The East Carolinian, November 17, 1981






�he iEast (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
vol. 58 No. 25
Tuesday, November 17, 1981
Greenville, N.C
8 Pages
Nuclear War?
ECU Professors Respond
B PATRICK O'NEILL
stall Wiiui
Massive demonstrations opposing
nucleat weapons have been taking
place recently in Western Europe.
1 hese actions, coupled with remarks
from President Ronald Reagan
about a limited nucleat war being
fought on European soil, are caus-
ing main Americans to lake a closer
look ai the administration's defense
policies
I on Felker, an East Carolina
political science professor, said lie
had his doubts about Reagan's posi-
tion thai the Soviet Union cannot
a nucleat war and the ad-
, 0n's view that the United
Slates onh negotiate arms
agreements from a position of
strt
"The Soviet Union has historical-
ly hown thai the) will make
k � us sacrifices to achieve
parity 1 elket said. "The) will gel
tough in i esponse.
"Reagan is perceived as being
iwkish in western Europe
noted Dr. Robert Thompson, who is
also in the Department of Political
Science. "It's true in a sense that he
is pushing tor increased arms spen-
ding and new weapons systems
One of Reagan's statements was,
"I could see where you could have
an exchange of tactical weapons
against troops in the field without it
bringing either one oi the major
powers to pushing the button set-
ting off a clamor in western Europe
about what U.S. policy actually is in
regard to nuclear war. The response
from the Kremlin was, "Only he
who has decided to commit suicide
can start a nuclear war in the hope
of emerging a victor from it
"He (Reagan) doesn't think out
his statements . . . he's not consider-
ing their implications Thompson
commented. Felker added, "you
don't go out oi sour way to cause
your supporters problems. No
w estei n leader wants to be too close-
See DEFENSE, Page 3
'By January 1'
Substitute Will Be Announced
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Ashley B Futrell, Chancellor Selection Committee chairman, conducted an
open hearing for students, staff and the general public last month.
Bv DIANE ANDERSON
and PAUL COLLINS
An interim chancellor for East
Carolina will be named bv UNC
President William Friday b Jan. 1
board of trustees chairman Ashlev
Futrell told a meeting oi the SGA
Monday.
Futrell, who is also chairman oi
the chancellor selection committee.
said, "My understanding is that an
interim chancellor will be named as
of that time
Neither Fridav nor ECU
Chancellor Thomas Brewer could be
reached to confirm Futrell's asser-
tion.
The trustees chairman ret used to
speculate about who might be nam-
ed as interim chancellor but did say
the person would be from the
university and would nol be a can-
didate for the permanent
chancellorship.
"We have nothing to do with who
he (Friday) will name He has talk d
about several different people with
me but as to the exact person, I can-
not answet the question
According to several sources,
John Howell will be named as in-
terim chancellor. Howell, a pro-
fessor of political science, was a vice
chancellor for academic affairs
under Chancellor 1 eo Jenkins.
t Monday's meeting, Futrell
also commented on whether or no!
he thought the new chancellor
should be from North Carolina. "It
is not a matter of committing
ourselves to a geographical loca-
tion he said. "It everything else
wa equal and a man (was) from
N.C and a man (was) from Ohio. I
would choose the man from North
v. arolina
Futrell said he felt that the criteria
the committee is using in its search
should be made public
"We won't get perfection he
said, "but what we are going to try
to do is not get somebodv with a
grade ol 100, but if we can get
See SGA, P�tte 3
Newmans, TKE's Open Negotiations
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
the
c o
rep
1
MaH Wnlrr
ik in the tensions that have prevailed between
Tau Kappa Epsilon social fraternity and the
Newman Community came about last week tor
ne in over a vear.
, mee i between the two groups was demanded bv
Rom inatholic campus minister of the Newman
nmunit Sistei Helen Shondell, as a result of an act
indalism bv a few Tkl members on the Newman
unity's homecoming parade float. Those present
ii i k I officers as well as the president and
I the Catholic Newman Students Group,
esen of the Fast Carolina Gay Community,
,ple affiliated with the Newman House.
meeting was designed to "clear the air said
� Shondell. "1 feel the meeting went well and the
. their ears open to listen to what we had to
led atholic Newman Student President Cheryl
Both groups left with a better understan-
ach other she continued.
"It was a verv productive meeting. 1 was very well
enlightened bv it commented Jim Wagner, president
of the TKE fraternity. "The big step was the two ot us
meeting. We developed an understanding ot all the
functions of the Newman House
Recent problems developed as a result of the act ol
vandalism to the Newman float. According to Sister
Shondell some of the siens and frames from their float
were torn down, ripped and burned on the front lawn ot
the TKE house by members or visitors at lh Ikl-
residence.
"I didn't want to go outside said Sistei Shondell.
"I saw a lot of drunk men and decided to call the
police
The incident was also reported to James Mallory,
Associate Dean of Student 1 ife, who oversees the Inter
Fraternity Council. He is presently pursuing a course ol
action.
"It was one of those things that happen. It was really
unfortunate said Wagner "I hone i won't be i
reflection on the whole fraternity, it was just a couple of
people who got a little rowdy
Problems between the two groups have existed
primarilj since the Newman Community moved into the
house next dooi to the Ikl's last vear. Ihe root ot the
problem seems to be the bi-monthly meetings at the
Newman house conducted bv the Fast Carolina Cay
C ommunit) (ECGC). This fact has spread rumors that
all activities of the Catholic Community are centered
around the ECGC and that the) were in some way con
doning homosexuality.
"The purpose ol th Newman Community is to pro-
vide a welcoming community where students can come
to worship, receive counselling, form friendships, and
be provided with support said Sister Shondell.
"We're not condoning sexual acts. I'm not here to
judge anybody � I don't want to judge anybody she
further noted.
"Thev are two groups that are two different clubs and
there is no reason to associate them as one group said
She defended the rights of the ECGC to
meet at the Newman House. "They're people loo. rhey
have feelings too, jusl like you and me she continued.
Alter introductions b) Sister Shondell the meeting
proceeded orderly. ECGC representatives Mark .urn-
bach and Blair Carr gave a brief history oi their
organization.
The group began three years ago as a response to a
suicide letter from a gav student that appeared in The
Fountainhead, then the East Carolina student
newspaper. Ga students decided there was a n-ii for a
gay support group and a counselling service. Zumbach
said that he "didn't sec homosexuality as a perdominant
factor in our lives. We're students. Sex as far as an
orientation plays a .ery small role in who we are
Carr mentioned the high suicide rate among gavs and
the difficult) of being accepted bv a "straight society"
as two reasons for the group's existence. "We're not
here to convert anybody. I think we can all act in a ra-
tional manner c an said
See I KF's. Pane 3
Dorm Fire
Started By
Lit Pompon
B EMMA DAVIS
Stall Wrilrr
Greene Residence Hall was
ed Thursday night when
flan in a resident's cigarette
tei ignited a pompon.
Wendy Goes, a student living on
.floor of the dormitory, ex-
plain jd the cause oi the fire.
However, lieutenant Michael
Branch oi the Greenville Fire
Department said, "the cause of the
is undetermined It was out
when we not here
Branch and another fireman that
responded to the alarm brought
smoke ejectors to the room to
alleviate the smoke. According to
Branch, no one was allowed to enter
the building until the smoke was
gone.
"Smoke rises and depletes the ox-
ygen Branch explained.
"Ihe evacuation of the building
was poor said Charles E. Lawler,
the security guard on duty.
Several students stayed in the
residence hall during the evacuation
and most residents were slow in get-
ting out, according to Lawler. He
commented that students should
realize the seriousness of such
alarms.
The onlv damage was to the mat-
tress on which the pom-pom caught
fire according to several people on
the hall. The residents of the room,
Karen McGill and Roseann Blun,
refused to comment
Awareness Of Economic
Indicators Beneficial
The Charlie DnnleU concert will begin nt 9 p.m. Nov. 20 .1 Minges Coliseum. Appro�imelv 3.600 .ickels had
been sold for the concert at 5 p.m. Monday.
Concert Possible Sellout
The
Announcements
Opinions
Campus Forum
Entertainment5
Sports
Classifieds
By KAREN WENDT
si�le Mnor
Tickets sales for the Charlie
Daniels Band concert on Nov. 20
have been brisk and there is a
possibility of an advance sellout for
the concert, according to Jerry
Dilsaver, Student Union Major At-
tractions Chairperson.
Dilsaver said that about 3600
tickets had been sold by 5 p.m.
Monday, and of that number about
2100 had been sold to students,
which was unusually high for stu-
dent ticket sales. He said that there
had been "more student tickets than
public so farSecurity has been
tightened for the concert "because
of the basic nature of the crowd"
according to Dilsaver. Requests
from the bands organization have
also increased security. Security is
being handled by Carolina Protec-
tion Services, according to Dilsaver.
Therre will be no chairs on the
floor of the coliseum for the con-
cert, but bleachers will be pulled out
and balcony seating will be
available.
