The East Carolinian, December 1, 1981






�be SaHt (Eamliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Vol. 58 No. 28
Tuesday, December 1, 1981
Greenville,N.C.
10 Pages
SGA Reinstating Student Fund
Loans Available Jan. 18
t
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Kirk little. SGA treasurer, Monda described the reinstated student loan
fund as an "extremely successful" program.
By DIANE ANDERSON
vislinl News tdilur
After lengthy debate, the SGA
voted Monday to reinstate the $25
student loan fund as of Jan. 18,
1982. The emergency medical loan
fund will remain in committee until
the legislature reconvenes next
semester.
The motion to reconsider the
loans was brought to the floor by
legislator Chuck Blake. "I think the
$25 student loan should be
reinstated because there is a need for
it. Students have come up to the of-
fice to get it, and it is their money
he said.
Mitch Daub, chairman Of the Stu-
dent Welfare Committee, explained
why the bill was not previously in-
troduced. "The Student Welfare
Committee voted six weeks ago in
favor of the $25 fund, 9 to 1. The
question is not do we want it he
explained. "What is the purpose of
bringing the loan program back on
the floor if you know it is going to
be vetoed?"
Legislator Linda Bishop said that
the committee attempted to survey
students about the loans but could
not without the help ot the Office of
Institutional Research, which was
conducting its own teaching effec-
tiveness survey at the time.
The S25 student loan fund and the
SI50 emergency medical loan fund
were suspended in May by the sum-
mer legislature � which is compos-
ed of the SGA president, vice presi-
dent and treasurer � by a two to
one vote.
Treasurer Kirk Little cast the lone
dissenting vote. "Like anything else
it has minor problems, but on the
large scale it has been extremely suc-
cessful he said Monday of the stu-
dent loan fund. "1 have gotten let-
ters from different universities ask-
ing how we set ours up
According to Little, the loan fund
has never had any set policies.
With the help of Paul Breitman,
SGA financial adviser, a list of loan
policies has been drawn up for
presentation to the legislature.
A surcharge of $1 is charged on
every loan, no matter how small,
and a $10 late fee is charged on the
principal if the loan is not repaid
within the time limit.
Little said these charges were in-
stituted in 1980 because of losses in
the program. Since that time, the
surcharges have exceeded losses in
the fund, he added.
"There definitely is a great need
for these loans on this campus, so
we do need to work on way to cor-
rect these uneollectables legislator
Russell Overman said.
There is a 2.2 percent uncollec-
table rate on the loan fund.
According to Little, the uncollec-
table rate on the emergency medical
loan fund "is about the same ratio
as the student fund, but $150 adds
up a lot more quickly than $25
"The loan was at one time, over
two years ago, just for pregnancy-
related conditions, termination or
continuation of the pregnancy. That
was changed on June 9, 1980, and it
was changed that any condition
determined to be a medical
emergency" could be funded, accor-
ding to Little. "Our usage rate for
the medical emergency fund roughly
doubled when that was enacted, and
it was a service that was greatly
needed
The proposed loan policies state
that "Emergency Medical Loans are
made only on the recommendation
of a certified physician of the
University Health Services
"1 don't feel that the total picture
was looked at Little said in regard
to the suspension of the fund. "1
think one of the reasons the bill
might have been signed by the peo-
ple who signed it was for fundamen-
tal political beliefs
"The proposal was given to the
summer legislature on May 27 to be
discussed on May 28. They suspend-
ed them the funds) on May 28. I
asked for their feedback, written or
verbal, and received none
SGA President I ester Nail was
unavailable for comment on this
matter.
Marvin Braxton, SGA vice presi-
dent had no comment.
The SGA. in other business, also
approved the bill for the appropria-
tion of $815 to the NAACP. The
decision came as the result of an
amendment to the chapter's con-
stitution.
"We took out political and
changed that committee name
(originally entitled Political Action
Committee) to 'Relevant Issues
explained East Carolina NAACP
chapter President Virginia Carlton.
"We looked over the amend-
ments today, and thev meet all
guidelines for approval of an SGA
constitution said Bob Mills, chair-
man of the Rules and Judiciary
committee.
An appropriations bill for the
Graduate School of Music recital,
presented by Overman, was rejected
by a vote of 12 to 15, with two
abstentions.
Earlier in the meeting, Little
presented Paul Breitman, associate
director of Mendenhall Student
Center, with a plaque from the SGA
in recognition of his outstanding
service in the field of economic ad-
visement. "It was with a great deal
of sorrow that I and the rest of the
student body received notice of his
leaving Little said.
Breitman has accepted the posi-
tions at Rutgers University as
associate dean of students and direc-
tor of the student centers.
Overman also said the the
legislature was to be commended for
its performance despite a critical
editorial in last Tuesday's Last
Carolinian.
Students Win Fight Over Library Move
B IOM MALI
In what may be a sizable show o
the power o students on the bast
Carolina campus, several students
(ought for a change in the date the
Health Sciences Library would be
moved to the Brodv Medical
Sciences Building � and won.
On Thursday, Nov. 12, a
memorandum was issued to faculty
members by Dr. Jo Ann Bell, direc-
tor o the Health Sciences Library
(HSlin Belk Allied Health
Building. Bell announced in the
memo that the library would be
moving to the Brodv Building
'�during the month of December
No specific date was given o when
the HSL would be moving.
The next day Bel! issued-another
memorandum to faculty members in
the Schools of Medicine, Nursing,
and Allied Health and Social Pro-
fessions. "The HSL will begin to
pack journals on Dec 7, 1981, and
books shortly after that date the
memorandum read. Please warn
the students in your classes that ex-
cept for reserve materials (which
will be packed last) the collection
will not be accessible once it is pack-
ed
"Students should plan to finish
papers and reports by Dec. 7 or risk
not having access to the materials
they need the Nov. 13 memoran-
dum concluded. ECU'S exam period
begins Dec. 10 and lasts until Dc
17.
Lmilv Long, a graduate student in
Department of Speech, Language
and Auditory Pathology, has four
take-home final exams and claimed
that the research materials needed
for finals are too large in number to
be placed on reserve. Students could
not have found out about the move
until the Monday after the
memorandum was Issued, according
to 1 ong. She was told at a staff
meeting on Nov 18.
"We decided we were going to do
something about it, but we didn't
know what to do I ong said. She
and Ruth lav lor, another graduate
student, volunteered to head up the
protest against the Dc 7 packing.
1 ong said two other students.
Cindv Cobb and Ann Gschwind.
talked to Bell on Nov. 18. Bell told
them she would have 100 chairs in
the library during the packing and
would "try to get them some
tables according to Long. The
students were told that "shelve, are
very noisy when being taken down"
and that if Bell could not get tables
or reduce the noise she would try to
get study rooms on the first floor of
the Belk Building. The problem with
moving to separate rooms. Bell said,
was that "students tend to talk
unless supervised
Cobb and Gschwind were also
told that the contractors moving
library materials would not look at a
bid later than Dec. 17 because of the
upcoming holidays. Long said.
Three weeks are needed to move the
library, and Bell told the students
that she wanted it to be open by Jan.
4 � the day medical school students
return from Christmas break
Bell said Monday that based on
her past experience, the library is us-
ed least during the week of exams.
"In the first few days of classes, it's
like a circus over here she added.
"We tried every way we could to
minimize the inconvenience. 1 don't
know any way to get around it
The students had a petition ready
on Nov. 19 that protested the pack-
ing before exams were over. More
than 400 signatures from students
majoring in health professions to art
and business were eventually col-
lected.
Many graduate SLAP students
distributed the petitions, as well as
Mike Ernest, director of the Hear-
ing Impaired Students program. "A
friend of mine knocked on the door
of a nursing class with about 200
students and told the instructor
about the petition I ong said.
"They didn't didn't even know
about the petition
Long and Taylor decided to talk
to Dr. Ronald I. Thiele, dean o the
School of Allied Health and Social
Professions. Long was told that
Thiele was in a conference and
could not be reached, but he issued
a memorandum to faculty members
on Nov. 19 saying that he had
received "expressions of concern
from a small but vocal group of
students The memorandum read
that there was "absolutely no alter-
native" to the schedule planned for
moving the library and urged pro-
fessors to notify Bell of any
"absolutely essential" materials in
addition to those kept on reserve.
In a Nov. 24 meeting with Dr.
Susan McDaniel, associate vice
chancellor for academic affairs.
Long and several other students
were told to ask their professors if
they would be using material not
available to Bell, Long said.
Mc Daniel told the students she
�'hesitated to be optimistic" and
that Bell is �'very service-oriented
according to Long.
McDaniel reportedly told Long
and the others that it is was very
easv to get people to sign petitions.
According to Long, McDaniel
argued the semantics of the petition.
See LIBRARY, Page 3
Faculty Salaries
B MIKE HUGHES Dr. Staurt Bondurant. will earn
sulU�,� 100,000.
Salaries for faculty and ad- Chairman of the departments of
ministrators in the University of surgery at the L NC and ECU
North Carolina system are slated to medical schools will receive a max-
increase between 10 and 13 percent mium ot SI20,000 per year, a figure
beginning next year. set b tne BOG.
However, salaries foi professors At ECU and five other institu-
and lecturers will vary from campus tions in the state, the maximum
to campus, since the Stale Personnel salaries set by the BOG for faculty
Act, which controls many employ- as of January 1, 1982, are: $43,000
ment practices, does not apply to for professors, $33,700 for associate
employees of the UNC system. professors, $29,400 for assistant
For instance. Chancellor professors and $23,200 for instrue-
Chnstopher Fordham of UNC at tors. The average salary, however,
Chapel Hill will receive an annual will be $25,322.
salary of $79,380, whereas Winston- At UNC-CH and North Carolina
Salem State University Chancellor State University, average salaries
Douglas Covington's salary will be paid will reach $27,342. The max-
$52,820. The salary for the imum salaries will range from
chancellor at ECU will increase to $50,500 for professors to $25,100
$69,730 after January 1, according for instructors at the two schools,
to a UNC Board of Governors Robert Hursey. an associate pro-
report, lessor of mathematics who compil-
The highest salaries will be paid to ed much of the information for an
medical administrators and faculty. ECU Faculty Senate study, claims
Dr. William Laupus, dean of the that few faculty members are earn-
ECU School of Medicine, will ing the maximum salaries,
receive $88,000 annually. The dean Hursey quoted the fall 1980
at the Chapel Hill medical school, average salary for campus faculty
����mmj���� members (excluding medical school
0�1 lf Sjlft faculty and administrators) at
JH FiG IrlSKJC $22,494. Hursey claims that that
MHaMaHHHHHaBiiHMHHaai average is still accurate and that it
�y falls below the annual estimated
Announcements budget for a four.person famjiy.
Opinions4 The Bureau of Labor Statistics
Campus Forum4 sie(j the estimated intermediate
Entertainment5 budget for the fall of 1980 at
Sports8 $23,134.
Classifieds 9 The highest salary paid for a cam-
Increase, Vary
pus faculty member is about
$38,600, acording to
Hursey.However, Hursey emphasiz-
ed that the majority of campus
faculty members � the vast majori-
ty � are receiving salaries close to
the $22,494 mark. "The standard
deviation is very low he said.
Each year, the American Associa-
tion of University Professors
publishes a comparison of pro-
fessors' salaries at institutions
around the country. Both Hursey
and Dr. Thomas Johnson, chairman
of the ECU Faculty Senate, claim
that ECU salaries compare un-
favorably to others around the na-
tion.
UNC-G Student Leader
Miller Leaves Office
By MIKK HUGHES
suff Wnler
Wishing the student government
at the University of North Carolina
at Greensboro "a most successful
and fulfilling school year SGA
President David Miller has resigned.
Miller and another UNC-G stu-
dent, Darius Davis, were arrested by
Greensboro police on Sept. 24 on
charges of false pretense stemmm-
ing from credit card fraud.
According to the police report,
Miller pocketed a credit card on
Sept. 10 that was left at the Sears
store where he worked. Twelve days
later, he and Davis attempted to
purchase clothing with the card.
When the clerk behind the
counter began to run a routine
credit check on the card. Miller and
Davis fled from the store. Miller
was recognized by several of the
store's employees.
On Sept. 24, the two students
turned themselves in to police after
being contacted by officers. The two
were released without bond, and the
case is currently pending in N. C.
Superior Court.
If convicted of false pretense,
Miller and Davis face maximum
prison sentences of 10 years.
Miller's term of office lasted only
eight days, as he took a leave of
absence on Sept. 29.
In Miller's absence, SGA Vice
President Rusty Weadon assumed
the position as president.
Immediately following Miller's
official statement of resignation,
Judy Hullman, a member of the SG
Board of Elections announced that
nominations for a replacement
president would be accepted beginn-
ing the following day.
The upcoming election for a new
SGA president will be the fifth such
contest for the post since the spring
of last year.
All Choked Up
The offensive fumes and smoke from this unsightly tar machine
Auditorium choke passersby.
PfMto By OARY PATTERSON
at Wright

-
w ' .
.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER I. 1981
Announcements
N
BANKING AND
FINANCE
Be'a Kappa Alpha, the banking
and finance fraternity, will meet
8t 6 p m n Mendenhall room 271
on Wednesday. Dec 2 Mr Paul
Rename from Wheat First
Securities will discuss the stale ot
today s securities markets Ap
plications and the annual dues ot
V will be collected at this meeting
All interested persons are .nvited
to attend
SLC
The ECU Sign Language Club
Will hold ts regular bimonthly
i vered o.sh supper and meeting
on Sunday at the Mendenha" S�u
tii Center Mult. Purpose Room
The supper will beg.n a' 6 P m
with short business meeting and
captioneo Mm to to"ow
The meal and meeting are open
to any interested student faculty
member or a member of the com
muny You 00 not need to know
Sign Language to atteno but
students who are !a�ng s,gn
language classes or who have
taken them in the past are en
couraged to attend The purpose of
the SlC is to allow sign langugage
students and hear.ng ,mpaired
lents ano community
members to socialise and develop
communication skills
We hope to see you there
MEN WANTED!
The ECU Men s Glee Club is cur
rently recruiting men tor the Spr
ing Semester The Glee Club w.u
be tourmg North Carolina m
January with a number ot other
appearances scheduled
throughout the semester If you
would like to lO.n this fine chorus
or only wish to inquire about
future mempership please contact
Ed Glenn Director at the School of
Music 757 6331 or at 757 6195 The
Men s Glee Club is open to ail men
campuswde and offers one hour
cred't per semester The Glee
Club rehearses at 12 00 M W F
Anyone interested in iommg the
Glee Club next semester should
contact Mr Glenn as soon as
possible in order to be eligible for
the Spring Tour
SGA
There are still openings for SGA
representatives from Belk and
Tyler Dorms Applications should
be Submitted at the SGA office
Filing deadline is 4 p m
December 1
P.E. MAJORS
am students who plan fo declare
physical education as a major dur
ing the spring semester or who in
tend to student teach during the
spring semester should report to
Mmges Coliseum at 10 a m on
Wednesday, Dec 9for a motor and
physical fitness test Satisfactory
performance on this test is re
quired as a prerequisite for of
ticiai admittance to the physical
education maior program More
detailed information covering the
test is available by calling
757 6447
AUDITIONS
Auditions for Stephen B Fin
nans production ot Neil Simons
BAREFOOT IN THE PARK will
be held at the Methodist Student
CEnter (5th nad Holly Streets) on
Friday, Dec 4 at 7 30 p ,m and
Saturday, Dec 5 at 2 00 p m The
roles of Cone vyoung newlywed).
Mr veiasco la Bohemian),
Telephon man and Delivery Per
son are still open everyone is m-
vited to participate BAREFOOT
in THE PARK is the second pro
duction of Mr Fmnan's develop
ng little theatre organization and
will open February 24 For further
information, please call Mr Fin
nan at 757 3546
CO-OP
The Co op Office, locate in 313
Rawl. currently has job openings
for Spring Semester 82 wiftit he
following agencies, interested
students are urged to apply today I
General Accounting Office in
Virginia Beach, VA - Business
majors with 2 9 GPA's or above
who have completed approximate
ly 75 hurs (juniors) should apply
Burroughs Corporation � Com
puter Science and accounting ma
,ors placement may be in
Charlotte NC, Atlanta GA, or other
Burroughs Corporation worksites
Student may request placement in
specific areas throughout the U S
Social Security Administration
,n Baltimore. MO - Recruiter will
be on campus January 28 to inter
view computer science and math
majors Interested students
should stop by the office to com
plete necessary forms
PIRATE BASKETBALL
All campus organizations are
urged to send a group represen
tative to the Student Athletic
Board meeting on Wednesday,
Dec 2 in Mmges COIiseum. Room
142143 at 5 p m Experience
MINGES MANIA contests and
FUN
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroii
man in care of the news editor
There is no charge for an
nouncements. but space is often
limited.
The deadline for announcement
are 5pm Friday for the Tuesday
paper aid 5pm Tuesday for the
Thursday paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
CLOTHING AND
TEXTILES
The Clothing and Textiles
Association is holding it's monthly
meeting at 5 00 tommorrow in the
VanLandingham Room m the
Home Ec Building
We invite all Clothing and Tex
tiles majors and minors to become
a member We also welcme ou oldf
and new members This month's
feature is a discussion with a
fashion model II should prove in
terestmg. so come iom us1
CERAMICSGUILD
The Eighth Annual Ceramics
Guild Exhibition and Sale ot tune
tional pottery and clay sculptural
forms will be held December 3 and
4 (Thursday and Friday) from 9
am tilSpm This year's location
is the Mam Entrance Lobby in the
Leo W Jenkins Fine Arts Building
on East Fifth St All proceeds
benefit the Ceramic Guild's pro
grams for lecturers, workshops
and symposiums All work is
original and hand made in this
event which has become an East
Carolina Community holiday
tradition
Further information is available
from Ms Linda LeMar. President
or Charles Chamberlain, Faculty
Advisor, ECU Art School 757 6665,
8 12 mornings
HOME EC
Phi Upsilon Omicron (Home
Economics Honor Society) and the
Student Dietetic Association m
vites you to have a cup of coffee
and see all the baked goods and
crafts we will be selling at our
Christmas Bazaar It will be held
on Monday. Dec 7 from 10 a m 4
p m m the Home Ec s VanLan
dmgham Room Please plan to
stop by
SOCI ANTHCLUB
The Sociology Anthropology
Club is having a covered dish
Christmas Dinner on Dec 2 at 6
pm in Brewster D 307 Just bring
yourself, a friend, and your
favorite covered dishfeasserole,
salad, dessert, etcAll are
welcome Have a safe and happv
holiday break
EBONY HERALD
The Ebony Herald needs writers
for news, arts and people sections
If you have interests in these areas
and basic writing skills, please ap
ply with Media Board secretary,
Monday through Friday. 9am
5pm Leave name and phone
number
LAW SOCIETY
ECU Law Society will meet on
Wednesday evening, December 7
at 7 00 m Room 212 of Mendenhall
Or Takey Cnst of Jacksonville
will be our guest speaker join us
Bring a friend Information, call
Diane Jones 756 6556
BLESS YOU
God bless you all during the hon
day' Why? Because with me help
of Jesus, I rn able to love
EVERYONE
PRCMEETING
The Parks Recreation, Conser
vat,on curriculum and
Cooperative educaton are cortduc
�ng a meeting tor an PRCmaiors
and PRC general college students
who are interested m obtaining
iummer employment in their
f.eio The meeting will be held on
Thursday. December 3 at 6 30
p m m 244 . endenhall
LET'S GET PHYSICAL
The physical ' ECU Team
Handball Club will meet Thursday
Dec 3 at 3 30 pm m 105 Memorial
Gym Plans for next semester will
be discussed Alt interested per
sons should attend
ATHLETIC BOARD
The Student Athletic Board will
oeet m 142 143 Mmges Coliseum on
Wednesday. Dec 2 at 5 P m Be
prepared for MINGES MANIA
The East Carolinian
�. I92i
Published every Tuesday and
Tnursdar during the academ
yoar and every Wednesday dur
,iig me summer
Tht Eas' Carolinian is 'he
t.oai newspaper ot E��'
Carolina Un.verS'N ' '
operated and published I
b� 'he s'uden'sof Eas' Ca
Ui'iverS
Subscription Rate 20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville, NC
POSTMASTER Send ��
i anges fo The Eas' Ca'
Old Sou'h Building. ECU G'e
Ville, NC 77834
Telephone 7J7 � J� 30
Application to man at se'oic
class postage rates n pending
Gteenville, North Carolina
Papers Prevented From Reporting Campus
BOSTON (CPS) -
Several college
newspapers around the
country recently found
themselves in trouble
for trying to report
rapes rumored on their
campuses.
Suspecting the
iolent crime has in-
creased in and around
their camus. staffers at
Boston College's paper
resorted to suing col-
lege police to try to get
a look at BC Crime
records.
A few days later in
mid-October, members
of Boston University's
student paper staff
staged an impromptu
sit-in at BU police
headquarters in an at-
tempt to sec records of
BU crime. The students
were arrested, and now
face trial on trespassing
charges.
And in the most ex-
treme example of ad-
ministration concern
over student reporting
of camus crime,
Chicago police in early
October seized the en-
tire press run of an edi-
tion of DePaul Univer-
sity's student paper
that contained a story
about a campus rape.
Though publication
of the DePaulia was
suspended, DePaul's
president finally
ordered the paper
reinstated.
On all three cam-
puses, student jour-
nalists now suspect
their administrations
are trying to cover up
crime statistics for fear
of damaging their
schools' public image.
"We'd received a call
from an anonymous
student that there had
been an attempted rape
at a dorm recalls Ed-
ward Cafasso, news
editor at Boston
University's Daily Free
Press. "We called the
campus police, and
they said they hadn't
heard anything about
it. That's what's been
happening for years
regarding crime on
campus here
Subsesquently,
Cafasso says, he and
four other staff
members went to cam-
pus police headquarters
to see police logs of the
alleged rape attempt.
Refused access to the
records, the group re-
mained at the station
until Chief Paul Bates
ordered them to leave.
"We didn't plan to
stage a sit-in Cafasso
asserts. "It was all kind
of spontaneous
When the students
refused to vacate the
premises, "We were ar-
rested, handcuffed,
and marched out of the
building Cafasso
relates. The five were
taken to a downtown
Boston police station,
where Cafasso says
they spent two hours in
jail before being bailed
out by their newspaper.
Nixon Library Debated
. � rka trncta�c Qrou�H Prnnfual
DURHAM (CPS) -
Duke University
leaders, embroiled in a
controversy over the
proposed building of a
Richard Nixon library
on the camus, may ig-
nore a compromise by
faculty members op-
posed to the library and
thus further polarize
university factions.
Some faculty members
are threatening to
boycott campus ac-
tivities in retaliation.
Duke's faculty,
which has been the
most vociferous oppo-
nent of the library in
the university com-
munity, wrote a
23-page report recom-
mending the library be
limited in size and be
separated from a Nixon
museum.
The Faculty Senate,
which approved the
report by a 53-0 vote,
generally believed the
recommendations
would be binding on
the trustees.
But last week the
chairman of the board
of trustees annnounced
the faculty recommen-
dations were "certainly
not binding" on the
negotiations between
the university and the
former president's
lawyers over the
library.
The announcement
by board Chairman J.
Alexander McMahon
was "just one more
slap in the face to the
faculty says J. David
Barber, a Duke
political science pro-
fessor and author of
several books on the
presidency.
The most recent
disagreement between
faculty and administra-
tion has raised the
debate � which has
besen raging since
university President
Terry Sanford an-
nounced in August he
had talked to Nixon
about building the
presidential library in
Durham � from the
pros and cons of the
library to one about the
faculty's role in the
university's decision-
making process.
Roy Weintraub,
chairman of the Facul-
ty Senate, says the
faculty will boycott the
library advisory com
mittee until the trustees
clairfy the faculty's role
in the process.
Weintraub hints the
faculty may escalate its
protest. He "refused to
rule out" the possibility
the faculty may abstain
from other university
functions in addition to
the library.
Barber explains the
"library is a scholarly
question, so the view of
the faculty should be
determinate
McMahon contends
the faculty's input,
while "appreciated
"should just be con-
sultative
When Sanford an-
nounced the library
proposal, some faculty
members objected that
any Nixon building
would end up being a
memorial to a disgrac-
ed president.
Originally the Facul-
ty Senate narrowly
voted to tell the trustees
to stop negotiating with
Nixon, but the next day
� September 4 � the
trustees voted to con-
tinue negotiations
anyway.
The trustees argued
that the scholarly value
of the presidential
records � 36 million
documents and 6000
hours of tape � was
worth the effort of pur-
suing talks.
"We would like the
papers. We just don't
want the library and
museum history
department Chair-
woman Jean Scott ex-
plained in September.
Nixon reportedly
told his lawyers that the
library has to be ac-
companied by a
museum at Duke,
where Nixon graduated
from law school in
1937.
Students haven't
been as active in the
controversy as the
faculty. About 50
studetns formed
SCANDL (Students
Committee Against the
Nixon-Duke Library)
in October. It has rais-
ed about $100, and run
some newspaper ads
against the proposal.
A majority of
students, however,
seems to favor the pro-
posal.
Proposal details are
being worked out by
Duke lawyer Eugene
McDonald, who was in
Washington, D.C.
recently to negotiate
with Nixon attorney
Stanley Mortenson.
Reached by phone in
Washington, Morten-
son declined to com-
ment whether he'd talk
to Duke representatives
about the library.
While McDonald
says that "in my mind
negotiations haven't
started yet some
library opponents say
his visits with Morten-
son broke Sanford's
moratorium on talks
until internal university
policy is settled.
"Did they tell you
that 1 guaranteed I
would be on the phone
to them at four
o'clock Bates
reports. "They were ar-
rested and charged with
trespassing. That's the
whole story as far as
I'm concerned
Cafasso notes his
group was inspired by
fellow journalists at
Boston College.
"We had informa-
tion that a rape had oc-
cured on campus
says Elisa Sperane,
news editor at The
Heights, BC's student
paper. "The police
denied it had happened
and wouldn't let us see
their logs. We get a lot
of reports from
students about campus
crime, which we'd like
to substantiate. But the
police just say 'No, it
didn't happen, and we
can't let you see our
records
The BC paper then
filed suit under a
Massachusetts law that
makes most police log
entries public
knowledge.
Boston College and
Boston University of-
ficials contend the
statute doesn't apply to
their privately-hired
police forces.
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BC's Speranza notes
that student papers at
nearby Harvard,
Brandeis, Wellesley
and Tufts all have ac-
cess to campus police
files.
She stops short of
saying BC police are
covering up crime.
"We don't know for a
fact whether they're
concealing a lot of stuff
or not. That's just the
point of our suit. We're
trying to find out
Cafasso suspects the
BU administration of
encouraging police sup-
pression of crime
reports, out of a preoc-
cupation with its self-
image. "1 think there's
a high source of
pressure on Chief
Bates, perhaps even
from BU President
John Silber
"We have not
covered up anything
counters Robert
Bergenheim, BU Vice
President for Labor-
Public Relations. "Not
a single incident on
campus, whether rape
or anthing else, has
been supressed
While Bergenheim
admits the present
secrecy of BU police
files represents "the ad-
ministration's view, not
mine he also fears the
impact of "coverage
blown out of context.
Student journalists
tend to play things up
to sound as if the world
is coming apart
"Believe me. we
don't take the problem
of crime lightly,
though. We're aware
college campuses are
magnets f�r
criminals
"1 don't think it
gives us a black eye if a
problem with security is
publicized says Rev.
Thomas Croak, dean
of students at DePaul
in Chicago. "It should
simply goad us into do-
me a better job
But Croak admits
�There's a lot of con-
cern by college ad-
ministrators in general
about the image of
their schools as being
safe, especially when
you have an urban
campus
Croak was the ad-
ministrator who
ordered campus and ci-
ty police to seize all
copies of the October
9th issue of the
DePaulia, which ran a
story about a rape com-
mitted on the Chicago
campus three days
earlier.
Before the edition
was confiscated. Editor
Vince Ke'len had refus-
ed Croad's request to
delay running the story
for a week.
"My concern was for
the young lady not to
read about this in the
school newspaper
says Croak, who had
counseled the rape vic-
tim and claims she was
"going through con-
siderable trauma
"I'm a First Amend-
ment devotee Croad
asserts, "and 1 don't
believe in limitation of
information. 1 had
pangs of conscience
about confiscating the
paper, but my obliga-
tion to the individual
student's well-being
had to come first
DePaulia Editor
Kellen notes that the
regular Chicago press
carried the rape storv.
"(Croak) could have
requested the papers
not to run the storv.
but the attitude seemed
to be 'they can run it.
but we shouldn't run it
at DePaul
Croak's order was
overturned four davs
later in a special session
of a university senate
subcommittee on
publications, and the
confiscated edition was
subsequently
distributed.
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The ai
" Inp
I
I � -
the -
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time
We;
trip a
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pre-
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time,
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Amu
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degradin
infe.
Hence
tme '
campus
the gan
student5-
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The
game h,
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spread
are
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!





