The East Carolinian, November 12, 1981






�-?-
On The
Inside
The Prep Priestess
Swallowing Politics
On College Circuit
Page 3
w
'Glass Menagerie :
Little Theater Wins
In Local Production
Page 5
The Final Game:
Pirates, Indians
'Smoke' Saturday
Page 8
Me
(Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 24
Thursday, November 12, 1981
Greenville,N.C.
10 Pages
ECU History Traced
These rec
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
ords in the basement of Fleming Hall may soon be moved into a permanent archive in Jovner Library.
Archives Established
By DIANE ANDERSON
Documents and records are
heaped up in boxes and scattered
around in the basement of Fleming
dorm among old street signs and
machinery. Other permanent type
records are kept in various locations
on campus and in separate offices,
schools and departments.
Lack of a central archives for
university records has been an ever
increasing problem and according to
Julian R. Vainwright, University
business manager, "The whole
thing hinges on money
However, in early January
following approval of the project by
the UNC General Admnistration
and funding through the recently
enacted budget, a professionally
staffed and managed archives is
scheduled to begin operation at
ECU.
"The whole thing is more than
Fleming basement. Anybody with
records on the campus will be in-
volved said Vainwright.
Donald R. Lennon, director of
the East Carolina Manuscript Col-
lection, will assume duties to
oversee operation of the archives,
which will be located somewhere in
Joyner Library. "1 cannot tell vnu
where in the library it will be
located said lennon. "There are
several options. It will be up to the
administration to make a decision
about where it will be
The archives will maintain a con-
trolled environment, readily accessi-
ble to researchers. It will be staffed
by an archivist and a secretary, ac-
cordng to lennon. Funding also in-
cludes the price of shelving and
other equipment and supplier
"The universiy has seen the need
for a professionally operated
university archives for some time
Lennon said. "During the past year,
a records survey was undertaken in
cooperation with the State Division
of Archives and History in order to
identify and locate campus records
and schedule them for proper
preservation. With the establish-
ment of a formal program in
January, the new archivist can move
immediately to gain control of the
university's records and to set up
proper record management pro-
cedures to assure their future safety
and accessibility
Dr. Mary Jo Bratton. a professor
in the history department, is now in
the process of writing the 75-year
history of East Carolina University.
She has run into problems finding
records because mere has not been a
central university archives.
See ARCHIVE. Page 2
ECU Students Address Minority Issues
B PATRICK O'NEILL
M�ff Writer
I he issues that concern minority
students were addressed last week
bv various campus leaders at the se-
cond "SOUL S On The Mall" of the
semester.
Russell Parker, president of the
ECU Society of United Liberal
Students (SOULS), said the event
was designed to "promote new ideas
and see what imput we can get from
everybod else. I want them to
know what we can do as a group
together to change policies and raise
issues that are considered important
to most minority students
SGA President Lester Nail, the
first speaker, called for student ac-
tion and "invited " students to get
involved in campus affairs. "1 pro-
mise you won't get anything done
unless you are motivated Nail
said.
Marvin Braxton, student govern-
ment vice president, spoke of the ac-
cusations made against him by The
East Carolinian columnist Charles
Sune. "I don't really apreciate Mr.
Sune's charges. If he thinks he's go-
ing to discourage me he's wrong
said Braxton. "They were some
pretty rough charges towards me.
I'm nobody's 'White Knight I'm
not going to stand for it he con-
tinued.
Braxton denied the charges and
said he was "going to work harder.
I've gotten a lot of support from the
student bodv and I love a good
fight
Braxton also commented on the
positive spirit among minority
students. "Everybody's working
real hard. The blacks on campus are
now organized he commented. He
supported his statements by men-
tioning that "SOU1S" was now
receiving student funds for the first
time in its II vears in existence at
ECU.
Student Union President Ron
Maxwell reflected on past civil
rights struggles for minorities when
he addressed the group. "Today
that fight still goes on. But we've
got to take our fight out of the
streets. We've marched, now we
must march ourselves into the
classrooms noted Maxwell.
"We've paid for a piece of the pie,
now it's time for us to claim it
Homecoming Week Has
No Major Crime Rise
By GREG R1DEOUT
Sl�lf Urilrr
Homecoming week brought no
significant increase in crime to the
East Carolina campus, according to
the police blotter this week.
However, the security department's
records did show a large number of
fire alarms being set off. Campus
security would like to remind
students that tampering with these
alarms is a federal offense. The
following are dorm reports and
related incidents.
Nov. 3. 12:10 a.m. � An
anonymous caller reported that a
street sign is being carried into a
room in Jones. 11:00 a.m. � Melin-
da Jo Weaver of 318 Garrett
reported the larceny of her bicycle
from the east side of the dormitory
and vandalism of her vehicle. 10:30
p.m. � Ralph G. Longley of 480
Jones reported the theft of a radio
from his room.
Weekend
Weather
Maxwell invited students to come
by the Student Union and ask for a
job. "I beg vou come by, we need
you
"Apathy is our greatest killer
warned Carolina NAACP Presi-
dent Virginia Carlton. "Now we
have a president, Ronald Reagan,
who is closing the doors for us. If
you're complacent here, you won't
care later. We can't sit back, we've
got to get involved in the process
"It's time to unite. Equal oppor-
tunities are over she concluded.
Other events on the mall included
a song done to sign language by Gail
Pascal and a skit entitled, "From
Violence to Non-Violence" written
and performed by Tony Williams
and Michael Lockamy. The
dramatic skit captured the attention
of the audience. It recalled moments
in history when non-violence was
applied to conflict resolution as well
as showing the struggle of two
brothers in dealing with their own
problems of injustice and violence.
"The basic message was to help
blacks understand the struggles oi
our forefathers and be cognizent of
the non-violent measures they used
in reaching their goals noted
Williams. "God inclines us to use
non-violence and he provides a way
that our non-violence will work
"We were trying to erase the feel-
ings of hate, animosity and pre-
judice wherever it may exist, and to
do it in a non-violent measure �
that's the only way it can be eras-
ed Lockamy said. "There's no
Clear and breezy today with a
high in the mid-SOs. Clear tonight
with lows in the 40s. Clear and cool
through Saturday, with highs from
the upper 50s to mid 60s.
Nov. 4. 2:05 a.m. � Jeffrey P.
Farfour of 403 Aycock was cited for
curfew violation in Fletcher. 4 p.m.
� A female student reported
harassing phone calls. 4:53 p.m. �
Ruth J. Peters of 301 White
reported the larceny of a battery
from her vehicle.
Nov. 5. 4:28 a.m. � Andrew
Fraser Walsh of 358 Jones and Jen-
ny L. Brown of 720 Greene were
cited for being in violation of
curfew in the Greene Lobby. 6:30
a.m. � Anthony Dwayne Becton of
208-D Belk reported the theft of
items from his room. 10:50 a.m. �
Maria S. Faulkner of 425 Fletcher
Nov. 8. 5:20 p.m. � Paul B.
Sumrell reported the theft of his
bicycle from Austin building. 6:27
p.m. � Charles H. Hypes of
408�D Belk reported the larceny of
his room key from the south side of
the dormitory. 7:24 p.m. � A
female resident student reported
that a white male had exposed
himself to her in Joyner Library. 9
p.m. � Wilson Barton Edwards Jr.
of 109-B North Meade Street was
arrested for alleged indecent ex-
posure. 11:30 p.m. � Joseph M.