Apple Records in Greenville was
the first outlet to sell out their supp-
ly of tickets. They bave been provid-
ed with additional tickets.
The band plays from a variety ol
musical types from rock to country
and is usually known as a southern
rock band. However Daniels does
not agree with the labels. In an arti-
cle in Newsweek Daniels was quoted
as saying, "We don't bother with
trends or fads. Our band represents
a certain amount of something in a
world that changes everyday �
oops I sound like John
Chancellor
"Labels are restricting. I don't
see why everything has to be
pigeonholed, categorized, and com-
puterized. I don't think about what
kind oi music we play. 1 think about
what quality of music we play. Our
music has definitely got some coun-
try influence on it, but it's definitely
not what's known as traditional
country music. We just play the
music and let other people put titles
on it. Some reviewers from up that
way called it 'Southern twang, Nor-
thern bang and city gang 1 thought
that was prettv apt. But if people
want to call me a hillbilly, hell,
that's all right, if they want to call
me a rocknroller I don't care
about that, either. It doesn't make
no difference Daniels said in an
interview with Stereo Review.
Tickets for the concert are on sale
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall and at local ticket
outlets. Tickets are $7 for students
in advance and $9 for non-students
and at the door.
By MIKE HUGHES
SUfl Vnler
The "ooh's" and "ahh's" mav
run rampant after a person leads
news about fluctuating unemplov
ment rates, changes in the Gross Na
tional Product (GNP) or Consumer
Price Index (CPI) revisions, but
how many people know what these
terms � these economic indicators
� mean.
For instance, the U.S. Depart-
ment of Labor issued a report last
month stating that the nation's
jobless rate had risen three-tenths ol
a percent to 7.5 percent during
September.
Many leading economists, in-
cluding Monte J. Gordon and Jack
M. Pompan, agree that these
statistics are generally quite ac-
curate, but what good is accuracy
without definative meaning?
In order to understand the
unemployment percentages and
rates, Americans should know that
the figures issued monthly by the
Bureau of Labor Statistics (BIS) are
not intended to be reflective oi the
total United States population.
The rate of unemployment
represents the number of jobless
people who are actively in the work
force, according to the Census
Bureau, which compiles much of the
data used by the BLS.
The term "work force used in
this context, refers to persons ac-
tively seeking employment and
those who are actively in the work
force, including the self-employed.
For the purposes of its unemploy-
ment surveys, the Census Bureau ex
eludes U.S. armed forces personnel
from the totals.
Each month, Census Bureau
workers interview about 50.000
households which the bureau deems
reflective of the entire U.S. work
force. The interviewers ask ques-
tions of the household members to
determine their working histories
for the preceeding 30 days. The
answers to these questions are the
basis for determining work force
size, unemployment rate and other
labor statistics.
�Wording to Pompan. the Cen-
sus Bureau's statistical sampling
method achieves a high degree oi ac-
curacy on the national level but is
much less accurate in determining
jobless rates in cities and smaller
measuring units.
Another economic indicator, the
GNP, measures the nation's rate of
economic activity. According to the
I abor Department, the GNP is in-
tended to measure the market value
of all the goods and services produc-
ed in the United States.
Ihe GNP is not an attempt to
measure the quality of life or the
standard oi living in the United
States, the 1 abor Department says.
Ihe GNP is mere.) a general
economic summary of U.S. produc-
tion of goods and seivices and is
measured in dollars � lots ot
dollars.
For example, the GNP tor PttO
was more than $2.5 trillion, accor-
ding to a Commerce Department
report.
1 ike many Americans today, 'he
CPI, prepared monthly by the
Department of labor, is concerned
with inflation. To calculate this in-
dex, the Labor Department prices a
theoretical market basket of goods
and services each month at locations
around the country.
These costs are compared to
prices paid for the same items in the
past with regard to changes in the
average American worker's wages
and other factors.
The CPI figures are usually ac-
companied by a percent-change
listing. This represents the rate of
inflation since the previous year, a
figure calculated by the BLS.
With President Reagan's new
economic program just getting
under way, many Americans will be
greatly affected by these and other
economic indicators. Therefore,
several economists agree that an
awareness of the economy and of
economic terminology may prove
beneficial in the near future.
t
A





THt EAST C AROl INIAN
NOMMBLK 17, 1981
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement ias
Or et as possiOle' typed and
couple spaced 'o The East Carol
nan in care ot the news editor
There is ro charge tor a
nouncements but space s often
I "tea
The deadl'ne tor announcement
areSpm Friday tor the Tuesdsa.
paper anct S p m Tuesday tor trte
I isdasy paper
Tne space is ava lable to a'i
ipus organizations anct depart
PTC
rue Greenv lie Pi b wspof
� s onmitl mee' n fh�
d Doom �' r poblK
AED
� � e - a be �-� mei?no H 'r
. Movem
P.E. MAJORS
All students who plan 'o tie. iare
physical education as a maid dur
.ng the spring semester or who n
tend to student teach during the
spring semes'er shou'd report to
M.nges Coliseum at 10 a m on
Wednesclav Dec 9 t-r a motor anci
physical fitness tes' Satis! �
performance on tn.s tes' 1 'i
quired as a prerequ s e � �
tioal admittance Ic 'he p
education maior program Vote
detailed informal on i overing the
test is ava.lab'e by cali.ng
757 6442
SIGMA THETA TAU
The Fast Carolinian
Published ever� Tuesoa� and
Th0rsoav during 'he acade (
yeat and every Ateonesday I '
no, "ie summer
operated and pul � ' ' anc
: . ����� students H E asi
-� -s.ty
Subscription Rate 110 yearly
The East Carolinian oltices
are located in the Old South
Buiidinq on the campus of ECU
Greenville H C
POSTMASTEI! I � ' � �
e nanges to The East �� i"
0 J South B � '�- Ei Green
. � V. JJ4
Telephone til 6J�6 636? 6 30i�
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville North Carolina
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
Alpha kappa Alpha sorority
warmlyinvites you to their annual
Student of the year contest
Tuesday November 17th at 7 00
p m in MenoenhaM Auditorium
Please lO.n us tor an evening of en
,o,ment 'alent and fashion A
a'Sh p will be awarded to the
ties' 'a'ent
ve would also like to encourage
more students and non Greeks to
share 'her ideas at the SOULS
meetings every tirst and third
Thursday at 7 00 p m
Many thanks to all the students
tor 'heir participation at the ALL
(.reek Homecoming Biockshow
Solidarity is 'he key to success
UTILITY BILLS
Greenville residents who are
concerned about utility bills and
what can be done to conserve
ener an urqed to a'tend the
general meet.nq Tuesday 8 p m of
, , ague rl Women voters
i- � Presbyterian Church Four
j . � � a too �
H � I Keep Ui lit Bins m
Bounds rioo implementing Green
t net gy Plan
SAM
The Shi
of Advancement of
. rh American
As.
w
Nov a' 4 p m in
u i � a . 11 be T E
Viai ' anagei ' saiar ied
� . . menl al P irltngton in
tries ' Fbe topic will be
selection and inter
.ipwmg techn.ques w.th Burl
'ndus'ries Ah persons are
a � . ome 'o attend
PROSE CONTEST
The Rebel. Jeffrey s Wine and
Beer Co . and The Attic are spon
s-ino, a Prose Contest Fiction.
Drama, Mystery Typedentr.es
may be submitted to the Media
Board or Rebel offices by Nov 30
Cash prues of S175 175 M5 and
JI0 First second, third and two
honoranans respectively will be
awarded before Christmas
LIBRARY TRUSTEES
The next regularly scheduled
meeting of the Sheppard
Memorial Library Board of
Trustees will be held at 1 p m
Thursday, Nov 19. in the Con
terence Room ot the Mam
Library
ONA
The Organijation tor Native
Americans will be having a dinner
meeting (tonight) Nov 17 at the
Western Smlin It you plan to go
meet us m the lobby of Mendenha'l
at S p m For any additional infor
mation call 7S8 9473 or 7S8 9597
Evreyone is welcome to attend
MINORITY LAW
The UNC Law School invites
undergraduate minority students
to participate in a Law School In
formation Day on Nov H) '981
the day long comlerence will be
held at the UNC Law School in
Chapel Hill and is open to any
minority person who is thinking
about attending law school
Registration forms are available
in the Career Planning and Place
ment Office. Bloxton House
YHDL
The Young HOme Designer's
League will meet on November 17
Tuesday at 5 00 All members are
urged to attend The meeting will
be held at Belk Tyler in the con
terence room near the customer
service desk (Carolina East Mali'
We will be meeting with Vivian
Strickland interior Designer at
Belks
MEN WANTED!
