
"American art and much of the
art developed in America just
wasn't worth that much 20 years
ago observed Rudy Turk, curator
at Arizona State University.
Consequently many schools
didn't realize the value of their art
until some of it was vandalized or
stolen from the ill-protected
Bortz Accepts Position At Hartford
. � . � i� -ii � J: mm � � A r-v i- �. � r-� � t i c 111A � n t 11 �i rrrmc mnr� Qf nrncn
(Ontinued From Page 1
Bortz, 36, was
selected for the ECU
post in mid 1979 to suc-
ceed retiring dean of
admissions John H.
Home. He had served
for three years as dean
o admissions at Texas
Christian University
and earlier served seven
years, 1969 to 1976, in
institutional reserach,
as dean of men and
director of admissions
at Bethany College,
Bethany, W. Va.
Bortz said he would
leave ECU with "mixed
emotions" and that his
work here has been
"very rewarding
"The interest and ac-
tive involvement of the
chancellor, not only in
making himself
available for our pro-
spective student and
parents programs, but
also in financially sup
porting the efforts of
the Admissions Office
in publications, facility
improvement, data
processing and
audiovisual aids have
helped us im-
measurably. It is my
hope the the ad-
ministration will con-
tinue this effort in the
future; without it, East
Carolina University
will not fulfill its enroll-
ment objectives
In addition to serving
on a number of ad-
ministrative commit-
tees and in other
assignments, Bortz also
served as acting direc-
tor of the ECU Com-
puter Center during
most of 1980 while a
search for a fulltime
director was in pro-
gress.
Recently, Chancellor
Brewer designated
Bortz as the University
official to coordinate
East Carolina Universi-
ty's compliance with
the University of North
Carolina system con-
sent decree in civil
rights litigation.
As admissions direc-
tor, Bortz implemented
a program of increasing
number of honors
scholarships for
demonstrated academic
achievers; initiated and
implemented a series of
ECU Today prospec-
tive student-parent
panel programs
presented across the
state and in Virginia;
upgraded and improv-
ed the publications pro-
gram of the admissions
office to attract more
academic achievers and
provide higher visibility
for the university in the
prospective student
market place. He also
reorganized and
redesigned facilities of
the admissions office to
make offices and inter-
view rooms more at-
tractive and inviting;
and implemented
greater use of com-
puters in making more
timelv contact with
prospective students.
He assisted in develop-
ing a computerized stu-
dent data base and in-
formation system with
the Computing Center.
buildings in which it was stored,
Turk says.
"Our only problem is that we
need a new building he contends.
"We are sitting in an old building
that was built as a library. We have
ample security. We have ample
staff. And all our records are in
order. But we have 9500 works of
art, and only have enough room to
show 400 works at a time
Turk is luckier than most of his
peers, who frequently must try to
untangle the shoddy or incomplete
record-keeping of the past with little
help.
It promises to get worse. Strapped
administrations seem unlikely to
devote larger shares of their dwindl-
ing resources to help the curators
move from the era of lackadaisical
art warehousing to an age of protec-
ting and advancing their
increasingly-valuable collections.
Some campuses, however, are
recognizing the value of their collec-
tions. Financially-troubled Lehigh
University, for example, is about to
put a sizable collection of rare
books and manuscripts form its art
collection on sale to raise funds.
Last year Yale sold off gold
dubloons, and coincidentally
managed to balance its budget.
Generally, collections arc left
unappreciated and unprotected.
Arizona State's Turk hopes to get a
new art building for his collection,
though "maybe not in my lifetime
Curators must also anticipate
another rush of art donations if
Congres passes a law increasing the
tax deducation for artists and
writers who give works to non-
profit institutions.
"People love to give artwork
Turk summarizes, "but they're not
so excited to give away money
Until they do, Turk says the only
way to minimize the losses is better
planning. "If you can't keep the
things in your collection secure, you
shouldn't be holding them. Many
people don't think of it until the
theft occurs
Bermingham agrees. "In areas
where you can't control security, as
with outdoor sculptures, you just
have to put up pieces that are
reasonably repairable. Vandalism is
something as predictable as the sun
coming up in Tuscon
I1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
Yearbook Completed
Continued From Page 1
would suffer if they pressed for the
earlier shipping dale.
The book was orginally scheduled
to be distributed in the latter part of
September. This date was delayed,
however, when Pickett replaced
Barne Byland as editor in June.
Byland resigned under pressure
from the Media Board which was
concerned about her ability to com-
plete the book. At the time of
Byland's resignation, only 13 of 336
pages had been finished.
When she took over. Picket!
hoped to have the yearbook back to
campus by Thanksgiving. She said
the further delav was necessarv
because "there was more work than
I anticipated
Pickett said she was generally
pleased with thequalitv of the book.
"Obviously the quality couldn't be
as good as the 'SO book because of
the time. But 1 feel we covered the
school ear adequately. The design
is similar to that used in the 1980
book
She added that several pages are
being used by Josten's, the company
that is printing the book, in its sam-
ple yearbook. "The sample year-
book is used by the company to
show schools what thev can do. It
highlights some o the company's
better accounts
Urban Resident
Rate Increases
B MIKE HUGHES
staff Wnirr
Nearly half of North Carolina's
citizens live in urban areas, accor-
ding to the 1980 governor's office
census report.
A total of 2,818,767 North
Carolinians, approximately 48 per-
cent of the state's population, reside
in what are currently classified as
"urban" areas.
State officials and city planners
throughout the state claim that the
2.5-percent increase in urban
residents is a natural result of the in-
creasing industrialization of North
Carolina.
According to Dr. Sheron
Morgan, a member of the gover-
nor's committee on population
research, North Carolina was about
60 percent rural in 1950. Despite the
apparent shift to urban living,
populations in rural areas have also
increased, though not as fast.
Morgan cited Governor Hunt's
balanced growth policy, saying that
an upsurge of industrial develop-
ment in rural areas has resulted.
Thus, employment growth has been
achieved in both urban and rural
areas of the state.
The largest increase in population
since 1970 was seen in Charlotte,
where urban migrations and annex-
ations brought an additional 70,000
persons in the decade.
The growth in population and
subsequent problems have caused
several major cities as well as 60 of
the state's 100 counties to create
positions either for city planners or
planning commissions.
Noting the increases, Hunt
recently established a state commis-
sion to consider growth problems
and recommend necessary changes
in policy.
The report also estimated that
North Carolina's population will
reach eight million by the 21st cen-
tury, a 30-percent increase in 20
years.
if
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At all of our fine stores
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Downtown Oeenville - Monday-Saturdoy 8 30 to 5 30
Carolina Eost Mall Monday-Friday 10 00 to 9 00
Saturday 10:00 to 6 00
TorrytownMoll - Rocky Mount - MonFri 1000 to9 00
Saturday 1000 to 6 00
1
I
X
J





Qttfe lEaat (SttroliniaK
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, w��(v�
Jimmy DuPREE, mmm emm
Ric Browning. o,WMf , Charles Chandler, ��� e,o,
CHRIS lICHOK, Business Manatrr TOM HALL, News Editor
Alison Bartel, �� m Steve Bachner, Bmmimmm Editor
Steve Moore, cmu. !��� Karen Wendt.m�
December 3, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Progeria
'Youngsters' Visit Disneyland,
Show Others How To Live
Admittedly, these are trying times
for our country. The crime rate is
rising. Inflation is at a record peak.
There has been a dramatic rebirth in
racial and ethnic hatred. And the
nuclear arms race is threatening to
destroy society.
But there is a glimmer of hope
coming which shows that citizens of
this country still have a big heart.
Just ask Fransie and Mickey.
Mickey Hayes is from Hallsville,
Texas, and Fransie Geringer lives
more than 11,000 miles away in
South Africa. They went to
Disneyland Wednesday.
Ordinary kids go to Disneyland
every day, but Fransie and Mickey
are not ordinary kids. They are suf-
fering from a rare disease, progeria,
which is an incurable genetic
disorder. It strikes only one in eight
million children, and victims usually
die in their mid-teens.
What makes Mickey and Fransie
look so different is that they do not
look like they are eight and nine.
They look closer to 80.
Progeria manifests itself in bald
heads, beaked noses and stunted
growth and causes the body to age
10 times faster than normal.
The Associated Press carried a
story in August about Fransie's
tragedy, mentioning that his dream
was to meet his storybook idol
Pinocchio at Disneyland.
Citizens of this country respond-
ed with donations for his journey,
which was orginated by the Sun-
shine Foundation, a charity group
based in Philadelphia.
Meanwhile, Texans raised money
so Mickey could meet Fransie. And
a friendship was born.
The children did not know about
each other before they met. They
thought they were unusual. Now
they know different.
Mickey can't keep his hands off
Fransie said Mickey's mother,
Cindy Edwards. "I don't think he
can believe he's real.
"I don't think they've been
separated five minutes. To watch
them play, you'd think they'd
known each other for years.
"When you see a change in your
son, it can't help but change your
life, too she added. "When your
child's happy, you're happy
And if Mickey and Fransie are
happy, why can't we all be?
Consider This. . .
The Jimmy Carter Committee for
a Greater America was established
to "support the causes he sup-
ports according an Associated
Press report.
A spokesman for Carter said the
group will provide financial help to
Democratic candidates and causes.
Carter denied the political action
committee will be used to further his
career.
In view of the 1980 presidential
election results, it remains to be seen
if the Carter-backed organization
will be more beneficial for
Democrats or the Republican op-
position.
'Moral Majority's' Purposes Cited
EDITOR'S NOTE: Jerry Falwell Jr. is a
sophomore political science major at
Liberty Baptist College in Lynchburg, Va.
The following was submitted to The East
Carolinian as an entry for the "Campus
Forum" but because of its length and con-
tent is reprinted as a column.
By JERRY FALWELL, Jr.
This letter is in response to the article
"Moral Majority: Threat to Freedom" by
Joseph C. Olinick that appeared in the
September 22 issue of this newspaper.
First of all, Mr. Olinick makes the
classic mistake that most f Moral Majori-
ty's opponents seem to make. He uses the
argument of separation of church and
state, which is totally irrelevant. If Mr.