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER I, 1981
�linian
HO Vfd' '
im�n otticts
t Old Sou'h
rtpuj of ECU
,J4? M�
I pending d

i ies1 to
he stor
s in ihe
'aper
ho had
e rape vic-
- .he �a
;on-
uma "
Amend-
' Croavi
1 don't
on of
1 had
c ience
ig the
fc �:a-
indi iduai
being
tor
that the
ess
rape stor.
I d hae
e pa
he story,
Itude seemed
can run it.
luidn't run it
rder was
our das
it) senate
111 e e on
and the
edition was
e n t 1 v
99
99
89
69
79
99
99
;s & Texas
New York Trip Called Success
B PATRICK O'NEILL
The annual ECU Thanksgiving
"Trip to New York City" was
another great success this year, ac-
cording to Dale West, a member of
the Student Union Travel Commit-
tee. West, a senior psychology ma-
jor, went on the trip for her third
time.
West seated that organizing the
trip was "pretty simple. We decided
to pursue the same channels as in
previous years. We already knew
everything that had to be done
Sam Boyd, the travel committee
chairman, was also pleased with the
trip. "I enjoyed setting up the trip
and I'm glad everyone had a good
time he said. Boyd has worked
with the travel committee for all ol
his four years at ECU and has been
on the New York trip twice. The trip
has been offered every year since
1975. This year two bus loads ol
students � 98 in all � went on the
trip. The prices ranged from $90 to
$110, depending on the number of
people to a room.
Bovd worked with Rudolph Alex-
ander, director of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, in putting the trip
together. Alexander praised Boyd
for his hard work. "The New York
City trip is certainly the most
popular trip we have offered
noted Alexander.
Other trips sponsored by the Stu-
dent Union have not been as
popular, according to Alexander
and Boyd. Trips to Disney World in
Florida, Hawaii, and a cruise to the
Bahamas have been offered in
previous years, but the high cost has
kept participation at a minimum.
"We kept the New York City trip
price the same as last year Alex-
ander noted. "This one alwys
sells Boyd added.
Boyd and Alexander are planning
another New York trip during spr-
ing break and encourage students to
sign up for this longer version of the
Thanksgiving trip. If the demand is
high it will become an annual event,
too. "I really hope the participation
is good in the spring Boyd said.
"I hope to go
Many of the students who went
on the trip last weekend seemed
pleased with the event and were ob-
viously eager to speak about their
experiences.
"You have to see it to believe it
said art student Wendy Russell of
her first trip to New York. "You
can't explain it. There's nothing like
this in the South she continued.
Mary Ellen Norton, assistant pro-
gram director, expressed similar
sentiments concerning the trip. "I
got to do all the things in New York
City that 1 never did before � hit all
the thrift shops � it was wonder-
ful Norton spoke of the "real
community atmosphere" during the
long bus ride. "There were lots of
jokes and funny stories. It really in-
troduced you to a lot of new peo-
ple
Sleep seemed to be the most
limited activity ot the trip, accor-
ding to Russell. "We stayed out all
night � everybody was excited, into
it, wired up � we just ran off the
energy of the city
Many of the students went to
Broadway shows and art museums.
Others walked and enjoyed the large
choice of restaurants. "We didn't
go on any tour buses or anything
Russell said. "We just got on the
street and walked. There were
buildings and buildings
everywhere
For many of the students, some
of the myths associated with New
York City were dispelled.
"Everybody up there was so nice �
they're just real friendly Russell
noted.
Everyone seemed to come back to
Greenville with much to remember
and talk about. One thing no one
seemed to come back with was
money � getting to New York and
Buses will run on their regular
schedules during exam week.
They will not run on Dec. 9
(Reading Day). Bus service
will continue until 5:30 p.m.
Dec. 17.
Library Pushes Back
Moving Date To Brody
Continued from Page 1
which only opposed the early
removal of textbooks and not jour-
nals, tables and photocopiers. "I
think we were very discouraged at
that point Long said. She sent
a
the hotel took a good deal of it. but letter with the petition enclosed to
that was just the beginning. "I'm Dr. William I aupus, dean ot
broke now Russell said.
Campus 'Killer' Game Banned
DAVENPORT,
Iowa (CPS) �Students
at different campuses
call it "Killer
"Assassin "Secret
Agent "Godfather
and � most commonlv
- "KAOS" (for Kill-
ing As An Organized
Sport).
But the faculty of St.
Ambrose College here
calls it a "sickness in
our society" and "a
degrading, destructive
infection
Hence, St. Ambrose
became the most recent
campus to try to ban
the game, in which
students secretly stalk
each other with rubber
darts or tags.
The number of
schools outlawing the
game has grown with
the sports' remarkable
spread in popularity
around campuses dur-
ing 1981.
Oregon State was the
first school to ban the
game, but was quickly
followed by the Univer-
sity of Massachusetts-
Amherst, and
Southwest Missouri
State University.
A number of other
schools like Arizona
State, Florida and
Loyola of New Orleans
have forbidden certain
clubs and groups from
using the game as fun-
draisers.
Still other schools
have modified the
game. Instead of rub
ber darts, Oregon State
and University of Pen-
nsylvania students
played rounds of the
sport with chocolate
kisses. One short-lived
Michigan State version
used pies instead of the
rubber darts.
But the hunting
nature of the game
makes many uncomfor-
table. Publicity sur-
rounding the University
of Florida version last
spring led to a barrage
of mail from alumni
threatening to
withdraw support for
the university.
"Our college has
always tried to stress
issues of peace and
social justice explains
St. Ambrose faculty
Chairman Fr. Edmund
Dunn. "The general
feeling is that the game
is hardly consistent
with the mission of our
college
Associate Professor
John Greenwood, who
drew up the faculty
resolution asking the
student government to
withdraw support of
the game, claims the
game is basically
"simulated assassina-
tion" and is
"physically and ethical-
ly dangerous
Earlier in the
semester, the student
government, at the ad-
ministration's request.
personally
principle
game and
"several'
changed the name of
the St. Ambrose ver-
sion of the game from
Killer to Godfather.
Last spring
Southwest Missouri
State University
Presidesnt Dr. Duane
Mever halted a univer-
sitv Rifle and Pistol
Club KAOS fundrais-
ing game because he
disliked the
behind the
because of
negative
complaints about it
from the community.
Despite opposition,
the game has been
popular, though not
alwavs effective as a
fundraiser. SWMSU's
rifle club officer Jim
Chenault said the game
before it was banned
made just enough "to
buy us all an evening of
pizzas and a few pit-
chers of root beer
A Penn State frater-
raised a total of
after expenses"
spring, "despite a
big turnout. We
about 80 people
signed up according
to an lnfraternity
Council officer at Penn
State.
"It's just a lot of
fun observes Robbi
Killy Smith, a St. Am-
brose sophomore who
helped organize the
Godfather round in
Davenport.
It has indeed proven
nitv
$66,
last
real
had
to be a resiliant form of
entertainment. Though
its origins are now
shrouded in legend, the
game has been around
at least since 1966 when
a group of Oberlin Col-
lege students, inspired
by an Ursula Andress
movie called "The
Tenth Victim
organized a round of
the stalking game.
In the interim, the
game has become near-
ly universal, usually
flourishing in the warm
spring months. Even as
conservative a campus
as Baylor University,
however, is sporting an
autumn round this
year.
Resistance to the
game has also grown.
Psychologist Bruno
Bettelheim thinks the
game "is pretty sick.
These kids don't have
any real problems, 50
they invent them
Tulane police chief
Col. William Berridge
last February called it
"a lousy idea and
worried his officers
could mistake a KAOS
stalker for a real
criminal. University of
Florida Chief Atkins
Warren similarly warn-
ed "it could turn into a
real disaster
"They just don't
understand it
counters Vince
DeGregorio, who
organized the God-
father game at St. Am-
brose. "I don't think
they see the difference
between a game and
reality
"If Godfather is
simply simulated
assassination asks
one St. Ambrose
senior, "then wouldn't
snowball fighting simp-
ly be simulated murder
by stoning?"
But Sophomore Ken
Rippetoe agrees with
the faculty position.
"Maybe the criticism
of the game has been
overdone, but I think
(the faculty is) respon-
ding to the violent
things really present in
this society
medical school.
On Wednesday. Nov. 25. long
talked to Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for student life. "He was
very cooperative and extremely
helpful she said. Meyer found out
that Laupus, not the university
business manager, was in charge ot
the contract. He then called 1.aupus
and put Long on the line. Laupus
told her he would find out the
limitations of the contract with the
movers and contact Meyer, who
later called Chancellor Thomas
Brewer and told him about the
situation, according to Long.
A memorandum was issued Men
day announcing that the library's
icsources would not be packed until
Dec. 17.
"The administration acted ver
quicklv in this matter I ong aid.
"I was reallv amazed. We had so
tie tune 10 do anything. nd
tacuity was behind us ion perceni
The new site o1 the librarv poes
other problems, however. I ong is
now trying to gel a bus service bet-
ween the Belk and Brody buildings.
"I go to the librarv everv dav she
said. "(The medical school) 1- the
natural place tor the libraiv 10 be.
I'm not contesting thai I one said
she contacted SGA legislators, who
suggested she try another petition.
She said thai another soiuuo:i
might be tor the bus route that lakes
medical and nursing students to the
Brodv Building mighi be altered to
include students in Allied Health.
21 shopping days
'til Christmas
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December 1, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Paul Breitman
ECU'S Loss Is Rutgers' Gain
Today, after 15 years at East
Carolina as a student and ad-
ministrator, Paul Breitman will put
in his final day as associate director
of Mendenhall Student Center.
Breitman, who first came to ECU in
1966 as an undergraduate, is leaving
to accept a position as associate
dean of students at Rutgers Univer-
sity in New Brunswick, N.J.
His leaving creates a void that will
be difficult � if not impossible �
to fill. In his 11 years here, Breit-
man has become, for good reajn,
one of the most widely-respected
administrators on campus.
Breitman graduated from the
university in 1970 with a degree in
business and accepted a position as
assistant director of student ac-
tivities. He was named associate
director of Mendenhall in 1974, and
although his title has remained the
same, his functions and importance
have never ceased to multiply.
Always a financial adviser to the
Student Union, he began serving the
SGA and the Media Board in a
similar capacity during the past two
vears.
Monday, the SGA honored him
with a plaque for his service.
Presenting him with the plaque was
Treasurer Kirk Little, who said, "It
was with a great deal of sorrow that
I and the rest of the student body
received notice of his leaving
We at The East Carolinian owe
Breitman an invaluable debt of
gratitude because in the past year he
has helped us solve numerous finan-
cial crises � both large and small.
And we would hazard a guess that
other organizations, ranging from
the Student Union to the radio sta
tion, feel the same way.
In an atmosphere in which
students are often lost in the shuffle
or shoved out of the way, Breitman
is nothing less than refreshing. His
door is always open, and his at-
titude shows a genuine concern for
the welfare of students. Unlike
some administrators, he puts
students first. In short, he is a con-
summate professional who also has
a unique ability to see things from
the students' point of view.
As Mr. Breitman leaves for New
Jersey, we can only wish him the
best of luck in his new job.
We feel certain that East
Carolina's loss is Rutgers' gain.
Consider This . . .
After a half dozen teams have
suffered the fate of being knocked
from the top position in the college
football polls, Clemson University
now stands only one game away
from claiming the 1981 national ti-
tle.
Alas, that contest will be New
Year's day against the powerful
Nebraska Cornhuskers in Miami's
Orange Bowl. It was only a few
short weeks ago that number one
ranked Penn State invaded that
facility only to be dethroned by the
Miami Hurricanes.
NOW SLAVING AT A
A WAKMONgR BROS. CARTOOUT jgjjgjggg
College Level Complaining An Art
By KIM ALBIN
and DAVE JOHNSTON
In these days of preparing for finals,
roommate reshuffling, and, of course,
Fiskian backlash it is high time we begin to
recognize and appreciate the great unsung
lesson of our academic careers: The Col-
lege Level Complaint.
As college students we master this art.
Although it costs nothing and no credit is
given, this ability may be the most valuable
edification we take into the workforce of
America.
Our education in Complaintability takes
place on many levels. In high school we
learn the basics of complaint: the "It
Stinks format. At that early stage we are
not yet expected to be able to support what
we say, we justsay it.
Even our parents seldom expect us to
document the criticisms we blurt forth.
They smile politely when we inform our
neighbor that her dog needs a bath. They
laugh when we refer to an entire line of
designer sportwear as "tacky They
understand when we fall back on that old
universal stand-by: "It (referring to any or
everything) Stinks
As college freshmen we soon discover
the obsolescence of the "It Stinks: form of
complaining and find that we are often
asked to lend credence to our gripes. But
the frustration of a grumbleless first
semester is too much to bear � which soon
leads us to the discovery of a rudimentary
college-level complaint form: 'The Thing
About That Is This is when, rather
than initiate your own moans (and risk ad-
monishment), your simply reiterate and in-
tensify established lamentations.
Some examples:
Parent: Gee, sounds like you've got a
prettv tough schedule
Freshman: Yea, and the thing about that
is that 1 just don't have time for
schoolwork. and
Sophomore: Doing laundry is such a drag.
Freshman: Yeah, and the thing about that
is that my poor mother is sitting at home
with nothing to do.
From thence we progress in our com-
plaintability to a more advanced style: the
"It's Obvious that format. This for-
mat, by nature of its boldness, requires
(and gets in abundance) supportive literary
and empiracal evidence. Just ask any
senior political science major about
Reagonomics, then prepare for the whine
session of your life. The "It's Obvious
that opening will unobstruct the flood
gates to release a veritable torrent of
oratory.
This leads us to the final, most highly
evolved state of complaint; Graduate Level
Lementation. An example of this kind ol
esoteric moaning is beyond the scope
these writers' preemptions, but b visiting
the laboratories and classrooms
graduate students you can watch them
look at one another and engage in solemn
and profound shakes of the head.
meaning of which is known only
themselves. Silent pipe smoking is also
considered to be a derivation of grad
level lamentation. This utterless, somber
gripe is truly the state of the art � yet the
art stops not here.
The full utility o the college level com-
plaint is realized only when one leaves
lege to consort with America's bourge
� to become a part of what George F. V
calls the "padded class "those pen
sufficiently educated, leisured, organized,
articulate and confident enough to ma
the art of complaining
So regardless of one's status in (
plaintability. whether you are a frustra
freshman floundering with "It Stinks
a grandiose graduate with a grasp on gi
ing inaudibly, be assured that your skills
will serve you your whole life through
i- Campus Forum
TKE Members 'Displaying Socially Learned Behavior'
Strike up another one for the TKE's!
We, the Brothers of Tau Kappa Epsilon,
do feel that the incident that happened
Homecoming Sunday was carried a bit
too far. With the excitement of
Homecoming in the air, the Brothers
and Alumni were socializing and having
an enjoyable time. We admit to the van-
dalism and destructin fo the signs that
were in the Newman's yard, but their
Homecoming float was completely ir-
relevant to the "Paint the Town Purple
and Gold" theme. We are sorry for
these actions, although the public should
not have been led to believe that we are a
constant source of harassment, as the ar-
ticle in last Tuesday's paper implies.
In 1968, the Kappa Psi Alpha
Business Fraternity became the Tau
Kappa Epsilon Social Fraternity. We
still are deeply involved in academics
and athletics, contrary to Dean
Mallory's belief that we are just a
"drinking club
When the Catholic Newman Com-
munity moved next to our house last
fall, they knew what kind of neighbors
they would have to deal with. Since the
East Carolina Gay Community meetings
were held at the Newman house, they
recieved harassment from us at First.
Those few who gave trouble did not act
mature, they were just displaying social-
ly learned behavior against the rising cir-
cumstances. Sister Helen Shondell feels
that every word heard from our house in
some way directed at her or her
organization. She even admits that we
are not the only people that have yelled
at the organizations which meet at the
Newman House. This problem is
campus-wide.
The Brothers and myself cannot
change our attitudes and beliefs toward
homosexuality, but an understanding of
the freedom to choose a life-style
without social pressure is in the making.
In the upcoming semester, the new of-
ficers will encourage an "easing of ten-
sion" between the two houses. The plan-
ning of these actions will be in the near
future. The next move is ours, we are go-
ing to make it worthwhile.
MICHAEL L. DINGA
Vice-President TKE
Good Taste?
To the photographers and staff of this
fine and renowned paper, I truly think
your picture of our homecoming queen
was in bad taste, sure the camera took
what it saw, but there were a thousand
others taken that I bet looked a lot bet-
ter.
As for the caption, I at first didn't see
how the word in homecoming pirate can
mean the same as homecoming queen.
I'm glad someone explained the situa-
tion to me, now you should explain it to
others as well. To you The East Caroli-
nian, I find bad taste in black represen-
tation and a big question on equality of
race, creed, and color. Homecoming for
ECU was, I thought, a big event. Please
explain the small write-up.
And to you Mr. Fisk, what's wrong
with giving blacks or any minority here
on campus a little voice? Is it that you
are afraid of us and not man enough to
admit it? What harm can we do you and
your kind? It is sad to know that there
are some of your kind still on this earth.
But that's okay, God is still going to
bless us.
JENICE P. PELLAM
Junior, Special Ed.
Headline Misleading
1 was very distressed at the heading
my rebuttal to Ronald Fisk's editorial
was given, in which you labeled me his
"lone sympathiser I consider myself
moderately liberal and I stated strongly
that 1 believe in equal rights for all peo-
ple. I have no sympathy whatsoever for
Mr. Fisk nor his distorted ideals!
MARK BROOKS
Geography
Make Room For ECGC
1 am writing in response lo Mark
Brooks' letter (Lone Sympathizer) in the
November 19, 1981 issue of The East
Carolinian. It appears that a number of
East Carolina students are misinformed
as to the purpose of the East Carolina
Gay Community. Surely were they to
know all the facts people like Mr.
Brooks might not be so ready to agree
with the opinions of Mr. Fisk. Perhaps
the ECGC is at fault for not making its
goals clear to the student body; perhaps
we, as a group, assumed that these goals
would be obvious. 1 hope that 1 can
answer the questions raised by Mr.
Brooks and in doing so, rectify this over-
sight by our organization.
Mr. Brooks asks why one group
should have privileges that the majority
of students do not have. I ask, "What
privileges?" We receive no rights or
special treatment that is not available to
every student and student organiztion on
this campus. In fact, our organization is
open to all students, faculty, alumni.
and staff of E.C.U regardless or race,
creed, color, sex, or sexual preference.
Mr. Brooks adds that in a state-
supported school there is no room for
special interest groups. Are not the foot-
ball team, the SociologyAnthropology
Club, the Arts Forum, the Model U.N
the various sororities and fraternities,
and the numerous other organizations
on this campus special interest groups?
Is there no room for them? Of course
there is! And there is also room for the
East Carolina Gay Community. Let's
face it: in a free country, we cannot cater
to everyone all the time. We are all in-
dividuals with individual interests. The
ECGC has established itself as a service
organization striving to meet the needs
of as many people as possible in this
community. We are trying to promote
an atmosphere of understanding bet-
ween people of different sexual orienta-
tions. We provide the opportunity for
the community to broaden its concep-
tion of alternative lifestyles through
counseling, discussions, lectures, and
other educational means.
It may appear that our group receives
more attention than other groups on
campus. This is bsecause we are a con-
troversial organization and therefore, in
the news more often. The only
"something extra" I can think of that
separates us from others is the occas-
sional harassment that we receive. I'm
sure Mr. Brooks does not want to deal
with that. No one does; no one should
have to. Through the efforts of the
ECGC we can hope for a future where
people who differ are not harassed, and
i he need for such a special interest group
does not exist.
MARKZUMBACH
Junior, Drama
'Fisk-al' Disability
Our Mr. Fisk seems to be a bit confus-
ed. If the students on this campus really
did give a damn, his stupid prejudices
would be the first thing that they would
go after. His limited mentality cannot
seem to grasp this simple point. Yet
perhaps, this is hobgoblin of little
minds.
JOHN WAl DEN
Senior, History
Minority Rights
Mr. Ronald Fisk, I did not know that
there were any racists at ECU crazy
enough to write such a sick letter to the
Campus Forum. Well, ever since I read
your letter I have been trying to decide
how I could compose my letter on a level
that you and others like you would be
able to understand.
You state that you don't know why
there is any ECU Gay Community or an
Afro-Amrican Culture Center. Didn't
you take U.S. History in the 11th grade?
Have you ever heard of the Constitution
of the U.S.? Read the 1st Amendement
to the Constitution. It states: "Congress
shall make no law respecting an
establishment of religion, or prohibiting
the free exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or of the press;
or the right of the people peaceably to
assemble, and to petition the Govern-
ment for a redress of grievances
Even though the majority of the
students at ECU are white, this does not
justify overlooking the needs and the
rights of the minority.
I think you are afraid that the minori-
ty (the black students) might take over
ECU and then the majority (the white
students) would become the minority. It
is a well known fact that people fear and
resist change and they fear anything that
they do not understand. You are no ex-
ception to the rule. 1 would like to
recommend that you read a book thai
may help to enlighten you. Black Like
Me by Howard Griffin. This is a white
man's perspective of black lite (so you
should be able to understand it). Yet.
although Mr. Griffin is a good writer. 1
don't know if he can accomplish anv
miracles and remove some of the
dehumanizing ideals from your think
ing.
As to your reference of "moral
diseases The American Heritage Dic-
tionary defines moral as: "Of or con-
cerned with the judgement of the
goodness or badness of human action
and character; pertaining to the discern-
ment of good and evil Where did you
receive your Juris Doctor degree? Where
and when did you pass the bar? When
did you become a judge? Where is your
court? Do you follow my line o reason-
ing? Well, even if you can't it is not for
you to decide what is right and what is
wrong for anyone, but yourself!
You and people like you receive pity
(as long as you stay out of influencial
and powerful positions), but when you
enter the power structure, we. the
minority must organize and fight you!
One way of fighting everything you
stand for (which is straight from the
ideals of Hitler, the American Nazi Par-
ty, and the KKK) is to vote.
I know that it never occurred to you
that our 1981 Homecoming Queen had
to have received a percentage of votes
from white s'udents as well as black
students.
Do you feel like a fool yet, Mr. Fisk?
If not, then you realize I am sure that
"they say Ignorance is Bliss.
JFANE. MILLS
Graduate Student
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
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Entertainment
DECEMBER 1, 1981
Page 5
'Time Bandits'
Exhilarating
Fantasy Film
��.�-�.��-�.���

xxx
ix
as
B JOHN WEY1 ER
M�(( Wrllrr
V hat would happen if Montv
Python's Flying Circus, 1 ewis Car-
roll and Cecil B. DeMille met? The
likely result would be something
similar to the epic coined) fantasj
film Time Bandits, now playing at
the Buccaneer Theatres in Green-
ville.
A collaboration between the
British comed group, the 19th-
century author of Alice in
M onderland, and the late director
of Hollywood epics is not as im-
probable as it sounds, for, he
Supreme Being who created the
uimerse did a sloppy job of it. leav-
ing holes in the fabric of time and
space or so says Terry Ciilliam,
director and co-writer of Time Ban-
dits
Giliam, whose most widely seen
work is the animation and artwork
for Monty Python, has created a
unique, intriguing and somewhat
unsettling motion picture. Time
Bandits resembles nothing so much
as a modern Alice in Wonderland.
Like Carroll's classic, Gilliam's film
is wild humor, social satire, and
psychological insight all in one
weird work.
1 ike Alice, Bandits centers
around a child who falls down a
hole into a wonderworld. Unlike it.
Bandits's kid character, Kevin, falls
down many holes into many way-
out wonderworlds, including the
Time of 1 egend, medieval England
and ancient Greece.
Instead of a white rabbit, Kevin
follows six dwarves into the void.
Former workers for the Supreme
Being, the dwarves have stolen their
master's map to the aforementioned
rips in time, using it to appear here
and there, now and then, in search
of plunder. They and Kevin en-
counter Robin Hood (Monty
Python's John Cleese), Agamem-
non (Sean Connery), Napoleon (Ian
Holm), an ogre with a bad back, a
giant, and many others.
Along the way the less-than-
Magnificent Seven are bedeviled by
the Evil Genius (David Warner), a
campy Antichrist who in the film's
climactic battle scene fights the boy,
the dwarves, a pig, an armored
tank, cowboys, knights, and Sir
Ralph Richardson as an unusual
Creator.
The eternal struggle between good
and e il is one of the film's themes;
another is childhood innocence and
imagination versus adult
materialism and monotony. Both
themes figure in the surprise ending,
which leaves viewers in a shocked.
See RACE, Page 6
Ramones Will Rock Hendrix In Late Show This Friday And Saturday
Irreverent rock group the Ramones � Dee Dee, Joey, Johnny and
Markv � are pictured above with actress P.J. Soles as they appear in
the acclaimed cult classic Rock ' ' Roll High School the late show
this Friday and Saturday at 11:30 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre.
m
Kurosawa '$ Epic Drama Playing Wednesday
Tomorrow evening at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall's Hen-
drix Theatre, the Student Cnion Films Committee will
present amazing Japanese director Akira Kurosawa's
Kagemusha.
Following the film in room 221 of the student center,
a short, informal discussion will be held. Coffee and
doughnuts will be served and unv interested students,
faculty and staff are invited to attend.
This stunning work directed by world-renowned
cimematic master Akira Kurosawa shared the 1980
Grand Pne at Cannes with All That Jazz and is the
director's first film since his 1975 Academy Award-
winning Best r-oreign Film, Dersu izala.
�s ambitious and accomplished as anything
Kurosawa has ever done. Kagemusha (The Shadow
It arrior) unfolds as both an epic tale of survival and an
indelible portrait of two men who shape, then become,
part of history.
Set in the 16th century � a favorite period of the
director's and one used in his early great films � the
story focuses on powerful warlord, Shingen Takeda.
and a petty theif who is his double (both portrayed by
Tatsuya Nakadai).
At first used only in combat to protect the real leader,
the double soon becomes a full time irnposter, unifying
and protecting the Takeda clan after the real warlord
dies.
Nakadai is superb in his demanding dual role which
reveals the depths o' human strength and adaptablity.
Meticulouslv authentic in its set and costume designs,
magnificently photographed, Kagemusha bears the
great Kurosawa trademark; it is a film that combines
panoramic beauty and sweeping motion with rich!)
developed, compelling characters:
"Akira Kurosawa's genius has been manifold all
through his long career. Prodigally, prodigiously, he
has moved with ease and mastery from the most
mysteriously interior to the most spectacular.
"With kagemusha, finished when he was 70,
Cinema
Kurosawa is back, really back: seizing us with his vision
that seems to transform the screen before us into dif-
ferent shapes and depths and rivers o force, with
stillness and with blaze. 'Yes I kept thinking as 1 wat-
ched, 'yes. Yes 1 don't know precisely what 1 meant,
though 1 could speculate, but 1 kept thinking it.
"What Kurosawa has done in his new work, extraor-
dinary in anyone but stupendous in a man of 70. is to
center his film in immense military action: to make that
action the sea on which individual lives sail, to make the
rush and clash of masses of men, on foot or on horses,
the ground of the whole 160 minute work.
"Part of the impact of Kagemusha, battles included,
comes from the cinematographer, Takao Saito, who.
with his operator Asakazu Nakai, has worked for
Kurosawa over 25 years. The color scheme is enriched,
heightened, to keep the film out of realism and in
'ballad though much of the specific action is graphic.
But, of course, most of the impact comes from
Kurosawa's imperial grip.
"The sweep of shots is marvelous, especially as
Kurosawa sometimes blends one into another going a
different way. The sound track is always incisive. Most-
ly the film strikes and strikes again with grand composi-
tions, grand gestures.
" If Kagemusha is not Kurosawa's fullest picture in
human and spiritual compass, it is up to his height in
cinematic purity. Kagemusha is Homeric
� Stanley Kauffmann,
New Republic
"Our respect for the film and the filmmaker is un-
bounded. Akira Kurosawa is one of the living masters
of the cinema. Most great directors have one classic by
which they are known, but Kurosawa has many. We are
certain it will take its place among the great Kurosawa
films
� Francis Ford Coppola
George Lucas
"Kagemusha is probably the great Japanese director
Akira Kurosawa's most physically elaborate, most
awesome film, full of magnificent views of lines of
mounted soldiers slowly crossing grand landscapes or
galloping along seashores, against sunsets of a
magnigicence that seems to foreshadow the end of the
world. Kagemusha is majestic, stately, cool and in many
of its details, almost abstract. It is so elegantly dire ted
that even perfunctory shots seem integral to the film's
ritual.
"In Kagemusha. Mr. Kurosawa contemplates tumult
in brilliant individual images of battle, of bodies falling,
of great bands of nameless men advancing to their
deaths. There is beauty in Kagemusha but it is imper-
sonal, distant, and ghostly. The old master has never
been more rigorous
� Vincent Canby,
New York Times
A rea Sing Of Handel
On For This Sunday
This area's first "Community Sing" of Handel's
Messiah is scheduled for Sunday, December 6, at 3 p.m.
in Minges Coliseum on the East Carolina University
campus.
The event, expected to draw people from all of
eastern North Carolina, features the combined choruses
of the ECU School of Music, the Greenville Choral
Society, and the East Carolina Symphony Orchestra
with audience participation.
An invitation is extended to all interested persons to
come and participate by singing with the combined
choirs on the familiar choruses of the Messiah. Au-
dience participants will be seated together in the front
See SING Page 6
Mysterious Death
Natalie A Hollywood Legend
A Film Career That Began At The Age Of Four
Shown above in a pose struck on the set of West
Side Story in 1961, Natalie Wood's film career had
begun long before when she was only 4 years old.
Natalie was named "the most talented juvenile mo-
tion picture star of the year" in 1947 and went on to
earn three Academy Award nominations for her
work on the screen. She may have been the only ma-
jor child actress to mature on film and attain adult
stardom: "I was a child actress as opposed to a
'child star It was easier for me to make the transi-
tion. 1 didn't have the terrible exposure to the
limelight as a child that Shirley (Temple) and
Margaret (O'Brien) had
By VERNON SCOTT
l PI Holhuood Rrponrr
LOS ANGELES (UPI) � Actress Natalie Wood cast
off alone in the night during a holiday yacht trip with
her husband and was later found drowned nearby in a
shallow lagoon. Authorities ordered an autopsy today
to determine how the 43-year-old star slipped into the
water.
Miss Wood's fully-clothed body, found shortly after
dawn Sunday, was floating just beneath the surface only
200 feet from the Isthmus of the resort island of Santa
Catalina, about 20 miles off the Southern California
coast.
Authorities said Miss Wood apparently drowned
after falling overboard from an inflatable rubber dinghy
found beached near the body. Today's autopsy was ex-
pected to shed some light on her mysterious death.
The three-time Oscar nominee had been spending the
weekend with her husband, actor Robert Wagner, and
actor Christopher Walken, with whom Miss Wood was
starring in the film Brainstorm. They arrived at the
island Friday aboard the 55-foot Wagner yacht, Splen-
dour.
The three went ashore for dinner Saturday night.
"Mr. and Mrs. Wagner had dinner last night in a
restaurant on the Isthmus, after which they returned to
their boat (anchored offshore) family friend and
spokesman Paul Ziffren said Sunday.
"While Mr. Wagner was in the cabin, Mrs. Wagner
apparently went to their stateroom he said. "When
Mr. Wagner went to join her, he found that she was not
there and that the dinghy was also gone.
"Since Mrs. Wagner often took the dinghy out alone,
Mr. Wagner was not immediately concerned. However,
when she did not return in 10 or 15 minutes, Mr.
Wagner took his small cruiser and went to look for her.
When this proved unsuccessful, he immediately con-
tacted the Coast Guard, who then continued the
search
The Coast Guard said it was notified of Miss Wood's
disappearance at 3:30 a.m. and immediately notified
lifeguards, who joined the search. Wagner spent much
of the morning aboard the lifeguard patrol boat
Baywatch Isthmus.
At 7:45 a.m a helicopter finally spotted the body
and it was airlifted to shore, where Wagner made
See NATALIE'S, Page 7
Raleigh Mourns Death;
Triangle Area Shocked
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) � The news Sunday of
Natalie Wood's death stunned residents of North
Carolina, some of whom worked with the actress on her
last movie, filmed on location in the Research Triangle
area this fall.
Miss Wood bought a hand-knit sweater from Marian-
na Wachtel of Raleigh after seeing Mrs. Wachtel wear-
ing it at a neighbor's home where the cast of Brainstorm
was filming. Someone took a picture of the transaction.
"The thing I'm so thankful for is that 1 have that pic-
ture of us arm-in-arm Mrs. Wachtel said. "It's so
much more precious now. 1 was going to send her a copy
See RALEIGH, Page 6