The ECU Men's Glee Club scur
rently recruiting men for the Spr
ing Semester The Glee Club will
be touring North Carolina in
January with a numbet of other
appearances sche4duled
throughout the semesAer if you
would like .o iom this fine chorus,
or only wish to inquire about
future membership piease contact
Ed Glenn. Director at the School of
Mustc. 757 6331 or at 752 6195 The
Men's Glee Club is open to all men
campuswtde and offers one hour
credit per semester The Glee
Club rehearses at I? 00 M W F
Anyone interested in joining the
Glee Club next semes'er should
contact Mr Glenn as soon as
possible m order to be eligible for
the Spring Tour
BOOK COVERS
The Circle K Club will be selling
phone book covers for only $3 in
front of the book store Tuesday
from 9 a m to 3 p m All proceeds
will go 'o the Donny Lassiter fund
For more information call
7S8 5966 Great Christmas pre
sent'
LECTURE
Or Vincent Mikkelson and Dr
Patricia Terrell from the ECU
School of Education will be the
speakers at the Library Science
Lecture which will be held on
Wednesday Nov 18 The program
topic will be What Reading
Research Says to Librarians ' and
will focus on the implications
reading research has tor school,
public and academic librarians
The lecture win begin at 6 30
p m m room 221 of the Depart
ment of Library Soemce. East
Wing ot Joyner Library A social
hour will follow the lecture All in
terested persons are invited to at
tend
The Library Science Lecture
Series is being sponsored Omtly
by the ECU Department ot
Library Scieince, the Pitt
Greenville Media Society and the
ECU Library Science Alumni
Association Dr Carol J Veitch is
program director lor the lecture
series Additional information on
this lecture and the remaining lee
tues m the series may be obtained
by calling the Department of
Library Science at 757 6621
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Sigma Tau Delta National
English Honor Society will meet at
7 30 p m m the Mendenhall Cot
feehouse on Thursday Nov 19
There will be ar election of 'he
society s 1982 cfficers. and an
Honors Seminar discussion led by
Dr Marie Farr and Dr Norman
Rosenteid Refreshments will be
served
HRC
The Greenville Human Rela
tions Council will meet Tuesday
Nov 17 a 7 p m in the first floor
conference room of O'y Hail a'
the corner of Fifth and
Washington Streets
UGLY MAN
The 1981 winner of the Alpha
Om.cron Pi First Annual Ugliest
Man on Campus goes'o the Kap
pa Delta soror'y wth the'
representative Horrible Horn
Hortance Second place ROfC
with Zits Scarp.mple. 3rd
place Delta Zeta sorority with
Grog and 4th place Alpha x
Delta with ' Wally Kjudd
All contestants will receive con
solation pries and a personal
copy of their photograph Thanks
to all who participated and con
tr.buted to Arthr,t.s Rersearch
ECGC BAKE OFF
Yes were eating again1 Th.s
time its a Ml course meal' In
keeping with 'he festwe hoi.flair.
ECGC w.H be having meir annual
Thanksg.v.ng dinner Turker Will
be prov del yet a SI donation is e
quested To make the meal com
plete or.no tour favorite s
Along with 'he six. .al theme of 'he
even.no, an informal discuss
concern rvg Itw eie lion ot "t'�
w.n be held So Come out �
lOy good compan, and rf '
meal Nov 24. 7 10 P m a' the
Newman CcnH f
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Onrticron Chapter ot Pr
Beta Lambda will hold il
meeting on Wednesday NOV 18 a'
4pm m Rawi 130 important up
. m.ng -veo' will Ot I
N.C.Sl.
The MOTtl
Legislature
MOV 17 in room Mer-
er and intere
pease a"end
SANTA CLAUS
�,��

7522 8 �
SURF CLUB
V � �
.
All rr .
T
Oxfam Sponsors Fast
B PATRICK
O'NEILL
"�till Virile,
he East Cartima
Hunger Coalition is
Tonsoring a fasion
. ampus next week.The
fasi in pan ot an inter-
n.inonal program
�;�an zed b 0fam
merica tilled 'Fasi
1 .i orld Harvesi
f acli car onthe
1h u r s d a b e; oi e
Ilankseiving Oxtam
asks people to go
without food for 30
irs, 01 skip a meal or
� � dii. donate the
�ne t hex uould have
spent on food to Ox-
fam's various sell tielp
projects in developing
countries
I he Oxfam hand
book states thai In
fasting a person can
demonstrate a per-
sonal willingness to ie-
pond to the needs ot
the poorer people . . .
u share the hunger
al a quarter of the
global famih lives ith
in Mid ear out
1 he handbook also
states that even one
person can make a dif-
ference and urges the
public to "support
practical protects
Hunger Coalition
member Theresa Dulski
said the fast will "help
raise the consciousness
of the participants
because you can feel
for thai one da how
people are living then
iies all the lime
Dulski .ailed the fasi a
"sell help project
Oxfam helps coun-
tries help themselves
she continued. "The
mone we gie goes fot
projects thai aid in
food production, ir-
rigation, farming
techniques and other
long-range permanent
solutions
Sue I auv et. anothei
alition member, said
she hoped "a loi ot
people participate in
the fast because it's a
good cause
"It's been a success
in the past and the
Hungeroaiition is
hoping tot a good
response from students
u ho would like to help
the poor Dulski add
ed.
All i n t e rested
students can sign up at
various tables sei up on
.ampus next Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thurs-
day or come to the
Hungei Coalition's
weekly meetings on
Thursday nights. The
group can be reached
b calling 2-4216
Gi Camavfla) Fatiques And
Shirts. Sleeping t��i
Backpacks Campm Equip
��ant. StMt Toa�J Shoe. Dunes
And Over 700 Different New And
Used Items. Cowboy Boots
"rmy-navy
IS0I S. Evans
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Criapter ot Phi Sigma Pi Na
��onal Honor Fraternity will mee'
Jttpm Wednesday in 133 Aus'in
KYF
The K.nqs Youtn Fellowship
will hold a mee'mg on Nov IV in
Room 28 in the Mendenhall S'u
dent Center Irom 8 10 p m The
topics ot our discussion will in
. lude 'he coming ot our Lord Jesus
Chnst Everyone is invited and
refreshments will be served a' the
end ot 'he mee'mg
ITALIAN NITE
LASAGNA
AND
SPAGHETT
ABORTIONS 1ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
1 24 week terminations
Appt's. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
D
Plus Garlic Bread CQQ
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A ALL
r
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SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
758 1228
RIGGAN
SHOE
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GREENVILLE
TWODOORSFIOM
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111 W 4tk St
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
758-0204
EVERY WEDS.
Current undergrade �
medical students may
compete tor several hundred
Ar Fore scholarship These
scholarships art to be award
ed to students accepted into
medical schoois as �restmen
o, at the beginning o� their
sopnmore year The scholar
sh.p provdes tor tuition
oooks. iao trees and equip
ment plus a S530 monthly
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in

T





A
TKE's Negotiate
Continued rom
Pace 1
Sistei Shondell
i nt ed out t hat
"sexual orientation i
ablished between the
cs of three and six
years It's not sexual
preference 1 nevei had
a choice about m h'v
ualit
I Kl Vice President
Mike Dinga spoke ol
his own Catholic upbi
$ing and Ins home
n church's apparent
toleranee
iosexualit 1 hese
- nds ol beliefs are ver
deep-rooted in man
�pie he a
"W e're asking you
tan e e o u r
behavioi but not youi
opinions added John
Gardnei. an I CU ad
ministratoi in the Di
sion ot Student I ife
"We're talking about
respect foi one
another's individual
i ights and freedoms
Muatclli noted thai
mam t atholics have
stopped worshipping at
the Newman House
because of the in-
timidation they are sub
iected to by
"intolerant students
who oppose the I . -t-
"l wish the Catholics
who don't come to
Newman would stop
and think about what
they're basing their
reasons on. Would you
stop coming to youi
classes oi this school
because there are gays
here? No' It's not tan
that we have to sui-
te! Muzzarelli said.
Sister Shondell stated
hei desire "to make
peace with the HCE's.
e'd like to go beyond
ignoi ing each other
Wagnei said he felt
hopeful that the situa
tion could continue to
improve when the new
IKl officers begin
theii terms later this
month "1 hope it con
linues the new of-
ficers vant to keep the
channels of com-
munication open he
noted. " I he other IKl
brothers reacted very
well. They all agreed il
has to stop
"The next move is
their move said Sister
Shondei. "I still
haven't received an
apology
Ciardner also asked
the IKl's tor further
efforts, "not itist talk"
at rectifying the pro-
blems. "I want to see
some commitment on
your part to bring us
together he noted.
Contingency plans
tor further dialogue
were discussed alter
this first step had been
taken to resolve this
lone struggle.
i in I si i -k U IM VN
SGA Hosts Futrell
Continued From
Page �
somebody with a grade
of 88 we will I eel that
we hae succeeded in
getting the finest p�ss'
hie person that we
could possibly get as a
chancellor
Futrell said the com
nnttee had not sel a
date by which a new
chancellor must In-
chosen but added that
applications must be
Dec. Is. "We have just
started to receive ap
plications he added
"We have had
something like 50
nominations
"My guess is that we
will have a chancelloi
chosen sometime in the
latter part ot pnl I
am basing it on how
long it took us before. 1
believe that the last ot
April will be a good
date
I he chairman was
Recording uriist
A like Williams will ap s
pear ai Room 244
Yfendenhall at S p.m.