Mauthe of 157 Aycock reported the
breaking and entering of his room.
Nov. 9. 5:05 p.m. � Lori Ross
reported the breaking and entering
at a vehicle owned by Cathy Wright
while it was parked in the Berkeley
and 14th Street Freshman Parking
lot.
Photo V GARY PATTERSON
Time Out
Two students take a breather and enjoy the weather on one of its warmer
upswings.
reported the breaking and entering
of her vehicle and larceny from her
vehicle. 11 a.m. � Terry Lambert
of 1021 White reported the larceny
of her bike from the east end of the
dormitory. 7:30 p.m. � David
Wayne Sawyer of 313-D Scott
reported the vandalism of his vehi-
cle.
Nov. 6. 12:10 a.m. Betty Jane
Franklin of 1012 Greene reported
the breaking and entering of her
vehicle while parked in the lot at
Third and Reade Streets. 1:45 a.m.
� John Edward Melum of 113
Rotary St. was arrested in the Fifth
and Reade Street parking lot for
allegedly being drunk and disrup-
tive. 1 p.m. � Diedra Bynem of 342
Cotten reported the larceny of her
LD. purse containing miscellaneous
cards and money. 2:30 p.m. �
Phillip Alexander of 307-C Scott
reported the vandalism of his
mother's vehicle while it was parked
on College Hill Drive. 4 a.m. �
Rebecca A. Yaun and John E.
Paulos were cited in violation of the
visitation policy.
Nov. 7. 6:46 a.m. � Sheri A.
Vaughan of 730 Fletcher reported
the breaking and entering of the
cigarette machine in the dormitory's
canteen.
way you can do it by an aggressive
means he concluded.
Asked if he felt the students en-
joyed the skit, Williams said, "I
really do. I heard a lot of people talk
about it. It seemed so real to them
In his conclusion, Parker thanked
everyone for their support and
spoke of future "SOULS On The
Mall" celebrations. He called
SOULS a voice to the university for
students to air their views.
He stressed his own desire to
work closely with the NAACP and
other minority groups, as well as en-
couraging black and white interac-
tion on campus. "We'll have more
of a voice in the university and we'll
have unified viewpoints he said.
Budget Cuts Effect Class
Size A t Black Colleges
B MIKE HUGHES
M�ff Vlnlrr
The federal budget cuts instituted
this fall by the Reagan administra-
tion have caused several changes at
102 predominantly-black colleges
around the country.
Administration officials at many
black institutions in the U.S. claim
they expect to begin losing students
rapidly. Many will drop out of
school permanently, the ad-
ministrators say, while others may
transfer to larger, public colleges
and universities.
A number of those administrators
also claim that in the near future
black institutions may not have
enrollments large enough to allow
the campuses to remain open in
"any worthwhile form
Tuskegee Institute in Alabama
suffered a 7 percent drop in student
enrollment from last year, and Dr.
Walter Sapp, the dean of student af-
fairs at Tuskegee, says he expects a
larger decrease next year.
Sapp echoed the opinion of
several other administrators in say-
ing that additional budget cuts
could have drastic effects on the na-
tion's black institutions.
Tuskegee's decrease in enrollment
is among the greatest. Alabama
State University in Montgomery,
Delaware State College and
Langston University suffered only
"slight declines
The majority of students at the
nation's predominantly-black in-
stitutions depend on financial aid to
pav tor their education. And the
cuts in student financial aid pro-
grams, especially the Pell Grants,
Social Security and National Direct
Student Loans, have effectively
decreased enrollment.
At Howard University in
Washington, D.C approximately
80 percent of the student body are
reliant on financial aid. Seventy per-
cent of all students at Delaware
State depend on aid, as do about 90
percent of all students at North
Carolina's Winston-Salem State
University.
On Black College Day, Sept. 28,
approximately 30,000 black
students marched in 15 states, many
in protest of the recent budget cuts
and many in anger.
In North Carolina, 10 of the
state's 11 predominantly-black in-
stitutions were represented at a
march in Raleigh. The mood at the
march on the state capital was in
support of stronger academic pro-
grams at the schools.
Dr. Hay wood L. Wilson of
Winston-Salem State sees the
Reagan cuts in financialaid as a
threat to black social mobility.
President Reagan's proposal to
spur private contributions to black
colleges in an effort to compensate
for the budget cuts is widely rejected
at many of the institutions.
At Clark's College in Atlanta,
about 100 of the school's 2,000
students left the college this fall, ac-
cording to Marian Wilkes, financial
aid director.
'

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mi l-AS! C AKOI INIAN
NOVf.MHt k 12, 1981
v
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I
)dmg
or
Birnbach Says More To College Than Fun
t'oHcgr Pita Nervier
I isa Birnbach, editor of "The Of-
ficial Preppy Handbook happily
takes credit for the preppy fad now
enjoying its second year of
supremacy on campus.
Since her witty guide to the mores
of the rich and casual appeared in
October 1980, it has become not on-
ly a bestseller, but a force moving
style-conscious students to buy
I acoste alligator shirts (preferably
pmk this year), khaki pants, Sperry
Topside shoes and anything from
the "prep mecca" oi the IT. Bean
catalogue.
Now a year old, the Handbook
has sold a phenomenal 1,193,(XX)
copies, is .n iis 22iui printing and
has spawned Canadian and
Japanese editions.
More is coming. Workman
Publishing, which produced the
Handbook, is offering preppy desk
diaries and the like to help separate
the "key" people from the "nerds"
and "wonks
But, oddly enough, undei the lair
Island sweater, penny loafers,
argyle knee socks and camel cor-
duroy blazer is a different 1 .isa Birn-
bach: a very serious. 25-year-old
liberal Jewish Democrat from New
York who is mostly amused by the
preppy phenomenon.
"People still ask me 'Was it a
oke?' 'Was it supposed to be
serious?" " Birnbach says. "1 still
can't believe that it's that hard to
figure out. There's a differnece bet-
ween you preppies are ridiculous
and us preppies are ridiculous.
That's what we were trying to do
"I don't like it when people want
to restrict other people from
something. 1 want everybody to be
preppy
So despite all the frivolity she had
helped promote, she is concerned
about the student audiences she
plays to almost constantly.
"When students want me to see
how preppy they are, they show me
their Reagan-Bush stickers. That
doesn't make me happy at all. I'm
political and I've always been
political, but I recognize that they
didn't invite be to be Lisa Birnbach.
They invited me to talk about
prep
Some of the time her views leak
out anyway. At Duke, she couldn't
resist speaking out against the Nix-
on library proposed for the campus.
"Students aren't political at all.
I'm worried that they aren't getting
enough out of their education.
When I'm up there I'm not trying to
say, let's all throw up together
1 here is more to college that that. 1
hope that most of them know that
all of this is just in fun
Birnbach does realize that some
do take it seriously, perhaps as a
symbol of personal caution.
"I wish something else (other
than prep) had become a symbol of
playing it safe, but preppy isn't im-
compatable with that mood
"If the only choices you have are
to major in business or art history
she explains, "one way to play it
safe is to dress preppy
It has also become a badge of
identity. "In the sixties you knew
that anyone who had short hair was
a fascist and voted for Nixon and
anvbody who had long hair was
okay. Now you can have long hair
and be a fascist
The alternative is to dress preppv.