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1, 1981
Raleigh Stunned By News
Continued From P. 5
of it.
"I told her it was one
of the most exciting
days of my life, wat-
ching them film. I felt
like she was my friend.
1 don't know now if 1
can stand to see the
movie
Her reaction was
common to others who
met Miss Wood during
her brief stay in North
Carolina during filming
of the $16 million
movie featuring a
young scientist played
by Christopher
Walken. It also
features Oscar winners
Cliff Robertson and
Louise Fletcher.
Mary-Fran Lyman, a
local actress cast as a
real estate agent, work-
ed with Ms. Wood for
two days.
"She wasn't the least
bit Hollywood Mrs.
Lyman said. "We just
spent two days together
but we talked mostly
about our children. She
was telling me that her
11-year-old daughter
had just had her first
slumber party.
Filming of the movie
has not been com-
pleted, but Don Levy,
MGM spokesman, said
most of Ms. Wood's
role was finished.
William V. Arnold,
coordinator of motion
pciture activities for
North Carolina, spent
five or six weeks travel-
ing with the Brainstorm
cast and crew. Arnold
'Sing' Slated
said news of Ms.
Wood's death "came
as a shock.
"She was so
vivacious and alive, so
full of herself he
said. "She seemed
pleased and happy
Gov. James B. Hunt
Jr who invited the
film's stars to one of
his news conferences,
called the death "a
tragedy and a loss to
millions of people
around the world who
she entertained and in-
spired.
"Her warm and
down-to-earth nature
made her many friends
in North Carolina. Our
out
to her
and
aide,
had
Ms.
hearts go
husband
children
Hunt's press
Gary Pearce,
breakfast with
Wood at the governor's
mansion.
"The governor knew
I had been a fan of hers
and arranged for me to
sit beside her Pearce
said. "I liked her a
whole lot, but the thing
that pleased me most
was that she was just a
very warm, friendly
person.
"She didn't put on
any airs. She'd talk to
you like she'd known
you all her life
ADVERTISE
NOW
STUDENTS ARE MAKING
THEIR SHOPPING LISTS -
ADVERTISE EARLY
WITH
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Mr. and Mrs. Ogre inspect the day's catch in a
scene from the new film Time Bandits.
Race For ' Time'
Continued From Page 5
confused state. But Time Bandits is not so much
a moie to he thought about as it is one to he
marvelled at, gazed at with childlike awe: the
script, direction and acting as all at least ade-
quate, but the set designs and special effects are
more than excellent.
Since people get dumber as they grow older,
some adults may not understand or appreciate
Time Bandits's bizarre blend of slapstick and sur-
realism. However, children and those still
childlike in spirit will enjoy this ingenuous epic.
Continued From P. 5
section of the
auditorium and are re-
quested to bring their
own vocal scores.
Church choirs
soprano; Kevin Bagby,
tenor; Mark Johnson,
tenor; Anne Gunn,
soprano; and Constan-
tine Peters, baritone.
The combined
choruses will be com-
prised of the Greenville
throughout the area are Choral Society and the
especially encouraged ECU Women's Glee
to come and sit
together.
Soloists for the per-
formance, chosen from
open auditions, include
members of the com-
munity and students in
the ECU School of
Music. They are Philip
Brown, tenor; Clifton
Harris, baritone;
Donald Greene,
baritone; Cheryl
Holder, alto; Jac-
queline Carnes,
Club, Rhonda Fleming,
Director; the ECU
Chorale Charles
Moore, Director; the
ECU Concert Choir,
Brett Watson, Direc-
tor; and the ECU
Men's Glee Club, Ed-
ward Glenn, Director.
The East Carolina
Symphony Orchestra is
directed by Robert
Hause. Conductors for
the December 6 perfor-
mance will be Robert
Hause, Rhonda Flem-
ing, and Brett Watson.
This event will be the
first Community Sing
of the Messiah in this
area. The Messiah has
been performed with
audience participation
several times in
England and in
Chicago in this country
with great success.
The last performance
of the Messiah featur-
ing ECU School of
Music performing
groups was in 1976.
There will be ade-
quate seating, and all
interested persons,
whether or not they
wish to sing, are en-
couraged to attend. No
admission will be
charged.
I
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IDUCTS
Natalie's Death A
Shocking Tragedy
( ontinued From P. 5
positive identification
and informed their
daughter, Courtney, 7,
and Miss Wood's
daughter by a previous
marriage, Natasha, 11,
who were on board the
yacht.
Wagner then took
the two children by air
to his Beverly Hills
home, where he was
joined by their friends
1 habeth Tavlor and
Roddy McDowail.
The death of Miss
ood brought expres-
s i o n s of grief
throughout the enter-
tainment industry.
Actress Stephanie
Powers, who co-stars
with Wagner in the
television series Hart to
Hart, sobbed, "There's
nothing 1 can say. It's
� not fair
Miss Powers, whose
close friend William
Holden died last week,
said. "It can't be a lov-
ing God to do this.
We've known each
other since we were
children. 1 can't believe
it. And those poor little
children of hers
Miss Wood, who
started her movie
career when she was 4
cars old. played a
range of characters
from adorable waif in
Tomorrow is Forever
to youthful sex symbol
in Rebel Without a
Cause.
She may have been
the only major child ac-
tress to mature on film
and attain adult star-
dom.
Shirley Temple and
Margaret O'Brien
never became adult
stars. Judy Garland
and Elizabeth Taylor
were both teenagers
before they became
stars.
In 1947, Miss Wood
was named "the most
talented juvenile mo-
tion picture star of the
year" by Parents
Magazine and she went
on to earn three
Academy Award
nominations during her
career.
Cast as James Dean's
sweetheart in Rebel
Without a Cause, the
brown-eyed brunette
won her first Oscar
nomination in 1961 as
Best Supporting Ac-
tress.
She was honored
with Best Actress Oscar
nominations in 1961
for Splendor in the
Grass and in 1964 for
Love with the Proper
Stranger.
Miss Wood was born
Natasha Gurdin in San
Francisco July 20,
1938, one of three
daughters of Nicholas
and Marci Gurdin.
Her father was a
stage designer and her
mother a ballet dancer.
She made her acting
debut when she was 4
years old in The Happy
Land. Two years later,
director Ivan Pichel
cast her as an orphan in
Tomorrow is Forever
and changed her name
to Natalie Wood.
Miss Wood married
actor Robert Wagner in
1957 when both were
beginning a steady
climb in Hollywood.
They divorced in 1962
and in 1969 she married
Richard Gregson but
divorced him and
remarried Wagner in
1972.
She enjoyed several
years of semi-
retirement after com-
pleting Bob A Carol A
Ted A Alice in 1969 but
returned to appear in
Peeper in 1975 and
Meteor in 1979. On
television, she starred
in the mini-series From
Here to Eternity in
1979 and appeared with
Wagner in Cat on a
Hot Tin Roof in 1976.
Her other film
credits include The
Searchers, 1956; Mar-
jorie Morningstar,
1957; West Side Story,
1961; The Great Race,
1965; Inside Daisy
Clover, 1966; and Love
with the Proper
Stranger, 1964.
Miss Wood had an
explanation for her
long career in
Hollywood.
"I was a child actress
as opposed to a 'child
star she said in an
interview. "It was
easier for me to make
the transition. I didn't
have the terrible ex-
posure to the limelight
as a child that Shirley
and Margaret had
The actress had a
daughter, Natasha, by
Gregson, a daughter,
Courtney Brooke with
Wagner, and a step-
daughter Katherine
Wagner, the offspring
of Wagner's marriage
to Marion Marshall.
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r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
DECEMBER I. 1981 Page8
CU Men, Women Win 1981 Openers
Defense Key
To Men's Win
Bx WILLIAM YELVERTON
East Carolina basketball coach
Dav e Odom got an early holiday gift
Saturday night � an impressive
72-54 whipping of Mid-American
Conference member Ohio Universi-
tv before a vocal croud of 1750 in
Minges Coliseum.
The game opened the 1981-82
season for the Pirates.
For a while it looked as though
the holiday season wouldn't get off
to such an auspicious start as the
Pirates found themselves behind 7-0
before senior Mike Gibson hit one
of two free throws after nearly two
and a half minutes of play.
Bui the Pirate defense � an
agressive, ball-hawking and much-
improved defense � enabled East
Carolina to pull away late in the se-
cond half, much to the joy of the
third-year coach.
M asked for a convincing defense
performance Odom said follow-
ing the game, "and you saw about
as fine a one as we can accomplish
at tins point. We were relentless, ag-
gressive and changing.
"But we can't rest on that he
continued. "We must continue to
ir to improve
Strong forward Morris Hargrove,
the high scorer for East Carolina in
a preseason contest with the
Australian National team, was
again impressive as the sophomore
popped in 19 points on 8-12
shooting and pulled down five re-
bounds to lead the way.
But the man who gave the Pirates
the leadership they were missing last
season was 6-4 senior point guard
Tony Byles � who was making his
return to Minges Coliseum after a
v ear's absence. He scored 12 points
on 5-7 shooting, picked off three re-
bounds and added four assists while
playing the most minutes � 36.
"Byles is so valuable Odom
stressed. He then added, "If we had
had him last year, would we have
been 12-1-4?
After Gibson stopped Ohio's at-
tempted shutout, Byles followed
with a layup, and Hargrove tied the
game by sinking a 15-footer.
The score was tied six more times
before junior guard Charles
Watkins brought the crowd to their
feet with a left-handed slam, putting
the Pirates ahead by two � 27-25 �
with less than three minutes remain-
ing in the first half. Watkins scored
six points on the night but added
five assists.
Junior college transfer Al Mack
gave the Pirates a four-point margin
at 29-25 with a five-fool jumper
and the Pirates went into intermis-
sion with a 31-27 lead.
Smooth Charles Green, another
junior college transfer, scored his
first points as a Pirate in the open-
ing seconds of the second half, giv-
ing East Carolina a six-point lead.
3327.
East Carolina's margin stayed
from two to six points for the bulk
of the second half but seemed in
jeopardy when Ohio's John
Devereaux's layup cut the lead to
one. 47-48, with nine minutes left.
However, Hargrove rammed a
dunk home and Green connected on
a short jumper with six minutes to
play for a five-point lead. Green
then upped the Pirate lead to seven
with another jumper.
Ohio forward Tim Woodson hit a
short jumper, cutting the Pirate lead
to to five, but East Carolina ran off
a 14-1 spurt � led by a power dunk
b Green � to guarantee the vic-
tory.
Green had 10 points on the night,
and Gibson added 11. Sophomore
Bill McNair chipped in with six and
Tom Brown added four.
The Pirates shot very well the en-
tire game � hitting 32-55 shots,
translating to a 58.1 percentage.
East Carolina also outrebounded
Ohio University, 31-29, with Brown
collecting six, Hargrove five and
Green and Gibson with four each.
East Carolina had only 10 tur-
novers, compared to 17 by Ohio
Universitv.
"Although it's just one game, it
certainly was important Odom
said. "We beat a team that will be
heard from in the MAC Con-
ference.
"I was tremendously pleased with
every member of our team he con
tinued. "(Charles) Green hit some
clutch baskets. Mike Gibson may
have played his best game as a
Pirate. And (Morris) Hargrove was
dominating at times. Just super
The coach said he "had a feeling
that Al Mack would play well. I'm
so happy with him right now
Odom also said he was
"pleasantly surprised" at the crowd
� since the students were on
Thanksgiving break. "They were in
the game he said. "The at-
mosphere is beginning to build
He was concerned with his team's
free throw shooting � 8-16 �
which he termed "horrendous
But he quickly added, "We may
have been overcoaching in that area.
Denkler 's Play
Leads Women
Bv WILLIAM YELVERTON
Battling Bucs
East Carolina's Mary Denkler (35) and I aura Regal (23) fight for the
rebound in a close contest with the l.ady Mountaineers of Appalachian
State Sunday in Minges Coliseum. Denkler's three-point play with 33
seconds remaining enabled the I ady Pirates to win the contest, 61-58.
over an Appalachian State squad that returned its best players from last
season's team. The I ady Pirates now face national power N.C. State
tonight in Raleigh at 7:30. Last season Past Carolina topped the I ady
Wolf pack in three overtimes. (Photo by Gary Patterson)
We've put a lot of attention on it,
and maybe we're trying too hard.
Free throw shooting is just con-
fidence and concentration, so we'll
back off of them some and sec if
that works
The difference in the game.
Odom said, was a changing East
Carolina defense. "We didn't show
anything but full and half-court
man-to-man against the
Australians, and 1 don't think they
(Onto U) expected us to be as active
and varied as we were. We're using
a little different philosophy this
year
The Pirates travel to Missouri for
the Show-Me Classic Dec. 4-5 and
face nationally-ranked Missouri in
their first contest. "1 don't think
an thins - nip �ssible Odom
said. " v . � a good shot. Out
guys believe il e can do itI don't
think they'll be intimidated
Othei Wtiiis competing are the
I !ni ei sitv
nasius.
�f Wvomme and Can-
OHIO t MV( KsV 'Mi
u i o 11 . I' i U ' l I Chilian
IHJ-I. Hil 22-26. 1 10-0. 4. arb ii l DO H�cl � ! 0
! . i j : 0-0 4
14 I I72l
Hargi � S J-� 19 Green 4 - 2 10. Ciibvwi J 1-5 1I.�1 '
0 i h Hva :i: i � � � oo-oo Rei . wo. f�
IM) 0. Mack I 0-0 2 M.S � i oi)h. H' at ; 0(i4. Peai ttt 00
0 It 00-00
Haiti im. ECU 31. �) I V ' "W ' " "
o.il�ni Npori s dii"f
"It seems we never have a close
opener responded a tired coach
Cathy Andrui after her team's
first game of the season in Green-
� ville before 650 Sunday afternoon.
Appalachian State � Scrappy
Appy � saw to that, as they battled
the bigger lady Pirates of East
Carolina down to the last few
seconds, losing 61-58, on center
Mary Denkler's three-point pla
with 33 seconds left in the contest.
Freshman center Darlene Chaney
made a tight first half even tighter
when her follow shot tied the score,
24-24, at intermission.
'Twas only a sign of the things to
come.
The second half was full of cold
shooting by ECU � under 40 per-
cent, compared to 53 by the Moun-
taineers. But speed, quickness and
height enabled the Lady Pirates to
win their first game in one start.
The score was tied throughout the
first tew minutes ol the second half,
but Appalachian, on a basket bv
enter Muriel Higgmbotham built a
four point lead at 36-32. But East
Carolina's Sam Jones connected on
a20-footei with less than 15 minutes
remaining, reducing the lead to two.
However, Appalachian's Kay
Hampton hit two big shots, one on a
running jumper ft a behind-the-
back pass, to increase the lead to
40-34.
1 ast Carolina battled right back,
however, as forward Fran Hooks
connected on a 12-footer, and Mary
Denkler added another basket, cut-
ting the lead to two, 40-38.
Deukler then followed her own
missed s 101 with 10 minutes to pla,
tying the score at 42.
Tiie Pirates finally took the lead,
46-44. with 7:27 to play when Jones
hit on a spinning jumper.
Applying an aggressive, trapping
defense. East Carolina built a four-
point lead at 48-44. Transfer
, Loletha Harrison crashed the offen-
sive boards for a tip-in, and guard
Lillian Barnes followed with a
10-footer with 6:48 to play.
After Denkler's three-point plav.
speedy freshman point guard
I oraine Foster scored on a lav up tot
the final margin.
Jones. Harrison, Foster, Barnes
and Denkler were all in double-
figures lor tlie Pirates � 10. 12. 12
and 11, respectively.
Appalachian State was led bv
Susan Cameron and Kay Hampton,
who each had 12 points. Higgin-
botham added 10
East Carolina was plagued b
cold shooting in the fust halt, hit-
ting onlv 12-37 shots, as were the
Mountaineers, who healed up in the
second halt, connecting on 17-32
percent of their shots to make ii
close.
"For the first game Andrui
said, "we plaved well. Appalachian
plaved out of their minds, and 1 give
them a lot of credit. They were well-
prepared.
"Our defense wasn't reallv what
we wanted it to be. Now. don ; get
me wrong � intensity-wise, ii was
good. But we were a lit'le
unorganized at limes
A surprise starter was Harrison,
who replaced Denkler in the lineup
because the latter was a minute late.
"She did a reallv good job An-
drui said. "Man (Denkler) came
in and gave us power on the inside
The fourth-year Pirate coach was
especially pleased with the plav ol
freshman guard Foster, as si e was
ol young 'cam's comeback.
"For our kids . me back she
said. "1 think i was ver commen-
dable. We did a good job at the
end
Wait
Have
Defense was again the key as the
' lead was built to 50-44 after Har-
0 rison took a pass from Jones and
connected on a driving layup with
1 six minutes to play.
The Mountaineers battled right
back, though, to take a 56-54 lead
-with two minutes to play when
guard Pam Allen followed her own
miss and Angelita Horton retaliated
with a 12-footer from the right side
of the lane.
ECU's Barnes was fouled by
Allen with 1:19 to play � with Ap-
palachian up 56-54 � and missed
the one-and-one, but Harrison
followed the missed shot, tying the
score at 56.
She was, however, worried bout
her team's cold shooting. "We
shots at the basket, but ihe
go in. Our's were falling out . there's
were going in.
"1 was pleased with the intensity,
the enthusiasm. I'm not pleased
with the disorganization, though.
We can't play like we did tonight
against N.C. State (7:30 p.m. Tues-
day).
The Lady Pirates face a legitimate
national contender in the Wolf pack
of N.C. State, a team Andruzzi
described as "very good � good
defensive power, good offensive
power. We're going to have to be
prepared for them
Then, reflecting back op, the vic-
tory over Appalachian State, she
says, "Thev (ECU) busted out 'here
tonight � from one end of the court
to another.
"They were rats (the team's
nickname) out there
APPALACHIAN STATE (SS
S Camerson 6 0-0 12, Higginnotharr 4 2-1 10. C.
Cameron 3 0-1 6. McLelland I 0-1 2. Hampton fc 0-0 12.
Skeie 1 0-0 2. Allen I 0-1 2. Horton60-0 12. C'uklasurcOO-0
0
eci n
Jones 5 0-0 10. Harrison 2 0-4 4. Foster 6 0-0 12. Barnes 4
4 12. Hooks I 0-0 2. Chanes 10-0. Regal 10-24, Denkler
5 II II. Hedges 0 043 0
Halftime�ECL' 24, Appalachian Siaie 24 rouled
out �Higgmbotham Technicals�ECL Coach Andruzzi (I)
A-6.V)
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Autttaal Sports Mllor
Seven years is a long time, much
too long for East Carolina track
coach Bill Carson.
But the wait was well worth it.
Carson found out last Tuesday
that his team has been admitted into
the IC4A Conference � "the
greatest track conference in the
country he says.
"I tried to get in for six or seven
years Carson explained. "But
they said they would not go south of
Virginia. I tried again a few years
ago, but they had the same
philosophy.
"You must be a member of the
ECAC (Eastern Collegiate Athletic
Conference), and once we joined,
they had a rule you had to lay out a
year. And they honored it
Conference ties are important in
the world of track and field, and
Carson knows it. "Even when we
were in the Southern Conference
he says, "they always would talk
ACC, which is a good track con-
ference. As an independent we
couldn't talk conference.
"Now we have a conference
which is better than theirs
The IC4A is one of the oldest
track conference in the country and
includes all the big Eastern schools
� "powerhouses as Carson terms
them � Seton Hall, Farleigh
Dickinson, St. John's, Pittsburgh,
Penn State, West Virginia, Rutgers,
all the Ivy League schools, just to
name a few.
Also included are all the
metropolitan schools, such as
Manhattan.
"It's quite a league Carson
says, adding that the primary im-
portance is the "fact that you get to
compete for a championship, facing
80 difference schools. The greatest
performances of the year come out
of this conference
How importance is the con-
ference? "To the schools that are in
it, it is possibly more important than
the NCAA's Carson replied
quickly.
As far as conference ties affecting
recruiting, Carson says, "It's not
going to change the way the way I
recruit. We might go back to the
hurdles, though, but we'll still be a
relay-sprint school. We can be an
event factor
The Pirates open the season
Saturday in the West Virginia
Development Meet in Morgantown,
a meet that Carson says is just for �
as the title indicates �
"development. There will be some
fine mile relay teams there. We're
just going to work, and see what
they look like
As far as the season goes, Carson
says he is optimistic, but adds he
needs another good recruiting year
to be "where I'd like us to be
Indoors, the Pirates will be par-
ticipating in six events, four in-
dividual and two relays.
Clint Harris, a starter on the ECU
football team, will handle the
55-meter dash, along with Jeff
Golden. Carson feels Harris has a
good chance to qualify for the na-
tionals.
Veterans Tim Cephas, Carlton
Frazier, Charlie Watkins and Keith
Clark will handle the 400-meter
dash. Currently, Frazier is not
enrolled in school, but Carson ex-
pects him back for the Spring
semester.
Ray Dickerson is the top man in
the 500 meters, and Carson believes
he, too, has a good chance to meet
national qualification times. Shawn
Laney and freshman Lawrence Er-
vin will compete in this event, too.
Ervin will also run the
800-meters, along with Tim Kelly,
Michael Swann, Dickerson and
Laney.
Dickerson, Clark, Cephas and
Ford probably will run the 4 X 400
relay, Carson says.
Carson said that Carlton Bell �
"an outstanding man to lead off for
us" � will not run this year to due
other commitments and added the
team will miss his experience.
Dickerson, Ervin, Laney and
Mike Swann will start out in the 4 X
800 relays.
Reflecting back on his team's ad-
mittance to the IC4A Conference,
Carson says, "Nobody can talk con-
ference to me because I have a
superior conference
But he adds that the most impor-
tant aspect of the conference affilia-
tion is that "a kid can run for a
championship
Carson is entering his 15th season
as head coach for the East Carolina
men's track program, once again
hoping to take his squad to a na-
tional championship meet.
While the Pirates were members
of the Southern Conference, Carson
coached his squads to three team
championships, eight runner-up
finishes and one third-place perfor-
mance.
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I HI I-AST CAROI INIAN ll I MBt k
IVR1
PATTFHSOH
1st W
Heels
Tremendous
North Carolina
coach Dean Smith savs
his top-ranked Tar
Heels looked
'�tremendous' on of-
fense in a 74-67 win
over Kansas, but he
wasn't as pleased with
their defensive effort.
'They were willing
to give us the 15-footei,
but our players showed
a lot of patience in at
tacking the one
Smith said "1 thought
we were tremendous ot
fensively
In othei weekend
Atlantic Coast c on
ference basketball ac
tion. 6th-ranked
Virginia coasted to a
76-57 victory over
George Mason in the
championship of the
V uginia Tipoff Classic;
Uth-ranked Wake
Forest was upset by
Richmond, 64-61;
Clemson defeated Stet-
son 74-72 in the finals
of the 1PTAY Tourna-
ment; North Carolina
State beat Campbell
68-53; Duke was edged
out by Vanderbilt,
76-75, in double over-
time; and Maryland
took I afayette 82-58.
Janus Worthy
scored 23 points and
Sam Perkins added 16
for the Tar Heels,
despite Kansas' efforts
to keep the ball outside.
The Jayhawks held
the lead. 47-43. four
minutes into the second
half when North
Carolina made its move
and scored 12
unanswered points, in-
cluding seven by Wor-
thy, to put the Tar
Heels ahead, 55-47.
Kansas closed the
gap to within four at
two points during the
stretch, but North
Carolina held on for
Works Leads
NMU To Win
M A R Q I 11 II
Mich tl PI) ' George
Works, Northern
Michigan's junior
fullback, does just that.
v, orks i ushed for
112 yards and scored
three
i u c h d O w n
Saturday to power Nor-
thern Michigan to a
55-6 i u � lizabeth
City (N C.) in the
quarterfinal round ol
the NCAA Division II
playoffs.
The win sends the
Wildcats to the Palm
Bowl a: Nk Allen.
Texas, next Saturday to
5 ithwest Texas
state, which defeated
acksonville State.
58-32 in its quarter-
. ime.
into Satur-
day's game. Works, the
leading Division 11
s c o r e r with 21
touchdowns and f-
noinls.
49 irds " the I
four-digit runner in
NMl history
Northern Michigan
(11-0) broke open a
10-6 game in the second
quarter with a 30-point
outburst Works scored
touchdworo on run- ol
one, two and two
yards. Mano Ferretti
added a 2ard Held
goal, his second ol tour
in the game, and senior
split end Greg McClain
caught a 65-yard
touchdown pass from
quarterback Tom Ber-
toldo, his second ot
two receptions that
went for touchdowns.
NNH 's tour-point
lead in the first quarter
came on a 38-yard field
goal bv Ferretti and a
-ard touchdown
pass from Bertoldo to
McClain.
Elizabeth City scored
its lone touchdown in
the first quarter when a
Northern Michigan
punt was blocked by
I loyd Jackson and
teammate Steve Cook
ran it in for six points.
NMU closed its scor-
ing with 15 points in the
second half. Ferretti
kicked a 32-ard field
goal for the only scor-
ing in the third quarter.
In the fourth
quarter, Elizabeth City
quarterback Ralph
Eagleton was tackled in
the end one for a safe-
ty, Steve Gjerde ran in
from the one and Fer-
retti kicked his last field
goal from 31 yards.
Northern Michigan,
in the Division II
playoffs for the fifth
time in seven years and
the 197 5 national
champion, amassed 695
total yards " 464 pass-
ing and 231 rushing.
McClain had six recep-
tions for 205 yards and
Bertoldi was 22 of 42
for 443 yards ' a career
and school record.
Saturday's game was
plaved before a home
crowd of 4,192 at
Memorial Field under
overcast skies and
temperatures in the low
30s that may have
daunted the visitors
from the South. It was
Elizabeth City's first
appearance in the
playoffs under the
leadership of second-
vear coach Johnnie
Walton, a former
Philadelphia Eagle
quarterback.
Coach Bill
Rademacher's NMU
team finished the
regular season No. 1
after Southwest Texas
lost to Texas AM. Only
one other team,
Delaware, has made as
many Division II post-
season apearances as
NMU.
Last year the
Wildcats were
eliminated by Santa
Clara 27-26 in the
quarterfinals.
the win.
Although Smith was
pleased at the offensive
production, he was felt
the Tar Heels' defense
was sporadic and ex-
pressed disappointment
over the rebounding.
Forward Matt
Doherly agreed.
"We got a win he
said. "It wasn't great.
but it was good to get
one under our belts
Offensively we hit
when we had to. Defen-
sively, it takes a little
while to get everything
working
In Charlottesville.
Virginia raced to a 17-3
lead in the first eight
minutes of play and
coasted to a 76-57 vic-
tory over George
Mason, which never
got closer than 1 1
points after the opening
spree. Virginia's largest
lead came with 3:22 left
when a three-point plav
provided the Cavaliers
with a 71-48 bulge.
"This is the kind oi
team where if one guv
isn't doing it.
somebody else is there
to take up the slack
said Virginia coach
Terry Holland. '1
looked out there one
time and we had three
freshmen and a walk
on on the floor at the
same time
Three Virginia
plavers placed in dou-
ble figures Jimmy
Miller with 16 and left
Jones and Craig Robin
son with 14 and 13
respectively.
At Richmond, N ake
Forest coach Carl Tacy
said the Deacons failed
to force the Spiders out
of their slow-tempo
game
"We were unable to
generate effective
defensive pressure and
our fast breaks were
verv limited he said.
"It was important tor
us to build on our
halftime lead and force
them to play faster, but
we failed to do that
Richmond nailed un-
til late in the second
half, w hen .1 oh n
Schweitz tied the game
at 44 44 on two free
throws and put the
Spiders ahead with two
more.
I"wo dramatic fast
breaks in the final 30
seconds scaled the win
for the Spiders, lorn
Bethea scored 17 points
and Schweitz added 16.
Clemson held an
11-point lead over Stet-
son with just under
eight minutes to plav in
the fmals ol the 1 igers'
IPTAY Tournament,
but the Hatters cut the
margin to 1 69 when
Biad W at son scored on
a lav up after a steal.
But Stetson lost
momentum and Clem-
son regained control,
outscoring the Hatters
8 3 in the final minutes.
Forward I hurl
Bailey and point guard
Sidney 1 owe scored 16
points each to pace
North Carolina State to
the win over Campbell,
while Scott Parych ad-
ded 14.
"It wasn't pretty,
but we'll take it said
Wolfpack coach Jim
Valvano.
In Durham, Duke
was forced to settle for
a loss when Vanderbilt
guard Phil Cox scored
24 points in the second
half and four more in
the double overtime to
pace the Commodores
to a win. He finished
with 30 for the night.
Vanderbilt trailed
throughout regulation
play and chipped away
a 12-point Duke
halftime lead to force
the game into extra
periods.
In College Park,
Herman Veal scored 16
points and Charles Pitt-
man scored 14 to lead
the Terrapins to an easy
rout. Maryland broke
out to an early 11-2
lead and Veal put in
two foul shots late in
the first half to make it
35-14.
With 10:57 remain-
ing, Maryland forward
Peter Holbert scored
eight straight points
and a brief rally by
Lafayette was not
enough to upset the
Terps.
ECU
Coaches Lose Out
BATON ROUGE,
1 a. (UPI) " Louisiana
State coach Jerry
Stovall. who suffered a
humiliating 48-7 defeat
to arch-rival Tulane,
has fired three assistant
coaches in an effort to
rebuild his tattered
team.
Stovall Sunday
dismissed quartertback
coach Bob Gatling,
defensive coordinator
Greg W illiams and in-
side linebacker coach
Bobby Morrison and
reassigned several other
coaches.
However, the drubb-
ing bv the Green Wave
Saturday that left 1 SI
3-7-1 on the season,
was not the reason for
the firings, Stovall said.
"1 just felt that it's in
the best interest of our
football club to make
the changes Stovall
said. It's not been an
easy decision for me.
There've been some
sleepless nights and
some short walks in the
kitchen over it
Williams and Mor-
rison worked under the
late Bo Rein at North
Carolina State and
were retained by
Stovall. Gatling was
hired by Stovall.
Pete Jenkins, defen-
sive lineman coach, will
act as defensive coor-
dinator, in addition to
his regular duties.
Stovall said offensive
tackle coach Buddy Nix
was switched to inside
linebackers coach.
The three fired
assistants will be paid
through Jan. 31, 1982.
when their contracts ex-
pire, team officials
said.
Stovall said he fired
the assistants soon after
the Tulane game to give
them time to make
possible job contacts,
not because of the out-
come of the fateful
bout.
"I wanted to do it as
quickly as possible
after the season was
over Stovall said, "to
give them as much time
as possible to make
the contacts necessary
for themselves
Stovall said he did
not anticipate addi-
tional changes in the
coaching staff, but
would begin concen-
trating on revamping
the Tigers' offensive
scheme.
"W'c will keep the
same, basic defensive
scheme he sad
"Offensively, we will
look long and hard.
Stovall said he would
petition the
Southeastern Con-
ference to permit
recruiting coordinator
Sam Nadar, receiver
coach Steve Regan and
junior varsity coach
Bruce Hemphill to
become off-campus
recruiters.
The move would
allow the Tigers to re-
main within the
number of off-campus
recruiters stipulated
under NCAA regula-
tions.
ABORTIONS
) 24 week terminations
Appt's Made 7 Days
CALLTOLL FREE
1-800 321 0575
Items and Prices
Effective Tues Dec 1
Thru Sat Dec 5, 1981
Copyright 1981
Kroger Savon
Quantity Bights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers

� i
Classifieds
on
Fall means
football, fun, and
fine savings at the
One-Stop-Shopping
Place, Kroger Sav-on!
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised Hems s required to be jeady
available for sale in each Kroger Savon except as spec U
cally noted in this ad if we do run out of an item we ,i o fer
you your choice of a comparable Hem when ayaiiab e retiec
Sh same savings or a ra.ncheck which will entitle you to
purchase the advertised item at the advertised price within 30
days
FOR SALE
WATERBEDS LOWEST prices
,n NC and SC on line wood
aterDed and accessories Com
piete beds with 15 year warranty
,0f as 10 as '79 Delivery
available Call David lor more in
.ormat'On Tt 2�6
CARICATURES BY
Weyter- �a�e yourself or a Ir.end
rnmo.talued cartoon style A un,
aueqiH.dea' Special Xmas rates
HO tor color or black and white. 6
X 10 Call '52 5'75
REFR'GERATOR 5 8 cubic inch.
,n 9reat shape Must sell Call
Mme at 758 "S3
FOR RENT
KOOMMATE needed to share 3
bedroom apt Preter male student
Call 758 9127
FURNISHED ROOM lor rent in
large house located in Lake
fth Greenville Convenient
to hospital and university Deposit
required Call 756 6308
anvi
w
POINT O PINES Camp lor Girls
is looking lor lemale counselors
Check Placement OHice or write
Andrew Rosen 221 Harvard Ave
Swarthmore Pa 1�081
PERSONAL
Dec 2. 1981 at 7 00 at 2101 E Filth
St IKD house) Call 758 3186 il nde
needed Casual dress Merry
Christmas
GOOD EVENING -Can you
schwmget Hope you had a
good turkage and iunk! Good to be
back with iams m 316A-your little
rock n rolls " � Zoo and Lon
PIXIE YOU are the light ol my
hie I love you Rascal
EXCELLENT TYPIST will do
term, research and thesis papers
articles lor publication and disser
tations Reasonable rates Call
757 1378
FOUND LADIES watch on In
tramural soccer lield Call
752 9657 to claim it
OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO
MIDNIGHT-Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd.
X
ROOM FOR rent, close to campus
i80 month plus one s.�lh utilities
call 752 0748 or 758 3545
ROMMATE NEEOEO to share 2
Bedroom turn,shed apartment
close tocampus �1H 50 per month
plus one hall utilities Call ?58 3358
alter 5pm
FURNISHEO OR unlurnished I or
j Bedroom new apartment on
Johnston St 2 blocks Irom cam
pus Call 758 8377
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
V20 per month plus one hall
utilities. ,ust need your bedroom
.urniture. ava.iable Jan I phone
Leil-e Tyler al 757 3745 or 752 0.80
Keep trying
WANTED FEMALE roommate
to share 2 bedroom turn.shed
apartment Two blocks Irom cam
pus !00 renl P5 0ne ,h
ut.nt.es Cheryl 752 t�59
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted
one bedroom 92 50 and one ha
utilities Beomn.ng Jan I. call
jean 758 3530
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share Georgetown Apt as ol Jan
i phone 758 2671
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
TWO OOOHS FROM
COXFLOKIST
111 W 4WiS�
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
7SS-0204
NOTARY PUBL.v Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy at
757 3734
TYPING FOR students, pro
lessors etc Kempie Dunn, 1019 E
Wright Rd Greenville. NC 27834
Call 752 6733 alter 1 p m
EXCELLENT TYPIST Proles
s.onal piper.ence with any paper
demand Reasonable rates Call
757 1378 alter 4 p m on weekdays.
anytime weekends
YOU ACED the game ol marbles,
so now I am yours I did have an e
cellent time compared lo no
other RMV oh what a hm I don t
even want to stop grinning I love
you
THE ECU Auslr.al.an Rules Foot
ball Club, which is currently rank
ed nth .n the nation according to
the Australian Football magazine,
opens its season Wednesday
against a strong Kentucky team
Please come see All Americans
Lee Holder Spain Barwick and
Rich Turner at their best Game
time: 3:00 at Greene F.eld
KAPPA DELTA Attention all
lemales Tree trimming on Tues
1981-82
Pirate
Sports
LSAT
�& LSAT � MCAT � GRE
GRE PSYCH � GRE BIO � MAT
GMAT � OAT � 0CAT � PCAT
VAT'SAT.ACT-CPA'TOEFl
MSKP � NAT L MEO BDS
ECFMG � FLEX � VQE
NOB � NPB I - NLE
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
Test Preparation Specialists
Since 1538
For information. Pease Call
919-489-8720.
Cans
DISPOSABLE
Good News
Razor
TAB
vFLV.0.
WIETE OB
Coca-Cow
10-
Pack
RATH BLACK HAWK
Canned Ham
7
58
SLICED TO ORDER
Boiled Ham
Lb.
SAVE
Bs
fa�ncS
SOLID
DEODORANT
Right
Guard
$457
FESTIVEN j
2.5-Oz. If
Stick �
Poinsettas
$3"
for
BAGGED
MONOGRAMS
UNLIMITED
Get Your Sweaters fc Shirts
Ready for the Fall.
Co-Ed Outlet
Located next to Plitt Theatre
Mon. Sat. 10 9 Call 335-2424
cc Oteatn
�it�n
10a
fc-A
COSMETICS A
FRAGRANCES
16�,
t






10 rHE! AM CAROl INI AN DECEMBER I, 1981
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ECU Basketball 1981-82
MIA - I INIA N
Sp� ll 1
THE ECU WOMEN
1 980-81
A Tough Act To Follow
Mary, Mary:
The 'Denky' Lady Pirate
Andruzzi:
Force Behind The Lady Bucs
THE ECU MEN
E C AC -Sou th :
The Prayers Are Answered
W a t k i n s :
. Ex Marine Steals The Show
Byles:
Return Of The' Point Guard





ECU Basketball 1981-82
December I, 1981
Charles Waikins Slams One
1981-82 ECU Men's Basketball Team
Nam
Greg Batson
Jeff Best
Tom Brown
Tony Bytes
Mike Fox
Michael Gibson'�
Herbert Gilchnst
Charles Green
Morns Harqrove"
Ai Mack
Mark McLaunn"
Bill McNair
Bruce Peartree
David Reicheneker
Charles Watkins
"Letters won at East
No
12
50
42
Hgt
6-2
6-9
6-6
24
20
52
10
34
33
35
22
40
44
55
11
Carolina
6-4
6-3
6-8
6-0
6-7
6-7
6-9
6-7
6-5
6-1
6-10
6-3
Wgt
162
213
222
175
172
222
165
200
218
210
183
200
163
222
184
Pot
G
C
F
G
G
C
G
F
F
C
F
F
G
C
G
Class
Jr
So
Jr
Sr
So
Sr
So
Jr
So
Jr
Sr
So
Fr
Fr
Jr
Birth Ag
122180 20
111361 20
121658 23
121758
9162
12759
31962
61160
111961
72761
41459
81061
7763
101063
81756
23
19
22
19
21
20
20
22
20
18
18
25
Hom�townHlflh School
Wilmington, NCNew Hanover
Pikeville, NCC B Aycock
East Greenwich. Rl
Worchester Academy
Brooklyn. NY South Shore
Cary. NCSanderson
Richmond. VAMaggie Walker
Cameron, NCWest Harnett
Washington. DC Spingarn
Pinehurst. NCPmehurst
Rush NYHenrietta
Springfield, MASpringfield Tech
Dunn NICDunn
Pantego. NCPantego
Niceville, FLNiceville
New Orleans. LA Landry
1981-82 ECU Women's Basketball Team
NoNamePos.Hgt.Wg�BornYr.
25Lillion BarnesG5-61205-30-59Sr
12Darlene ChaneyC6-21605-10-63Fr
34Mary DenklerF6-01552-11-61Jr
13Loraine FosterG5-714011 -30-62Fr
?4Loletha HarnsoriF5-81449 2-61Jr
4?Darlene HedgesC6-21651-10-61Jr
33Fran HooksG-F5-81403-13-61Jr
21Sam JonesG-F5-81458 11-60Sr
3?Ginger NoceF5-91356-4-61Jr
23Laura RegalF6-01603-4-63Fr
14Caren TruskeG5-61356-4-61Jr
HometownHigh School
Wilson'Fike
R.chmond, VA, Jefferson-Huguer.ot-Wythe
Alexandria. VABishop O'Connell
Spartanburg. SC Spartanburg
WhitakersNorthern Nash
Centereach. NY
GoldsboroGoldsboro
Mt OliveSouthern Wayne
Roanoke. VAVPatnck Henry
Granger. INClay
Columbus. OH'Northland
Lady Pirate Schedule
Nov
Dec
29
1
Sun
Tues
APPALACHIAN STATE
at N.C State
DIAL CLASSIC
300
730
Dec
Dec
Sat
Sun
Dec 12 Sat.
AT MONTCLAIR STATE
East Carolina vs. Villanova
Montclair State vs New Hampshire
Consolation Game
Championship Game
Dec
Dec
Jan
Jan
Jan
Jan.
Jan
Jan
29
31
2
3
�5"
Tues.
Thur
Sat
Sun
Tues
UNC-WILMINGTON
AT MIAMI (FL) JAMBOREE
Northwestern
Georgia State
Miami (FL)
Miami (OH)
af Kentucky
1:00
300
1 00
300
7:30
530
5:30
7:30
230
Jan
Jan
7 Thur at Louisiana State
10 Sun VIRGINIA
12 Tues. at North Carolina
- EAST CAROLINA - DUKE DOUBLEHEADER
15 Fri James Madison vs. Duke
EAST CAROLINA w. CAMPBELL
16 Sat. Campbell vs. Duke
EAST CAROLINA v.
JAMES MADISON
TrJ
7:30
7:30
730
6:00
8:00
6:00
8:00
Jan24Sunat Georgia Tech200
Jan25Monat Wake Forest7:30
Jan29Friat Aopalachian State7:30
Fen3WedEAST TENNESSEE STATE730
Feb7SunN.C. STATE3:00
Fen11Thurat Old Dominion7:30
Feb16TuesDUKE - LADY PIRATE CLASSIC 730
Feb 20 Sat
Feb 21 Sun
Feb
Mar
27
3
"55T-
Wed
Virginia State vs. Western Kentucky 6 00
EAST CAROLINA �. 8 00
MICHIGAN STATE
Consolation Game 6:00
Championship Game8 00
soulft CAROLINA 7-3fJ
NORTH CAROLINA 7 30
Pirate Schedule
Nov28SatOHIO UNIVERSITY JU
Dec 4 5Fri -Missouri Show-Me Classic
SatColumbia. MO
Dec4Frivs Missouri (CST) 9 05
Dec5SatConsolationChampionship
Dec7MonCAMPBELL UNIVERSITY7 30
Dec18-19Fri -SatMountaineer ClassicCharleston WV
Dec18Frivs Long Island7 00
Dec19SatConsolationChampionship
Dec22Tueat Duke University7 30
Dec30Wedat George Mason University7 30
Jan4Monat Baptist College730
Jan6WedWILLIAM & MARY730
Jan9Satat James Madison University"730
Jan11MonWESTERN ILLINOIS730
Jan14ThuUNC WILMINGTON7 30
Jan20Wedat Campbell University in Raleigh7 30
Jan23Satat N C State University730
Jan27WedUNC CHARLOTTE7 30
Jan30SatUNIVERSITY OF RICHMOND-730
Feb4ThuBAPTIST COLLEGE730
Feb10WedOLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY7:30
Feb13Satat UNC-Wilmtngton730
Feb15MonEASTERN ILLINOIS7 30
Feb17WedJAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY730
Feb20Satat Navy'1 00
Feb22MonGEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY730
Feb24Wedat University of Richmond'730
Feb27Satat William & Mary7 30
Mar4-6Thu Sat- ECAC Tournament
Mary Denkler Sets
sat
Bucs Hope
To Improve
B CIIARI ' M H VNDI1K
iii
Easl arolina head basket-
ball coach Dave Odom looks
al Ins third season with the
Pirates as one thai "should see
marked improvemeni in nearK
all areas
I he 1981-K2 season marks
the 50th year oi Pirate basket
ball, and Odom vvould like
nothing more than to rightful-
ly celebrate a lrul golden an-
niversary.
Things got off to a good
start for Odom's troops before
the season started when it was
announced in August that the
Bucs would be joining the
ECAC-South, marking the
first conference ties held by
the team since 1977.
Three starters return from
last season's 12-14 club. Six
other underclassmen return
from that team. Two junior
college All-Americas and two
high school stars were added
to those numbers. Add to that
a transfer from a major col-
lege and the return of a tormer
Pirate star and there appears
to be cause for some op-
timism.
Charles Watkins, who join-
ed Ihe Bucs last December
after finishing a stint in the
Marine Coips, returns at
iuiard as ihe team'v leading
rei He averaged 12.x
poinis per game lasi eason.
key foi Waikins, and '
entire team in particulai. is the
return oi ;
Byles. Ihe New York nai
a starter tor the 1979-80
fir ates but sat oul last sea
with academe difficuhi
return stabilizes a poin
position that as no: -n
last season.
Byles' presence allows
Watkins, who had to step in
and take over the point last
year, to move to his natural
position of big guard
Backing up Byles a the
point will be the tandem of
freshman Bruce Peartree and
sophomore Herbert Gilchnst.
Forward appears to be the
deepest spot on the Pirate
squad. Mark McLaurin
started last year and returns
with his long distance shoo
ability. Mel aurin's spot at
small forward appear - to have
been taken over, lor the time
bemg anyway, by JC iranster
Charles Green.
The 6 Green led the Gold
team to a victory in the annual
Purple-Gold mtrasquad game
two weeks aeo. scoring 14
r.
Members u
men's basket
(L-Rj; assi
manager
Gilchrist, On
McNair, Mt
Bruce Pea
bounds
sho-
Gi
All
Catonsville
leue in B
Ba �
non to M
from Maine
but and app
contribute
KING SANDWICHf
DELICATESSEN
OPEN MONSAT. 11:00 A.M4:00 P.M.
HAPPY HOUR MON. FRI.
2:00 P.M4:00 P.M.
2729 East 10th
(Colonial Heights Shopping Center)
Dial 752-4297 for orders to go.
STEAK
Greenville's original STEAK sandwich
sliced cooked on the grill with on.ons and served
on an 8" Italian roll with our special tomato sauce
or lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise S2-5
Order a CHEESESTEAK and get Greenv.lle's
original with provolone cheese melted all the way
through
Hard salami, ham Canadian bacon, and pro
volone cheese on a 10" roll with all the tr.mm
,ngs For those with a hearty appeMe or share it
with a friend s2 �
A delicious blend of Provolone.
Natural Sw.ss and Cheddar cheese,
ietfuce, tomato, mayonnaise, omon
and garnished with oil, vinegar and
oregano. Your choice hot or cold SX.tS
Combination turkey and ham OR turkey and bacon
iyour choice) on three slices of bread Servi
lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise
HOAGIK -
CHEESE HOAGIE -
CUB
SI.95
.r- n 1 R Combination turkey, ham and bacon on four
KING VMM � sces Qf bfead with ,ettuce, tomato and
mayonnaise $2�
Kirvir RlttlkR Quarter pounder - all meat with all the
KING BL'Kli'tK � eprved to vour prefer
trimmings
ence
With melted cheese
prefer
SI.55
SI 70
KOSHER CLUB -
Corned beef and pastram. piled h.gh on
rye bread. This triple decker comes with
a double layer of melted Swiss cheese,
hot mustard and your choice of either
staw or kraut $1 75
Whatd
clcthii
very e
navy
sets
destgnl
ECAC Games
All types of Deli Sandwiches
made to your order with your
favorite beverages.
Phone ahead for take out orders.





Charles (.reen
t schedule
IP-
' 0
L AM MARy"� 0
STERN iL,
; MrlLMIN . " ON
' 0
;30
JCHARLOTTE7 30
VERSlTY OE RICHMOND-7 30
PtiST COLLEGE
D DOMINION UNIVERSITY-7 30

STERN ILLINOIS-30
KES MADISON UNIVERSITY"7 30
1 00
ORGE MASON UNIVERSITY"7 30
-7 30
� 30
Bucs Hope
To Improve
ECU Basketball 1981-82
December 1, 1981
K CHAM ES CHANDLER
1 asi Carolina head basket-
bail coach Dave Odom looks
,ii his third season with the
Pirates as one iliai "should see
marked improvement in nearly
all areas
1 he WK1-S2 season marks
the 50th year ol Pirate basket-
ball, and Odom would like
nothing more than to rightful-
ly celebrate a truly golden an-
niversary.
Things got off to a good
start tor (Mom's troops before
the season started when it was
announced in August that the
Bucs would be joining the
ECAC-South, marking the
first conference ties held by
the team since 1977.
Three siariers return from
last season's 12-14 club. Six
other underclassmen return
from that team. Two junior
college AiAmericas and two
high school siars were added
to those numbers. Add to that
a transfer from a major col-
lege and the return of a former
Pirate star and there appears
to be cause for some op-
timism.
Charles Wat kins, who join-
ed the Bucs last December
after finishing a stint in the
Mai me C oi ps, retui ns ai
guard as the team's leading
scorei He averaged 12.8
points pei game last season.
A key for Watkins, and the
enure team in particular, is the
return of pomi guard lony
Byles. The New York native
was a startei tor the 1979-80
Pirates bin sal out las! season
with academic difficulties. His
return stabilizes a pomi guard
position thai was not strong
last season.
Byles' presence allows
Watkins, who had to step in
and take over the point last
year, to move to his naiural
position of big guard.
Backing up Byles at the
pomi will be the tandem ot
freshman Bruce Peartree and
sophomore Herbert Gilchrist.
Forward appears to be the
deepest spot on the Pirate
squad. Mark Mel aurin
started last year and returns
with his long distance shooting
ability. Mel aurin's spot at
small forward appears to have
been taken over, for the time
being anyway, by JC transfer
Charles Green.
T he 6-7 Green led the Gold
team to a victory in the annual
Purple-Gold intrasquad game
two weeks ago, scorine 14
: ac �c mgk �e s�cxax xm �ec xwboocv
KING SANDWICH
DELICATESSEN
OPEN MONSAT. 11:00 A.M4:00 P.M.
HAPPY HOUR MONFRI.
2:00 P.M4:00 P.M.
2729 East 10th
(Colonial Heights Shopping Center)
Dial 752-4297 for orders io go.
STEAK Greenville's original STEAK sandwich Thin
sliced cooked on the grill with onions and served
on an 8" Italian roll with our special tomato sauce
or lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise S2.50
Order a CHEESESTEAK and get Greenville's
original with provolone cheese melted all the way
through S2.f5
HOAG1E � Hard salami, ham Canadian bacon, and pro
volone cheese on a 10" roll with all the tnmm
nqs For those with a hearty appetite or hare it
with a friend 2.60
n
CHEESE HOAGIE �
A delicious blend of Provolone,
Natural Swiss and Cheddar cheese,
lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onion,
and garnished with oil, vinegar and
oregano Your choice hot or cold $1.95
Cl.L'B Combination turkey and ham OR turkey and bacon
(your choice) on three slices of bread. Served with
lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise $1.95
KING CLUB
Combination turkey, ham and bacon on four
slices of bread with lettuce, tomato and
maonnaise$2.60
KING SURGES
Quarter pounder � all meat with all the
trimmings served to your prefer
ence$1.55
With melted cheese$1.70
KOSHER Cl.UB �
Corned beef and pastrami piled high on
rye bread. This triple decker comes with
a double layer of melted Swiss cheese,
hot mustard and your choice of either
slaw or kraut$2.75
.
All types of Deli Sandwiches
made to your order with your
favorite beverages.
Phone ahead for take-out orders.
The Pirates
Members of the 1981-82 East Carolina
men's basketball team include: front row
(L-R); assistant coach Tom Barrise,
manager Barry Elliott, Herbert
Gilchrist, Greg Batson, Tony Byles, Bill
McNau, Mike Fox, Charles Watkins,
Bruce Peartree, manager Ronnie Clark,
and assistant coach David Pendergrafl.
Back row; assistant coaches Don Carter
and Herb Krusen, Mark McLawin,
Thorn Brown, Morris Hargrove, David
Reicheneker, Michael Gibson, Jeff Best,
AI Mack, Charles Green and head coach
Dave Odom.
points, pulling down 12 re-
bounds and blocking three
shots.
Green was a junior college
All-American last year at
Catonsville community Col-
lege in Baltimore, Md.
Backing up Green, in addi-
tion to Mel.aurin. will be
Thorn Brown. The 6-6 transfer
from Maine sat out last season
but and appears now ready to
contribute Odom sees Brown
as his "Mr. Steady
Sophomore Morris
Hargrove impressed Odom
and his staff in preseason
drills enough to earn a starting
spot at power forward. The
bulky, 6-7 performer was
awesome at limes on the
boards in last week's 72-71 ex-
hibition loss to the Australian
national team.
Hargrove also led the team
in scoring against the
Australians, tallying 23 points
while adding nine rebounds.
Brown and JuCo transfer AI
Mack will spell Hargrove from
lime-to-lime.
Mack was, like Green, a JC
All American last season.
scoring over 24 points per con-
test For Hiibert College in New
York. The 6-9 sharp-shooter
will see some time at center.
Presently entrenched as the
See ODOM, page 5
aJph Lauren
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clothing selection by Ralph Lauren oxford cloth shirts, pure silk
very exciting. Running the range from neckwear, all cotton khaki pants and
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oPftnav&
MEM!
W
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
CAROLINA EAST MALL
TARRYTOWN MALL.
ROCKY MOUNT





ECU Basketball 1981-82
December I. mi
Odom Comments On His Pirates
Pirate coach speaks out on the
positives, negatives of each of
of the 15 ECU team members.
Mike Gibson
Senior, Center
"Should be one of our leaders offen-
sively and defensively. Needs to concen-
trate in areas of defense, rebounding and
passing. In order for ECU to be a good
basketball team this year, Michael Gib-
son be a good rebounder and our best
post defender
C iW
AI Mack
(enter-Forward
"Thinks offense but needs to work on
his defense Although he's improved
defensively, he needs to work more in
that area. A fine shooter and a natural
compliment to Michael Gibson
Morris Hargrove
Sophomore, Forward
"Our most physical player on offense
and defense. He must learn to use finesse
as well as brute strength. If he can en-
compass those two elements together he
will certainly be one of our leaders in the
frontcourt this year
Charles Green
Junior, Forward
"Perhaps our most versatile player in
that he can play as many as three posi-
tions (big guard, both forward spots).
Also, he is perhaps our most unselfish
plaver. Is just becoming aware of how
important'it is for him to use all his
talents. "
Charles Watkins
Junior, Guard
"People will notice him less this y ear,
but hopefully he will be doing more. I
sav this because he won't be handling the
ball as much because of the return of
Tony Bytes. Statistically, I think he will
at least be on par with last year. "
� V
Tony Byles
Senior, Guard
"You miss him more when he's there
than when he's not here. I realized that
this year, now that he's back, how much
I missed him last year. When he's got the
ball it's like putting a babe m Us
mother's arms. "
Thorn Brown
Junior, Forward
"Gives our team a great deal of
maturity and a good measure of ability.
Valuable in that he can play more than
one position. A joy to have around.
Thorn will certainly be a full-time player.
Makes very few mental mistakes
Bill McNair
Sophomore, Forward
"Stilt searching for answer of how to
corral all of his raw abilities. Has im-
proved in certain areas, but most im-
prove m others. Mostly, he must im-
prove his decision making
)) .
Herbert Gilchrist
Sophomore, Guard
"Has improved us a ipwrlerback.
Nobody wants to play any better than
Her hie. When he learns to lot all v relax
he will be a very good compliment to
Tonv Byles. We have confidence in
Herbert to play at any time in a game for
a short period of time. "
Bruce Peartree
Freshman, Guard
"Has improved defensively as fast as
any player I 've ever coached. Possesses
a great deal of confidence, which is in-
herent in winners. He expects to win and
loves to compete. "
Mike Fox
Sophomore, Guard
"Mike has improved but still needs to
work on his ball-handling and passing
skills. We hope we will play with a high
level of confidence. We hope also that he
is willingness to compete will become
more evident. "
(ireg Batson
Junior, Guard
"He has captured the heart of
everyone connected with our program.
He's just as important as anyone else in
his own way. As long as I'm here Greg
Batson will always be welcome
Jeff Best
Sophomore, Center
"Definitely has improved in practical-
ly every area. He's moving quicker and
with a greater purpose. One of our
smarter players. H ill need another year
of growth and maturity before he can be
considered a full-time player.
Mark McLaurin
Senior, Forward
"I think he will be very valuable to us.
A lot like Charles Watkins last year in
that what he was asked to do last year he
should not have been asked. Should be
more confident this year as a role
player
Andruzzi Asses
I jllion Barnes
Senior, Guard
"A totally self-made ballplayet Has
worked her way into the starting lim
Has been here all of my four wars
we've grown together. A good student.
provides a great deal of leadership Had
a shoulder operation in August, but she
doesn't have time to cry. '
David Reicheneker
Freshman, Center
"Maybe our most pleasant surprise. Is
still learning fundamentals. When he
does master the fundamentals he'll be a
fine player for us. We're bringing him
along slowly. We will use him in certain
situations this vear
l)arlene( hane
Freshman, (enter
"Always offense oriented, but has im-
proved significantly on defense. A lot oj
potential. At 6-2, she's agile. Hw
will to learn. "
Mar Denklcr
Junior, Forward
She wins the heart oj tin
because she is a die hard. She's (hi
around ballplayer � wilt he up
Academic A11- American this season.
She's having to become a leader
Loraine Foster
Freshman, Guard
"The Isiah Thomas of women's
basketball. She never played point guard
in high school, but she's making the
transition quickly. She just smilles when
you ask her to do something and noes on
to get the job done.
Foletha Harrison
Junior, Forward
"darned a lot of experiem
Louisburg College. Defensively,
verv polished. Seeds to work oi
sive name. We look forward 'o � .
perience helping. "
Darlene Hedges
Junior, (enter
ew York, Sew York Darlei
understand what I'm saying
translate for the rest of the team.
improvement of her game could I
a lot inside. Ver loyal; really wants to i
well.
Fran Hooks
Junior, Guard
"Very intelligent individual. She'll be i
all night studying for a test. Always
in the shadows of other people. Fran an
Mary (Denkler) provide our comic relict
Sow thev are veterans. "
�9,