Nov. 22. Admission ;s j
free.
111U11 Vl IHI! 11 11U Vl 1111111111111M1111M M M11M11J111M11M111 n 11111111M M11 t M i 11111 ni
I CASH PAID FOR
DIAMONDS AND GOLD
also asked wh only represi
one student had been ev,
appointed to the ,eai h are dedicated to find
committee a chancell
" I he sole reason foi l!l students
the existence of hCl
you aend people lik v ' V
you. students. We fell Lcsiei N
thai unde. the rules
having the president ol
the student body
represent the students
directly and present a
concert
have would give
students adequate i
Defense Policies Cause Scrutiny
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
Mil
'
tain them (in
mihtat v).
the
i,
IC aCiCie
Felkei said he h
bilateral agreement
can be reached
number of nui
a w a i e
cei ns
then con- time, we ought to be
encouraging the na-
only make us more in-
secure in every way
He called on students
,11 �r v i.t he tions of Western
I elker saia tu in "form your opinions
thought there would be Europe to begin to plan iu
an increased arms race, tor then own defense,
"In the final analvsis, he said.
no weapons system will I elker feels thai
,

t h e
a
missiles in Europe. It ��J nLToTwam
such action is not said, suggesting the onger need o, .van,
: en. 1 elker .eels elimination of poverty "tag brother polices
Western cood and the eradication o. such as NATO. He also
disparities in wealth as sees a slight weakening
insurers to security, of Soviet control in the
Felkei also stressed Eastern European bloc.
pohces to increase the "It's an opportune
levels ol contact bet- time to bring about
ween the last and change he said. "A
Wesi "A! the same majoi arms race can
es t ern
lavior" in the
S i e t s.
;ves
!
think
moved in
atory mannei
could to the
now . 1 hese college
years are the seed times
of life and unless oU
plant well, you won't
have a harvest of high
yield Felkei added
that s o m e coo 1 -
Leaded, concerned and
intelligent involvement
m issues" is needed to
"confront policy
makers with the tacts
dnd prov ide alternative
points of v lew
407 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
MIKE ROBINSON
VALERIE HARRIS
BUSINESS (919)758-2452
1 INDEPENDENT !
I JEWELERS
tTiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiimimiiii'ii11111"11111111111111111"1
�oeaches
'PROUDLY PRESENTS
THE ROCK AND ROLL
OF
'A,
,j0 mm

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I





Stye East Olaroiinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, ��� in m�
Jimmy DuPREE, Maamt emo,
Ric Browning. �,��� v-n Charles Chandler. - �
Chris Lichok. mm mm- ToM Hall �" Bd"w
a. u.Ak, d.dtci � w Steve Bachner, �nrri��m�Me�w
Alison dartel, mmmmw ����� �
crr-yiDc w KA�EN WENDT. sifk BMm
STfcVE MOORE, Onulaiion Munofrr
November 17. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Ed Emory
Should Pirate Coach Walk Plank?
"Make Emory a Memory
The phrase is simple, yet cutting.
It, of course, applies to ECU head
football coach Ed Emory.
Emory's Pirates saw their chances
for a winning season go down the
drain Saturday due to a 31-21 upset
loss at the hands of William and
Mary.
The "Make Emory a Memory"
slogan first appeared a week earlier
during the Pirates' 66-23 homecom-
ing win over East Tennessee State.
A group of ECU students displayed
a .banner which broadcast their
slogan for the entire Ficklen
Stadium crowd to see.
The essence of the slogan is sim-
ple. Emory has been with the
Pirates for two years, during which
lime the club has gone 9-13 (4-7 last
year and 5-6 this season).
The losing seasons come on the
heels of eight consecutive winning
seasons. Before the Emory era
began the club had not fielded a
loser since 1971.
The solution is simple, right? Out
with Emory!
Wrong. There is much more to
the recent problems of the East
Carolina football team than just Ed
Emory.
No doubt Emory has made some
bad decisions during the past two
years. But there have been some
positive advancements as well.
Plainly and simply, we feel that
Ed Emory should be allowed to
fulfill his three-year contract. Two
vears is not sufficient time for
anyone to build a successful foot-
bail program.
"Why build?" you say. "The
program was fine until Emory got
here
The very successful Pat Dye
preceeded Emory. Perhaps the best
Dye team was fielded in the coach's
last season at ECU. That team,
though, was made up of a large con-
tingent of seniors. Dye would not
have wanted to tackle the task of
molding an under-talented, inex-
perienced team that Emory faced a
year ago.
Under Emory the Pirate program
has improved in a number of areas.
The team now has a sufficient
weight-training system, something
that was not as notable under Dye.
ECU's recruiting process is also
much improved.
This, of course, brings to surface
Emory's greatest strength. He came
to ECU with the reputation as a
great recruiter and has proven this
to be the case. Last year's recruiting
class may have been ECU's greatest
DOONESBURY
ever.
"THE EAST CAROLINIAN
, .NY
Emory can be expected to come
through with another strong group
of newcomers this year. Therefore,
the talent it takes will be present.
This brings us to another point.
First, Emory should be allowed to
stay on, but he must realize that
changes have to be made. Those
changes reach to the very heart of
the ECU football team.
Any great football team is backed
by a great staff. This is something
that Ed Emory does not have. He
must make some coaching changes.
If he does not, he can rest assured
that 1982 will be his last year as
head coach of the Pirates � if angry
supporters allow him to hang on
that long anyway.
Speculation has arisen that some
rich Pirate supporters may come up
with $30,000-plus to cover Emory's
1982 paycheck, therefore making it
possible for the Pirates to hire a new
head man for next year.
If Emory fails to make the
necessary staff changes this specula-
tion could become a reality.
In our opinion, the ball is in
Emory's hands. We feel he can field
a winner at ECU. He certainly can
bring quality talent to Greenville.
Now he must readjust his staff to
make sure the Pirates are adequate-
ly coached.
Further, we should remember that
Emory is an ECU graduate and is
truly in love with the school and its
football team. His life-long goal has
been to return to coach at his alma
mater. That goal has been reached,
now he is reaching for success.
Perhaps the most positive thing
about Emory is that he is dedicated
and that he is a Pirate. If he were
cut on the wrist he would bleed pur-
ple and gold. He is not here to use
ECU as a stepping stone.
For all his good qualities, Pat Dye
was here for just that reason. ECU
was only a step toward where he
eventually wanted to go � to the
real big-time. If allowed, Ed Emory
is here to stay. This is his home, his
love. Perhaps the student or sup-
porter who does nothing but gripe
about him should take this into con-
sideration.
Again, though, Emory cannot ex-
pect to keep his job simply because
of his love for the school. He has
lots of decisions to make during the
off-season. Some of them may hurt,
but they have to be made.
Make Emory a memory? Only if
he is foolish enough to ignore some
problems that simply must be cor-
rected.
by Garry Trudeau
'Rudygate'�Trip Funds Questioned
By CHARLES M. SUNE
live too much by principles . . . the rest of
the world doesn't. . . if I don't change, I'll
only get hurt.
� CM.
When I first arrived at this Mecca of
eastern North Carolina several years ago, I
came seeking a complete education.
I became involved in various organiza-
tions in order that I might learn some of
the secrets of success and thereby become
better prepared in my world conquest. I ex-
pected to be taught many lessons by my
teachers, and I have not been disap-
pointed. In all frankness though, they were
not always lessons of what to do, but fre-
quently, lessons of what not to do.
Enter Rudolph Alexander, associate
dean of students for student activities and
exective director of Mendenhall Student
Center. I must admit my first impression
of Alexander was a good one. Though 1
considered him to be more conservative
than myself, I had no disrespect for him
and in fact trusted him.
It was not an unusual assumption to
make since most people would
automatically believe a man in his position
who had served the university for so long,
and who you might respect as your grand-
father. Remember though what your
grandfather taught you � never judge a
book by its cover.
All our lives we will be faced with the
basic questions of what is right and what is
wrong. We come to college expecting,
perhaps naively, to be taught those dif-
ferences by our teachers. When I speak of
teachers, I mean teachers in the broad
sense � those entrusted with shaping our
lives. Alexander is one of those teachers.
Not unlike any other teacher, he provided
me with an example � though it has been a
bad one.
In his capacity as director of Mendenhall
Student Center, he serves as adviser to the
Student Union programming organization.
Like the doctor-patient relationship and
lawyer-client relationship, the teacher-
student relationship is sacred. As in all
cases, one party depends on the other for
help. A violation of that trust, because it
involves human lives, is a violation of
those people. Alexander has violated that
trust.
The "principle" example: Rudy goes to
the Big Apple: "The goal of the Travel
Committee is for everyone to have the
most fun possible on the New York City
Trip read the travel committee general
information sheet in 1978. Fun is exactly
what Alexander must have had. Alexander
decided he wanted his girlfriend, Sara
Henderson, to go on the 1978 trip. No pro-
blem.