Olinick had done his homework, he would
have known that Moral Majority is not a
religious organization in any way. It is a
conservative political organization, similar
to many liberal organizations like the Na-
tional Organization of Women and People
for the American Way. Moral Majority's
membership comes from Catholics, Jews,
Mormons, Protestants and many people
with no religious persuasion at all. Dr.
Jerry Falwell heads the organization as a
private citizen. Contrary to some people's
beliefs one does not give up his status as a
private citizen when he becomes a
preacher.
Moral Majority's objective is not to
force moral standards on a public that
does not want them. They believe � and
with good reason � that most Americans
agree that pornography and sex on TV
simply lead to a general decline o; the na-
tion's morals. It is a historical fact that
whenever a nation has experienced moral
decline, political and economic decline
have followed promptly. This, not
religion, is the basis for Moral Majority's
objection to pornography and sex on TV.
Moral Majority has never singled out a
specific television program for any type of
h t list as they have been accused of doing
and the national Moral Majority organiza-
tion has never and will never attempt to
remove any book from any library or
school. Moral Majority simply wants both
sides of every issue to be taught in the
public education system, not just the
liberal view. Moral Majority seems to
always catch the blame for these types of
censorship actions practiced by other New
Right organizations.
Moral Majority is against abortion
because they believe that it is murder. Most
doctors now agree that life begins at con-
ception. The freedom of choice in this
country does not include the option to kill
someone else. This is plain and simple
enough for anyone to understand.
However, Moral Majority is not opposed
to abortions in extreme circumstances.
Mr. Olinick speaks of freedom in his ar-
ticle, but in some public universities and
schools today, a student can read the ideas
of Karl Marx on campus, but he cannot sit
on the same campus and read the Holy Bi-
ble. Is this freedom? Moral Majority is not
trying to take away freedo. .s, but simply
trying to regain the ones already lost to the
liberals.
Neither is Moral Majority trying to force
any so called "moral legislation" on the
people. Every law in our system today is
based on morality in that they tell us what
is absolutely right and wrong. The law
distinguishes what is wrong by determining
where our freedoms begin to harm others.
In other words. Moral Majority believes
that the freedom to present anything one
desires on TV can be harmful to children
and to the morals of the nation and could
eventually lead to an overall decline of our
nation as I explained earlier.
The major misfortune of Moral Majori-
ty is simply that it is often misunderstood
by SO many people. This is mainly because
the liberal press has distorted the goals of
Moral Majority in as many ways as possi-
ble. They have succeeded in making many
people think that the freedoms in the First
Amendment apply only to liberal causes
and not to conservative or religious ones.
It is my belief that when all the people
learn the truth about the reasons for and
objectives of Moral Majority, it will
become an even much more influential
force than it is today.
i- Campus Forum
Legislature Speaker Refutes Editorial's Soap Opera Scenario
After reading the editorial concerning
the Student Legislature in the Nov. 24
edition of the East Carolinian, I felt
compelled to comment on the
"opinions" expressed. As Speaker of
the Legislature, I was extremely
displeased with the account of the SGA
meeting and the sarcastic and
melodramatic way in which the view was
presented.
Obviously, it was a slow news day and
the staff was bored and had nothing bet-
ter to do than "create a soap opera
This newspaper is always reacting to
something, but the problem is that the
rewspaper does not always know to
what it is reacting to, as evidenced by the
SGA editorial. It was evident that the
editorialist was unknowledgeable of the
political precess and lacked any
understanding of or familiarity with the
legislative process or parliamentary pro-
cedure.
The SGA Legislature is not a soap
opera combining the elements of
mystery and excitement, nor is it a com-
edy. The only comedy on this campus is
the "newspaper" itself. If you wish to
criticize the legislature's motion to
reconsider the NAACP bill, then do so
on the merits of the bill or on the
motives behind the reconcideration mo-
tion, not the reconsideration maneuver
itself because it is a correct parliamen-
tary process.
Your perception and interpretation of
the legislature's conduct reflected your
misunderstanding of the parliamentary
and legislative process. I recall no
members speaking out of turn or inter-
rupting one another except in the cases
of correctly using parliamentary pro-
cedure maneuvers as explained by
Roberts Rules of Order.
The only individuals I recall walking
around were SGA executive officers,
who are not members of the legislature,
and members of the gallery present, such
as yourself. The legislators did not con-
duct themselves like a pack of baboons,
though for someone who is unfamiliar
with the legislative process it's possible
to gain a false impression.
Since the paper deems the SGA
Legislature a circus, then surely you
would characterize the U.S. Congress as
a zoo, especially if you had seen one of
the Congressional sessions. If the
Legislature wasted time in open debate
procedures by "clarifying" issues, then
this is the price of representative
democracy and having a deliberative
legislative body. But the price is minimal
as compared to the alternatives.
If a soap opera exists on this campus,
then it surfaces each Tuesday and Thurs-
day as we endure the continuing saga of
"What's the newspaper up to now
Although I can hardly wait for the next
episode, "Circus III I trust 'hat in the
future the paper will be able to present a
more informed opinion absent of any
false perceptions about SGA.
Also, it might be helpful to be present
in the Legislative room 221 and not 248,
although I am sure the meeting in 248
has all the excitement and mystery of the
Perils of Pauline, which you obviously
like, but our SGA meeting in room 221
does not.
GARY R. WILLIAMS
Speaker of the Legislature
Fight Back
To all interested readers: I AM
DETERMINED TO FIGHT BACK!
After reading the many responses to
Ronald Fisk's letter published by the
East Carolinian last Thursday, I felt
compelled to writed my own opinion
about the matter. Like Ron, it is also
difficult for me to condone
"homosexuality but 1 must add- to
each his own However, there is no
justification for such overt implications
of discrimination and racism that Ron
inferred upon the minority students here
at ECU.
With a large amount of Pride-
Dignity-and-Courage, I willfully con-
fess that I am a minority student (Black
Afro-American) who can not sitback
"idle" without defending myself for the
rights charged against me. Yes, I AM
DETERMINED TO FIGHT BACK!
Without excuse, my four and a half
years attending this institution, I have
gained numerous friends and associates
from various racial and ethnic
backgrounds.
Still, I have this personal problem. I
feel I must rebel when someone is trying
to keep me from reaching my goals. It is
much similar to the Frustration-
Agression theory. As a result of my
frustration-instead of tolerating or
compromising with it� 1 must retaliate.
Yes, I am determined to fight back!
Of course, my methods to resolve con-
flict are very rare-indeed! Also, it would
be very hard trying to influence others to
support me. You see, "Threats and ver-
bal abuse" are not that effective. Also, I
have never used "nuclear arms and a
"Saturday-night Special" is much too
cheap for solving problems.
Instead, the most powerful weapon I
know to use is "love Believe me, it is
the greatest force mankind can use to
promote change and settle dispute. Also,
it works!
Ron, I really love you man. Even if
that means, 1 must stand alone. Listen,
if you ever get down and need a
friendplease remember my hand and
shoulders will always be there to help lift
you up. Let's be brothers, OK. (I John
4:7,8)
P.S. Thanks Dad and Mom for your
special child-rearing techniques -they
are still working!
MICHAEL SHERL LOCKAMY
Senior, Political Science
Homecoming
The students who reside on campus
here at ECU have had the privilege of
formal representation by the Student
Residence Association since it's creation
in the fall of 1980.
However, in my opinion the S.R.A.
was poorly represented in the homecom-
ing court election when only five out of
15 dorms had representatives in the elec-
tion.
The committee headed by S.R.A. Vice
President Barry Seay to select a
representative out of all the dorms
wasn't very successful. Some dorms
received no information on how to pro-
ceed selecting their representative. The
young lady chosen to represent S.R.A
ended up representiong her own dorm.
I fail to see why such a traditional
campus activity has to turn into such a
complicated and confusing political pro-
cess.
I also fail to see why good com-
munication has to be such a problem,
which incidently was one of the reasons
given by the S.R.A. vice president for
the lack of information concerning the
election.
Obviously nothing can be done this
year to remedy the problem, but I would
hope that next year more girls have the
opportunity to participate in this tradi-
tion that is an entire campus activity.
ED DOUGHERTY
Junior, History
Toilet Paper
This is a response to Ms. Shirley's let-
ter of complaint in the Nov. 24 issue of
The East Carolinian. I agree with you,
Ms. Shirley, in that toliet papering yards
to such an extent is indeed ridiculous,
but has it ever occurred to you that is is
not the so-called prestigious sorority
women who do the rolling, but rather
the few immature members of frater-
nities who clutter the yards?
It seems to me, that you have
mistakenly presented your "Golden
Fleece Award" to the Greek organiza-
tions of the wrong gender. Ms. Shirley,
evidently it is not clear to you that it is
quite impossible to remove all the toliet
paper from the tops of the trees. I feel
that genuine effort is made by all the
sororities on Fifth Street to keep their
houses and yards neat and presentable.
Another item of your letter that 1
found disturbing was the fact that you
referred to sorority women as
"prestigious "civilized and
"scholarly" in a very sarcastic tone. For
your information, being in a sorority
does not mean that you are out for men,
a partier, or that you think you are bet-
ter than anyone else. In fact, many
sorority women are also members of
various honor organizations, and of
course every individual in or out of a
sorority or fraternity has his own special
talents.
As for myself, although only a pledge,
I take pride in the fact that being in a
sorority means involvement that benefits
myself and the school. Obviously, you
and many other people fail to see the
good that sorority and fraternity
organizations do for the community.
So, Ms. Shirley, next time you pick up
a stray piece of toilet paper, glance over
to one of the sorority houses to sec some
girls raking up the mess. If you are still
annoyed after doing this, consider that
there is a positive aspect to this problem
in that you can save money by using
your collection of bathroom tissue for
your own personal needs.