It is "instant respectability. I mean,
you're always dressed for a job in-
terview
Birnbach is not without her own
prep school credentials. Daughter of
a gem importer and a writer. Birn-
bach went to Manhattan's Lennox
School. Riverdale Country School,
Barnard College, and Brown
University, gratuating in 1978 with
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Birnbach
an English degree.
It was at Brown when Birnbach
and classmate Jonathan Roberts
started keeping notebooks of the
foibles of their fellow students,
usually those of the upper classes.
"We even had a list of preppy
diseases she recalls, "there was a
lot of things that didn't make it into
the book
Sadly for pop culture historians,
the notebooks were lost, and Virn-
bach and company had to start from
scratch when Roberts proposed to
Workman Publishing to "do a book
on preppies The publishing house
was initially uninterested, but in spr-
ing 1980 when designer Ralph
Lauren produced a line of preppy
clothing. Workman changed its
mind.
Roberts convinced Birnbach to
edit the book because Roberts, a
Workman staffer, was busy with
other projects. They assembled it in
five months.
Birnbach "really thought the
book would die a few months after
it came out when students waded
into the school year. "College
students don't spend much time in
the book stores after they buy their
(text) books she reasons.
Instead, the handbook took off,
and Birnbach has been touring col-
leges ever since.
Her first tour took her to the
West and the South, including
Hampden-Sydney College in
Virginia, which she dubs "the prep-
piest college in the country.
"Other than Cordon I iddy, 1
think I'm hitting the college lecture
circuit the hardest she laughs.
On the circuit, she plays her high
priestess of prep role to the hilt,
wearing Top Drawer regalia and
presiding over any kind of pro-
preppy event the sponsors concoct.
At the University of Southern
California, she judged a Who's
Most Preppy Contest. Somm en-
trants brought golf carts and stan-
ding closets full of The Right
Clothes.
At UCLA, the winner squeezed a
sailboat indoors "along with his
slaves
"Terrific excess Birnbach
marvels. "It was just great
Generally she does a 90-minute
"WE'VE
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NOV. 19 th:
"Thar when th�
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tor a dav Give it a
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THI OCtAT AMIBKAM
SMOKIOUT
Ameman Cancer Sooerv t
stand-up comedy routing and then
answers audience questions. Topics
range from prep sex ("a contradic-
tion in terms") to drinking. She en-
courages students to "wear beer
"Beer is not only a beverage, but
a fashion accessory she advises.
The ultimate in drinking accep-
tance is performing the "technicolor
yawn" - throwing up in public.
"I really love making people
laugh she says.
"There really can't be a sequel (to
the book) as such she adds with a
laugh, "we say that nothing's
changed since 1635, so there isn't
anything different
The Boston Latin School, regard-
ed as America's original
preparatory school, was founded in
1635.
But things have changed for Birn-
bach. "the main difference is that 1
know that publishers will now take
more seriously other things I want
to do
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Stye iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, Edo,im cw
Jimmy DuPREE. ���,� ��v
Chuck Foster, omw ,yw��ne Charles Chandler, �� �
Chris Lichok. ��� m Tom Hall, mm �,�,
Al ISON BARTEl , Prriucuon Managrr STEVE BACHNER. EMItrlmmmfii Editor
Steve Moore. �� -r Karen Wendt, seio,
�K TNVV?
November 12, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Media Board
Meddling Tangles Internal Affairs
In 1978 the board of trustees
created a media board for East
Carolina. Its purpose was to remove
politics from the administration of
campus media, which up until that
time had been under the auspices of
the SGA.
The Media Board was envisioned
as an overseer of media finances
which would not meddle in internal
affairs. Its constitution specifically
prohibited it from interfering in the
editorial policy of any medium.
The arrangement worked � for a
while.
But then the board started meddl-
ing, and things went from bad to
worse.
For example, early last month the
board voted to allow Buccaneer
editor Amy Pickett to change the
cover of the 1981 yearbook, and this
was only after three weeks of debate
on whether or not to allow her to
change it. Board members saw fit to
go through all this rigmarole despite
the fact that the choice of a cover is
clearly an editorial decision.
Then several weeks later the
board reinstated an employee who
had been fired from The East
Carolinian, an obvious example of
meddling in internal affairs.
And now the Media Board has
decided that it will play the role of
mediator between the staff of The
Ebony Herald and editor Debra
Wiggins, who had decided to
dismiss her staff.
Things have now gone beyond
worse; they are the pits. The Media
Board seems to think it should make
editorial policy for and interfere in
the internal affairs of campus
media. As Pickett put it, "They're
trying to be something they're not
And that something they are not
is the editor of any medium on this
campus.
Each spring the board hires the
media heads and then approves
budgets for each of them. This �
unless some emergency arises �
should be the extent of the board's
role.
Board members have little or no
journalistic knowledge. That is
what editors and general managers
are for.
Again Pickett summed up the
situation beautifully. "After all the
work we do, for them (the board)
not to have trust in us is just about
the end
Quite simply, further interference
in such matters cannot be tolerated.
It is time the Media Board learned
the meaning of "mind your own
business
Haitians Seek Half A Chance
Economically, this country is in
trouble. But what country is not?
And to make matters worse, hun-
dreds and hundreds of Haitians are
fleeing their island country, heading
toward the Land of the Free and the
Home of the Brave. We have
enough problems; problems they
will only add to. Right?
Wrong. We cannot imagine what
it would be like to live in the most
impoverished country in the
Western Hemisphere. Compared to
the people of Haiti, we live like
kings and queens.
The Haitian refugees entering our
country only want half a chance.
They only want half a chance for
a more decent life. Half a chance to
live in sanitary conditions; condi-
tions that are continuing to worsen,
even though the Duvalier govern-
ment gets $140 million in foreigh aid
each year. They only want half a
chance to read and write � 80 per-
cent cannot.
They only want half a chance to
live past their fourth birthday �
one in four dies before reaching this
plateau. They only want to be
helped, something that has become
impossible since the Ton-Ton Mar-
coutes � Haiti's secret police �
have undercut missionary aid that
would have helped improve living
conditions.
On the 26th of October, 33 Hai-
tian refugees were on the last leg of
their 600-mile journey to freedom
when their small boat broke up in
rough seas off the coast of Florida.
All drowned.
And were denied that half a
chance for a more decent life.
There is little that we can do to
stop this flow of illegal immigrants
into this country, so in stead of tur-
ning our heads and condemning
them; we need to help them in any
way possible. They are a proud, yet
poor and pitiful people who see the
United States as a new land on the
horizon. A new land for a new life.
And they only want half a
chance.
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Jones Cafeteria
Viable A Iternative
By KIM ALBIN
At some time or another in our live, we
have all been warned about the ill-health
and lunacy which result from adopting a
vegetarian diet. A comic on The Tonight
Show once remarked that the reason
vegetarians did not eat McDonald's
Quarter-Pounders was because they could
not pick them up.
A new species of fad dieters, indigenous
to our own campus, are at this moment
tempting us to join their ranks. I know that
they exist because 1 have been one of them.
I hope to spare someone else from becom-
ing one of them, although I know that the
temptation will be great.