He decided to make an exception to the
travel committee rules which "provides
these trips for students, faculty, staff,
alumni and their dependents" to allow his
girlfriend who had never attended or work-
ed at ECU, to go on the student sponsored
trip.
He decided that his girlfriend should
receive a complementary room on an
isolated floor next to his in the Hotel Taft
in New York City (rooms 1111 and 1112 to
be specific).
It was he, without committee approval
who made all the exceptions, that violated
the student trust that he is ethically bound
to uphold. "To hell with principles, to hell
with ethics � I want to take my girlfriend
on a trip to New York at student expense
Times and circumstances change, but
principles do not. I have no problem with
someone who wants to take his girlfriend
on a trip. But Alexander did not simply do
that. He made exceptions to rules he
helped formulate; he made those excep-
tions without committee approval. He
gave his girlfriend a free room that other-
wise would have gone to a member of the
travel committee and, in short, he violated
a trust.
I am not a pillar oi irtue. 1 have done
things in my time that I regret and, in
retrospect, would do differently if I had to
do again. But 1 have never violated a trust
as Alexander did.
If Alexander were a doctor he might lose
his practice; if Alexander were a lawyer Tie
might be disbarred. But. because he is an
administrator at ECU with nearly 20 years
seniority, he will probably remain to
manipulate the minds of maturing students
just as he did me and others before me.
Though it is often difficult, we have no
choice but to live by principles. Though
one can get hurt for living by these in-
tangibles, it is far more difficult to surie
without them. However, it is painfully evi-
dent that people will be hurt by those who
live without principles. Some of us had to
find that out the hard way.
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is (he first in a
series of columns that will deal with the
record of Rudolph Alexander.
i- Campus Forum
'Klanism' Expressed In Letter
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TO. IPTDALUMNI'
This is in response to Ronald Fisk's
letter of concern about the minority rule
here at East Carolina University. Well,
since you claim to be so concerned about
inequality, then sit back and get your
taste buds ready for this.
Although the majority of the students
here at ECU are white, that does not ex-
clude the fact that everyone deserves
equal rights and opportunities and will
not stop until we (the minority) get it.
Whether the Homecoming Queen had
been Chinese, Iranian or any other
minority, should not be looked on as a
basis for the malicious slander that was
written toward our 1981 homecoming
queen. Beauty does not come in colors,
it comes in the quality of the person.
In justifying your argument, you had
the audacity to compare the ECU Gay
Community with the Afro-American
Culture Society. These two organiza-
tions are entirely different and working
toward two adverse goals. We feel
angered that there is such a presence of
Klanism, when you obviously don't
know what it is like to be in our shoes.
We feel that there are more serious
issues that you could have been in-
terested in rather than the fact that there
is a black homecoming queen. Where
were you when blacks had to drink from
separate water fountains and Jews were
put in concentration camps?
Obviously you are a follower of Hitler
and believe in the perfect "blond hair
"blue-eyed race but tell me, "Do you
fit in this category?" The only thing that
I agree about your statement is "God
Bless You because at the rate you are
going, you will need all of God's Bless-
ings to succeed in this world of turmoil
and depression.
v LISA WHITE
Senior, PRC
More Fisk
Ronald Fisk, you are an ignorant in-
dividual, and the only moral disease on
this campus is the one you have, pre-
judice. People (black or white) make up
this campus, and it takes everybody to
make this campus function. Packs have
contributed a lot in making this universi-
ty and this nation great. It is people like
you who hold up the progress of this
university and you should not even be
here. So why don't you go join the KKK
or the Nazi party, you would fit in with
them perfectly. From one angry and
shocked white Anglo-Saxon individual
with spine and moral fiber.
MICHAEL WATKINS
Junior, Political Science
American Smokeout
I am happy to be involved in the 1981
Great American Smokeout. 18 Vi years
ago I quit a three-pack-a-day habit of
smoking cigarettes myself.
We've learned from past smokeouts
that those people who successfully quit
for one day really want to quit per-
manently, so we're prepared to give
those Smokeout Day participants all the
support we can.
A Gallup survey done for the
American Cancer Society showed that
nearly 16.5 million Americans attempted
to give up cigarettes last year during the
Great American Smokeout. Just under 5
million made it through the 24 hours.
One to ten days later, 2.2 million were
still free of the cigarette habit.
Each year, volunteers and staff across
the country spend time planning for
Nov. 19 � plans which wil hopefully
capture the imagination of every smoker
in America. I hope ECU students will be
convinced to take a one-day health
break � a break which just might free
them from the cigarette habit for good.
JOAN S. BOUDREAUX
Pitt Co. Chairman
The Great American Smokeout
Campus Poetry
M here Is The Joy-
Where is the joy that that once came
from giving
Where is the joy that once came from
living
Is there anyone left to smile,
Is there anyone willing to talk for a little
while!
Where is the Joy?
H here are the People
Where are the people that like to run
Where are the people who like to have
fun
Is there anyone left to play with,
Is there anyone left to pray with for a lit-
tle while
Where are the People?
"Who is There?"
Can Anyone hear me?
What happened to Prayer?
How can it be?
Is there anyone left to care?
Who is There?
' Where is the hope'
Should all burdens lie on the Pope?
How are you gdng to cope?
Where is your hope?
Where is the hope?
JESUS LIVES!
G.HARRIS
Senior, Social Work
Next Si
Commitu
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Theatre
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bah! I
history
thriller'
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THE hAST CAROL 1N1AN
Entertainment
NOVLMHLR 17, 1981
Page 5
Elvis Costello
Goes C&W On
Almost Blue'
Paying Homage To Country
Coslello during lasl ear Chapel Hill concert. The photograph is by Spectator magazine's Chris Seward of Raleigh.
By CHARLES LAWRENCE
Nl�fl Wrilrt
In 1977, Elvis Costello came to
prominence in the New Wave Music
scene, playing a powerful range of
pop music with a vengeance unlike
any heard on the radio at that time.
Now, four years, six albums, and
almost 100 original tunes later, Elvis
Costello feels comfortable enough
to stop doing his own material long
enough to acknowledge some of his
influences. With the release of
Almost Blue (Columbia Records),
Elvis makes public his love for
country and western with a collec-
tion of 12 songs bv other people.
The material on Almost Blue
reveals the range ot styles to be
found in country music, going from
a rave-up version ol Hank Williams'
"Why Don't You Love Me 1 ike
You Used ro Do" to ballads like
"Too Far Cone" and tearjerkers
like "Brown to Blue
Elvis' two country music heroes
are well represented. George Jones
is represented with three tunes.
"Brown To Blue Color Of The
Blues" and "A Good Year For The
Roses Flying Burn to Brother,
Gram Parsons is given fitting
memorial with "How Much I I ied"
and "Hoi Burrito no. 1
Othei sources tor material include
Merle Haggard. 1 oretta I vnn, Pat-
s (line, lamim Wynette, Charlie
Rich and RdvB artist Joe I inner.
When the material is good, Elvis
is very good and most of the
material is very good indeed. The
best cuts (end to be the slowei
numbers. Elvis is able to make full
use ol his own vocal style and make
those songs his own. Standouts in-
clude "Sweet Dreams "Color Of
Ihe Blues" and "How Much I
1 ied
Ihe Attractions, Elvis' back-up
band, are as usual excellent, with
Steve Nieve getting a chance to shine
on honkytonk piano. Supplemen-
ting the sound is John Mel ce
(originally from Clover, the band
heard on My Mm is I rue, now with
the Doobie Brothers) on lead and
pedal steel guitar.
for Costello fans, the album is a
must. For the casual listener, this
collection can serve as an excellent
introduction to the world of country
music from one of its biggest fans,
Elvis Costello
Hitchcock Showcased In Sunday Film Festival
ByJOHNWEYLER
statt VVnlcf
Next Sunday, November 22. the Student Union Films
c ommittee will present an Alfred Hitchcock Festival,
featuring foreign Correspondent (showing at 2 p.m.).
ToCatch i Thief(4 p.m.), The Lady Vanishes (6 p.m.),
and Frenzy( p.m.). The Films will be shown in Hendrix
rheatre ai Mendenhall Student Center. Admission is b
Cl ID and Activity Card or MSC membership.
Hitchcock, who died last yeai at the age of SO. is pro-
bablj the single most respected filmmaker in cinema
history. Though his movies are "mere" entertaining
thrillers (not to mention that themes and insights are
there for the astute viewer), thev were created with con-
Best Foreign Film
Plays Wednesday
Tomorrow evening at 8 p.m the Student
Union films committee will present Jin
Menel's Academv vvard winning film Closely
M atched Trains.
It will be shown in Mendenhall Student
C enter's Hendrix Theatre and Dr. McKav Sund-
See CZECH. Page 6
summate craft and skill. Hitchcock figured his pictures
out to the last detail before a foot of film was exposed
� indeed the actual filming he considered anti-
climactic. His technical triumphs, and the suspense, fear
and dark humor they unfailingly evoke, have made him
both an inspiration to filmmakers and a star in his own
right to audiences (the only director ever so honored).