NANCY CROFT
Freshman, English
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
DECEMBER 3.1981 Page 5
Mike Cross
Singer, Songwriter A Treat
By GARY PATTERSON
Staff Writer
The mechanical bull and punching bag were frozen
and silent at the Carolina Opry House on Sunday,
November 22. As all eyes and ears in this country and
western bar were focused on the stage. There stood a
lone entertainer named Mike Cross. A native of Lenoir,
North Carolina, Cross performed his three hour set with
the smoothness and wit of an old time auctioneer who
had something to please everyone.
Cross opened with "Rocky Top Bar-B-Que" from his
recent album entitled "Rock-N-Rye The night was a
rich mixture of foot stomping songs like "Whiskey for
Breakfast" "Nobby and "Too Late to Be Saved
along with folk songs such as "The Scotsman "Good
Night Medley" and the slow rythmic melodies of "The
Bounty Hunter" and "Kentucky Song Two other
songs that seemed as if they were especially written for
ECU called "Start Drawing the Lines" and the other a
comical take off from "The Wizard of Oz" called "If I
Only Had Some Cocaine Both brought the crowd into
a roaring sing-a-long.
Going to a Mike Cross concert is like Sunday dinner
at grandma's with something for everyone. Mike does
all the cooking himself. Though he uses other musicians
in the studio, he rarely takes them on the road. This
really gives a down-home and wholesome atmosphere to
his concerts.
While most of today's performers seem like unac-
cessable and unrealistic people, Cross comes across as
just an average guy out doing the thing he loves and
making a living for his family, just like anyone else. He
was more than welcome to grant The East Carolinian an
interview after the show. Backstage, fans and autograph
hunters swarmed around him like bees to honey. One
teenage girl with blonde hair was a very avid fan who
follows him whenever he tours North Carolina. She
couldn't stop hugging him and was eager to see him in
Raleigh and Greensboro during the Thanksgiving
holidays. Cross just sat by a pot of coffee taking it all
in, with an occasional wink to his wife, sitting across the
room. He took the time to be personal with each fan,
never once sounding plastic as one would think most
performers would. That is just one of the qualities that
separates Cross from other performers, making him an
entertainer.
After the fans cleared out, he offered us a round of
Michelobs and reminisced on his university days at
UNC during the early seventies. There he learned "the
fine art of drinking" and how to play the guitar. His
love for the guitar grew, and eventually he did some gigs
on the local college bar scene. He chose Western
literature as his major because "it was the only thing I
could think of that I wouldn't have to go to class, just
sit at home and read After two years, he withdrew
from school, totally absorbed in music.
Continuing to play bars, he made a quiet debut in
1979 with the album "Child Prodigy released on
G.H.E. Records. In 1980, he burst onto the radio scene
of the Southeastern United States with two albums titled
"Bounty Hunter" and "Born in the Country Out of
these albums, beside the popular title tracks, came such
hit songs as "Blue Skies and Teardrops and
"Kentucky Song Airplay in North Carolina was
especially high. His latest release is a live album called
"Live and Kicking on the Sugar Hill label out of
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where Cross currently
resides. He says it will probably be next fall before he
will release a new studio album. "I've really just started
on it Cross commented. "I just got back from
See MIKE, Page 8
Mike Cross
regales the audience with the fiddle
roto � (,ar pa rrmsos
Need Christmas Cash? Here Are Some Ideas
By JOSEPH Ol I NICK
Usually around this time of year,
a lot of people start digging in their
pockets, searching for extra cash;
consequently, some people try to
raise money through various
methods.
If you happen to be in need of ex-
tra cash, you might want to pawn
some valuable object. According to
an employee of one of Greenville's
pawn shops, guns usually bring the
most money when pawned; below
them in price are 35mm cameras
then gold and diamonds, then
stereos and televisions, then
bicycles. To pawn something is like
taking a loan out on it. The item,
pawned, is held by the shop for 30,
60 or 90 days; then if the item has
not been claimed by the original
owner, it is put up for sale. If the
original owner of the pawned item
does decide to claim it, he must pay
a fairly high rate of interes' on the
money that had been borrowed on
the pawned item.
Another way of making extra
cash is selling gold jewelry or other
gold items to one of the many gold
buyers. At present, the approximate
price of gold is $400 an ounce;
however, that does not mean that a
gold object, weighing an ounce, can
be sold for $400, for the value of
gold items is determined by the
number of carats of gold in them.
Thus, high carat gold will bring a
high price.
Selling books is another standard
way of raising cash. Usually, half of
the new price of a book is paid for a
used book. According to one UBE
employee, the condition of the book
does not really matter; UBE will buy
back books in almost any condition.
Really, there are a lot of jobs that
one could take to raise cash. With
Christmas shopping in full swing,
there should be some temporary
jobs at local stores. Then, one could
charge other people for doing small
jobs for them. For example, one
could tutor someone in something,
chauffer someone around, rake
leaves or split wood for some local
citizen, do a term paper for so-
meone The list is endless; there is
always someone who would rather
pay to have something done than do
it themselves. One just has to think
a little and search a little.
If you are really ambitious, you
might ant to collect aluminum
cans and sell them to a recycler.
Definitely, there are a lot of empty
cans on campus after k weekend1
and it takes a lot of aluminum cans
to make money. The price that is
paid for aluminum cans is .20 a
pound. However, one recycler said
he paid one woman 5100 for the
cans that she had gathered in one
week, so there must be a lot of cans
around.
Those who like to make crafts
and hand-make, decorative items
have some opportunities open to
them because it seems like people
like to buy hand-make, decorative
items and give them as gifts. Such
items tend to sell for high prices,
too. For example, a wreath of dried
graRe,vines wit,h a sparse arrange-
ment of dried flowers on ft sells for
$25 in some places. Of course, one
must find a place to sell such items.
Sometimes, merchants or gift shops
will sell crafts and art works for
other people on consignment.
For those of you who are
desperate and devious, there are a
lot of ways to make extra cash. For
example, one could pretend to be
with some big charity and go around
and collect extra cash, or one could
sell Christmas cards or magazine
subscriptions and pocket the sales
money with no intention of deliver-
ing the goods. Really, it takes no
time to think up a quick, cheap
scam, but naturally, the students at
ECU are above such things.
Overall, there are many ways to
make extra cash; one just hac to
have enough initiative and ambition
to think of them.
Book Dedicated To Anti-Preps
The Preppie.
By KAREN WENDT
The cover tells it all.
"If you think that "Mummy" is
nothing but an old Egyptian
"If you have an allergic reaction
to the sight of pink and green
"If the only alligator you can
relate to is on "Wild Kingdom
"Then here's the book for you
Yes, it's the latest in the how-to-
hate line of books, "The I-Hate-
PREPPIES Handbook subtitled,
"A Guide for the Rest of Us
No one is certain whether its im-
pact will be as striking to the
clothing styles of the U.S. as the
"Preppie Handbook" but the same
basic issue is there. It is a guide to
the supposedly uninitiated on how
to dress to impress those of your
social circle.
The book centers on four primary
groups; the Jock, who is born; the
Greaser, who is born; the Nerd, who
is born; and the Freak, who is made.
It includes sections on dress, places
to shop, names for children,
heritage, homes, food, social life,
decor, vacation spots, pastimes,
music, films, parties and evensex.
For its educable readers it also in-
cludes several quizzes on how to
spot the scene which indicates the
most about the anti-prep lifestyle.
But seriously,(if possible) the
book is an enjoyable parody of the
handbook mentioned earlier. As a
matter of fact it is modeled as close-
ly to the origial as possible, using
the same style page layouts and even
a remarkably similar cover (the
alligators are substituted with
turtles).
The only problem with the book
is a lack of a cohesive audience.
They type of people that would
benefit learn from the book would
never be caught dead reading it and
'Muffle' would never be caught
dead with this book at the sorority
house.
The book contains a host of
relatively useless information. It
does define its characters in an
original manner, one which Webster
is probably turning over in his grave
about.
The Nerd: "The only group that
goes back to Biblical days, when
making flour was a compulsory
course
The Jock: "Contrary to popular
opinion, the word Jock is not deriv-
ed from the term athletic supporter.
Nothing is derived from an athletic
supporter
The Greaser: "Once again con-
trary to popular opinion, the word
Greaser is not derived from grease,
which Greasers stoped using in the
spring of '63. Greaser instead goes
way back, like a Greaser's hair
The Freak: "The First American
Freak was a member of the Con-
tinental Congress named Eugene
Brissie, who found a way to
mainline snuff and as late as 1802
was asking how the war had come
out
The thing to remember is that it is
always best to listen to both sides of
view and to admit new ideas into
your life.
This book won't do it for you
though.
k?

t&rfc
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0$
Pfcolw � ,AB rAm RM
Gift Ideas Vary
For Christmas Time
and the Anti-Prep
By DONNA LEIGH DAVIS
suff Wiiitf
Well, it's that time of year again.
For all of those scholars whose
minds have been temporarily befud-
dled due to menacing upcoming ex-
ams, it is time to lay aside such petty
trivialities as Organic Chemistry and
Qualitative Analysis and concen-
trate on the hard stuff - like what to
get Grandma for Christmas. Being
the spontaneous unique, fun-loving
individuals tha all true East Caroli-
nians are confirmed to be, it goes
without saying that ordinary, mun-
dane gifts such as a tie for daddy,
Fruit of the Loom products and
socks in assorted colors for other
members of the family are not fit to
grace the shopping list. This being
an established fact, the seeker of
higher learning must then logically
rationalize the identity of the "
right" Christmas present. Step one
in solving the dilema (or at least for
into grotesque faces that if anything
would be a grand diet-aide or
cuspidor. Another splendid gift idea
guaranteed to delight and amaze is
the ever-popular "Pickled-People
Who wouldn't love to wake every
morning to a pruned ace with glazed
eyes gazing fixatedly through a glass
jar? However, if the loved one and
alleged recipiant lacks a profound
appreciation for the state of rigor
mortis, there are other alternatives.
When looking for the truly charm-
ing, cute, useful, enjoyable, chic
gift, some may have to look no fur-
ther than the nearest mirror.