ICU Basket ball 1981-82
irates
December 1, 1981 5
l Mack
eI e r - r �rv ardk on i 'l'(l
:tl ural
�ill MiNair
lomore. Forward
! how !(
1Has irn-mi-in-
�ilchrisl
-more. Guard
terback .
tmplin
Iruce Pearl rev
fvuman, Guard
fensh 11 v as fast as
"t' Possesses
idence, which is in-
He expects to win and
Mike Fox
Ihomore, (.uard
I oved but ttll needs to
U-handling and passing
vt will play with a high
(; M e hope also that he
will become
reg Balson
lunior. Guard

1
Jeff Best
phomore, (enler
mprovid in practical-
quickerand
' . irpose.One ofour
r It ill net 'l anotheryear
aturity before he can he
ne plover.

avid Reieheneker
rt'shman. Center
u t pleasant surprise. Is
iamentals.H hen he
� damentalshe '11 he a
'or us. Were bringing him
H e will use htmin certain
s xeai
Andruzzi Assesses Lady Bucs
UUion Barnes
Senior, (.uard
"A totally self-made ballplayer. Has
worked her way into the starting lineup.
Has been here all of my four years �
we 've grown together. A good student;
provides a great deal of leadership. Had
a shoulder operation in August, but she
doesn't have time to cry. "
J
Darlene Chaney
Freshman, Center
"Always offense oriented, but has im-
proved significantly on defense. A lot of
potential. At 6-2, she's agile. Has a great
will to learn. "
Sam Jones
Senior, Forward
"Action! Great deal of athletic ability.
Has had a very good preseason.
Unselfish � we have to tell her 'that's
your shot, take it Samis a creator on
(he court; she makes things happen. "
Mary Denkler
Junior, Forward
"She wins the heart of the people
because she is a die hard. She's the all-
around ballplayer � will be up for
Academic All-American this season.
She's having to become a leader. "
'
Ginger Noce'
Junior, Forward
"Transfered here because she wanted
to be in a top program. She is behind
because of changing systems, but has her
mind set on being the best possible
basketball player
Loraine Foster
Freshman, Guard
"The Isiah Thomas of women's
basketball. She never played point guard
in high school, but she's making the
transition quickly. She just smilles when
you ask her to do something and goes on
to gel the job done
Loietha Harrison
Junior, Forward
"Gained a lot of experience at
Louisburg College. Defensively, she's
very polished, Needs to work on offen-
sive game. He look forward to her ex-
perience heping. "
Laura Regal
Freshman, Forward
"One of our freshmen who has a great
deal of potential. Once Laura learns our
system, she's going to be important to
our program. She'll beat up on people,
our 'Big Rat' inside. "
Caren Truske
Junior, Guard
"Real hard worker. Learned our
system quickly last year after transferr-
ing from N.C. State. Very good student.
Plays both point and wing. Has a great
deal of enthusiasm and desire to learn. "
Darlene Hedges
Junior, Center
"ew York, New York! Darlene can
understand what I'm saying and
translate for the rest of the team. The
improvement of her game could help us
a lot inside. Ver loval; really wants to do
well
Fran Hooks
Junior, Guard
"Very intelligent individual. She'll be up
all night studying for a test. Always been
in the shadows of other people. Fran and
Mary (Denkler) provide our comic relief.
Now they are veterans. "
Odom Is
Confident
In Pirates
Continued from p. 3
team's staner at the center
spol is 6-8 senior Mike (iib-
son. One of only three seniors
on the team, Gibson will he
looking to compensate tor a
disappointing campaign last
ear.
The same is the case for the
entire team, which hopes to
bounce back strong after last
year's losing record.
"I feel that we can definitely
be a good team Odom said.
"But I feel we must play con-
sistently good, not just in
spots, last year we never put a
consistent streak together
Following last week's ex-
hibition with the Australians
Odom said he was quite
satisfied with the status of the
Pirate defense, but said the of-
fense had a ways to go.
"We've worked a lot more
on defense he said. "We are
just really beginning to get in-
to what we want to do offen-
sively. As the season goes on I
think we'll improve a lol in
both areas, though
Senior swingman Mark McLaurin





ECU Basketball 1981-82
December 1, 1981
Despite Rebuilding Claims
Andruzzi
Optimistic
B WILLIAM YK1 VKRTON
vsManl Sports tditur
Lady Pirate basketball
coach Cathy Andruzzi's goals
for the 1981-82 season are sim-
ple: "We want to do the best
we can do � be the best club
possible, on and off the
court she says.
East Carolina opened its
season at this past Sunday
against the Mountaineers of
Appalachian State in Minges
Coliseum.
Andruzzi, entering her
fourth season as head coach,
has turned East Carolina into
a national contender. Her
team vaulted into the top
twenty last season, finishing
the year with a 23-7 record and
an at-large bid to the
regionals.
Gone from that group are
all-everything performer
Kathy Riley, Marcia Girven,
Rountree and Laurie
� now an assistant
Lydia
Sikes
coach.
But her young team has
"come along a tremendous
amount in the preseason,
Andruzzi says. "We're made
big improvements; our defense
has become tougher. We've
been strict on fundamentals
because we have a new set of
principles for our newcomers
and veterans. We have a whole
new squad
And that squad will count
on senior guard-forward Sam
Jones, forward Mary Denkler
and guard Lillion Barnes for
leadership. Jones, "a "real
player who makes things hap-
pen says Andruzzi, averaged
14.7 points and 5.3 rebounds
last season after transferring
from Louisburg Junior Col-
lege. Denkler chipped in 14
points per game and added 6.8
rebounds as she improved
steadily each game. "She
played with (Marcia) Gervin
for two years notes Andruz-
zi "so it's up to her now
Barnes, Andruzzi says,
could be the heart and soul of
East Carolina this season.
"She has done a tremendous
job she said, "and has im-
proved drastically Barnes is
coming off of a shoulder
operation in August and
refuses to let it hamper her
preparation for Sunday's
game.
"She wouldn't let you know
it if she was hurt or not An-
druzzi said. "She is going to
give 100 percent all the time
After the completion of last
season, Andruzzi faced the
task of replacing the heart of
her team. So she came up with
a banner recruiting crop, in-
cluding two high school All-
Americans, center Darlene
Chaney and point guard
Loraine Foster, another
freshman "sleeper 6-0 for-
ward Laura Regal, and the
most valuable player of the na-
tional junior college cham-
pionship team, 5-8 forward
Loletha Harrison. Another
All-VAIAW performer from
Division 111 Randolph-Macon,
forward Ginger Noce
transferred.
Chaney, 6-2, was most
valuable player at the annual
Virginia high school all-star
game. She scored 20 points
and claimed 14 rebounds to
solidify her standing as the
best prospect in the state. She
was also a member of the Con-
verse All-America team.
"She's young said An-
druzzi, "but is learning the
system. She's making very big
strides
Point guard Foster was
another state high school all-
star most valuable player.
"Loraine has been doing a
�remendous job said An-
druzzi. "She's the Isiah
Thomas of basketball, as we
call her
The Sparanburg, S.C.
native was all-state last year
after being the leading scorer
in northern S.C. last season
with a 23.2 average. She also
holds the S.C. prep record in
the 100 meter dash.
The "sleeper" according to
The Lady Pirates
Members of the 1981-82 East Carolina
women's basketball team include: front
row (L-R); Darlene Hedges, Caren
Truske, Sam Jones, Fran Hooks, Mary
Denkler and assistant coach Laurie
Sikes. Back row; head coach Cathy An-
druzzi, Ginger Noce Darlene Chaney,
Laura Regal, Loletha Harrison, Loraine
Foster and assistant coach Beth Burns.
recruiters could be 6-0 forward
Laura Regal of Granger, lnd.
She averaged 15 points and 15
rebounds per contest for Gray
High School last year. An-
druzzi said that she, also, must
get used to the ECU system.
Andruzzi said she has "no
idea" what here starting
lineup will be this season, but
stressed that "the people who
will start will be the hardest-
working, most responsible and
most dedicated.
"We want a consistent
group on the court con-
tinued the Lady Pirate coach.
"Playing for East Carolina is a
privilege, though. You have to
earn your opportunity to
start
IK?ieilTi9RS
W PRECISION HAIRCUTTERS

' C"5
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Phone 752-3172
Pirates To Pl
Odom Says Benefits
Can Already Be Seen
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sport Mitt
Things have changed in re-
cent months for East Carolina
basketball coach Dave Odom.
With the word this past
August that his Pirates will be
competing in the ECAC-South
this season, he was found the
outside world � and recruits
in particular � 10 be more
receptive to visits by he and his
staff.
"It's been really very
heartening at times Odom
said. "It" exactly what we'd
hoped it would be
With the Pirates now team-
ed up in the conference with
Old Dominion, Richmond.
George Mason, James
Madison, Navy, and William
and Mary, Odom said
recruiting has gone much
smoother than in the past
"I think we may have gotten
in some doors that may not
have been open to us in the
past he said. "In the past we
were only able to go so far
with a number of recruits.
They'd ask what conference
we were in. We'd sa
'independent, BUT Now
we're able to tell them 'the
ECAC-South We know that
wh ;n we sell the league we're
selling very fine athletic and
academic institutions as well
The third-year ECU coach
will definitely feel the effects
of the league as he prepares his
team to play in the upcoming
season. In fact, Odom say us
his entire appraoch to a season
has been changed due 10 t he-
conference affiliation. No
longer must he worry about
the trials of being an indepen-
dent.
"It changes our plans a little
bit he admitted. "In the past
we had to consider each game
a season in itself. One was
equally important to the other
The overall record meant
everything.
"Now, though Odom
continued, "the conference
record is more important.
That's not to say that the
overall record is not impor-
tant, it's just that we can build
more now. What you do in
January will no longer directly
Tfect what you're doing in
March
Odom said the Pirates could
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Os;
ECU Basketball 1981-82
December 1, 1981
ates
Hack row; head couch Cathy An-
Gingei Soce Darene Chancy,
oletha Harrison, Loraine
ml coach Beth Burns.
"We want a consistent
� on the court con-
tic Lad) Pirate coach.
"Playing for Last Carolina is a
privilege, though. You haeto
youi opportunity to
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ast Hastings Ford
? 752-3172 j
mvwnnnnniiiinriwr m� immJ
ne
Pirates To Play In ECAC
Odom Says Benefits
Can Already Be Seen
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Things have changed in re-
cent months for East Carolina
basketball coach Dave Odom.
With the word this past
August that his Pirates will be
competing in the ECAC-South
this season, he was found the
outside world � and recruits
in particular � to be more
receptive to visits by he and his
staff.
"It's been really very
heartening at times Odom
said. "It" exactly what we'd
hoped it would be
With the Pirates now team-
ed up in the conference with
Old Dominion, Richmond,
George Mason, James
Madison, Navy, and William
and Mary, Odom said
recruiting has gone much
smoother than in the past.
"I think we may have gotten
in some doors that may not
have been open to us in the
past he said. "In the past we
were only able to go so far
with a number of recruits.
They'd ask what conference
we were in. We'd say
"independent, BUT Now
we're able to tell them 'the
ECAC-South We know that
wh ;n we sell the league we're
selling very fine athletic and
academic institutions as well
The third-year ECU coach
will definitely feel the effects
of the league as he prepares his
team to play in the upcoming
season. In fact, Odom sayus
his entire appraoch to a season
has been changed due to the
conference affiliation. No
longer must he worry about
the trials of being an indepen-
dent.
"It changes our plans a little
bit he admitted. "In the past
we had to consider each game
a season in itself. One was
equally important to the other.
The overall record meant
everything.
"Now, though Odom
continued, "the conference
record is more important.
That's not to say that the
overall record is not impor-
tant, it's just that we can build
more now. What you do in
January will no longer directly
effect what vou're doing in
March
Odom said the Pirates could
Easy, Economical
transporfafion
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Li� k
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�NO Helmets
�NO Insurance
�NO Registration
We Are Also the Motobecane Bicycle Dealer
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757-3616
AAon. Fri. 9:30-5:30 Sat. 9:00-4:00
OTOBECANE
NCAA Tourney A
Tourney Title A way
WOED
now build so that they peak at
tournament time. The ECAC-
Sou h conference champion
gets an automatic bid to the
NCAA Championship Tour-
nament, making March the
time that the Bucs must be at
their best.
"We don't have to put that
much emphasis on non-
conference games Odom
said. "We can experiment, all
with the idea that we can use
what we learn to make a better
showing in conference
games
The news came in late
August, the news that East
Carolina athletic followers
had waited and hoped for over
a year.
During August's third week
the Pirates were admitted to
the Eastern College Athletic
Conference (ECAC) for men's
basketball and some unan-
nounced non-revenue sports
by the league's executive coun-
cil. A month later, the decision
was made official upon the ap-
proval of the total ECAC
membership.
ECU was placed in the
ECAC-South, one of seven
divisions of the 232-member
conference. Other members of
the ECAC-South include Old
Dominion, George Mason,
James Madison, Richmond,
William and Mar, and Navy.
The Pirate men's basketball
team begins conference play
this season. The Bucs will also
compete in the conference
tournament, set for March 2,4
and 6 at the The Scope in Nor-
folk, Va. The tourney cham-
pion will get an automatic bid
to the NCAA tournament.
"This is a very positive
thing for East Carolina
University said Athletic
Director Ken Karr following
the official announcement.
"The best thing, of course, is
that it provides access to the
NCAA tournament as early as
this season
The late August announce-
ment by the ECAC board
came as somewhat of a sur-
prise, as four of the current
ECAC-South members had
announced last October that
they were pulling out of the
league.
Those schools were ODU,
Richmond, James Madison
and William and Mary. Those
four combined with ECU in an
effort to form an entirely new
conference.
Stumbling blocks greeted
the five, though, as the group
could never determine what
school would become the sixth
and final conference entry
(NCAA requites six teams
minimum in a conference).
Due to the problems, the
four four that withdrew reap-
plied to the ECAC-South at
the same time, of course, that
the Pirates applied
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ECU Basketball 1981-82 December I, 1981
mmoES
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Andruzzi
Strength, Vigor Of Lady Pirate
Head Coach Brings New Heights
To ECU Women's Basketball
ECU Basketball 1981-82 December I, 1981
47'm a very demanding
person, but I don 7 expect
any more from other peo-
ple than I expect from
myself. M
�Cathy
Andruzzi
By JIMMY DuPREE
Managing Mtlnr
Basketball, to many people,
is an enjoyable game of skill
which provides exercise for
those who participate and
entertainment for those who
watch. But to Cathy Andruzzi
it's more than that � it's her
life.
"Basketball is. not just
bouncing balls; it has opened
me up to a lot of things in
life says the fourth-year
ECU coach. "Basketball has
taught me that you have to be
responsible. Whether it's to a
program, your friends or just
to life in general, you have to
be responsible and take charge
of things. You have to be a
doer to accomplish worthwhile
goals
Putting this philosophy into
practice has made Lady Pirate
basketball one of the fastest-
growing programs in the na-
tion. Preparing for 26 schedul-
ed games along with post-
season competition is a
365-day-a-year "hobby" for
the confessed workaholic.
Pre-season practice begins
as soon as classes get under-
way in the fall. Often days
begin at 5 a.m. with Nautilus
weight training and conclude
alter conditioning drills that
evening. Only classes and
study hall interrupt the cons-
tant diet of basketball.
Once the season begins,
classes, travel, games and
practice leave little time for
social life � for either players
or coaches.
Demanding? Maybe, but
it's Andruzzi's opinion that
"anything worth having is
worth making sacrifices for
"I'm a very demanding per-
son she admits, "but I don't
expect any more of other peo-
ple than 1 expect of myself. If
you have a job, do it. That's
Andruzzi (At Right) Joins
Celebrating A Big Score
all I ask.
"It irritates me to no end
when people procrastinate and
don't get the job done. I'm not
going to waste my time on
people who make excuses.
"There's too many things I
want to do in my life � there's
no room for procrastination
Recruiting new talent for
the ECU program has been
one of the vital challenges An-
druzzi has faced in her four
years here. Prior to her arrival
it was not unusual for scholar-
ships to be offered to athletes
the coaches had not seen in
person.
"You have to have talent to
come to East Carolina she
conceeds, "but that's not the
only factor we consider. We
cannot make verbal contact
In With The Team In
Explaining Tactics
Andruzzi is always very intent when she huddles
with her team during a game. When she calls such a
huddle, her players say, their attention belongs to
the coach.
with girls we are interested in,
so we are limited as to what we
can find out about an in-
dividual's personal life. We
can, and do, talk to their
coaches and others to find out
if the she's a good student, a
hard worker, punctual � that
sort of thing.
"There was one girl who
had a lot of talent on the
court, but we knew through
her coaches that she couldn't
cut it in the classroom so we
marked her off the list.
"Playing basketball at East
Carolina is a total educational
experience.
"Adolescents today are less
responsible than they were a
couple of years ago, but it's
not altogether their fault.
They are surrounded by a
great deal of negative in-
fluences
"Negativity" and
"disloyalty" have no room in
the vocabulary of Cathy An-
druzzi.
"I'm an optimist by
nature she says. "I look for
the good things in people. I try
to eliminate all the negative
people from my life. You have
to surround yourself with the
good people of this world.
"I can't sit still. I'm hap-
piest when I'm working, or
with my family or players
The last two elements of this
statement cannot actually be
seperated. There is, of course,
her biological family, but
beyond that is her extended
family unit including her
players, assistants and other
support personnel.
The product of a "strict
Italian family Andruzzi
draws strength from ex-
periences of her youthful days
growing up in Manhattan and
later Staten Island, N.Y.
Although her parents still
reside in Staten Island, they
often journey to "Pirate
Country" to see their daughter
at work.
"My parents are very sup-
portive and a big part of my
life in basketball she says.
"That's important to me. I
know it's my life and 1 have to
make my own decisions, but
my parents have always been a
major influence on me.
"I think I get a lot of my
morals, my ethics from my
father (Joseph). He's a very
strong man � not so much in
physical strength as he is
strong in character
During one road trip this
season the Lady Pirates will be
gone for over a week; a situa-
tion which could lead to pro-
blems for most groups
"We (players, coaches, etc.)
have ;o be a family she
reasons. "We enjoy the op-
portunity to be with each
other.
"1 think I have good kids,
but you have to remember
they're human. 1 don't think
fans realize those kids put
their life into basketball from
August until the end ol the
season.
"We (coaches) work very
hard to make their experience
enjoyable
The Lady Pirates have en-
joyed marked success under
Andruzzi, but the players
value their days at ECU for
more than the number of
games listed in the win col-
umn.
"She really cares a lot about
us says junior Mary
Denkler. "She may get mad
and yell sometimes, but it's
only because she wants ever-
body to be the best.
"She'd go out of her way to
do anything for her players.
She does a lot of little things
people don't realize, don't
hear about
Victories over N.C. State,
North Carolina and Virginia
and a narrow miss against
Southern Cal propelled the
Lady Pirates into the Top 20
for the first time last year �
one step closer to Andruzzi's
goal of a national
powerhouse. Three times dur-
ing the 1979-80 season at-
tendence at Minges Coliseum
topped the 4,000 mark, and
the Lady Pirates dropped a
77-73 decision to nationally
sixth-ranked USC as 4,500
watched.
"We're getting there she
admits with a smile of con-
fidence. "The program has
grown a lot in the four yean
I've been here; we have the TV
show (on WNCT-TV, the first
ever for a women's basketball
program), the radio show.
"But we're not stopping,
we'll continue to grow. Our
program is all business. We
don't want people to pay us lip
service. Just give us the things
we need to get the job done
"We make a plan, put it in-
to action and then re-evaluate
it and make adjustments.
We're young; we're still learn-
ing
It doesn't matter whether
the Lady Pirates are in a tight
game or running away with an
easy victory, Andruzzi cannot
sit idly as her players run up
and down the court. Officials
repeatedly warn the vivacious
ECU mentor to stay behind
the line marking the edge of
the playing surface, but as
soon as the words are spoken
she is again crowding the
margin shouting instructions
to her "Rats
"1 don't even realize I'm
doing it most of the time she
says. "When we go back and
look at the tapes of the games.
I see this person running ali
over the place � including on-
to the court.
"They've said the rule
about coaches being on the
playing surface will be enforc-
ed more this year. I hope they
didn't do this because of me
she chides.
A confessed adict requiring
massive daily doses of coffee.
Andruzzi has worked iong
hours for her program to gain
success.
"One of our goals was to
have our own identity � we
do she adds. "We don't live
or die by what happens at
other schools in the state.
We're proud of our program
and school and what we have
to offer.
"We have a state, regional
and national identity we have
never had before.
"There's no limit; as soon
as you've set a limit you might
as well pack your bags
The only bags Cathy An-
druzzi's packing are for Lady
Pirate road trips.
The Lady Pirate Mentor
Is Often On Her Feet,
Shouting Instructions