Foreign Correspondent (1940), is both the usual Hit-
chcock combination of spine-tingling suspense and rib-
tickling humor, and an obvious propaganda piece for
war-torn Britain. The plot concerns an American
reporter (Joel McCrea) sent to England to cover the
war. who becomes embroiled in an elaborate espionage
plot. Says Donald Spoto in The Art of Alfred Hit-
chcock, "it is difficult to maintain that Foreign Cor-
respondent is simply a propaganda movie. It's struc-
ture, the complexity of the secondary characters, the
disarming humor and a curious subtext about the use oi
language establish it as a work concerned less with the
war than with the people who see complexities have
created the war. It is indeed a film with many levels, and
it deserves somewhat more consideration than the
Hollywood historians have accorded it
To Catch A Thief 1955) is one of Hitchcock's lighter,
frothier films, "Hitchcock Champagne" as someone
once called it. The natural beauty of Cary Grant and
Grace Kelly (the typical ice-cool, patrician Hitchcock
heroine) are contrasted with the splendor of the French
Riviera in a sophisticated vamp about cat burglars and
jewel thefts. Says Spoto, "To Catch A Thief h rather in
the genre of The l.ady Danishes � happy, irresistable, a
creampuff of a movie with a little suspense at the very
end
Which brings us to The lady Vanishes (1938), of
which The New York Times critic enthusiastically
wrote: "If it were not so brilliant a melodrama, we
should class it as a brilliant comedy. Seeing it imposes a
double, a blessedly double, strain: when your sides are
not aching from laughter your brain is throbbing in its
attempts to outguess the director. Hitchcock occasional-
ly relents with his rib-tickling, but his professional
honor would not brook your catching up with his plot
The plot involves a kindly old lady, (Dame May Whitty)
who meets a young woman (Margaret Lockwood) on a
train. Awakening from a nap, the woman tuids that not
only has the old ladv vanished, but that all the other
passengers denv she ever existed.
Contrasted with The I ady I anishes is Frenzy (1972),
one o Hitchcock's grislier pictures. I he theme is one ol
Hitchcock's favorites, an innocent man accused ol
crime. Here the innocent is Jon Finch, suspected of be-
ing the rapist-murderer that has been terrorizing Lon-
don. Ihe guilty partv is actually his friend (Barry
Morse). Ihe most well remembered scene occurs in the
back o a trunk, as Morse, amid heaps oi potatoes,
wresiles w th the nude corpse o a woman he recently
killed, attempting to recover some incriminating
evidence. Hitchcock's second-to-last film. Frenzy is
considered one of his Finest.
�v:xttvNWM
What Price Mood?
Pipeline Fare Too Expensive
By KATHY WEYI.ER
Slaff Wnlfr
1 ocated in the subterranean depths of the Minges
Building in downtown Greenville is a restaurant with
Real Class. This is the Pipeline, which, if you're like
many ECU students, you've probably heard of but
never been to because you assumed it was too expensive.
I o be honest, such an assumption is probably correct.
The Pipeline is expensive. But it is such an impressive
little place, it's worth at least a visit or two on special oc-
casions.
Cuisine
IRRIS
The Pipeline offers appetizers ($1.35-53.25), salads,
including a spinach salad ($2.50-53.95), sizeable sand-
wiches ($2.95-54.65) � the best deal here - and entrees
($6 25-510 00). Believe it or not, a selection of vegetable
side dishes is also available. Entrees come with a baked
potato fries, Potatoes Pipeline (tiny block potatoes
seasoned with pimento) or Vegetable du Jour. The
Garden Salad Bar is also icluded, or you may opt for
spinach salad for an extra dollar. French bread com-
pletes the meal.
If you can still manage dessert after all that, the
Pipeline has a selection of simple sweets ($.95-$1.95) to
choose from. Mocha Chocolate Mousse and Strawberry
Cheese Crepes are available for the more adven-
turesome. .
Beer, wine and mixed drinks are offered in addition
to the usual coffee, tea, soda-type beverages. Beer prices
are a bit high � $1.00 for regular domestic brands and
Stroh's draft for $.85. However, Happy Hour (4 to 7
p.m.) prices are considerably lower.
My companion and I reallly enjoyed persuing the
Pipeline's menu, which offers many welcome changes
from usual downtown fare. The waitress pointed out
which items were unavailable, and despite the fact that
this seemed to indicate some slackness, we appreciated
her thoughtfulness in informing us of the changes.
While waiting on our dinner, we sampled the drinks,
and, I'm sad to say they weren't very good. The Pina
Colada my companion ordered seemed to be made with
watered-down pineapple juice � period. My vodka sour
threatened to leave my lips in a perpetual pucker.
We were also a bit disappointed in the salad bar. The
items were very fresh, but there were few of them.
Our dinner was elegantly served from a standing tray
and looked incredibly appetizing � like advertising
food. Unfortunately, within a few bites we came to the
conclusion that the Pipeline must not employ a gourmet
chef. The food was good, mind you, but not as superb
as it should have been for the money. Too much of the
food � particularly the vegetables and sauces � ob-
viously came from a can or a packaged mix. We never
got to sample the French bread as they were out of it
that night, for which our waitress was almost embarass-
ingly apolegetic.
Why, you well may ask, if the food is less than
outstanding, is the Pipeline so impressive? Precisely
because of its top-drawer atmosphere and service. You
feel comfortable at the Pipeline. It's not so cozy that
you feel you're eavesdropping on others and it's not so
spacious you begin to feel iosolated and agoraphobic.
The waitresses make you feel welcome. The decor is
comfortably luxurious. All in all, the Pipeline is just a
nice place to be.
Norman Luboff Choir Peforming Here Thursday
The versatile Norman Luboff Choir will perform choral arrangements in the Hendrix Theatre this Thursday
evening at 8 p.m. The internationally known conductor and composer will lead his choir in a program of
popular songs, show tunes and renditions of his folk and gospel songs. Tickets for the performance can be
obtained at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student Center or by calling 757-6611 (ext. 266).
Tickets are $2 for students and $5 for the general public. All tickets sold on the night of the show will be $5.
The performance is being brought to campus as part of the '8182 MSC Artists Series.
!
&&&Mtt

t





rHEEASl IAROIIN1AN NOMMIII.K 1?, IVM
Buckminster Fuller, the originator of the geodesic dome, will lecture tonight at 8 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre.
Czech Film Coming To Hendrix
Continued From P. 5
the station dispatcher, release and continues to sihilities
who talks constanth inform the artisi i sen yel to conn
wall of the English about sex, seduces a
Department will lead a numbei ol women, and
short, informal discus- ecu into trouble when
sum following the film he uses the station's
in room 221 ol the stu- stamps on parts ol a
dent center. Coffee and girl telegraphist's
doughnuts will be serv- anatomy; and Milos'
ed and all interested girlfriend, a conduc-
students, faculty and tress with whom he
staff are united to at- tries unsuccessfully to
tend. hae sex. "his en
Winner ol the counter leads him to an
cadem ward as abortive suicide at
Best 1 oreign I anguage tempt
i 1m (1967), Jiri Milos' final success
Menel's Closely Hat- at real his
ched trains is un manhood occurs with
pretentious, lacking in an oldei woman, a
cinematic flashiness membei ol the
and a masterpiece ol resistance. He has to
understatement. Its face his political
subject � the ex- responsibility im-
periences ol Milos, a mediately afterward,
17-year-old trainee in a when he is given the job
provincial railway oi blowing up a Ger-
staton during the Ger- man ammunitions
man occupation ol train. He succeeds, but
t, zechoslovakia �- is killed: the iron is in
slight Milos' becoming a man
Bui the station sexually jusl in tune to
represents a microcosm be killed because ol his
ol the world; it is in its political awakening:
detailed observations "It is quite the best
ol the station's in- product oi the
habitants that the film celebrated - zech
derived its richness. cinema renaissance thai
Menzel depicts we have seen in this
Milos' sudh comic at- counrty so far. It is also
tempts to become a the best movie I have
man both, politically seen this year. Having
and sexually. Ihe sup- gone that far, 1 might
porting characters in- as well go all the way
elude the station- and predict that it has
master, a huge and an excellent chance ol
sloppy man who col- becoming a film clasic
laborates with the on the order of Grand
Nazis and sees sin all Illusion ot Citizen Kane
around him but flirts � one of those pictures
ivith visiting women; that is nevei out ol
Richard Schickel
.I7W1967
Sigma Nu Presents
ELBO
TUffi MOV.17
WVWWWm ��.��.�.�
125.00
FREE
To the first place
winner of the
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ATTIC
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PRlCCS 010
P�PS OF- GfcEAJVU.�T
Typd entries submitted to
Media Board or Rebel offices by Nov JO
Pizza inn
BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
MonSun. 11:30-2:00 2.69
MOIl.&TueS. 6:00-8:30 2.89
HELP WHEN TOTJ NSBD IT MOST.