However, for those individuals who
are blessed with precisioned,
analytical minds coupled with
periodic artistic tendencies but must
duck to avoid broken glass every
time a mirror comes in view, it is
suggested that you refer back to step
one, or better yet, the socks and
underwear. Ohand for you who
Humor And Drama
In Weekend Flicks
the unexperienced freshman shop- don't exactly fit into that category,
per) is usually to visit sundry
establishments of mercantile. After
extensive research and clinical ex-
perience the average student will
find himself swathed in assorted
paraphenalia such as mugs distorted
but feel like the Grinch who stole
'Rock V
Roil High School'
Christmas without the annual pur- is the late show at Hendrix Theatre this weekend. The film
chase of underwear, do not despair. will be shown after the featured presentation, ' The Elephant
I hear they have it out in several new . ,�� . . . y
flavors this year, if you have a Man- Both films are sponsored by the Student I nion Films
"taste" for that sort of thing Committee.
East Carolina will be treated to
two films this weekend. The Student
Union Films Committee will be
presenting The Elephant Man as its
primary feature and the film Rock
and Roll High School will appear as
the late show on Friday and Satur-
day night.
The Elephant Man is the true
story of the life of John Merrick, a
man so hideously deformed that his
only means to eke out a living was as
a freakshow attraction.
A sympathetic doctor treats him
and helps to restore a visage of
dignity to this maligned person. The
film is set in atmospheric London
and treats a delicate subject matter
with both compassion and insight to
man's inner nature.
The fi'm stars John Hurt as the
Elephant Man.
"Brilliant! No film more ar-
tistically daring and emotionally
overwhelming has come along this
year. John Hurt gives a perfor-
mance that is unforgettable. John
Gielgud is excellent, and Anne Ban-
croft is almost too grand to be
true. "
�Charles Champlin, Los Angeles
Times
Rock 'n' Roll High School is
everyones high school fantasy
played out. The film is about clever,
rebellious teens who battle their
militaristic principal and literally
blow their high school to pieces.
P.J. Soles (Carrie) is Riff, ardent
rock-and-roll fan and leader of the
rebellion, who attempts to bring her
brand of music and her favorite
rock group, The Ramones, to Vince
Lombardi High in Southern
California.
What ensues between Riff's
followers and the school principal is
fast moving, satirical, anarchy
punctuated by the rapid-fire musical
intenstiy of the Ramones.
Music by Fleet wood Mac, Paul
McCartney, Devo, ALice Cooper,
Brian Eno, Velvet Underground,
Chuck Berry, Nick Lowe, and
others provide the background for
innumerable visual puns and sight
gags in this outrageous rock V roll
extravaganza.
See ROCK, Page 9
T-








Hearts
Delight
ACRILWI &R
(Reduced Ice Cream Prices)
Chapter X
(Best In Beach Music)
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ECO. Qp�M�IH�. N C
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GREENVILLE
(Not Open to General Public)
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Greenville, NX.
(Opening Soon On Monday Night)
Mil
Your Painters Hat from
The UBE
and Ticket Stub from the
ECU-Campbell Game for. . .
Reduced Beverage Prices
Reduced
Admission
MINGESMANIA This Monday
Don
Miss
MtNGES-MANIA
from UBE, Pepsi Cola and ECU Athletic Department
A
,
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- �





mmGES
MANIA
1000
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GIVE AWAV
Monday, Dec.
ECU-Campbell Game
ATiTIC One year free pqss
$50000 Value
��!��.�� v. i,tij��ii �0k ii��i�n � -
textbooks from the
$10000 Value
U.B.ES
51 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. N.C.
Ml
h l hodges � Q000 Gift Certificate
Dinner for four at
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PLANTERS
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$10000 worth of groceries from
Five 2000 Winners
Overton s
Supnm.tiUt'l Iiu
YOU MUST HAVE YOUR PAINTER'S HAT FROM
THE UBE AND TICKET STUB TO WIN
t
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 3. 1981
Language Interests This
Student Of Strange Words
By ANNE HENRY
MafTWrfKr
The second and most
common translation is
As many foreigners to remove your body
who are learning the from the presence of
English language will the speaker. The choice
attest, English is one of of the verb "take" is
the most complicated questionable. Accor-
and unpredictable ding to Webster's New
languages. There are World Dictionary of
many rules to learn and American Language
for each, there are (2nd College Edition),
twice as many excep- to take means, "to
tions. With the hun- grasp, to seize to
dreds of thousands of capture However, it
words in the English could not be found to
Value is the worth of
an objects (usually
monetary). Priceless is
to have no value. It is
therefore logical to say
that a priceless object is
really a piece of junk.
The winners of the
Superbowl are not
world champions as
they are called. Cana-
dian football is quite
different from
American football
Therefore, the Super-
bowl winners are only
the American cham-
pions.
Parts of the body are
also misnamed. Your
back is the back por-
tion of the body; why is
the front portion of the
body called the
stomach? Should it not
be called the "front"?
Your belly button is not
a button; it is a scar.
You do not have an ap-
pendicitis attack (it
does not attack you).
Rather, it an inflamma-
tion of the appendix
Eyes are not whipped
or beaten as eyelashes
suggest.
Articles of clothing
See WORDS. Page 9

The Romantics
will be appearing at the Attic on Sunday, December 6. I ook for a review
of the concert in Tuesday's edition of The East Carolinian
Mike Cross Enjoyed
Continued From Page 5
Ireland,
where 1 was gathering some new material and a
tour of Saudi Arabia which he described as a
wierd experience. "The audience couldn't speak
Englishso it was hard to tell if I was pleasing
themEvery now and then, someone would
shout JOHN DEAN-VERR, and I would break
into "Thank God I'm a Countr Boy
Unlike his colleagues in the music industry
Cross sees the live stage as a special event that
should be treated difierently every time. He
remembered when he was recording the
"Rock-N-Rye" album in New York. Bruce Spr-
ingsteen was sharing the same studio with him,
and they got to become friends. He was amazed
that Bruce has a lot of the same ideas about per-
forming as himself. "Bruce is a starHe doesn't
have to go out and sweet and scream for three or
four hours.
"Bruce and 1 remembered standing in long, cold
lines just to see vnir favorite performers only to be
disappointed when thev came out and played a
90-minute show like it was a chore and dashed
back to the hotel. The fans don't have to buy
tickets or albumsand a lot of singers seem to
forget that
Cross doesn't want to leave a show until he's
sure that crowd is pleaded. As he stated, "I've
never had a bad show Now I'll admit that a few
were a little offbeat, but it 1 ever had a bad show
it was the ticketholders' fault, not mine.
"You have to be able to sense the atmosphere
of the place you're playing and plan around that.
The Opry House is a country-and-Western bar
that sells beerThe crowd wants to get rowdy,
so I've got to get rowdy. When I'm playing an
auditorium where the seating is very formal, and
alcohol isn't served. I have to adjust my show to
fit that tpe of surround�"?s.
language, one can im-
agine the multitude of
combinations formed
to express ideas and
thoughts.
A great many of
these combinations are
accurate and concise,
fully explaining the
thought transmitteed.
For example, the
sentence, "Jack and
Jill went up the hill to
fetch a pail of water"
clearly communicates
the thought of the
speaker. The structure
is correct and clearly
expresses an idea.
However, most
Americans do not
always express
themselves clearly, nor
do they put words
together that make
complete sense. For ex-
ample, think of many
slang terms that have
been created. Can you
see the English student
trying to memorize the
multitude of modern
jargon? Chances are
slim that he could han-
dle all the terms
without rupturing a
blood vessel as a result
of anxiety, the expres-
sion "take a hike" can
mean one of two
things. One is that the
person wishes to
observe his natural sur-
roundings, thus walks
amid the wild and free.
L�Ma,oo Aqout CoiutgcThe Hwp Ia))i
�7 i7 H- inn � i � � ' � � �-� - f
OH, I H�P A TV Pajm
fof. -TWsfcS6viAJ6, A)o'
it's too mo yovj Couuwt
GO MoMC AO HWt
A TUfiJI
THE
qolDEisn
GREAT FOOD
7(c44ei tyte
tine, (u�t&
�UB
Famous Foot Long Sandwich
Morehead City
Greenville
B.M.T.
(Ham- Pepperoni-Oenoa- Bologna)
SUBWAY SPECIAL
(Ham-Genoa-Bologna)
SPICY ITALIAN
(Genoa & Pepperoni)
ROAST BEEF
HAM
TURKEY BREAST
PASTRAMI
PEPPERONI
GENOA SALAMI
BOLOGNA
ALASKAN KING CRAB
SHRIMP
TUNA
ITALIAN EXPRESS
(Sausage & Meatballs)
SAUSAGE
MEATBALLS
CHEESE
VEGETARIAN
SALAD PLATE
Srrtrd �ilh touf rhiiicr of � nwrkan (I
� Oniiiiu �IriiiKr 'lull Plrkkn � toiaalon
�( .rrrn Prppro �BI�ik Olitrs 'Sail �Ptpprr n4 OH
We've got more taste.
We now have iced tea and
potato chips.
208 E. 5th St.
758-7979
have "take" defined as
the action described in
the above term.
Although this is the on-
ly reference consulted,
this writer does not
believe that dictionaries
would greatly differ
between definitions.
Among our everyday
foods and appliances,
we find odd names.
Hamburger steak is a
redundancy
(hamburger is steak).
Electrical tape has no
electricity in it. Posters
should be caller postees
because a poster is so-
meone who hangs up
printed material. A
postee is something
that is being hung.
"Janitor in a Drum" is
a very misleading name
for a product; one ex-
pects a man to pop out
similar to a jack-in-a-
box or a genie from a
bottle. Peppermint
contains no pepper.
Buildings should be
called "builts" because
the structure has
already been com-
pleted. Hot water
heaters are actually
cold water heaters; hot
water is not heated in
the machine. The coat
of arms is certainly not
to be taken literally.
Snow shoes are not
made of snow as the
name suggests.
61 VtNW AJokkis
�-�
� M . �
OH, I Wtr HomC
Ia� Ufc� TV pfAjOCjtS,
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
JO SPARROW
MIKE ROBINSON
VALERIE HARRIS
LARGE SELECTION
OF
DIAMOND AND
14-K GOLD JEWELRY
YOURSEIKOAND
PULSAR WATCH
HEADQUARTERS
WE BUY GOLD
AND DIAMONDS.