This species, the Croatarian, is a
dangerous breed: a cross between a
vegetarian and a junk-food junkie.
Croatarians have been known to subsist on
nothing but coffee, Nip-Chee crackers, ice
cream, doughnuts and those little caramel
things with the white stuff inside. They
monopolize tables and standing room in
the Croatan for hours and have also been
spotted, when rushed, dashing through the
soda shop picking up yogurt, bags of
chips, and more of those little caramel
things with the white stuff inside.
All it takes to become a Cfoatarian is a
busy schedule, a willingness to try and get
through a semester with a constant
headache and a sincere lack of regard for
one's health. Most of us have at least two
of these qualifications. Alas, I had all
three.
I had them, until one day a friend of
mine suggested that the probable cause of
my failing health and depression was, in
fact, my Croatarian diet. As you can pro-
bably well imagine, that was the last thing
that 1 wanted to hear. "No 1 insisted,
"It's the weather that's making me ill, I'm
allergic to it. It can't be my diet � whoever
heard of anyone getting depressed from
eatng too much ice cream? Besides where
am I supposed to eat on campus?"
At his suggestion, I temporarily reduced
my Croa-calorie intake and decided to
look for other sources of sustenance within
the overgrown hedges of our campus'
perimeter.
Sufferably, I fell to the obvious task:
trying the food at Jones Cafeteria. I had
not eaten in Jones since freshman orienta-
tion and had heard nothing positive about
the place since. In fact, I'd heard plenty of
moaning about the food there, but on
reflection 1 realized that the moans I had
heard were from older students who had
not eaten there since their freshman orien-
tations. In all the years that had elapsed
since then, I ventured to ponder, could it
be that the food had improved? Nay, I
thought, but if it is still that bad than I will
at least be able to vindicate my return to
the Croatan tomorrow.
Hey, you guys, the food at Jones
Cafeteria isgood.
I am not saying "the food's not bad
or "the food at Jones is tasteless but
nutritious but that the food I ate at
Jones was good. It cannot compare to a
meal I once had on the Champs-Elysses
but then, believe it or not, neither can the
food at Margeaux's. The food at Jones
cannot compare to the food at
Margeaux's, but can you imagine
Margeaux's serving the volume of students
that Jones serves, for the price that the Ser-
vomation charges on an all-you-can-eat
basis? 1 think not.
Nor, I reason, can we honestly compare
Jones' food to the food at another local
cafeteria, S&S, because the food at S&S
cafeteria is lousy and overpriced. It just
would not be fair.
So lacking comparable dining
establishments, we should stop knockin'
the food at Jones. Instead of griping about
the cafeteria we do have, why don't we
direct our energies towards seeing that a
comparable dining establishment is built.
i.e a new cafeteria � this one centralK
located.
I believe that our administrators arc in-
deed a cooperative crew. But like those
teensy little Radio Shack computers, they
are only as useful as the information the)
are fed. How are they supposed to know
that we need a new cafeteria when we keep
turning up our noses at the one we have?
Just because those "hippies" who attend
ed school here before us did nothing but
complain about the food servwe does not
mean that we must follow their iead. Our
mouths can not only gobble and complain.
they can also be used to suggest
preferences to those who will listen.
So Dr. Meyer, Mr. Alexander.
Chancellor Brewer: I would prefer a new
dinig hall on campus to the existing lack of
same. The food at Jones is okay, really,
but the distance of that structure forces me
to eat little caramel things for lunch. (With
white stuff inside).
The idea of subsisting on a Croatarian
diet is perverse; Croatarians all over cam-
pus are falling into ill-health and lunacy.
Let's do something to help the rest of them
fast, before they go crazy or die of
malnutrition and we become tempted b
all that extra space in the Croatan.
r Campus Forum
Minority Rule Angers Student
by Garry Trudeau
This letter is to all concerned students
who are tired of inequality on this cam-
pus. Why should the majority of the
students have to put up with such a
sickness as the East Carolina Gay Com-
munity? Why should we stand idle at the
fact that there is an Afro-American
Culture Center?
Well, I'll tell you why. It's because we
sit around and let these moral diseases
grow and do nothing to prevent them
from being. All we have to do is examine
the present situation of injustice to the
majority of students and ask ourselves,
"What is right and what is wrong?
It is a well-known fact that the majori-
ty of the students at ECU are white.
Ther are so many beautiful white girls
on our campus. Yet we have a black
homecoming queen. This is only because
the majority of the students did not
vote. Well, if that's the way you want it,
fine. Sit back, get wasted and say, "To
hell with the world And hell is exactly
where we will go. But from the rest of us
with spines and moral fiber, the passive
� liberalists better take heed. Some of
us have had enough Si�, and we don't
plan to take anymore. God bless you.
RONALD FISK
Sophomore, English
Homecoming Explanations
On behalf of the Student Homecom-
ing Committee, I would like to apologize
for the confusion over the Brice Street
Concert and pep rally last Thursday
night. First of all to Coach Emory and
the team, I'm sorry that the pep rally fell
through, but there was no room for it in
Hendrix. To anyone who didn't get the
messages and showed up, 1 also
apologize for the inconvenience,
especially to the band or team members.
My committee didn't even realize that
the concert was being set up in Hendrix
unitl 4 p.m. Thursday, and we did all we
could to notify everyone. The change
was made due to the fact that it was sup-
posed to rain.
On a more positive note, I would like
to thank Ken Hammond for all of his
hard work and help in booking Brice
Street, because the concert was almost
cancelled three times within three days.
Thanks also to Page Stout for planning
the pep rally and for being so understan-
ding when things fell through. And most
importantly, I would like to thank the
Student Homecoming Committee
members for all of their dedication and
patience these past few months. The
committee members were: Marlene
Clay, bands; Patty McKelvey, entertain-
ment; Jacky Boys, decorations; Kim
Futch, halftime; and Irma Thomas,
publicity. We are all extremely grateful
to Dean Mallory for being our advisor.
Thanks also to everyone who par-
ticipated in this year's homecoming by
building floats or decorating or just at-
tending the activities. We certainly hope
that everyone enjoyed this past
weeckend, and if you did, it makes all of
the work worthwhile.
DIANE DAVIS
Homecoming chairman
Congratulations
I would like to congratulate you on
your coverage of our homecoming
festivities. I'm sure everyone enjoyed
this past weekend's excitement of the
parade, our victory over ETSU and the
crowning of our new queen.
However, you seem to have neglected
one very important picture on the cover
of Tuesday's paper. As an active brother
in Sigma Nu Fraternity I would like to
express my disappointment that a pic-
ture of our prize-winning float was not
shown. The brothers of Sigma Nu work-
ed very hard and very, very long hours in
constructing not only this first place
float but our two winning floats prior to
this year. We undertake construction of
our floats and everything we attempt
very seriously, and I feel we deserve the
opportunity to be recognized for a job
well done. Wew lost a chance to be
recognized once again when the an-
nouncement of the winners was made 15
minutes before game time and our
members were not yet together to con-
gratulate each other.
So at this time I would like to say con-
gratulations Sigma Nu. Once again you
put together a great homecoming and
now you are going recognized.
DENNIS SCHRONCE
Junior, PHYE
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed.
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Glass Menagerie
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Once again you
smecoming and
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ISSCHRONCE
Junior, PHYE
tules
welcomes letters
view. Mail or
m the Old South
loyner Library.