The Fleming Center haa been here for women
of all ages since 1974, offering understanding
and help to anyone faced with an unplanned
pregnancy day or night. Services include
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekday ft Saturday Abortion Appte.
Evening Birth. Control Hoars
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR mGHT
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We're here when you need us.
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SPAGHETTI DAY
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below the advertised pnre in each A&P Stnr� ex pt as spec iti all)
in this ad
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ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
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complt





J
58
70,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 17. 1981
Page 7
How Quickly Tide Turned On East Carolina
B CHARLES CHANDLER
sports i ditoi
How sudden things can change.
And how sudden they did change
for the East Carolina football team
and Pirate head coach Ed Emory
Saturday.
Following last week's 66-23
thrashing of East Tennessee State
the Pirates stood at 5-5 on the year,
needing only a win over William and
Mary in the season finale to record a
winning campaign.
Aftci facing a mass of negativity-
all season long the thoughts of
finishing above the .500 mark must
have been pleasing for Emory and
troops After all. William and
Mai was i fS. and had been ranked
as one of the nation's 20 worst
learns m Playboy magazine's pre-
season issue in August.
ro even the most negative ECU
observers last Saturday's finale had
a 'W" written all over it. It seemed
sure that the record books would
forever tell of a 6-5 1981 finish.
William and Mary had other
ideas, though, and spoiled
everything for Emory and his club.
Behind Chris Garrity's 399-yard,
four-touchdown passing perfor-
mance the Indians upset the Bucs,
31-21.
The loss left the entire East
Carolina community in a near state
of shock. The team had, for the se-
cond year in a row, finished below
.500. Last season's 4-7 ECU mark
coupled with this season's finish
leaves Emory at 9-13 for his career.
Following career loss number 13
Emory refused to thing negatively
and looked toward the future with
optimism.
"We're extremely disappointed
a red-eyed Emory said in his post-
game press conference. "This loss
will make things tougher on us. But
we cannot and will not dwell on it.
Our efforts will be turned to 1982
starting Monday at 3:00. We will
have a great off-season program
and we will have a great recruiting
year. We did it last year after a 4-7
record and we will do it again this
season
Emory admitted to being
"shocked" that his team had failed
the test he most wanted it to pass.
Overconfidence, he said, could have
been a problem.
"I know I didn't see any way we
could lose he admitted. "I think
maybe our guys felt the same way. 1
think we felt we probably had better
athletes and better speed than they
did. We may have taken for granted
that William and Mary has improv-
ed a great deal since the start of this
season (when the Indians lost their
first four). We damn sure didn't
think they would beat us, but they
did
Emory said he felt no pressure
following Saturday's disappoint-
ment. Their have been murmurs of
strong discontent for the head coach
from both team members and peo-
ple in the ECU community. Emory
said, though, that things are much
better in Pirateland than most peo-
ple realize.
"From the elements that were
here in December of 1979 (when he
has named head coach, replacing
Pat Dye) to the elements that are
here in November, 1981 said the
second-year mentor, "I know our
program is so much stronger than it
was. Everything that wasn't there is
there except the 'WV, and they are
coming. You have to build a pro-
gram on a foundation, and we have
got that foundation.
"I guarantee that we will be a fine
football team he continued. "If I
didn't feel this way 1 wouldn't stay
here and beat a dead horse. Our
program is going in the right direc-
tion, both internally and external-
ly"
Emory admitted, though, that
Pirate fans could expect to see some
changes made during the off-
season.
"I will evaluate every phase of
our progam � coaches, players,
schemes, systems. I'm the man that
has that responsibility. 1 will make
whatever changes I feel are
necessary
Changes are probably a necessity.
A second straight losing season cer-
tainly will not sit well with sup-
porters of a program that did not
field a loser for eight consecutive
years (1972-1979) before Emory's
arrival.
No doubt there will be some at-
tacks at Emory in the coming weeks.
They began Saturday when a chorus
of "boos" followed the Pirates off
the field. Emory said, though, that
the negative attitudes come from a
small minority of supporters.
"I know that 90 percent of our
supporters are behind us in our ef-
forts he said. "But our program is
in a situation where we will have lots
of comments on finishing 5-6. But 1
expect the East Carolina people to
be the most supportive in the
world
Emory said that the negativity did
not bother him, that recruiting and
preparing for 1982 was much more
on his mind.
"Anybody that wants to put any
pressure on me is going to have to
catch me he said, "because I'm
going to be in Norfolk, Charlotte
and places like that recruiting. I'm
going to work and not worry about
what people say
QB Garrity Passes
Indians To Win
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports r dilor
William and Mary, quarterback
ris Garrity passed for 399 yards
and foul touchdowns to lead the In-
dians to a H-21 upset victory over
1 ast � aroima Saturday.
1 he loss vsas a bitter one for the
Pirates, who fell one win short of a
winning season. The club, which
finished at -b, had been a heavy
favorite hut not play like it in its
sea- ' 'ale.
"VK e are verv disappointed said
ECU head coach Ed Emory follow-
rig the game. "This is probably the
toughest loss I've had in 22 years of
ng I've never felt the agony
i loss hke tliis one. We've worked
so hard for it. h was a must win fo�-
a w inning season
1 he Indians jumped on top early,
scoring the Hues 10-0 in the first
quarier. The visitors scored on the
opening possession, mar-
80 yards in just over five
Ciarnty connected with wide
eiver Kurt Wngley from 24 yards
out to cap the drive.
A big break resulted in the second
Indian score of the afternoon.
I aszlo Mike-Mayer's kickoff that
followed the TD was a line drive and
struck ECU's James Bunn in the
chest The ball was recovered by
William and Mary at the Pirate 47.
rhe Indians took advantage of
the opportunity, increasing their
lead to 10-0 on a 28-yard field goal
by Mike-Mayer.
The Pirates got back in the game
a lib, a score less than two minutes
into the second quarter. A 33-yard
run by reserve quarterback Kevin
Ingram set up a three-yard
touchdown run by senior halfback
Harold Blue, which narrowed the
Indians' lead to 10-7.
The clubs exchanged possessions
for the remainder of the half and
appeared set to go into halftime
with the visitors up by three. That
Williamand Man 10 T 6 14 11
K I8 7 7 721
V.MWrtgks M pas frnai (.arms iMiac Marr ktcki
VMMikr-Mascr 2� K.
a iBlur ma iBushbrrk kick)
WMsandrrs 41 paw from Umn iMtkr Marf kirki
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Kl1 iiwi 1 rua iBuskbrck kick)
WM� ngl� 14 pau Iron s.arrits iMiar-Masrr luckl
WMWriglrs � pau from (.arrils iMikf-Masrr kick)
AAM Ht
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Kushrssards 32-S� S-i33
Passmisards 403 t�
Passes4S 3J-2 7-1-0
PunlsJ.JJ7 MU
tumblrs-ioM 0-0 2-2
Praallirs.sards 4-35 -J0
Total IItrirsr 453 J52
isnivini 4.1 11 MM us
Raskin! V4 4M Po.rll 19-44 Wrighl 9-24 K I
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Pacing - wm (.amis 44-34-2-399 Murpnt 11-0-4
K I Sflsoa n-0-0-0 Ingram 11-0-19
Rrrnsing VNAM: Sullon H01. Wrigks S-9 Sandrrs
6 I2J. Po�HI 103. Walters 2 19. Vsrighl I 9 Kl Pope
I 19
was before "it" happened.
With three seconds remaining in
the opening half the Indians faced a
third-and-nine situation at the ECU
41 and called for a timeout. What
resulted turned out to be a big turn-
ing point in the contest.
Garrity faded back to pass and, as
time ran out, launched a high "Hail
Mary" pass into the endzone, where
a group of six players � three
Pirates and three Indians � were
waiting.
William and Mary wide receiver
Jeff Sanders, a freshman and the
smallest in the six-man crowd at 5-7,
leaped high and came away with the
ball. The TD gave the Indians
momentum and a 17-7 lead at the
half.
ECU came back strong in the
third quarter, running 28 plays to
seven for the Indians. The Bucs
drove 80 yards on their first second-
half possession for a score. The
drive lasted 6:03 and was ac-
complished totally via the ground
gain.
Halfback Leon Law son and
fullback Roy Wiley combined for 66
of the drive's 80 yards. Law son
dove over from three out to put the
finishing touches on the march,
pulling the Pirates to within 17-14.
The Pirates soon were at it again,
controlling the ball for over five
minutes in a scoring effort. Ingram
connected with freshman tight end
Damon Pope on a 19-yard pass play
to get things going. I aw son once
again closed out the drive, scoring
on a one-yard run early in the fourth
quarter to give ECU its first lead of
the day, 21-17.
The Indians went to their passing
attack as a source for a comeback.
Garrity connected once with
Sanders for 20 yards and with Mike
Sutton twice for a total o 44 to
move the ball to the ECU 14.