YOUR INDEPENDENT
JEWELERS
407 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
ACROSS
1 Quart pan
5 Fermented
drink
9 Imitate
12 Maple genus
13 Unemployed
14 Born
15 Goddess of
grain
17 Unlawful
19 Conceit
21 Irritates
22 Jog
24 Suffice
25 Sob
26 Pronoun
27 Ring
29 Scale note
31 Ethiopian
title
32 Zeus s
beloved
33 Cooled lava
34 Ron
35 Hypothetical
force
36 Be present
38 Illuminated
39 Some
40 Negative
41 Rational
42 Datum
44 Robs
46 Understand-
ing
48 Dull finish
51 Card game
52 Adriatic wind
54 Rip
55 Sailor
56 Church part
57 Icelandic
writing
DOWN
1 Moccasin
2 Bar need
3 Edgy
4 Handle
5 Scale note
6 Redactor
7 Partner
8 State Abbr
9 Irate
10 Mountaintop
11 Lampreys
16 Tin symbol
18 European
land
20 Simpleton
22 Beginner
23 Highway
25 Clothed
27 Municipality
28 Dugout
29 Devastation
30 Grafted Her
34 Exploded
36 Poker stake
37 Goes in
39 Performer
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
See Answer
Page 9
41 Schedule
42 Sensed
43 Ox of
Celebes
44 Halt
45 Part of to
be
47 Basketball
org
49 Youngster
50 Time period
53 Diphthong
1i141�7�1011
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U
r �
�B
wnr
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i
4






IS
s
not
a s m
(it
ptd
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DEC EMBER 3, 1981
Tricks To Cutting Costs
Calls Home Cheerful
By JULIE MORGAN
Staff Writer
I think most college kids, especially freshmen,
enjoy a phone call from home. Most kids will not
admit this weakness though. After living away for
couple of months, I have begun to learn the ins
and outs of the high cost phone bills.
The best solution that 1 have come up with is:
"call collect or bust Do you think your mother
is going to hang up on a pitiful voice from her
own flesh and blood? Now if your father
answers, hang up as soon as the operator iden-
tifies your name. This way he'll think there's an
emergency or something and call you right back.
My Dad is quite a worry-wart. It's usually within
ten seconds that I receive my return call from
home.
Because I am the eldest of six children in my
family, and the first to leave home, I have an ad-
vantage over most college kids to receive a larger
amount of long distance calls. However, in my
case, 1 believe the disadvantages outweigh the ad-
vantages. The conversations I have with my fami-
ly over the phone are the most unique exchange of
verbal communication ever heard in my ex-
perience.
1 usually talk to my father everyday. He calls
from his office. Usually he has little to no news
for me. Our call is interupted almost everytime
with people running in and out of his office. I
guess he calls to make sure I'm still down here, or
haven't done anything rash. At the same time, if 1
have any news for him, he usually forgets to tell
my mother altogether, or worse yet, if (by some
miracle from God) he does remember to tell my
mother something I've told him, he twists or even
leaves out half of what I've said. Instead of an 83
on my history test, I got a 93. Sometimes I
wonder if he does this because he really doesn't
remember, or he's subconsciously wishing that
Yale would start offering me free-tuition or
something.
Ordinarily, I receive a call from the rest of my
family once a week. This call always leaves me
laughing hysterically for the rest of the week.
First, I catch up on the latest news or gossip from
Rock' And 'Elephant Man
Appear As Weekend Flicks
my mother. Then my little sisters get chance to
talk. Cindy, a six-year old Brownie, gymnist and
Barbie expert tells me about when she fell down
on the playground at school, scraped both of her
knees and cried real hard. She says good-bye, and
hands the phone to my two-year old sister. Sally,
sometimes as confused as one of the devil's
children, begins her conversation with such
creativity as: "Julie she begins excitely, "Cindy
fell down on the playground at school Before
she hangs up she manages to count to thirteen for
me. This phone call lasts for at least hour with lit-
tle said of any importance, however it does get me
through the next week.
When I'm sick it's good to know I can call
home for comfort. Maybe this sounds foolish to
most people. Sure, I'll admit I miss my home, but
I like to think of my dorm room as home too;
even though my father would quickly remind me
that my room here is only somewhere I hang my
hat. In turn, I remind my father that in my room
also hangs my phone, and if he would only admit
that he missed me too, he wouldn't mind the
I phone bill expense so much.
REE
120
ION
The F.lephant Man
will he shown tonight at 7. It will also he shown Friday
and Saturday nights at 5, 7:15 and 9:30. The film is
sponsored hy the Student Union Films Committee.
Words Intriguing
continued From Page 5
"The best non-documentary rock film in years,
High School which features the Ramones, ex-
ploding mice, and white kids on punk who joyful-
ly blow up their school, is indeed the real thing.
It's a rowdy, exuberant, wonderfully sophomonc
movie that puts its more expensive competition to
shame. In capturing the rebelious adolescent
spirit of rock and roll. High School is downright
masterful. It's an accomplishment that a director
who is less passionate about rock and roll could
not have pulled off. The film is about high school
kids and how music lets them live out their fan-
tasies.
-l.lovd Sachs. Rolling Stone
Continued From Page 8
are included in the
misnamed category.
Sneaker, a common
term among Nor-
therner, for tennis
shoes, do not creep up
behind people but are
worn on the feet. Pants
uorn above the knee
are called shorts.
Should not pants cover-
ing the entire leg be
called "longs"? Are
Ci rtinouiuqrd Fatiquev And
Shirt Sifi'pntq Baqi
b.�ckpHi�.jmp.nq Equip
mni Stvel Iod Shoe 0�srH-s
And O.i-i '00 Different Near And
Ui items Cowboy Boots
ARMY-NAVY
t SO I S Evans
Street
jocke) shorts worn on-
K by, jockeys, boxer
shorts only b boxers1
Why are swim suits
often called bathing
suits? You swim in
them, not bathe. One
the other hand, why are
thev called "suits"?
i
This list of
linguistical oddities
could go on indefinite-
k. Eiwy langaage-hms
them, and they are
written and spoken
without a great deal of
thought.
'The Ramones in V Roll H.gh School! What
a great idea! More than two decades ot
amateur criticism have been shown us that,
especially in a B-movie. it's not the surface drama
that counts, but the 'mise en scene The
Ramones are heroes of New York punktheir
music sounds good on the sound track, and you
believe it when the kids go wild for them. The real
glee in the movie comes from P.J. Soles - her eyes
shin with it. WAmping in her baseball cap, she
was the sexiest thing in Came. She tries to carry
the film with pure energy - running, jumping,
talking nonstop. The Ramones rock out in
celebration
-Greil Marcus, New West
10
ECU
Student
Discount
on
glasses
�1M?�!A&��1
AcER� 1 JoT� �M11
CIRI Auf0iI
fvJfllRKS
UEki LIE UUfcJ
L.C2 UOtJUOU U
UU UD CL5 UB
r
m
v
T
E3
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
1185 00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For fur
the' information call 112-0535
(Toll Free Number
800 32! 258) between A.M.
and 5PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St.
Raleigh. N.C
PUBLISHER NEEDS
ON CAMPUS CONSULTANT
We are looking for a faculty member or spouse,
graduate student or administrative person who
would like to supplement present income with a
second career in college textbook publishing.
The role is one of public relations. The prere
quisites are relationships and familiarity with
the academic community. We will provide you
with the skills and knowledge about textbook
publishing.
We are a 63-year old publishing house with many
authors already on campus. The person filling
this position would consult with on campus facul
ty members about the unique aspects of our
NEW DIMENSION Group as well as provide a
liaison with out traditional publishing groups.
Your inquiry is completely confidential so send a
letter and resume . . . to . . .
Tyson Lubin
408 Talbot St Box 635 X Burg Publishing Company
St. Michael's. MD 21663 M.noeapohs. Minnesota
�SELECT,
GROUP
OF FRAMES)!
-EYEGLASSES�
2995
PBotThe
havefchold
onto
two
'Grtyourctowsoffmy
Wot pen. See. I don't
get no respect!
SINGLEVISION
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SELECTGROUP M MOK
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Let us make you an appointment
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752-1446
OPTICIANS
ornciHOuas
im !���
MOM '�
VISA
Kinston,
Goldsboro &
in Greenville at
Parkview
Commons
Paoptahtjy
ortungar lot
my PMot rirtaHnat bs-
couss �tay n omcys
fishing tot o fins port pan
�vjt wntss through attorn And
Pttd chorgss omy 79 lot s
Ptopts oat aw hands on a and
toraat n my pan So I don't gat no rsspscf I don't mafcs out ony I
wflhrnyPiseRazorPoint Bvmtssmmip-asorrsmooth
�ytth on sxira tins Mns its matti cotloi hatps ksap
�m pomt from going squish- so paopis
lovsn ro only J9 lhay
should buy 9m own pan-
ond show soma ra-
jpaclloimy
propafty
PILOT
fine point mote pens
People take to o Pi lot like ifs the own
� Ml
;od
fe too.
Special gifts
for
Special People.
Including
Fresh nut mixes
Herb teas
Ginseng products
Ananda scented body oils
Handmade silk boxes
Cookbooks
Teapots
Potpourri
Carafection candy
Rainbows
J.D. Dawson
Co.
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville Location
SILVER
SALE
Rivergate Shopping Center
Greenville, H. C.
Monday-Friday 10 a.m. 'til 8 p.m
Saturday 10 a.m. 'til 5 p.m.
758-6264
Sale Ends
Dec. 12th
f�w
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That tape is BASFs Professional n�a pure chromium
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And isn't that what you
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ail oi me musn;
BASF
Carolina East MallPitt Plaza
I





1 HI t-ASI lAROl INIAN
Sports
Anxious Emory Admits Next Year Is Critical
Kmon Hopes lo lead Pirates For Main N ears
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport tdllitr
"1 would belying if I didn't admit
that 1 realize I've got to win next
year to remain the head coach at
East Carolina
Relaxed in a chair at his Cireen-
ville home, Ed Emory made the
statement Wednesday night alter he
had reviewed the 1981 season that is
now past and looked ahead to the
19S2 campaign that lies on the dis-
tant horizon.