Potion, all letters
J�e, major and
phone number
kuthoris). Letters
typewritten pages,
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THE EAST CAROLiNJAN
NOVEMBERS. 19S1 PM 5
Glass Menagerie
Play Successful Despite Performing
Inside Methodist Student Center
By Candlelight
a scene from "The Class Menagerie"
PHOTO BY GARY PATTERSON
Try Lifestyle 1000
ByJOHNWEYLER
Staff Writer
Greenville's fledgling little theatre
was successfully launched Tuesday
night, November 10, with the
premiere of a fine production of
Tennessee Williams' The Glass
Menagerie. The play, which will run
until November 15 at the Methodist
Student Center, is the first of what
director Stephen B. Finnan hopes
will be series of shows. If future
productions are as professionally
done as this one, the series' success
seems assured.
Assisted by an excellent cast, Fin-
nan brings to life William's
"memory play" about a family
trapped in unreality and one
member's attempt at escape. The
four-person cast consists of Aman-
da Wingfield (Dianne Harris
Pickett), a cracked Southern belle
trying to keep her fatherless family
alive through the Great Depression;
Laura (Paige Weaver), her crippled
daughter, whose entire existence
revolves around worn-out Victrola
records and a collection of tiny glass
animals; Jim (Gregory Watkins), an
ordinary young man brought to the
Wingfield's home in a pathetic at-
tempt at finding a beau for Laura;
and Tom (Robert John Willie),
Laura's brother, "a poet with a job
in a warehouse
Willie brings genuine emotion to
his role as Tom, who is also the
play's narrator. Willie's only pro-
blem is that he seems a little too con-
scious of the fact that he is reading
dialogue rather than speaking
naturally. Pickett provides a curious
interpretation of Amanda, playing
her as a perpetually flustered,
frightened woman, Yet, the inter-
pretation works, and well. Weaver
makes a fine Laura, and Watkins
gives a professional performance in
his stage debut as Jim.
The set, though spare, aptly
recalls the 30's era, as do the
costumes. The period music played
often during the show adds an
authentic, and eerie aura. Finnan's
rainbow of regret and remembrance
is brightened by his direction. The
show is well-staged, with possible
exception that much of the play oc-
curs off the raised stage, at stage
right, which could be difficult for
the viewers in the far, opposite cor-
ner to see.
Willie and Weaver work well
together, as they did in "Getting
Out an ECU Drama department
production last spring. The most
striking feature of Tuesday night's
show was the emotion aroused by
the cast. Willie and Weaver, who
together shared the story's final,
dad, scene, were obviously too
shaken to smile during the curtain
rail, which occured only a few
moments after their touching
finale. The Glass Menagerie,
which Finnian also produced, in
association with the Wesley Foun-
dation of Greenville, will be per-
formed nightly through Saturday,
November 14, at 8:15, with a
matinee, at 2:15 on Sunday,
November 15. Tickets, $3.50 for
general admission, and $2.50 for
students, can be acquired from the
Methodist Student Center, at 501
East Fifth Street, Greenville
(telephone 758-2030 from 9 a.m. to
1 p.m.) or from the Central Ticket
office in Mendenhall Student Center
(757-6611, extension 266).
'Raging Bull' Coming
This weekend in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's Hendrix Theatre, the
Student Union Films Committee
will present Robert De Niro's best
screen performance in the shattering
biography of boxer Jake LaMotta,
RagingBulL
The film will be shown on Friday
and Saturday nights only at 5, 7:15
and 9:30 p.m. Admission is by stu-
dent ID and activity cards or MSC
membership for faculty and staff.
Since early 1978, director Martin
Scorsese has channeled his energies
New Courses
Suggested
B KAREN WENDT
M.oc you ocr wondered whether
ihe coarse you were taking were tru-
l necesary? Probably.
�nd have you eer wondered whv
more practical subjects aren't
taught instead of that boring course
that ou are stuck in now? Even
more probable.
But the ultimate question is this
tust what is it that I should learn in
this school?
There are courses that, if designed
correctly, could truly enhance the
college experience. Some suggested
courses are:
�Scheduling 1000: INTRODUC-
TION TO PREREG1STRATION-
An analysis of the processes that are
involved in preregistering and the
drop-add process, including
statistical analysis of the chances of
being bumped from a course and the
odds of getting five 8 a.m. classes
per week. Will also touch on the
proper style of filling in bubbles on
a computer card.
�Scheduling 2000: ADVANCED
PREREGISTRATION: An analysis
of the advanced methods of
scheduling so that you do not have
to get up before 2 p.m. and how to
take a minimal number of hours to
receive maximum credit.
�Nutrition 1000: DORM FOOD
PREPARATION: An analysis of
the methods of cooking in the
dorms including sessions on cooking
with hot plates, broiler ovens, pop-
corn poppers, basement microwaves
and standard irons.
�Nutrition 2000: EATING OUT:
An analysis of eating out cheaply,
including the arts of eating childrens
portions, searching our all-you-can-
eat dinners and taking advantage of
church suppers.
�Nutrition 3000. BEING TAKEN
OUT: An analysis of how to be
taken out to dinner often, including
having multiple birthdays, having
parents come to town and dating a
lot.
�Lifestvles 1000. DEALING WITH
DEVIANT BEHAVIOR: An
analysis of the ways of dealing with
a seven foot roomate with a pet
gorilla who never buys his own beer
and bathes on Friday the thirteenths
that fall on a full moon.
�Economics 1000: DEALING
WITH BILLS: An analysis of the
methods used to ward oft aebtors,
including the merits of skipping
town, giving false mailing ad-
dresses, giving false names, and the
possibiity of violence (though only
as a last resort). Should be taken
with Economics 1005.
�Economics 1005: GAINING
FUNDS: An analysis of various
methods of gaining funds including
overdrawing checking and master
See SUGGESTIONS, Page 6
It's A LivingBut Not An Easy One
DeNiro Stars
.as Jake LaMotta in 'Raging Bull'
into bringing boxer Jake LaMotta's
life to the screen.
With a screenplay by Paul
Schrader (Taxi Driver, American
Gigolo) and Mardik Martin, direc-
tor Scorsese has created a powerful
film that will endure.
Raging Bull is the story of middle-
weight champion Jake LaMotta
brilliantly portrayed by Robert De
Niro. Raised in the slums of the
Bronx, Jake slugged his way
through life, beating his wife, his
friends, and anyone who stirred his
vicious temper, including the
mobsters who for years kept the
championship just out of his reach.
The same forces that made
LaMotta a hoodlum � fear, rage,
self-hatred and guilt � made him a
winner inside the ring. And he in-
deed was a winner, earning millions
of dollars in a decade.
He squandered this on houses,
cars, women he did not love and
friends he could not trust. When
LaMotta lost the title, he began a
quick decline that led to public
humiliation and imprisonment.
But Jake was not defeated and
after pursuing a career as a
nightclub performer, he emerged in
1970 with his autobiographv Raging
Bull.
De Niro's performance in the film
netted him last year's Academy
Award for Best Actor. He makes an
amazing transformation from a
boxer in the peak of condition to the
extremely overweight nightclub per-
sonality of LaMotta's later years.