From there Garrity tossed a pass
to Wngley for the go-head score.
What Comes Up
Photo By OAVE WILLIAMS
Must come down. And this time, the ball came down in the arm of the smallest Indian, 5'7" split end Jeff
Sanders, who leaped over Pirate defenders for a touchdown at the end of the first half Saturday against Past
Carolina. Sander's catch may have been the turning point of what turned out to he a disappointing game for
the Pirates.
Down 24-21, the Pirates took the
ensuing kickoff and drove to the
Western 40 before being turning the
pigskin over on downs.
Garrity and the Indian offense
then went to work again, ripping in-
to the Pirate secondary with
punishing success. The Wrigley-
(iarrity combination again dealt a
crushing blow, the two connecting
on a scoring pass from eight yards
out. marking the third time that the
quarterback and wide receiver had
struck gold.
Wrigley's final score came with
only 2:01 remaining and clinched
what has to be the biggest Indian
win of the season.
"I can't express how great this
victory feels William and Mary
head coach Jimmye Laycock said
following the contest. "Garrity's
passing performance was the
greatest passing exhibition I've ever
witnessed, pro or college. Our game
plan was to throw, throw, throw
And that Garrity did, completing
34 of 44 en route to his school-
record total of 399 yards.
Tailback Jeff Powell was Garri-
ty's most frequent target, finishing
with 10 catches for 53 yards.
Wrigley pulled down eight recep-
tions � including the three TDs �
as did Sutton
The Pirates completed only one
pass, getting all of their success on
the ground. Wiley led the way with
88 yards on 17 carries. Law son gain-
ed 81 on the same number of at-
tempts.
W&M A Mystery To Laycock
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
4.sstsiaai Sports Kdilor
William and Mary head football
coach Jimmye Laycock finally
handed the Tobacco Festival cham-
pionship trophy to one of his
assistants and calmly sat on a water
cooler. He sighed deeply and then
looked up at the group of reporters
gathered around him.
"Don't wait for me to start talk-
ing, gentlemen he laughed.
And he surely had good reason
to. After all, his Indians had just
beaten East Carolina, 31-21, spoil-
ing the Pirates' chances for a winn-
ing season � their first under
second-year coach Ed Emory.
Football "experts" term this type
of game as a "season maker
Laycock, however, described the
game as a "mystery
"Last week was a mystery to
me he said, referring to his team's
23-14 loss to lowly Harvard. "And
this one's a mystery, too. I don't
know what the heck is going on
Indian quarterback Chris Garrity
sure did. He threw 44 passes, com-
pleting 34 for 399 yards and four
touchdowns. The yardage and com-
pletions were new school records
while the touchdowns tied the old
mark.
"We went in with the idea that we
were going to throw the football
Laycock explained. "Our best runn-
ing back (Bernie Marrazzo) had a
bad side bruise, and we didn't want
to take any chances
Why throw the ball 44 times?
"They play their safeties very
deep he said. "We felt we could
cross people underneath. A lot of
credit goes to our offensive line.
They really held up well. Chris
(Garrity) had all day
Laycock had nothing but praise
for his senior quarterback. "I've
never seen a kid who threw the ball
like that he said. "He was unreal.
Unreal. He was so hot
Laycock admitted that he was
worried about a letdown, especially
after his team's showing against
Harvard. "The kids did a fine job
he stressed. "They picked
themselves up more than I ever
could
The Indian coach left all the
"picking up" to quarterback Garri-
ty, who says, "I felt really good. I
saw what Luck (West Virginia
quarterback, Oliver) and the Miami
quarterback (Jim Kelly) did to
them.
"1 knew 1 was going to have a
good day he continued. "They
have weak spots in their secon-
dary
The game's most crucial play
came near the end of the first half
when Garrity threw a pass into the
endzone, which split end Jeff
Sanders � all 5'7" of him � pulled
down for a touchdown, much to the
dismay of three East Carolina
defensive backs.
"He (Sanders) took it away from
everybody Garrity explain-
edOne waits for the tip, and the
others follow the ball
"We work on a desperation pass
like that all the time Emory
countered. "You car try it 1000
times, and it will work one of those
1000 times. We just happened to hit
on that one time. Our defender did
not time the play well, but (Sanders)
made a great catch
Garrity said more roll-outs were
called in the second half "because
we figured they'd (East Carolina)
pressure us more. But I had time all
day. I couldn't believe it.
"East Carolina was so big and
quick. But 1 could look look all over
the field � up and down, and the
cross over the middle was there all
day long. Their safeties play back
too deep
"We lost our chances for a winn-
ing season last week Garrity add-
ed, "And that's all I wanted � a
winning season
ECU Intrasquad Game Set Wednesday
Alone In The Pocket
H illiam and Mary quarterback Chris Garrity has his arm cocked and
ready to throw against ECU Saturday, as he did 43 other times,
completing 34 for nearly 400 yards and four touchdowns.
The East Carolina basketball
team will hold its annual Purple-
Gold pre-season intrasquad game
tomorrow night (Wednesday) at
7:30 in Minges Coliseum.
Admission to the game is $2 for
adults and $1 for children. ECU
students will be admitted free with a
valid ID and activity card.
Pirate coach Dave Odom an-
nounced on Tuesday the breakdown
of his 15-man squad for the scrim-
mage.
The Purple team will consist of
point guard Tony Byles, swingmen
Mark McLaurin and Bill McNair,
forwards Morris Hargrove and Al
Mack, center David Reichenecer
and guard Mike Fox.
The Gold team will include
centers Mike Gibson and Jeff Best,
forwards Thorn Brown and Charles
Green, point guards Herbert
Gilchrist and Bruce Peartree, along
with guard Charles Watkins.
Guard Greg Batson will see action
for both squads.
Fans are asked to choose a squad
to cheer for and sit accordingly.
Gold fans will sit in the south
bleachers while Purple supporters
are asked to sit on the north side.
The Pirates will hold an offical
pre-season scrimmage in between
the intrasquad game and the Nov.
28 season opener at home against
Ohio University.
ECU will face the Australian na-
tional team on Monday, Nov. 23 at
7 p.m. The Australians recently cap-
tured the Oceania basketball cham-
pionship, qualifying them to play
for the Men's World Basketball
championship in August in South
America.
Seven members of the Australian
team have played on one or more
Olympic teams. ECU is one of only
11 U.S. schools on the national
team's pre-tournament schedule.
Peter Walsh, a seven-foot center
who has competed in two Olympic
Games and one world champion-
ship, leads the Austrian squad.
t
r





IHt I ASl f-XKOl INIAN NOVEMBER 17, 1961
East Carolina Falls In Tourney
Bv CHRIS
HOI IOMAN
Mali rtiili
The East Carolina
volleyball team finished
on a strong but down
note, losing two out of
three contests in the
NCAIAW tournament
in Chapel Hill.
On Friday, in the
first round, East
Carolina defeated
Duke for the third time
this season, 15-7 and
15-13. By winning this
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look mg forward 'o
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LORI B Happy Birthday Jama
HAPPY 21ST BIRTHDAY GW' Do
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WAYNE HERE S wishing you a
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TO ALL 'he generous brothers and
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HAPPY BIRTHDAY Sun B Why
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things you do' Is that a battle scar
or did you fan oft the bar at PB s'
Has Sidney fixed the draft in his
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PRINCE WHAT do you want a
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HEY ED The Wad Nimonas-I
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DELAYED ANNOUNCEMENT
the tudges have tallied their votes
and the winner of the first annual
Dansey with no Pantsies is third
floor resident Jetl Humbert Jeff
illustrated his winning technique
tor an those people present at
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winning performance Con
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RUPERT HOW much crappola
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really must hafve messed up to
deserve all this lu'k Bui when he
went there there was no air, and
he ahad to catch a ride home go
mg down Hawa better week
match the Pirates earn-
ed the right to face the
second-seeded UNC
Tar Heels.
In the first match,
the home team was
deteated by the 1 ad)
Pirates, 16-14, only to
see the Lady Tar Heels
come back to take the
last two by scores ot
9-15 and 10-15.
On Saturday, the
Pirates were knocked
from the tournament
by Appalachian State,
the Pirates' third loss
of the season to the
Mountaineers.
Alter the tourna-
ment, head volleyball
coach Lynn Daidson
was disappointed that
the Pirates could not
put it all together but
was very pleased with
the way her squad hung
in against tough UNC.
"The first match
against Duke wasn't a
very good match
Davidson said. "It was
very slow. I think
everyone had the tour-
nament jitters.
"The match against
UNC was very, very
close she explained.
"What was sit great
about the match was
that we never gave up.
We were down 12-4 in
the second game and
came back and scored
six points
With the games in
the state tournament
concluded, the 1 adv
Pirates finished the
season with an 11-23
record, overall.
A regional bid,
which was thought to
be a possibility, never
materialized so the
tournament ended the
season for the I ady
Pirates.
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4





Title
The East Carolinian, November 17, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 17, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.163
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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