The ECU head coach discussed
what he fell were past mistakes and
delved into changes that will most
likely come about in the near future.
Emory's record is 9-13 after tak-
ing ovei the reigns o the ECU pro-
gram from Pat Dye almost exactly
two years ago At that time he sign
ed a three yeai contract.
W ith but (me year left on the con-
tract and after two disappointing
seasons, which were the first two
losmt! years at ECU since 1971, the
pressure is on for 1982. Emory savs
next yeai is definitely a critical one.
a yeai thai will sureiv hold for him
main a km less night.
"1 must be honest he said,
'i rom a purely selfish standpoint I
know I'll feel some pressure once
next season starts � 1 teel it to a
degree now
� knew when I took this job that
football is not the kindest thing in
the world. Bui I've never been a
losei and 1 believe with all mv heart
that we will get the job done here at
asl Carolina. If we do not succeed
next year and arc asked to leave 1
know it'll be the toughest thing in
the world tor me to accept
Emory, an ECU graduate and a
Pirate Ml -America in the late
I950's, sas he feels all the ingre-
dients are available for a big-time
program at ECU.
"We've got the greatest product
in the world to sell (to recruits) he
said. "We've got the school, the
facilites, the town and the
schedule
Winning, though, has not come
easy for Emory since he came on the
Pirate scene. Building a talented
foundation, he said, has taken tune.
Now that he has had two sears to
recruit his own players into the pi"
gram, Emory said the time has come
for changes. One ot the hist areas
that figure to change next season is
the Pirate offensive scheme. Emory
hinting that the wishbone attack is
on the outs
" I he first yeai 1 was here I did
not feel we were good enough on
defense to win he said. "1 did not
feel the defense could hold the othei
teams and get the turnovers thai you
would need to win defensively
I herefore, we went w ith the
wishbone on o! tense We wanted to
use up time offensively, control the
football and keep the defense ofl
the field.
"Now we teel more confident
about the defense, thai we've im-
proved a great deal. We will make
some changes in the structure ot oui
offense because ot that
I he new ot tensive sti uctui e
would include throwing the ball a
greai deal more than in the past.
Emory said.
"Oui theory will be thai we'll
thiow the tootbatl any place on the
field next year, WeTJ work out ot
multiple sets. We will make the
commitment to throw the ball at
least 4() percent ol time, at any
lime and on any down
I he Pirate coach said the offen-
sive switch is not something he jusl
recently decided upon.
"We knew the first year that this
was coming he said. "Bui we
wanted to wait until we had the right
people here We thought bv staving
with the wishbone we might have a
chance to go 7-4 or 6-5
I he reverse occurred, though, the
Pirates finishing 4-7 and 5 6. "It we
could have known that ahead ot
time Emory said, "we might not
have waned. Maybe we would have
gone ahead and made the switch
Othei changes' I he E I mentoi
says the entire program is being
evaluated, hinting that chat
might even take place within the
coaching stal
" 1 hat's always the first thing you
look at he said. "I beleive our
stall is outstanding, but it 1 discover
thai changes are necessary, thev will
be made
Negative. Emory hates the word,
vet has been taced with it time and
again this year. The 19H1 season
not exactly kind to the program that
he ha been called to lead Incident
after incident in 1981 occurred '
the coach now admits tried his pa-
tience. 1 he press made cacti case
verv clear to the public
I irsl there was the resignation ot
Chancellor rhomas B Brewei Next
came the accusation bv North
c arolina coaches that two 1(1
.idles had spied on the la- Heel-
m the I N( law school library
One week later the Pirates were feel-
ing the wounds ot a 56-0 loss to the
Heels
it all that was no!
irting spin end 1 arry 'K
quit the team and biased Emo
the newspapers, saying he had "losi
respect" tor his coach.
1 hen came pei hap- ors
wound ot ail, the Pirate
final game ol th n 31-21
William and Mar. H
lett I! c 6 oi, tl
wm would have imam a
positive 6-5.
just two weel
daggers struci the ECU pi
sta'e audit was released
revelaed thai the EC!
department was in d I
than $400,000,
"It's been pretty ini redibli
Emory admitted w
head. "People have a tende
eve the printed word a
re read a � st abo i
was negative.
"It certainly won
recruiting. I hose sort oi
what other coaches will lov�
to recruits about. I jusl h
make the kids realizi
great place
football
Emory discussed .
aforementioned "negative'
but felt that the tw
hardest felt.
�� 1 hey're the
ild really do anyth
tid. "I think b
case ol extreme- W
for thearolina .
fidem tor illiai
1 I lov 12-
win ovei W �� tei i
team and
� i ed up '
( arolina
IU-UN
the game and I ai H
it would :
"W e d
.v. � �
see EMOK . Page 12
Ninth-Ranked State
Holds Off Lady Pirates
Bv M1 I.IAM EI.ER10N
mil sp.trl. I dllm
and EC 1 i et
e 1 adv Wolfpack
. 1 a ice in i
da was different.
ranked N.C. State held ofl
� second-half rally bv the
. Pirates ol I ast Carolina for a
b2 56 win in Raleigh before 14(H).
state jumped out to a 20-5 lead
nd the play ol Louisburg Junior
C ollege transfer Paula Nicholson �
tot met teammate ol ECl 's
etha Harrison � who poured in
rter 21 'points in the first halt.
� mission the Wolfpack held a
I Ad Pirates fought back in
iecond half, cutting the lead to
little as three, but clutch shots bv
Ginger Rouse lifted State to the win.
We played very well defensively,
we did not do what we wanted
jo in the first half offensively
remarked Easl arolina coach
( athy ndruzzi. "In the second
��.c flattened oui their one and
the ball down low to Marv
(Denkler) and I oraine (Foster),
"I �a especially pleased with the
defensive play ol 1 oletha Harrison,
who shut ofl Nicholson in the se-
cond half she added. "Harrison
guarded hei man to-man in the se
cond half, limiting her to one field
and one tree throw Harrison
and Nicholson were on I ouisburg's
national junior college champion-
ship team last yeai
1 he 1 adv WOlfpack found a
"different" East Carolina squad in
the second period. Denklei goi hot,
scoring 12 of her team's 16 points in
that halt and IV overall.
Freshman rocket Loraine 1 oster
also keyed the second half com-
eback, pumping in 17 points and
dishing o six assists while limiting
star State guard Angie Armstrong
only two points and two assists
overall.
State jumped out to an early lead
a- Nicholson scored the first then
first 10 point- as the lady Pirates
were bothered bv cold shooting
31.3 percent in the first halt. 1 ast
Carolina missed their first seven
shots.
1 he 1 adv Pirates gradually cut
the State lead in the second half,
though, to as little as three al 53-50
on a free throw bv Denkler with live
and a half minutes to play.
Both teams traded baskets, and
with a little more than four minutes
to go, Foster hit a jump shot from
the side, cutting the lead to 55-52.
State's Rouse shot the Lady
Wolfpack to a nine-point lead at
bl-52 with a little more than two
minutes lett in the game. After
Foster's shot with 4:11 left, the
I adv Pirates didn't score again until
there was less than a minute left.
An important factor in the second
half was an aggressive man-to-man
defense applied bv State. But the
1 adv Pirates did outrebound their
rivals, 36- 34, even t ho u g h
Nicholson corralled 14.
The lady Pirates, despite their
poor shooting in the first half, out-
shot State for the game but turned
the ball over 20 times. However,
State hit 14 of 17 free throws while
the Pirates connected on only 4 of
10.
Prominent individual perfor-
mances included Jones' 11 points
and five assists and Rouse's 10
points and five assists. She was
bothered bv a back injury last year.
Denkler scored 15 of her 19 points
in the second halt.
Next action for the 1 adv Pirates
is at the Dial Classic in New Jersey
Dec. 5-6. Then the team returns to
Greenville to face the 1 adv
SeaHawks of UNC-Wilmington
Dec. 12.
ECU's Sam Jones (Rijjhn Sets To Pass
Robbins Is
Named A-A
A pait
wen. named to a pan
all star
East Carolii
I f bins wa
nd-team Ml
America,
dav. Robbins �
first-teame-
dependent
today.
Defensive end lody S
named to tru S
was h
America on. 1
230-pound c hester, M
transfered to E( I last
C how an Junior C olid
Robbins, a 6 c. 275 ; n de I
Merry Hill, is the only the
Fc l playei to be named an P
America. He
mer defensive sate a
P i ates to evei be nam
team A
Guard Wayne Inman, deft
end v arv i iodette and
Damn Kepley all were thi
are the only othei playe
been named to one ol P's
three A- squads since the
began playing on the Di
level.
Robbins had earliei beet
to play in the :
all-star game in Mob
c hristmas Dav I
nually features some ol the
senioi - in the i
'We've Got To Get On The Boards'
Odom Outlines Gameplan For Missouri
Odom Shouts Instructions To The Pirates
By CHARLES CHANDLER
spurts r dilnr
rating on I6th-ranked Missouri
in the first round of the Show-Me
Classic this Friday presents East
Carolina with a "can't lose" situa-
tion, says Pirate coach Dave Odom.
The only way the Pirates could
really lose out, Odom says, is if they
fall flat on their faces against the
powerful Tigers, a team the ECU
coach rates as the best his club has
faced since then-number one
ranked Duke two years ago.
"Our team is very well-rounded
he said. "We're confident going out
there. If we really got beat bad I do
think we'd feel some ill affects.
Otherwise, though, we have nothing
to lose. Nobody expects us to beat
Missouri
That doesn't mean Odom doesn't
have a few tricks up his sleeve,
though.
"Oh, I think we've got a chance.
The players do too. But there are
some things that we have to do in
order to upset them
The first ten minutes. Odom savs.
are most important.
" I hat's when we can give
ourselves a chance to win. During
the first ten minutes there are some
things we must establish, lust,
we've got to get on the boards.
Secondly, we can't let them come
out running like Secretariat.