De Niro made the effort without
the benefit of special make-up. gain-
ing over 70 pounds for the part in
what is certainly one of the most
controversial sacrifices ever made
by a screen actor.
Co-starring in Raging Bull are Joe
Pesci as LaMotta's devoted younger
brother who is eventually forced to
hate him and Cathy Moriarty as his
teenaged wife Vicki who, for her
own safety, must finally leave him.
"Martin Scorsese's Raging Bull is
the best American movie of the
year � Jack Kroll, Newsweek
"Robert De Niro's evocation of
Jake LaMotta is a magnum opus
performance rich in detail and sub-
tle in shading � After Dark
"Martin Scorsese's finest film
� Vincent Canby, New York Times
Barkeep 9s Life Not Glamourous
By KAREN WENDT
Style UMor
Have you ever opened 400 beers
in one night?
Sound familar? That's how I
began an article similar to this one
in 1980. I had had the dubious
privilege of being assigned to work
behind a bar and report on what it
was like to be behind it rather than
in front of it. Ah, the life of a
reporter.
At that time the whole experience
was one that 1 wanted to forget. But
it was fun. It must have been since I
began working for the Attic the
following year and worked for them
for several months.
Working behind the bar may look
interesting to some, boring to others
and tedious to even more. And some
nights it's all three. Working behind
a bar is fun, but it is some of the
hardest work you'll ever put in. The
easist job in the world it ain't.
For one thing there are a lot of
rules to remember. Never serving to
a minor is a big one that almost
everyone in and out of bars knows.
Also though it is not always possi-
ble, there is a standard polky in
most bars that they will not serve so-
meone who is already drunk.
Which brings up the question of a
floor person. A floor person is the
person who spends most of the night
troubleshooting. The bars do not
want drunks or troublemakers in
their clubs and they usually have a
person or two looking out for such
people. We were told to look out for
sleepers or people who appeared
that they would pass out and to get
them out of the club.
And it is a rule that is enforced.
When a young man passed out
recently in Rafters I saw an
employee pick him up and carry him
outside where we found him later
sitting on the sidewalk.
The law says that no alcol i can
be served after 1:00 EST and 2:00
DST. But that's not the end of the
story. No alcohol can be consumed
after 1:30 in a club. Period.
Whether you're an employee or a
customer. No exceptions. And it is
not just policy it is the rule.
It is the policy in the Attic that
when the band stops playing, unless
an encore is expected, they stop ser-
ving beer. To one and all. In other
clubs it is usually at 1:00 or 2:00 or
when they turn the house lights on.
Doing the job is tough. And mak-
ing a living at it is tougher. It is only
for about Five to six hours a night,
but that is straight work, with
breaks a luxury. The barkeep stands
on his feet for all of that time and
has to keep the beers and the
customers moving. Some regular
bartenders have callouses on their
index fingers from opening all of the
cans.
Minimum wage is the usual pay
but if you are trying to make a living
at it you will have to work every
night, every day of the week. And
since most of the barkeeps in this
area are students they can't make
their living soley by working at the
bar. So tips are important.
And though it may be sexist it's
true that the tips are generally better
if there is a female working at the
bar. Why? Because (and it is a mark
on our sex) women do not tip as well
as men. Not nearly as well. And
when that's how you're making
your living, tips are important.
There are ways you can make
their life easier:
�Don't hassle a barkeep if they can't
serve you any more for whatever
reason. If you don't think it is
legitimate then ask to see the
manager. If it is before one o'clock
and you want another beer, but they
won't serve you, then go to a conve-
nience store. It's cheaper there
anyway.
�Leave a tip no matter how small.
Every little bit helps.
�Don't jump in front of other peo-
ple at the bar trying to be served
earlier. They get mad and the
barkeeps get mad and it usually
won't get you served any faster. I
can guarentee that the bartenders
are getting to you as fast as they
can. The faster they are the better
the tips; and we already talked
about that.
�After the bar is closed LEAVE.
There is nothing to do and it keeps
the barkeeps there longer if you just
hang around. They have to clean up
too.
�Bring your ID (college preferably)
every time you go downtown. Every
time. Don't count on your gray hair
and cane to get you in. No ID, no
entrance is often the policy. And
don't hassle the guy or girl checking door is just doing their job and
ID's; they're just doing their jobs. following the rules. They have to eat
That is the thing to remember, too. Remember that the next time
Whoever is working the bar or the you go downtown.
��M. 1 o i n .a. � mm �� �� i ��
The Downtown Scene
a medley of bars
PfeetoBy ttm jvrtan
-S





�w
-MMj&x � i
1M EAST ROl 1MAS
M)! MBtR 12, 11
These Are The
'Good Old Days'
BCHADBIFFK1N
1 can't wait until 30
vears from now. I'll put
a log on the fire, settle
back in my rocker, and
fire up my old pipe
About then m little
grand-daughter will
crawl up in my lap and
say, "tell me a story,
grandpa And I'll say,
'�OK darling, what
would you like to
hear?" Then squirming
with excitement she'll
say, "tell me about
when you were in
school
Then, rocking slowl)
back and forth. I'll
begin. "Well honey, 1
wasn't as lucky back
then as you are now.
Everv dav rain or shine
1 walked about four
miles to get to school
"Was that all the
way from our house
grandpa?"
"No dear, that was
just from the student
parking lot
"Did you live in a log
cabin Cirandpa, like
Abraham 1 incoln?"
"Well dear, 1 sup-
pose it was kind of like
a cabin. The only dif-
ference was that the
one 1 stayed in had five
floors and the called it
a dormiton "
"And grandpa, did
you hae to sit up late
at night and study by
candlelight like Mr.
I incoln?'1
� 1 sure did
sweetheart. You see
there were only three
receptacles in my room
and after 1 plugged in
the stereo, the tv and
the coffee pot, there
was no place left to
plug in the lamp
"Did your cabin
have a little house out
back grandpa, where
you had to wait in
line?"
"No dear, we didn't
have one of those. We
did have a 21-seater
just down the hall but
you still had to wait in
"line
"Were you poor
back then grandpa?"
"Yes dear. Poor as
dorm mice
"Grandpa?"
"Yes little one?"
"Did you ever get
punished for misbehav-
ing?"
"Yes dear, a couple
of times
"What did you do
Grandpa? Pull so-
meone's pigtails or spill
your milk?"
"No dear. I threw a
football game once and
in my senior year I
started a riot
"Did they make you
wear a dunce cap
grandpa?"
"No sweetheart, it
was worse than that.
They made me wear a
purple and gold
sweater
"After you finished
school grandpa, what
did you do then?"
"1 haven't done
anything yet dear, I'm
still looking for a job
New Teaching Methods?
Suggestions
For Courses
Robert DeNiro
.from flick 'The Raging Bull'
Continued From Pajje 5
charge accounts, and getting money
from home. English 2000 is also
recomended.
�English 2000: WRITING FOR
FUNDS: An analysis of the
methods used to gain funds from a
variety of sources including
Parent's, Grandparents, Aunts
Uncles and Distant Cousins
� English 1050: WRITING FOR
TIME: An analysis of the methods
used to defer creditors for as long as
possible, and also a small section on
writing notes to professors to get
out of class assingments.
�English 3000: AIA AN 1
WRITING I ok FUNDS: An
analysis of methods of finding, and
recieving monetary grants lot
various purposes Includes a section
on writing letters fur use to get you
out of doing the work that the grant
was to finance.