10
ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
Returnees
Are Many In
ECAC-South
Old Dominion And James
Madison Are The Early Favorites,
But Several Other Veteran Clubs
Could Peak And Surprise
"he I CAC-South has been
realigned, with Easi Carolina
mo ing in and five learns mo -
ing oui.
! : e lop iwo finisher from a
yeai ago, Old Dominion and
James Madison, return,
though, and arc solid favorites
io load the pack again.
Following is a brief sum-
mar ol each conference team
OLD DOMINION
There is "somewhat guard-
ed and protected optimism" in
Ihe Monarch camp, sas
Coach Paul Webb.
Outsiders sa the optimism
should be overwhelming. The
Monarchs are co-favorites in
the league race. Some believe,
though, that Webb's team
ma be alone at the top. One
national publication, Sport-
slime's, ranked ODU 14th in
the country in its pre-season
poll.
A budding tradition com-
bined with an impressive crev
or returnees earned such a
ranking. ODU has competed
in tour post-season lour-
naments in the past five years,
the only sears that the team
has competed on the Division 1
level.
A big step was taken last
sear when the club handed
then-number one ranked
DePaul its only regular season
loss. ODL was the league's
regular season champion, yet
went to the National Inviia-
lional Tournament instead ot
i he NCAA's when James
Madison rolled to victory in
the FCAC -South tournament.
Senior forward Ronnie
McAdoo (15.9 ppg, 9 rpg).
ihe cousin of NBA star Bob
McAdoo, leads the way for
Webb's club. The presence of
6-10 center Mark West (10.9
ppg, 10.3 rpg) certainly makes
McAdoo's job easier. West led
the nation in blocked shots last
season, averaging four per
game.
Add Cram Robinson (9.1
ppg and 6.3 assists) and Billy
ECU Basketball 1981-82
The Kast Carolinian
December 1. 1981
CREDITS
Photos: Gary Patterson, Dre
Rumbley, Kir Sloan. (Cover color
photos by Patterson)
Editor: Charles Chandler
Contributions: William YcKer-
ton. Jimmy DuPree, ECU Sports
Information, ECU Print Shop
Printing: The Daily Southerner,
Tarboro.
Mann (13.9 ppg) and you have
an impressive, experienced
backcourl lo combine with
Mc d�Hi and v est. Finding a
!ins! siatlet is a concein now.
though, s.ns ebb.
"We have the tour solid
returning starters he said.
But we've got to come up
with a dependable fifth startei
and develop some depth.
"On the other hand
Webb continued, "we will
have our strengths. 1 think out
quickness will he a positive
thing lso, we should be pret-
t mature
JAMES MADISON
The Dukes won the league
tourney last season to earn the
rights to go to the NCAA
Tournament. Once there, all
ihe Dukes did was defeat a
highly-favored, nationally-
ranked Georgetown team and
give Notre Dame all it wanted
before bowing out. All thai,
sas JML head coach I ou
Campanelli, was a big step.
"it definitely meant aloi
said the sixth-year mentor. "It
did a loi for the school and the
program. 1: vaulted us into a
position where people
recognize us as a major college
basketball team. Nine years
ago, vou know, this was a
girl's school
But not anymore. The
Dukes are co-favorites with
ODU in the ECAC-South
race.
Four starters, headed by 6-6
forward Lint on Townes (15.3
ppv. 5.8 rpg last season and 35
points last week in an exhibi-
tion win over Yugoslavia),
return from the 21-9 tourna-
ment squad. Included among
the nine losses was a mere one-
point defeat to powerful
Virginia.
Defense was a JMU by-
word last year, the Dukes
ranking sixth nationally in
team defense (57.2) and 12th
in field-goal percentage
defense (43.4).
In addition to Townes,
guards Charles Fisher and
Dave Dupont, along with
center Dan Ruland are return-
ing starters.
"We're working hard
said Campanelli. "But we've
got a lot of inexperienced
depth. We're trying to gel
something out of three or four
guys
Positives? "We play hard.
In EC AC
South action
last season,
William and
Mary's Billy
Barnes (22)
drives on Rich-
mond's Mark
Reed. The
t w o s o m e
should make
themselves
heard before
the conference
season ends.
play good defense and can
shoot well Campanelli said.
"1 inton (lownes) is one of
the best shooters I've ever
been around
WILLIAM AND MAR
The building process con-
tinues for the Indians, who
progressed to 16-12 last year
despite what might have been
the school's toughest-ever
schedule.
"I think we're on solid
ground now said head coach
Bruce Parkhill. "We're head-
ed in the right direction. Our
objective is to continue to im-
prove
Improvement could be
ahead again this year, as five-
regulars who filled four star-
ting positions return from last
year. 1 eadmg the way is All-
EC AC-South performer Mike
St ray horn, a 6-5 forward who
averaged 11.1 points per game
last year.
Billy Barnes (9.2 ppg, 55
steals) and Tonj Traver (7
ppg) return as starters ai
guard. Ken Bowen and Brant
Weidner are back to share the
center spot again.
Heading the list of
newcomers is 6-4 guard Keith
Cieplickt. twice Vermont's
prep athlete of the year and an
Ail-American a sear ago.
Cieplicki averaged 33 points
last vear for Rice Memorial
High in Burhgnton, Vt.
"We have a good nucleus
this year Parkhill said. "But
we lost four seniors from last
year. We hope to counter that
with some of our younger
guys
The Indians, long a ball
control learn, may try to speed
things somewhat this year.
Parkhill admits the club may
"run a little more and be more
aggressive than in the past
GEORGE MASON
Ask any league coach and
he will admit that the Patriots
are the team to watch.
"George Mason said one
ECAC-South mentor, "could
be very dangerous. They have
as much talent as anvbody in
the league
Despite losing leading scorer
Dave Skaff (20.1 ppg) to
graduation, George Mason
figures to be much-improved
over last season's 10-16 club.
Besides Skaff, nearly
everyone else returns. In addi-
tion. 6-10 center Andre Caddv
is back after sitting out last
vear. Caddy has careei
averages of 16.1 ppg and 9.9
tpg and was an all-conference
selection in 1979-80.
Sophomore guard Andy
Bolden is back aftet averaging
16.9 points and earning con-
ference rook ie-of-I he-year
honors a veat ago. Bolden's
backcourt partner. John
Niehoff, also returns Io the
slatting lineup, along with 6-4
forward Ricks Dillatd.
Much of the optimism in the
Patriot camp results from a
big recruiting yeai Head
coach Joe Harrington, a
former assistant undo 1 efty
Driessel at Mat viand, brought
in 6-9 JuCo iransfei Mike
Hanlin, 6-7 Centenary transfer
Mike Shannon and 6-8
freshman Pierre 1 a.Mitte.
See ALL Page 19
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'Silly Freshman1 No Longe;
Denkler Having
Become Leader
By JIMMY DuPRKK
M�Mflat Milor
She came to ECU in 1978 as
a talented but unorthodox
freshman capable of providing
offensive punch off the bench
as well as comic relief on the
road. Last season she further
developed offensively, averag-
ing 14.4 points a game with a
.548 field goal accuracy mark.
Now, junior forward Mary
Denkler is cast in the role of
being a veteran leader of the
1981-82 Lady Pirate basket-
ball squad.
"She and Fran (Hocks) us-
ed to be my silly freshmen
chides coach Cathy Andruzzi.
"Now she's a junior and hav-
ing to become a leader. It real-
ly doesn't seem like it's been
that long
Does being expected to pro-
vide leadership pressure
Denkler? Hardly.
"I didn't think about it
much coming into the
season she said. "It's
something you have to get us-
ed to.
"We're a young team, but
our freshmen are good. We
have a lot of enthusiasm, but
we really need experience.
"I think the main challenge
we face this year is to over-
come youth and not be in-
timidated by other teams
The Lady Pirates will have
to overcome youth quickly on
the road, as they play in the
friendly confines of Minges
Cloiseum only twice in their
first II outings.
"I think everybody is
capable of scoring suggests
'Denk "There's not any one
person who is going to
dominate the scoring. We have
a lot of offensive talent
The Lady Pirates will incor-
porate the "motion" offense
into their routine this season
� a move Denkler looks for-
ward to.
" 'Motion' is reaction to
given situations she ex-
plains. "We still have set plays
to run, but it allows much
more freedom.
"We've still got to get used
to each other. We've got to
know what each one of us is
doing. We get along well, and
that'll help us in the long run.
We want to help each other "
While working at Pal Ken-
nedy. Bit '
summer,
America cam
develop her
through impr
Denkler hopej
her 6 �
average
the void let;
of center Mar
"I knew I
on (defense)
"I've worked
lot, and try
more court at
At the bej
season Denkl
were the talles
6-0. Now Den
tallest on tl
junior DarleJ
freshman U
each measi
freshman L
6-0.
��We will
taller team tl
had bet oreI
druzi "The
off fhebench
give Denk
rest when th
be important
(he season
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In EC AC
South action
last season,
William and
Marx 's Hilly
Barnes (22)
drives on Rich-
mond's Mark
Reed. The
i woome
should make
themsel ve s
ht ard beore
tht conference
season ends
avi
! il
"uf along with 6-4
ard Rick I) Hard
v - ��! ihe optimism h
' � ' camp results
bruiting yeai Head
loe Han
assisiam undo I eft
- - ai Maryland, h
' � Ju( o iranstei Mike
f lanlin, 6-7enienan iransfei
Mike Shannon and 6-8
n ai Pierre I Arc
See ALL Page 19
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34
'Silly Freshman No Longer
Denkler Having To
Become Leader Now
ECU Basketball 1981-82 December I, 1981 11
By JIMMY DuPRKK
Managtaf tdilor
She came to ECU in 1978 as
a talented but unorthodox
freshman capable of providing
offensive punch off the bench
as well as comic relief on the
road. Last season she further
developed offensively, averag-
ing 14.4 points a game with a
.548 field goal accuracy mark.
Now. junior forward Mary
Denkler is cast in the role of
being a veteran leader of the
1981-82 Lady Pirate basket-
ball squad.
"She and Fran (Hooks) us-
ed to be my sly freshmen
chides coach Cathy Andruzzi.
"Now she's a junior and hav-
ing to become a leader. It real-
ly doesn't seem like it's been
that long
Does being expected to pro-
vide leadership pressure
Denkler? Hardly.
"I didn't think about it
much coming into the
season she said. "It's
something you have to get us-
ed to.
"We're a young team, but
our freshmen are good. We
have a lot of enthusiasm, but
we really need experience.
"1 think the main challenge
we face this year is to over-
come youth and not be in-
timidated by other teams
The Lady Pirates will have
to overcome youth quickly on
the road, as they play in the
friendly confines of Minges
Cloiseum only twice in their
first 11 outings.
"I think everybody is
capable of scoring suggests
'Denk "There's not any one
person who is going to
dominate the scoring. We have
a lot of offensive talent
The Lady Pirates will incor-
porate the "motion" offense
into their routine this season
� a move Denkler looks for-
ward to.
" 'Motion' is reaction to
given situations she ex-
plains. "We still have set plays
to run, but it allows much
more freedom.
"We've still got to get used
to each other. We've got to
know what each one of us is
doing. We get along well, and
that'll help us in the long run.
We want to help each other
While working at Pat Ken-
nedy Basketball Camps this
summer, the Academic All-
Ameiica candidate strived to
develop her defensive skills
through improved quickness
Denkler hopes to improve on
her 6.8 rebounds per game
average of a year ago and fill
the void left by the graduation
of center Marcia Girven.
"I knew 1 needed to work
on (defense) she admits.
"I've worked on positioning a
lot, and trying to develop
more court awareness
At the beginning of last
season Denkler and Girven
were the tallest Lady Pirates at
6-0. Now Denkler ties for third
tallest on the squad, with
junior Darlene Hedges and
freshman Darlene Chaney
each measuring 6-2 and
freshman Laura Regal also
6-0.
"We will have a somewhat
taller team than we have ever
had before eonceeds An-
druzzi. "The additional height
off the bench will mean w can
give Denk and others more
rest when they need it. That'll
be important especially later in
the season
PtKStO By KIP SLOAN
Denkler Drives Against Appalachian
Overton s
Supermarket, Inc.
PIRATE COUPON - 5 DISCOUNT ON
Any Food Order Regardless of Size
Present this coupon and show
your ECU ID to cashier.
Offer Expires Dec. 19, 1981
i ID no.
i
'Home of Greenville's Best Meats" ! Amt. Purchased
PRICES EFFECTIVE DEC 3 DEC 5
HEAVY WESTERN
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LB$2.19
HEAVY WESTERN
T-BONE STEAKS
lb $2.29
BREYER'S
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12 GALLON
$
1.99
FRESH WHOLE
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42
Coca-Cola,
Tab, Sprite,
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98
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:lip this coupon
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$
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with this coupon and $7.50 food order excluding specials. Without coupon Sis Limit
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COCA- SOFT DRINKS
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2Utr Regular $1.19 VahM
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12 ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
MJNOES-MANJA
ECU Assistant Barrise Begins Drive To
Make Minges A More Formidable Coliseum
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Minges Mania
Get used to the term. It will
probably be seen and heard a
great deal before the current
basketball season is over. At
least that is what East
Carolina coaches hope.
The idea is to create increas-
ed interest in Pirate basket-
ball, and to get that interest in-
to the confines of Minges Col-
iseum when ECU is playing a
home game.
"Our overall goal is to try
and fill the student section
said assistant coach Tom Bar-
rise, the author of the 'Minges
Mania' terminology. "We
think the crowd is as much a
part of a basketball game as
the team on the floor or the
coach on the bench
Barrise and his coaching
cohorts have contacted nearly
every student organization,
hoping that the groups will ral-
ly behind the slogan and make
the thought of "mania" in
Minges Coliseum a reality.
"Everyone we've talked to
seems very positive about it
Barrise said. "We feel the
students want to be a part of
this thing and we certainly
want them to be
A crowd is important. Bar-
rise said, but the student
crowd is most important.
"The student body has to
become the sixth man said
the ECU aide. "Behind every
home court should be the
home court advantage. If a
team comes in here and the
crowd is not that enthusiastic,
it is a help to the visiting
team
In the past, attendance to
ECU home basketball games
has usually been meager. Bar-
rise hopes the push, and
hopefully a much-improved
team, will help transform
Minges into a lion's den for
opposing teams.
"We'd love for a scout to be
envious of our arena. We'd
like nothing more than for a
scout to go back and tell his
team 'hey, that Is one heck of
a tough place to play
Barrise, head coach Dave
Odom and the staff have taken
their thoughts to the com-
munity as well. Don Edwards,
manager of the University
Book Exchange, and the
Pepsi-Cola company liked
what they heard.
Edwards and Pepsi are pro-
iding "Minges Mania"
painters caps for the siudeni
body.
"I'd really like lo see us
develop a big-time at -
mostphere in Minges Id-
wards said. "1 just hope the
students will respond to this. I
think they'll find that atten-
ding major college basketball
games can really be fun. And
it will help the team so much,
too
The word "fun" is one that
Barrise likes lo use when talk-
ing about attending an ECU
games.
"We hope we as a team will
be fun to watch he said.
"But we will also be doing
other things. We're working
on having nightly contesls. I
think once the students start
coming, they'll want to come
back
Barrise is also very concern-
ed with what some call a very
apathetic student body.
"This is my first year here,
so I don't know about any
apaihv. But I don't think there
should be any. College is the
most fun you'll ever have. It's
no time lo be apathetic
Especially if "Minges
Mania" is to become a reality.
Both Coaches9
Shows Are Set
East Carolina basketball
coaches Dave Odom and
Cathy Andruzzi will be
featured in their own televi-
sion and radio shows during
the season.
Odom's 30-minute weekly
highlight show will be hosted
by Lee Moore and aired at 4
p.m. each Saturday on
WCT1-12, Channel 12, New
Bern.
Andruzzi's TV show will be
shown at 12:30 p.m. each
Saturday, preceding the ACC
telecasts,on WNCT-TV,
Channel 9, Greenville. Henry
Hinton will host.
WOOW radio station (1340
AM in Greenville) will aire
both of the coaches' radio
shows.
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BEST BUY IN THE AREA FOR
IZOD LACOSTE SHIRTS AND
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seGORDON FULP
GOLF AND SKI SHOP
LOCATED AT GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
Q?F MEMORIAL OR. -OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
8:00 A.M. TILL DARK
Hoping For Mania'
The ECU men's basketball team took time out
Monday to pose with the new "Minges
Mania"painters hats, which were bought by
Pepsi-Cola in conjunction with the University
Book Exchange. The hats will be given away
to students during the December 7 game with
Campbell. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
American Designer Jeans
Jordache
Sasson
Calvin Klein
Cotter
Sergio Valento
Gloria Vanderbilt
French Designer Jeans
Bonjour
Oscar de la Renta
Chardon
Yves Saint Laurent
Jackets
Jordache
Sergio Valente
Bill Blass
Members Only
Genuine
Leather Jackets
Sasson
and a full line of
accessories by such
famous names
as Pierre Carain,
Christian Dior
on all items with
coupon
Offer good at
Jeans Glory
and Style Plus
Offer expires
Dec. 31. 1981
RETURNING to the
Pirate fold this year is
point guard Tony Byles.
A starter in 1979-80,
Byles sat out last year
with academic dif-
ficulties. His is expected
to quarterback the ECU
club.
(Photos By Gary Patter-
son)
Shirley's
Cut & Style
Barbers �
James, Mike & Marty
8 a.m6:30 p.m.
McnFri.
appointments only
located downtown
(within walking distance of campus)
on second floor of Minges Building
Phone 752-1855
Fashion cuts for
both men and women
Byles
After
Expe
"All
figui
Now I �
:
ball coach Dave �
vcr intern a
fice and refled
last season's 12-14 r
looked ahea
mg
He spoil
the 1981-82 Pii I
mam reasons
timism, he said, was
ol point guard
Byles v a
junior in I
first year at the Pi
but did not pla
to academic difficj
sat out last fall
returned in 'tie sp
and work riimseH
purple, gold
uniform.
When Byl
campus Odon
to a-
chance
knows v
"1 v,a- down
H
T
8
incl
for
o
Fil
Jean's Galore
Located on downtown mall - aiso come by
STYLE PLUS located at East Carolina Convenience Center next to Winn Dixie
Prices ai
Offer expl
Corm
&2





ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
13
1A
Barrise Begins Drive To
K More Formidable Coliseum
t
Byles Returns To Bucs
After A Year On Sidelines,
Expected To Play Key Role
Hoping For 'Mania9
jm took time out
with the new "Mtnges
nuts, which were bought by
tjunction with the University
Book Exchange. The hats will be given away
to students during the December 7 game with
Campbell. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
RETURNING to the
Pirate fold this year is
point guard Tony Byles.
A starter in 1979-80,
Byles sat out last year
with academic dif-
ficulties. His is expected
to quarterback fhe ECU
club.
(Photos By Gary Patter-
son)
mencan Designer Jeans
lordache
son
(Calvin Klein
Cotter
Sergio Valento
ria Vanderbilt
French Designer Jeans
BonjOur
Oscar de la Renta
irdon
ves Saint Laurent
'eaters
lordache
io Valente
ans Men
Jackets
Jordache
Sergio Valente
Bill Blass
Mem jers Only
Genuine
Leather Jackets
Sasson
and a full line of
accessories by such
famous names
as Pierre Cardin,
Christian Dior
J
0 off
on all items with
coupon
Offer good at
Jeans Glory
and Style Pius
Offer expires
Dec. 31. 1981
Shirley's
Cut & Style
Barbers �
James, Mike & Marty
8 a.m6:30 p.m.
MonFri.
appointments only
located downtown
(within walking distance of campus)
on second floor of Minges Building
Phone 752-1855
Fashion cuts for
both men and women
Jean's Galora
Located on downtown mall - also come by
STYLE PLUS located at East Carolina Convenience Center next to Wmn Dixie
By CHARLES CHANDLER
"All of last year I tried to
figure out what was wrong.
Now 1 know; he was not
here
East Carolina head basket-
ball coach Dave Odom was
very intent as he sat in his of-
fice and reflected back upon
last season's 12-14 record and
looked ahead toward the com-
ing year.
He spoke with optimism for
the 1981-82 Pirates. One of the
main reasons for that op-
timism, he said, was the return
of point guard Tony Byles.
Byles was a starter as a
junior in 1979-80, Odom's
first year at the Pirate helm,
but did not play last year due
to academic difficulties. He
sat out last fall semester and
returned in the spring to try
and work himself back into a
purple, gold and white
uniform.
When Byles returned to
campus Odom had very little
to say about the guard's
chances of returning. Byles
knows why.
"I was down 21 quality
points1 said 11 io lank 6-4
senior. "I needed to maintain
a 3.5 average. 1 did prett
good in the summer, but still
fell a couple of points low. I
went to the first session of
summer school and got
everything straight
Now that Byes is back,
Odom is elated.
"He adds so much to our
team said the third-year
ECU head coach. "When he's
got the ball it's like putting a
babe in its mother's arms.
Everything is calm and confi-
dent when he's in there. There
is a great sense of organization
when Tony is running the
show
Coming back into a pro-
gram and being asked to be a
team leader has not been a
problem Byles said.
"I've been really accepted
well he said. "As a matter
of fact, I've been accepted so
well that it adds a little
pressure. It's nothing I can't
handle. I'm just glad the
players have accepted me and
I'm really glad to be back
Byles averaged 5.2 points
and just below two assists per
game :wo years ago. He said
the scoring loials should be
higher tins year.
"I d'n't worry about
shooting he said. "That's
not my main job. But I do
know I have to contribute
more than two years ago. I'll
still concentrate on on passing
and bali-handling, but I'll pro-
bably shoot more than I did
before
Byles says the current
Pirates could be better than
the 1979-80 team that went
16-11. That was the Pirates'
first winning season in five
years. "We have more
depth this year than two years
ago said the New York
native. "I think we play a lot
better together. 1 believe we
can have a better record
In retrospect, Byles said he
is glad his senior season was
prolonged by one year.
"I feel a lot better on this
team than I would have last
year. We're more of a family
now. From watching all last
year I have really gotten a lot
smarter. I expect to make
fewer mistakes and I know 1
have more enthusiasm
So does his coach.
HASTINGS FORD
TUNE-UPS
4 CYLINDER
6 CYLINDER
� � �
19.40
23.60
27.85
8 CYLINDER
includes labor, plugs, and all necessary adjustments
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includes 5 qts. of oil and filter.
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excluding illegally
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Day - 758-0114
Corner of 10th �-EO � EiM
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Offer expires Dec. 31, 198V





14 ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
Remembering A
Fabulous Five
Riley, Girven, Sikes, Rountree,
Owen; all now graduated. The
five led the Lady Pirates to a
23-7 record and a national rank-
ing last year.
Veranda Room
Happy Hour �
Fri. 4:30-7:00
Free Beef Ribs
& Tacos
Happy Hour every day!
Arbor Room
Restaurant
Special every
Sat. Night
All the prime rib
& burgundy wine
you can eat &
drink for only
$9.95
Both located at
The Ramada Inn � 264 By-Pass
CENTER MARCIA GIRVEN goes to the
hoop during one of the club's two wins over
arch-rival N.C. State last season. The first of
those Lady Buc victories broke State's
64-game winning streak against in-state com-
petition.
GUARD LAURIE SIKES, the all-
time Lady Pirate assist leader,
played a key role last year in direc-
ting the ECU attack despite bad
knee problems. She is now serving
Cathy Andruzzi's assistant.
FORWARD KATHY RILEY thrilled the ECU
crowds with her sharp-shooting ability and
agressive play. She is the school's fifth leading
scorer, despite playing just two seasons. Also a
Lady Pirate softball star. She is currently a can-
didate to win the coveted Broderick Award.
FORWARD HEIDI OWEN fil
ed the role that each team mi
have filled, the valuable resen
Owen alwas eemed to proi
the extra punch when it was net
ed most.
ROBBY)
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BY NIKE, CONVERSE,
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210 E. FIFTH ST.
752-4156
BOND'S
SPORTING
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218 ARLINGTON BLVD.
756-6001
ECU
Students
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104E.REDBANKSRD.
756-6000
RTSWORLD
All
Hot I owe 11
in present
s
Foui
yrM
k





ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
15
I ARC! A (ilRVEN goes to the
one of the club's two wins over
I Mate last season. The first of
Bin victories broke State's
stnak against in-state com-
GUARD LAURIE SIKES, the all-
time lady Pirate assist leader,
played a ke role last year in direc-
ting the ECU attack despite bad
knee problems. She is now serving
Cathv AndruAi's assistant.
FORWARD KATHY RILEY thrilled the ECU
crowds with her sharp-shooting ability and
agressive play. She is the school's fifth leading
-i orer, despite playing just two seasons. Also a
I ady Pirate softball star. She is currently a can-
didate to win the coveted Broderick Award.
FORWARD HEIDI OWEN fill-
ed the role thai each team must
have filled, the valuable reserve.
Owen always seemed to provide
the extra punch when it was need-
ed most.
GUARD LYDIA ROUNTREE was a three-year starter
until her senior year, yet still made the All-NCAIAW
team here last season thanks to her superb play off the
bench. During one nine-game stretch shot an amazing
68 percent. She is the Lady Pirates' third-leading all-
time scorer.
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DUXBAK MOLESKIN SHIRTS & DUXBAK VES1SWARM-UPS BY ADIDAS, COURT CASUAL & LOOMTOGS
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Pre-Christmas Sale in Progress
Old Fashioned Fountain
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Your Choice
250
ECU
Students
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104 E. REDBANKSRD.
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(JTOBTSWOBtP
All Ice Cream 20 C per scoop.
Hollowell's has been serving ECU students for over 50 years
in prescription service.
Sale runsTues Dec. 1 -Fri Dec. 4
Fountain specials also good week of first two home games.
Good at Hollowell's 1 and 2 stores
Quality � Competitive Prices � Service
91 1 Dickinson Ave
752-7105
6th St. & Memorial Dr
758-4104





16 ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981
McLaurin Maintains His Spirit Despite Injury
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
s�4st�nt SfHHIs I- dilor
It's Saturday, November28
� the opening night of the
season for the Pirates of East
Carolina � and senior co-
caption Mark McLaurin,
bothered by a severe disloca-
tion in one of his fingers, is set
to play.
The ECU Sports Medicine
department has outfitted the
Spingfield, Mass native with
a splint and bandaging, but
the game officials come over
and look at his finger, saying
the point on the splint is too
sharp. To play, McLauren
would have to take the splint
off
"There was just no way, "
responded coach Dave Odom.
So what does McLaurin do?
He sits on the bench and
cheers his teammates on.
"If that had been me
Odom said, "I would have
been crushed, but Mark must
have the heart of a giant. He
was very active on the bench in
support of the rest of the
team, doing the job of a co-
captain. "
It's Monday, Nov. 30, and
McLaurin has just returned
from having the injury ex-
amined. He has torn ligaments
in his little finger, and his
hand will be in a cast for three
weeks.
He admitts he feels "just
terrible but quickly adds, "1
know people who are worse
off than I am, so 1 can't really
complain "
That's McLauren.
The 6-7 forward is the only
ECU player that has been in a
Pirate uniform for four con-
secutive years. He is the last of
the Larry Gillman (former
ECU head coach) recruits,
which is something he says
that "doesn't even cross my
mind. I'm happy with
everybody right now. I haven't
had any conflicts with the
coaching staff or anyone.
"It's just like I was
recruited by Coach Odom
He played in the shadow of
Pirate stars Herb Gray and
Herb Krusen for two years,
but started all 26 games last
season and was selected as the
team's most valuable player.
He finished last season with
a 52 percent field goal ac-
curacy mark, having been
above 50 percent all three
years at East Carolina.
"I'm excited, definitely ex-
cited McLaurin says about
the 1981-82 season. "In my
opinion, this could be the best
team we've had since I've been
here.
"We've improved a lot with
the new players he con-
tinued. "We have team unity.
It's just a drastic change
As for goals, the parks and
More Power where1
it counts
CUSTOM EXHAUST SYSTEMS
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TELEPHONE (919) 758-7676
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Greenville
Tha Performing Parts.
recreation major says he
doesn't have any individual
ones. "The main thing is that
our team wins. If 1 had to
name one, it would probably
be to see East Carolina win big
� win the EC AC South and
go to some type of tourna-
ment.
"This is my last year � my
last chance
McLaurin says the high
point of his career came his
sophomore season when the
team went 16-11, but as far as
his own success, "I can't say
I've had any. But what I've
had, I'd have to give credit to
my parents. They're far away,
but we keep in touch. They've
picked me up and given me in-
spiration
A left-hander with a sure
eye for the basket, McLaurin
was second in assists last
season with 50, two behinder
team leader Charles Wat kins.
His high school career was
very successful; he was
selected for all-city three years
and all-Western Massachusetts
for two.
McLaurin says he will pro-
bably return at the end of
December, and he'll do some
running to sty in shape. And
the times he will not be able to
play?
He'll be cheering his team-
mates on, "doing the job of a
co-captain
An Intense Staff
A Proud Moment
ECU senior Mark McLaurin is pictured accepting a
plaque following the 1979-80 Pirate season. The
team went 16-11 that year, a time that McLaurin
says is the highlight of his career thus far. Despite
an early injury he hopes to make this year even bet-
ter.
With the departure last year of Eddie Payne and George
Felton to other programs, ECU head basketball coach Dave
Odom had to "recruit" new assistants. This year's crew was
together during last week's exhibition with Australia. They
are (L-R): Tom Barrise, David Pendergraft, Odom
(kneeling), Don Carter (standing and Herb Krusen (seated to
right of Carter). (Photo By Gary Patterson)
ODUj
Are F:
Say q
Old D I
Madison arc I
favorite
IA S
poll
six
clud
v. e r e
sec
th.
will
J4 po
bel '

ed � �
ihird, .
finisl '
fifth, Ri
Sav sev
M ' I
-
5th & Cotanche
m Greenvslle
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5 �'

!l 2818 E. 10th St.
j! Greenville Location
' I?
Tonight Chapter Ten presents Part 3 of
the All Campus Beer Chugging Contest.
Tonight's competition is between frater-
nity guys.
Don't forget the finals of the Beer Chug-
ging Contest - Tuesday, December 8
Wednesday Night
Ladies' Night
Thursday �5050
50t Admission �
50t Beverage
Friday Afternoon
End of Week Party
3 toy-
all beverages 50t
Saturday Night
Nickel Night
For more info,
call 752-9745
'
M-V





ECU Basketball 1981-82 December 1, 1981 17
is Spirit Despite Injury
s he
ividual
:i:
rs t he high
ihis
I he I
vO
�ve
.red itto
u awav,
rheyve
I given mein-
ith a sure
Mel aurin
ts last
0 behmder
was
he was
three ears
A Proud Moment
ECU senior Mark McLaurin is pictured accepting a
plaque following the 1979-80 Pirate season. The
team went 16-11 that year, a time that McLaurin
fays is the highlight of his career thus far. Despite
an early injury he hopes to make this year even bet-
ter.
An Intense Staff
With the departure last year of Eddie Payne and George
Felton to other programs, ECU head basketball coach Dave
Odom had to "recruit" new assistants. This year's crew was
together during last week's exhibition with Australia. They
are (L-R): Tom Barrise, David Pendergraft, Odom
(kneeling), Don Carter (standing) and Herb Krusen (seated to
right of Carter). (Photo By Gary Patterson)
LASS BACKBOARD COMBO $5997
N SOCKS - WHITE $04
��versified ALL SPORTS PUMP $327
IORTS INFLATING NEEDLES 89$
NG TOP FLITE $1997
our low price
NBA 1497
DAVID THOMPSON' J97
NG LARRY BYRD' 1397
ING'Dr. J $1257
NG MAGIC JOHNSON' 97
J Dawson
Co.
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville Location
2IbatrtrX
5th &Cotanche
in Greenville
Tonight Chapter Ten presents Part 3 of
the All Campus Beer Chugging Contest.
Tonight's competition is between frater-
nity guys.
Don't forget the finals of the Beer Chug-
ging Contest � Tuesday, December 8.
Wednesday Night
Ladies' Night
Thursday �5050
50t Admission �
50t Beverage
Friday Afternoon
End of Week Party
3to7 �
all beverages 50t
Saturday Night
Nickel Night
For more info,
call 752-9745
ODU, JMU
Are Favored
Say Coaches
Old Dominion and James
Madison are the overwhelming
favorites to bailie it out for the
ECAC-South title this season,
say the league's coaches in a
poll conducted by Hie hast
Carolinian.
Each coach was asked to
rale one through six the other
six teams in the league, ex-
cluding his own. Six points
were awarded for each tirst-
place vote, five for each
second-place sole, and so
forth.
James Madison finished
wilh four first place voles and
34 points total. ODU was just
behind, receiving three first-
place votes and 33 points.
William and Mary was pick-
ed by the coaches to finish
third, garnering 21.5 points.
East Carolina was picked to
finish fourth, George Mason
fifth, Richmond sixth and
Navy seventh.
H M N�lli Prr-��r�M.n �!��.�� ' P"H
(I irsl-plaT ol�- in parrRlkrMti
I ram ����' P�-
1 l.mu- Mj.Iis no Ml M
2 111,1 Ownu iJl J3
l ,llijm .nul Maf) 2 J
i IM.ii-lnu II
J lp�K Mawm II
ft Kivlmifiul II
- Sin I
Morns Hargrove Dunks Against Australians
blount-harvey





18
ECU Basketball 1981-81 December 1, 1981
Marine Watkins

Pirate guard Charles
Watkins fires a jumper in
action from last season.
The 25-year-old former
Marine is the team's
leading returning scorer.
�y CHARLES CHANDLER
On a basketball team that
finished with a 12-14 record,
one probably would be hard-
pressed to find a �'story" ot
human interest.
Such was not the case on the
hast Carolina team last year,
though. The Pirates finished
two games below the .500
mark, but that was no fault o'
the man who came from a
man's world to play a boys'
game, and played it with the
enthusiasm of a young teen.
It all began last December
when then-24-year-old Charles
Watkins joined the Pirates
after a four year stint in the
U.S. Marine Corps. It was the
New Orleans native's first
taste of college basketball.
It was not his first taste of
college, however. He attended
Louisiana Tech for just over a
year before joining the
Marines. Once there, he
played on the Marine Corps
varsity team, going on to
average 19 points in his last
season with the squad. The
next basketball he would play
would be on the intercollegiate
level.
Watkins spoke with excite-
ment last season whenever he
talked about playing with the
Pirates. He showed it on the
court as well, leading the team
with a 12.8 average and scor-
ing in double figures in 15 of
the 19 games in which he
played. The sophomore was
rewarded for his efforts by
receiving honorable mention
status to the All-Southern In-
dependent team.
Watkins' signing with the
Pirates was not brought about
after one of your traditional
go-visit-the-recruit routines.
During most of 1980 he was
stationed in nearby Cherry
Point. He often came lo
Greenville to visit his fiance,
who was an ECU student.
During the summer he
sometimes played on
weekends in Memorial gym
with a number of Pirate
players.
(Worn saw Watkins in
Memorial a number of times
and, to say the least, liked
what he saw. The two talked
on several occasions until,
finally. Watkins was signed to
a grant-in-aid.
Privately, Odom and his
assistants spoke excitedly
about Watkins' talents. But to
most Pirate followers the
former Marine was an
unknown.
The 6-3 guard burst from
obscurity in a hurry, though.
Soon the ECU fans had
adopted him as one of their
real favorites, taking a liking
Advance Tickets
To Be Available
To ECU Students
Tickets to East Carolina
men's and women's basketball
home games will be available
to students in advance, the
athletic department announc-
ed this week.
Students will be able to pick
up tickets beginning three days
prior to a particular Pirate
game. Tickets will be available
both at Mendenhall Student
Center and Minges Coliseum,
as was the case during football
season. A valid ID and activity
card will be required before a
ticket can be obtained.
The early pick-up is being
provided to help students
avoid waiting in what could be
long, cold lines.
Students that do not pick up
tickets prior to the game will
have to pick up a ticket at the
outdoors ticket office at
Minges before each game.
In the past students were
allowed to enter a game merely
by showing their ID and activi-
ty cards at the door. The new
ticket system has been
employed for a two-fold pur-
pose, say athletic department
officials.
First, it will provide a way
by which the department can
better market Minges Col-
iseum. Secondly, there will be
a halftime shoot-out at each
game. Ticket numbers will be
called out to determine the
participants.
The contest is being spon-
sored by Burger King. Prizes
reaching $100 will be
available.
Student seating will again be
located in the entire south sec-
tion and in both sets of end-
zone bleachers.
to his aggressive slam dunks,
outside shooting and his
overall enthusiasm for what lie
was doing.
"I can't believe this is hap-
pening to me Watkins said a
month into his first Pirate
season. "This is something
I've always wanted to do. It's
like'a dream come true
Now that the initial impact
of college basketball has worn
off, has Watkins lost some of
the enthusiasm that was pre-
sent last season?
"No way the 25-year-old
junior said bluntly. "The feel-
ing is still the same. Sometimes
I can't believe this is happen-
ing to me
Watkins says it means a
great deal to him that the stu-
dent body and Pirate follow-
ing appear to take a special lik-
ing for him.
"It's a great feeling he
said. "It's something I've
never experienced. When I'm
going to class I'm always stop-
ping to talk to people who
speak �o me. That's something,
1 really enjoy, because 1 like
people
Perhaps Watkins gains a
large measure of his populari-
ty from his oft-seen slam
dunks. He often goes over a
defender to aggressively put
the ball in the hoop. Watkins
teitrtecfe'a
� ucu'C (UMI
says chinking is both fun and
important for him.
"I love to dunk he said.
"One reason is that it excites
the crowd. Another is that it
lets out a lot of my inner
frustration. When I'm getting
ready to dunk all I'm doing is
content rating on killing that
rim
The 1981-82 season is going
lo one of change for Watkins
from his sophomore season.
The reason is the return of
Tony Byles to the point guard
position.
A natural swingman,
Watkins was called upon to
lend his maturity to the point
guard position last year. With
Byles on hand this year.
Watkins is freed to return
"home" to the number two
guard position.
"I feel a lot more comfor-
table at two Watktns said.
"U is what I'm used to play-
ing. The thing I like most
about it is the fact that 1 will
be able to take off on the fast
breaks and hopefully get some
easy layups
Watkins' opinion on how he
and his club will fare this year?
"I really think we'll be a lot
belter he said. "None of us
liked the losing record last
vear and now we want to do
something about it
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OFFICIAl NORTH CAROLINA STATE INSPECTION STATlCN
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
ISIFGoodrich
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SATURDAY
� :00 A.M. 1:00 P.M.
OPENMON FRI
� :00 A.M. 5:30 P.M.
' 'Consider us your cars'
Home Away From Home'
Cog gins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Greenville Blvd.
All In Conference
Believe Race Open
-4 '
Continued from p. 10
Freshman c arlos N ates will
provide help in the backcourt.
Yates averaged 25.8 ppv and
8 9 rpg in earning All-Amei
accolades ai Washini
lini Hij - ool.
��( )n papei everyone's say
ing we're pre
Harringion. "But we'i
hke a first-yeai team. Seven
. on ihi '� e neve;
played tor n
"We're noi a good earn
et. h will lal
jell. We mighl be unproved
ihis year, bui it mighl not
show in oui won-losi record
R HMOND
Improvement ha- been ilie
by-word with the Spiders tor
several seasons It that is to re-
main the case replacements
must be found tor Mike Pen v.
who ied last year's 15-14 team
with a 22.8 average last vear.
done alone with Perry is
point guard Doug Mills, who
chose not lo return lo school.
Also departing was head coach
I ou Goeiz, who chose to ac-
cept an impressive business ot-
ter rather than return lo
coaching.
A Cioet assistant last year.
Dick Tarrant, takes over as
Spider head mentor. Ironical-
ly, Tarrant was Goetz' bead
coach in high school.
I arrant can call on sharp-
shooter John Schweitz (18.7
ppg last vear) tor leadership
Also back is junior center Jefl
Pchl (11 ppg, 7-3 rpg).
Moving in for Mills at the
point is Talented Tom Bethea,
a transfer from Villanova.
Tarrant says the Spiders are
not looking to replace the
��irreplaceable" Perry, but
rather to adapt to a new stvle.
��. lot of our philosophy
last vear was based on Mike.
rarrani said "We will have to
have a different kind of ap-
proach now
rarrani added that the
Spiders would have to be more
conservative.
"A lot depends on tempo
he said. "If we can set a slow
tempo we can play with
anybody. If not it could be
disastrous
portunity to do something :
mam teams nevet gel lo do �
make up for past mistakes.
A long list ol veti
returns from last season's -Jf
team which had a lowl) 4; 3
Held goal percentaj
.� lean lop Iwi
guards Dave Brooks (10.8
ppg) and Rob Romaine 11( -
ppg), are back. Highly-to
freshman Sly Mata is e
to challenge the pair tor p
. time.
ol I vans' a
lives for the comit n is
increased produd '�
the frontcourt
among the big men is (
sophomore foi wd'd
who ied the learn
with a 7.4 rebounding average
last vcat.
1 vans iay. s :
del I '
t C A Soutl . adding
Navy, would like to jell
tor ihe post-season tourna-
ment ,
"p would be nice to upset
some � t (he better teams in the
conference he said. "But the
tournament is important fo us.
A; that time of the year it just
depends on who wants to play.
We'd like to strive to be at our
peak at that time
. V
5
2tf 4.
3
h?�
&
Roo
Tues Crazy Tue:
Wed Hump Nit
Thurs College
Fri "End of We
Party"
Sat "Best in D
Music"
Sun "Ladies'
758-4591
417 CotancheSt. IDi
NAVY
Head coach Paul Evans and
his Midshipmen have the op-
MEN'S SHOP
�s v -





ECU Basketball 1981-82 December I, 1981 19
s Still Excited
isiasm foi uhai he
elie e this is hap
atkins said a
a en eai
tie.
at
,an.
ihe initial impaci
. . basketball has worn
is W atkins losl son -
enthusiasm thai was pre
way the r year-old
lid bluntlv. " fhe feel-
is still the same. Sometimes
his is happen-
0 (11C
Watkins savs it means a
deal to him that the stu-
body and Pirate follow-
ippear to take a special lik-
�r him.
"It's a great feeling he
"It's something I've
Kperienced. When I'm
io class I'm always stop-
ping to talk to people who
ik to me. rhat's something,
all) enjoy, because I like
le
Perhaps Watkins gains a
?asure ol Ins populari-
m his oft-seen slam
He ften goes ovei a
to aggressively pin
al ,u the hoop. H atkins
says chinking is both fun and
important foi him.
�� love to dunk he said.
"(ne reason is thai it excites
the crowd, nothei is that it
U-is out a lot of my innei
frustration. hen I'm getting
ready to dunk all lni dome is
concentrating on killing thai
rim
Ihe 1981-82 season is going
to one of change foi Watkins
from his sophomore season.
Ihe reason is the return ol
on Byles to the point guard
position.
A natural swingma n,
Watkins was called upon to
lend his maturity to the point
guard position last year. With
Byles on hand this year,
Watkins is freed to return
"home" to the number two
guard position.
"I feel a lot more com tor-
table at two Watkins said.
"It is what I'm used to play-
ing. The thing I like most
about it is the fact that 1 will
be able to take off on the fast
breaks and hopefully get some
easv layups
Watkins' opinion on how he
and his club will fare this year'1
"1 really think we'll be a lot
better he said. "None of us
liked the losing record last
year and now we want to do
something about it
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WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
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SAUSftSifiVlCi
SATURDAY
8.00 A.M. 1:00 P.M.
OPENMON.FRI.
8:00 A.M. 5:30 P.M.
' 'Consider us your cars'
Home Away From Home'
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
3 20 West Greenville Blvd.
All In Conference
Believe Race Open
Continued from p. 10
Freshman C arlos Yales will
provide help in ihe backcourt.
Yates averaged 25.S ppe and
8.9 rpg in earning All-America
accolades at Washington's
I lini High School.
"On panel everyone's sav-
ing we're preiiv good said
Harrington. "But we're reallv
like a first-yeat team. Seven
guys on this learn have nevet
played for me.
"We're not a good team
yet. li will take time foi m to
jell. We migiii be improved
ilns year, but ii might noi
show in out won-losi record
RICHMOND
Improvement lias been ihe
by-word with the Spiders lor
several seasons. It thai is io re-
main ihe ease replacements
musl be found lor Mike Perry.
who led last year's 15-14 team
with a 22.8 average last year.
Gone along with Perry is
point guard Doug Mills, who
chose not to return to school.
lso departing was head coach
I ou Goetz, who chose to ac-
cept an impressive business of-
fer rather than return to
coaching.
A Goetz assistant last year,
Dick Tarrant, takes over as
Spider head mentor. Ironical-
ly, Tarrant was Goetz' head
coach in high school.
1 arrant can call on sharp-
shooter John Schweit (18.7
ppg last vear) for leadership.
Also back is junior center Jell
Pehl (11 ppg. 7.3 rpg).
Moving in for Mills at the
point is talented Tom Belhea,
a transfer from Villanova.
Tarrant says the Spiders are
not looking to replace the
"irreplaceable" Perry, but
rather io adapt to a new stvle.
"A lot of our philosophy
last year was based cm Mike
Tarrant said. "We will have to
have a different kind o ap-
proach now
Tarrant added that the
Spiders would have to be more
conservative.
"A lot depends on tempo
he said. "If we can set a slow
tempo we can play with
anybody. If not it could be
disasterous
portunity to do something thai
manv teams never get to do �
make up for past mistakes.
A long hsi ol veterans
returns from lasi season's 9-16
team which had a lowly 43.3
field goal percentage.
I he team's top two scorers,
guards Dave Brooks (10.8
ppg) and Rob Romanic (K4
PPg). are back. Highly-touted
freshman Slv Mata is expected
io challenge the pair for plav
me lime.
One of I-vans' main objec-
tives for the coming season is
increased productivity from
the frontcourt. Ihe leadei
among ihe big men is 6-7
sophomore forward-center
Gary Price, who led the team
with a 7.4 rebounding average
lasi veai.
1 ans savs his team is a
definite underdog in the
ECAC-South, adding that
Navy would like to jell in time
tor ihe post-season tourna-
ment.
"It would be nice to upset
some of the better teams in ihe
conference he said. "But the
tournament is important fo us.
At that time of the year it just
depends on who wants to play.
We'd like to sirive to be at our
peak ai thai time
A pair of
ECAC-South
players graced a
full page in
Street and
Smith's pre-
season basket-
ball magazine.
James Madison
guard Charles
Fisher, at
center, and
George Mason
center Andre
Gaddy, in left
box, got the at-
tention. In the
right box is
another 1981-82
ECU foe, LNC-
Wilmington's
Shawn
Williams.
& �'S
?�

Room
Tues Crazy Tuesday
Wed Hump Nite
Thurs College Nite
Fri "End of Week
Party"
Sat "Best in Dance
Music"
Sun "Ladies' Nite"
758-4591
417 Cotanche St. (Downtown)
tune tnuc u&K
Morehead City
Greenville
NAVY
Head coach Paul Evans and
his Midshipmen have ihe op-










Title
The East Carolinian, December 1, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 01, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.166
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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