"How do you do this? One, you
play every shot as a missed shot. Go
for the boards haul. 1 wo, you con-
trol them on offense bv not allowing
them to have the ball as much as
they would like. We'll be verv selec
tive in our shots
Odom added that it is important
for the Pirates, 1-0 after a 72-54 win
over Ohio University last Saturday,
to challenge the tall I igers inside.
Doing so won't be easy, especially
with the likes o 6-11 All America
candidate Sieve Stipanovich in the
center spot. Forward Mark
Dressier. All-Big Fight last year,
also is an all-star candidate.
Three years ago Stipanovich was
named one of the three best high
school centers in the nation along
with an rent Ail-Americans Ralph
Sampson (Virginia) and Sam Bowie
(Kentucky). He had perhaps his besi
game last veai in the title game ol
the Show-Me c lassie, scoring 25
points and pulling down 10 re
bounds in a wm ovei 1 amai
Missouri opened its season lues
dav night with an impressive 82-51
wm over Alcorn State Stipanovich
had 16 points and 11 boards in the
win.
I he victory was the team's 20th in
a row at home. Missouri also has
never lost in the eight-yeai history
of the Show Ale Classic.
"That doesn't bother us Odom
said. "Sure, it's impressive, but we
didn't lose anv o those 20 games or
any games in the tournament
before
1 he rest oi the tourney field is im-
pressive as well Wyoming, J-0 and
the pre-season favorite over
Bngham Young in the Western
Athletic Conference, and Canisius
are the other two entires that will
battle it out in the otht I
game
Missouri and W yom
partk ipants in the NCAA I
merit last year, are
favorites to meet in the champ
ship game. The Pirates a
parently the last seed in the t
as thev are lined up aj
I igers.
" 1 hey 're certainly very
or thev wouldn't have picked u
play in the opening round Od
commented. "They obviously Hunk
we're the easiest to bea thai
shows very little respect tor oui pro
gram
Preturbed? Odom says noi Bui
he would like to break a string
begun last yeai ol foui consecutive
tournament losses I he Pirates
played in two foui team tourneys
last year and failed to win a contest
"That reallv bothered me
Odom admitted "What bothered
me was the way we lost those games
I'd certainly like to break that streak
this weekend
Sw
Bv I MUM v
FOR 5
FOR
Wi
Jan
"Moti
4 p
3 dc
�Full
?






! tO
pCt loss
kt- 12
Is
-A
-i I ULlOlia
A,l-
'om
77
us! think
� thai
pro-
Bul
siring
onsecutive
Pit ates
?urneys
ed me
i' bothered
ose games
'hat streak
Swimmers Head For Tough Penn State Relays
B THOMAS BRAMK
This weekend's Penn
State Relays is the last
meet before the
holidays for the ECU
swim team. A strong
field of 14 teams sur-
rounds the Pines in this
event. The field in-
cludes last year'smeet
champ for the women,
NCSU, the men's
champ of a year ago,
UNC, and Eastern
Champ (ECU swimm-
ing conference) Pitt-
sburgh.
After last week's
sweep of UNC-W, op-
timism surrounds the
Pirates. "Our kids are
progressing well ex-
pressed ECU coach
Ray Scharf. "They are
tough kids and hard
workers, and that
makes a difference in
the success
"Some of our times
are among the best in
the country believed
Scharf. "On a given
day we can swim with
anyone
The women continue
Classifieds
to improve as they gain
experience. The ECU
women's team consists
of all underclassmen.
This youth is no han-
dicap, Scharf declares.
"This is the best
women's team we have
had in five years
Their record is 1-1.
The Lady Pirates
hope to improve on
their sixth-place finish
of last year. This will be
tough because there are
four teams competing
which finished in the
top 10 in the nation last
year.
The ECU men hope
to keep improving,
their record standing at
3-1. With the loss of
Doue MacMillian due
10 sickness, the Pirates
still hope to improve on
their seventh-place
finish. "The best relay
for us is the butterfly,
which MacMillian will
be missing from
Scharf says.
"This is a very ex-
citing meet, and our
main objective is to bet-
ter our times he pro-
claims. "I still hope we
impove on our posi-
tions, but time is most
important T h e
highest the Pirates have
ever finished in the
Penn Relavs is second,
back in 1970. This meet
will be the last for ilk
Pirates until Jan. II
when the men swim
aeainst Maine and the
women take on James
Madison.
SUPPORT
THE ECU
BAND
I
FOR SALE
WATERBEOS LOWEST prices
ill NC and SC on line wood
waterbedi and accessories Com
piele beds wirn is year warranty
lor as low as 17� Delivery
available Call David lor more m
lormalion -s� 7401
CARICATURES BY
Weyler�have yoursel! or a friend
rrimortaMed cartoon style A uni
que gift idea' Special Xmas rates
4 0 lor color or black and white 1
X 10 Call 75J 577S
REFRIGERATOR 5 I cubit nch
in great shape Must sell Call
Wike at 7s� nsj
AEIGHUIFTERS- BARBELL
plates lor sale York and Weider
Irom I' to 100 lbs 70 cents per
oound no ta� no freight Contact
M chael Propst, Body Shop
Manager at Joe Cullipher
Chrysler Plymouth
OATSUN 2402 silver air dam.
jerlect interior no rust must sell
S2SO0 752 U52
FOR RENT
ROOM FOR rent, close lo campus.
HO month plus one sixth utilities
call 7S2-0748 or '58 3545
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed.
�l?0 per month, plus one half
utilities, lust need your bedroom
lurmture available Jan 1, phore
Leilie Tyler at 757-3745 or 757-010
Keep trying
WANTED FEMALE roommate
to share 2 bedroom furnished
apartment Two blocks from cam
pus 5100 rent plus one third
utilities Cheryl 752 1�5�
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
one bedroom 92 50 and one halt
utilities Beginning Jan I, cail
Jean 75 3530
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share Georgetown Apt as of Jan.
1 Phone 75� 2671
ROOMMATE needed to share 3
bedroom apt Prefer male student
Call 7Si U7
FURNISHED ROOM for rent in
large house located in Lake
Ellsworth. Greenville Convenient
to hospital and university Deposit
required Call 756 6301
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
lor very me apartment on Elm
St �fuly carpeted, dishwasher,
cable TV and pool Within walking
drstance to campus J100 a month
plus : utilities. Prefer serious stu-
dent Call 7ST49U. Call 7S849S6
�eep trying!
MALE ROOMMATE needed to
share room in four bedroom
house Four blocks from campus
$72 50 per month plus one fifth
utilities Call 752 6901
ROOMS AVAILABLE FOR
RENT CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN
AVAILABLE BY CHRISTMAS M0
PFR PERSON DOUBLE OC
CUPANCY. J12S SINGLE OC
CUPANCY UTILITIES INCLUD
ED IN RENT 550 DAMAGE
DEPOSIT REQUIRED CALL
CLARK BRANCH REALTORS
ASK FOR MARTHA 75 6336
TWO BEDROOM lownhous tar
rent, unfurnished, l' i blocks Irom
campus, 5300 month, call Teresa
at 7S� 7041
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
spacious two bedroom townhouse
Nicely furnished with central air
and heat Ten minute walk to cam
ous For information call 7S�-702i
W
anvi
POINT O PINES Camp for Girls is
looking for female counselors
Check placement office of write:
Andrew rosefn, 221 Harvard
Avenue. Swarthmore. PA IfMI.
EXTRA MONEY up to 5100,000
or more a year paid daily! Intar
mation application send self
addressed stamped envelope to
CaWs. Depi G 2, P.O Box 1254
Greenville NC 27134-040.
PERSONAL
EXCELLENT TYPIST will do
term, research and thesis papers:
articles for publication and ditser
tations Reasonable rates Call
'57 !37�.
TYPING FOR students, pro-
fessors, etc Kempie Dunn, 1019 E
Wright Road, Greenville. NC
27834 Call 752 6733 after ! P
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST wants
typing to do at home Reasonable
rates Call 7S30.
EXCELLENT TYPIST proles
sional experience with any paper
demand Reasonable rates Call
?57 1378 after 4 00 p m weekdays,
anytime weekends
LOST SILVER
Square Frame.
but it won't be no fun when her
husband shows up with a gun
Hose and Noe.
CIRCLE K is n organuation
which does protects like baag no
tnti selling peanut and
DO YOU need a ride to Charleston
WVa or Columbus. Ohio or Fort
Wayne. IN. �r�a tar Christmas? If
so, I can take I riders willing ��
split gas. Leaving Friday 12 18 8
at �.m. Contact Dr. Chenowefh
at 751427 alter 5 3 p m before
Dec. 11.
FOUNO: LADIES watch on In
tramural soccer field. Call
7J2-MS7 to claim it.
TERRI. JAMIE AND HELEN: It
was a long wait, but you finally got
what you deserve! We love you!
Congratulations!
CANDY: EXPLAIN it to me on
more time, I'm confused! Love.
Skippy
Even though I had to pick you up
first downtown, you know how
much I love you Happy Anniver-
sary Snowman!
I would like to meet the girl who
has been putting the notes under
my windshield wiper Mike.
AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOT
BALL: A crowd of 1M braved the
elements and watched ECU'S
Australian LRLules Football Club
trounce 10th ranked Kentucky,
19 47. as Cornell transfer and ltfM
U.S.A.R.F. Associaton Pleyer-ol
the Year Rick Turner scored an
American record 4 points. All
American Spain Barwick chipped
in with 2 Unfortunately
freshman sensaton Bu Bel was lost
tar the season with a broken
femur. ECU. now ranked number
� in the nation, plays host to
number S UNC CH at 3:00 p.m.
Thursday at Greene Field. This
will be the team's final tune-up
before it participates over the
weekend in the prestigious Norfolk
Invitational. The 4 team tourna
ment pits ECU vs. number 14 Old
Dominion, number 4 Cornell and
number 1 Notre Dame in round
robin competition. The winner of
th tourney advances into the East
Regiona's with a possibility of
playing tar the National Cham-
pionship. Come support
Swashbucklers Thursday as they
continue their quest for the
U.S.A.R.F Association National
Championship.