�Lifestyles 2000 DOWNTOWN
IIT: An analvMS of wavs of deal-
ing mm violently with someone who
has just burn! you with a cigarette
and is about to spill beer on you.
� Self Defense KXK) KARATE: An
analysis of violent methods oi deal
,ng with a person who has just burn!
you with a cigarette and is about to
spill beer on
ACROSS
1 Succor
5 Weakens
9 Knock
12 Sandarac
tree
13 Dillseed
14 Guido s high
note
15 Sandy waste
17 Pronoun
18 Deface
19 Couple
21 Blouse
23 Sieve
27 Exists
28 Listened to
29 Edible seed
31 Drunkard
34 Babylonian
deity
35 Weirdest
38 Proceed
39 Arid
41 Lair
42 Crown
44 Printer s
measure
46 Chose
48 Killed
51 Dusky
52 Pronoun
53 Exclamation
55 Scotts
99 Hostelry
60 Wigwam
62 Exact
63 Footlike part
64 Mans name
65 Rational
DOWN
1 Possessed
2 Before
3 � Vegas
4 Make ready
5 Glossy fabric
CCOOCCOGO
6 Article
7 Church
bench
8 Fret
9 Negligent
10 Woe word
11 Separate
16 Made incur-
sions
20 Grumbled
22 Three-toed
sloth
23 Lean-to
24 Rip
25 Sun god
26 Female rutt
30 Abaft
32 Monster
33 Scurvy one
36 Legal mat-
ters
37 Parking haz-
ards
40 Longs for
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
See Answer
Page 7
Red
Cross
&h
Quality Repair
L
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113 Grande Ave
758 1228
Presicion
Designs
Stylist Ron Nichols
ECU Student Special
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219 Cotanche - Suite 7
43 Near
45 Scale note
47 Endures
48 Vessel
49 Unaspirated
50 Memoran-
dum
54 Layer
56 Time period
57 Hurry
58 Diocese
61 Negative
l MONOGRAMS
UNLIMITED
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Co-Ed Outlet
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Mon. Sat. 10 9 Call 335 2424
i
i
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winner of the
PROSE CONTEST
sponsored by
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ATTTIC
Typed entries jubmifed to
Media Board or Rebel ollicei by Nov JO
ABORT TO
12th WEEK
PREGN-
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(Toll Free NumDt'
100 22' 2ig between A M
nd 5 P M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
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917 West Morgan S'
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HELP WHEN TOTJ NEED IT M08T
The Fleming Center has been here for women
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pregnancy day or night Services include
Trie Pregnancy Teetlng
Weekday 6" Saturday Abortion Appta.
Evening Birth Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
Tlie Fleming Center
Were here when yon need ns.
123j15678 I91011.
�1314
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Nov 14. 1981
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jei Sav
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Fall means
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fine savings at the
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ADVERTISED HEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is requirt-
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16�,
1
U
�i






THE EAST C AROLIN1AN NOVEMBER 12, 1981
TV Work Makes Life Busy
J
Susan Roberts Of WNCT-TV
Tells Of Life On 'Carolina'
rU IHI)IU trkIN
M�ll Wrilrr
Not long ago it someone hud
told me that before the yeai was out
I would have talked with Glenn
Campbell, B.J. rhomas and
rrevino, 1 would have said, 'You re
King at the wrong kid. mister
pparentl) WN( 1 1 in Green
iUc thought differently because for
the pus! tune months Susan Roberts
been the hostess of "Carolina
ui morninc talk
!
aa
un
lri
show that's aired Monday thi
r-rida on Channel Nine
Interviewing special guests a
sai od morning" to ;
North v a' olinians at fx a.m
.i da '��
Susa She begins her da
a m and usualU b 5 !
he studio read to go
"I've onl been late twict
said, pausing I
�� a if she wet!
� id a yawn. Susan m;
. . y, but hei eyes were w
aw ak e hen you look at h�
tiei eves are ull you see rhe art
tn 1 ife Saei bluer i
Newri a
i -
she said
and threw
- �. . �
Wh x i' ta k
k d
.
lips she explained with a smile
that would have split the average
pei son's cheeks
1 , ng hours and haul work have
alwavs been a part of Susan's life.
i the l niversitv, of Washington,
she ievened a degree in
itre, she was up every morning
gymnastics and dancing
. ies began.
Hei iob as hostess requires a lot
more than just keeping long hours.
1 ach guest appearing on the show
i man) hours of research and
duling. She is also responsible
together special-interest
have to make a lot of
oils she said as she
elbows on her small
desk "I've had lots of ex-
: aking decisions and that
i a lot on this show,
lo sift through the good
k out the best
tunshed college in
started working us a
It was the only job 1
" she saul sheepishly and
erself. When a friend of
d to ireenville in August
g �. she decided to come along.
ol here I fried to get a job
net Nothing was
lidn't feel up to be-
ain
the ease, she decided
different. "The
1 always wanted to do was
television. When 1
htool one o( my
me that 1 really had a
She said nn voice was
si
naked. With those thoughts in mind
1 wasn't too sure 1 could make it. 1
wish she could see me now
Deciding to take a chance, Susan
set out with her fingers crossed and
applied for a job at every radio and
television station within a 30-mile
radius of Greenville. Before long, a
secretarial job came open at a small
radio station in Washington. "1
didn't want to be a secretary she
explained, "but they promised if 1
would take the job, they would give
me some on-the-air time. 1 started
out doing 10-second weather reports
and before long 1 was doing sports
stories and interviews. Five months
later this position opened up; 1 audi-
tioned for it and here I am
As one might expect, Susan con-
siders herself a lucky person. "1 like
my job and I want to do it well
she said with a determined look on
her face. "1 can't stand to do
anything half-assed she stated
slamming her hand down on her
desk and laughing.
Susan keeps three calendars on
her desk along with an appointment
book that closely resembles a
telephone directory in a big-city
pool hall. Five more calendars with
notes and names scribbled in all the
little blocks, hang on the walls of
her small soundproof office.
Her telephone rang and she
answered in a cheery, professional
voice. "It's about a fashion show
I'm producing she whispered,
cupping her hand over the
mouthpiece of the telephone. As she
talked she opened her purse and
dumped out enough cosmetics on
her desk to stock a small drug store.
She finished her conversation, rubb-
ed some stuff on her lips from one
of the shiny little containers, and
then placed the tools of her trade
back in her purse.
On a counter behind her desk is a
blow dryer, a mirror, a plastic bottle
of hair spray and about a dozen
video-tape cassettes.
The movie-star syndrome hasn't
caught up with Susan yet. "It took
me seven months to get my makeup
on right for the show she remark-
ed, patting her hair. "Looking my
best is really low on my list of
priorities. I don't want to have to
dress up every time I leave my apart-
ment. I find, however, that people-
are forcing me to. I can imagine
people seeing me in the grocery store
and saying, 'Boy, she looks like
s I'm going to have to do
something about it, I suppose
Susan enjoys her work and likes
living in Greenville. "When I came
here, I was looking for something to
make a living in she said, "and
that was all. I know I'm lucky, but
I've always worked hard too. I've
alwavs been concerned and very sen
sitive about my future
The telephone rang again. Her
face lit up like a neon sign; it was
her mother calling from
Washington.