JILL. LON. AND ZOOIE� don t
you ever die you beautiful young
things you. Lovage�Flashcubes.
THE BROTHERS and the plagues
of Phi Kappa Tau would like to
thank the Tri Sigmas for a
wammer jammer Mai-Tai party
that left us with mai-heedaches
The drinks were cold and the fever
was hot, hold on tight and shoot
your best shot! Oh Hell Yes! CDL
Ladies Watch
LaMarque If
found please call Carol 7SI-MI0 or
drop it off at White Dorm office.
Thank you.
CLARENCE� YOU'RE flirting
with disaster Your married gal
turned out to be more than a pal.
HXLP WHSH YOU NMD IT MOST.
The Fleming Center has been here for women
of all ages since 1974, otter4 understanding
and help to anyone faced with an unplanned
pregnancy day or night. Services include:
rrfM Pregnancy Testing
Wcttkday �V Saturday Abortion Appte.
Broiling Birth. Control Hours
GALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
The naming Center
We're here wheu you need us.
6th Annual
Kappa Sigma- ELBO
Christmas Party!
Tues Dec. 8th
Lots of Prizes, Gifts & Specials
1st GRAND PRIZE
Two Days all expense paid trip to Wintergreen.
2nd GRAND PRIZE
Your Very Own Pinball Machine
ST. NICK WILL BE THERE AND WE'LL HA VE
OUR END OF THE YEAR T-SHIRT SALE!
START YOUR HOLIDAYS RIGHT TUESDAY
AT THE
C
HR1STMAS PARTY
Currenturidergradua ���
medical students may now
compete for sever! htmdred
Air Force �c��M�rf�4t��. TfcMd
scholar" ore H 1 ��"�'
ed to tuJe�t� ���� wrlo
medical school a freshen
or at the beginning) of meir
vophmore year The �cho�er
ship provide for tuition,
books, lab free ��� owc
ment, ptu a tSX moimiy
allowance investigate thl
financial alternative �o tt�e
h.gh cost of medical educ
iio" Contact
U S A f HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
RECRUIT! MS
SUITE GL V ItM NAVAMO OR
1RALEIOM, NX. I���
PHCNE COLLECT HW1WWI34,
AS
SKI
WINTERGREEN
Jan. 4-715000 per person
Motorcoach transportation from Greenville
3 nights lodging in condominium �
4 persons per unit
3 days lift tickets and 1 night ski ticket
Fully escorted
Meet your friends on the slopes. Great way to
spend your Christmas holiday
TV' Booking and brochure available.
QUIXOTE TRAVELS,
INC.
ATTIC
RECORD BAR
APPLE RECORDS
JJ'S
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beginning August 30
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11:30-2:30


This weekend at the Coffeehouse:
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Chuck Ball
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Mark Rochelli,
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9:00-1 1:00 p.m. Dec. 4 & 5, 1981
Room 1 5, fylendenhall
Admission 50C
HODGES
210 E. FIFTH ST.
752-4156
BOND'S
SPORTING
GOODS
218 ARLINGTON BLVD.
756-6001
t
r
I






12
THE LAST CAROLINIAN
DfcChMBfcR 5, 1981
Football Team Holds
Annual Awards Night
Chowan Downs J Vs
Despite McNair's 35
Defensive end Jody Schulz,
kicker Chuck Bushbeck and offen-
sive tackle Tootie Robbins walked
away with the majority of the
honors Wednesday night when the
ECU football team held its annual
awards banuqet.
Schulz received the E.E. Rawl
Memorial Award, given for
character scholarship and athletic
ability. The Chowan College
transfer was also named the team's
outstanding defensive player, the
"Super Purple Pirate and receiv-
ed the big play award.
Robbins, who was named second-
team Associated Press All-America
earlier in the day, was named the
most outstanding offensive player,
the offensive captain, and received
the blocking trophy.
Bushbeck, who played this year
despite suffering from Hodgkin's
disease, received the Swindell
Memorial Award, which goes to the
player who shows dedication and
leadership and puts team before
self. Bushbeck was also named the
outstanding special teams player.
The complete list of award win-
ners follows:
lJHI II I �nhall V��ti1.
I ul,lundini� Oflensne hfhnwn
Outstanding l)rtrn.i,r rtrihrnan
Kuk ��rtiln Memorial oil, n.i
Kuk HanUl.m Memnripl IMrnsr
Mini Improved HW��i�� Plus"
M'i Improved llenMr
tindell Memorial xifd
r Ka�l Memorial k�ard
Outstanding Oft spr, ial Iram
Outstanding let "special lum
Viadrmn Vbiesmeni
I n k)rhampuin
Purple 1'iralr
�super Purple Pirate
' luKiandtnv Delenvist- Plater
Hl�kinv r,iph
Best HI. king �ark
Ouuianding ottensisr Haii
land Oserlon Outstanding Vnn't
lietrnstsr aptain
IHIfdMHaptain
Npmal I earn aptain
in mi liJcn
Sim lohnstrn
KiAi'l.ilJ K .i
Man � I .i in
1 eon I .i. � i r I �iw
VI it � i
i � H i-N.k
Ul. N,
. H � �
.
Id I IV kti 1 wr Btobs.1
M Li i
I.sis S,
I . VIil iv

rtH� Robb
K � tt .11: ihJ Him
H v'h,IK
Mil
l k i irani I � Grillin
I � k.hiiiv
l k, IV,
Four players scored
in double figures to
lead Chowan Junior
College to a 94-87 win
over the Hast Carolina
jayvee basketball team
Wednesday night.
Ken Kapel and Win-
fred Basnight did the
most to spoil the season
debut of the J V Pirates.
Capel poured in 23
points, while Basnight
tallied 16 and added
nine assists.
Chowan had to over-
come a superb perfor-
mance by ECU forward
Bill McNair to come-
away victorious.
McNair connected on
14 of 19 shots from the
floor en route to scor-
ing a game-high 35
points. McNair also
snared a team-hich 13
rebounds.
The only other Pirate
in double figures was
freshman guard Bruce
Peartree. The former
Pantego High star
finished with 16 points.
Soph o m ore g u a r d
Herbert Gilchrisl pitch-
ed in nine points and
eight assisis.
Herb K r u sen, a
former ECU player and
now a Pirate assistant
coach, said the ECU
J V' s w e re simply
outplayed.
"We fought back
real well Krusen said.
"We were down from
the very start. But, by
and large we were jusl
outplayed. Chowan
practices togethei and
we don't. That could
have had some affect
Emory Maintains Hope
Bill McNair
Continued From Page 10
I fust walked into the door here in
1956, and the learn wanted it just as
bad. It was our last chance too. It
turned out to be a real embarass-
ment, though
So did losing the season finale,
and a winning campaign in the pro
cess. Emory now says that his
heavily-favored Pirates and the
coaching staff were over-confident
going into the William and Marv
game.
"We didn't respect them like we
should have. It we had plaved them
like we did Miami and West Virginia
it would have been a different storv.
I hat has to be the toughest loss in
mv life since I first got into spoils in
the third grade
With negativity growing to sur-
round both Hmorv and the football
program as the season wore on, the
talk of the coach's dismissal erew
more frequent among E( I
followers. Emory knows if things do
not improve in 1982 it could be the
end o' his head coaching dav v
"1 believe next vear will be a good
one for us, though he said. "We
have a verv good nucleus of talent
returning. But 1983 should really be
our year. Thai will be a senior laden
football team I just hope we're
here to coach it.
"It would be a real shame it we're
not. I'd hate to see all the eps
we've taken and progress we've
made in 36 months ruined because
ot that
Emor sas he refuses to think t
1982 in a negative light, though,
saving thai he is confident the vim.
can be a winner
'� reall) believe we can go 7 4 oi
8-3 he iaid. "I'm more excited
now than I've ever been I really
want to gel out on the mad to
recruit and sell out program
matter ot fact I'm laving at four
o'clock tomorrow morning to go on
a recruiting trip
When Emory made that
nieni Wednesdav night the
had alreadv passed the 11
mark. What about rest?
M don't have time to rest he
said. " I here's too much to do it
we're going to become a great toot
ball team And I won't accept
less than that, no matter what the
eosis
clock
p.m
GET THE SPIRIT
MINGES-MANJA
IS CATCHING
SEE THE PIRATES
PLAY MonDec. 7th
vs. Campbell
Led bv 7-ft. center Tonv Britto
Minges Coliseum � 7:30
WESTERN SIZZLIN'
"The Family Steak House
9 9
MONDAY� $199
CHOPPED STEAK �
TUESDAY� $199
BEEF TIPS '
WEDNESDAY� $189
CUBED STEAK '
THURSDAY� $169
STEAK SANDWICH '
FRIDAY � $179
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
SATURDAY � $099
BARBEQUE RIBS A
SUNDAY� $199
STEAK ON A STICK �
B. Famous Salad Bar
� Free Tea with ECU i.D.
� All meals are complete including baked potato or French fries & Texas
B toast.
Take Out Service
1?03 E 10th SI. H�urs: m.miop.m.
� to 2172 MonThurs.
2M Bypass - 75.0040 loam 11 p.m. Fri Suit.
ATTIC
Souths No. 6 A Rock Night Club
THURS J FRI. & SAT.
SUH SNOW MC
RjrniaiiJloS
tifA h U.
ek

)
r

TUES
DEC. 8
THURSDAY NIGHT
RHYTHM AND BLUES DELUXE
ARHOCLEY
FRI. AND SAT. NITE
GLENN PHILLIPS BAND
"HIS GUITAR WORK HAS BEEN COMPARED WITH JEFF BECK
HIS ALBUM DARK LIGHTS WAS RATED WITH 3� j STARS BY
ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE
LOCATED
BEHINDTHE
ELBO ROOM
758-0711
COMING - THURS DEC 10
8th Annual BRICE ST CHRISTMAS PARTY
Greenville, N.C
BUSCH. The official beer of The Charlie Daniels Band
i � m
V
'





Title
The East Carolinian, December 3, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 03, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.167
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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