Susan hopes one dav to have a
family, a career, and if possible, a
home in a city larger than Green-
ville. The way she's going, there's
no doubt that she will have ull three.
HASTINGS FORD
LfAJrOG Pttovr CocigGg-The Hgg a)ah
ffA PVTTlrO' Of Aty
�L�cT0rJ P0T�HtJ
MO
TOO M0TH�A�S aO
HOOrA L�fT OrO Try
&H Qf))P AJoftg)
Svjfc� THEAZ I5, 40
TUNE-UPS -
4 cylinder �
6 cylinder �
8 cylinder �
19.40
23.60
27.85
includes labor, plugs, and all necessary adjustments
for electrical ignition engines only.
Oil Change & Filter Special - 1 2.05
includes 5 qts. of oil and filter. otter expires nov jo, itti
Prices are for Ford vehicles � other makes prices may vary
24 hr. towing service
excluding illegally
parked cars.
Day - 758-0114
Night - 758-1541
Corner of 10th & 264 Hwy.
The
ROLLING
STONES:
n
Th omen's Field
Hockey Club is proud to
present a beginning of
the week affair featur-
ing Rolling Stones
music all night long in
cooperation with Pan-
tana Bob's.
Come out and join (he girls
with reduced beverages.
Monday, November 16,
from 8p.m. until 1-u.m. Be
there.
3&!2&&&&2SS2e&&
All you
can eat
Popcorn
Shrimp
NOVEMBER 12, 13, 14
At
CENTRAL BOOK
&NEWS
Greenville Square Shopping Center � Phone 756-7177
Open 9:30 to 9 Seven Days A Week
WHITMAN'S
HARDCANDY
Special Good
Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday
This Week
Cross Green Street Bridge
Take left at 1st Light
Located one block down on left.
Regularly $2.95
n
25
ALLAIRMONT
Paper Back
CLASSICS
$�100
3�$1
WONLY
ALL HARDBACK
BOOKS
20�
Ooff
Register For Our
GRAND PRIZE
$50.00 Gift Certificate To
Be Used In This Store
DOOR PRIZES
Will Be Given Away
Daily During Our
GRAND OPENING!
r
a





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
In Ficklen Saturday
Indians Hope
To Upset Bucs
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
4�ustaal Sports Milor
At Ficklen Stadium Saturday,
two teams covering both ends of the
spectrum will meet for the 14th
time.
The Indians of William and
Mary, heading into the 10th game of
their season with a 3-6 record will be
trying to prevent the Pirates of East
Carolina from finishing 6-5 and
having its first winning season under
second-year coach Ed Emory.
The last two years have not been
the best of times for Indian coach
Jimmy e Lay cock, however, who is
heading for his second straight los-
ing season.
The Indians were 6-5 in 1977 �
their last winning season even
though the team posted a 5-5-1
mark the following year.
And things don't get any easier
for William and mary, as they are
set to meet an East Carolina team
that scored 66 points and had over
400 yards in total offense in a win
over East Tennessee State last Satur-
day in Greenville.
And the fact that the Pirates are a
wishbone team dot. n't help either,
Laycock admitts.
"East Carolina is the first
wishbone team we vsill play this
year he says, "and it's hard to get
ready for a wishbone team in one
week, especially one like ECU'S
East Carolina's speed "is the pro-
blem that concerns me the most
Laycock says, "especially their
overall speed in the backfield.
"And the tight end (Norwood)
Vann and the split end (freshman
Ricky Nichols) can really burn
you
William and Mary got off to an
uneasy start, losing its first four
games to Temple, Miami of Ohio,
Virginia Tech and VMI. But the In-
dians gained some momentum after
that and have won three of their last
five. The victories occurred over
Dartmouth, Marshall and, James
Madison .
William and Mary lost to Har-
vard, 23-14, last Saturday.
"We are a very inconsistent,
young football team Laycock ex-
plains. "We had good momentum
in that win streak, but we just don't
have enough experience. We've
made mistakes, and it's cost us
Quarterback Chris Garrity will be
one of the most formidable passers
the Pirates will see all season. He
has attempted 238 passes, com-
pleting 127 for 1,239 yards and six
touchdowns but has been in-
tercepted 17 times.
Garrity's favorite receiver has
been wide-out Kurt Wrigley, who
has caught 34 passes for 397 yards
and three touchdowns. Back-up
wide receiver Mike Sutton has pull-
ed in 22 for 231 yards.
Split end Jeff Sanders is also a
fine receiver, having caught nine
passes for 186 yards and two
touchdowns. Tailback Bemie Mar-
razzo is effective out of the
I-formation as he has caught 19
passes for 133 yards and one
touchdown.
Marrazzo is also the leading
rusher on the team, carrying the ball
112 times for 5! yards and four
touchdowns and is the leading
point-scorer on the squad with 30.
Back-up man Jeff Powell has gained
337 yards on 89 carries and has
scored two touchdowns.
The Indian defense has been "oft
and on Laycock says. "We don "t
usually give up the big play � we
usually stiffen up. But right now we
have a number of players hurt. Our
best tackle, John Cannon, will not
be able to play Saturday.
Winning Season At Stake
Emory: Wants
A W Not 'V
Past A nd Present Factors
Two players to watch for in Saturday's ECU- William and Mary matchup
are Indian QB Chris Garrity and Pirate running back Harold Blue.
Above, Garrity is sacked in the endzone in last year's game by now-
graduated James Freer. The play resulted in a safetv. Below, Blue scores
a TD earlier in this, his senior season. Blue and nine other Pirates play
their last collegiate games Saturday (Photos By Jon Jordan)
1 aycock savs his Indians face a
huge challenge in trying to rebound
from the loss last week. "The Har-
vard game was a very tough loss
he says. "We don't have our sights
on a winning season anymore. But
East Carolina does, and we stand in
theii way.
"We will have a great test when
we face East Carolina Saturday
East Carolina leads the series with
William and Mary nine games to
three. The first meeting between the
schools resulted in a 7-7 tie. The
Pirates hae won five straight,
21-15, 34-3, 31-10, 20-0 and 30-19.
The Indians last victory came at
the Oyster Bowl in Norfolk in 1977,
21-17, and prevented the Pirates
from gong to a bowl game.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport Mttor
"1 think our football season
comes down to Saturday afternoon
at 1:30
East Carolina head football coach
Ed Emory let it be known at his
weekly press conference Wednesday
exactly how important he feels it is
for his Pirates to defeat William and
Mary in their season finale Satur-
day.
The Pirates are 5-5 and Satur-
day's results will determine whether
the club finishes on the up side or
down side of the .500 mark.
"We can put an 'L' on the East
Carolina program or a W
Emory said. "We can put an 'L' or
a lW' on Ed Emory and an 'L' or
W" on the players. All the work
we've done and investments we've
made comes down to Saturday. 1
hope we've got so much pride in
what we've done that there's no way
we'll lose
Emory admitted that a loss,
which would bring with it a losing
season, could be really damaging to
the Pirate program. On the other
hand, a win could have some very
positive after affects.
"Having a winning season would
help with finances, recruiting, our
off-season program and our condi-
tioning program. It will help us
morale-wise also. They could see
1981 as a winning year and 1982 as a
year we're looking forward to
Obviously, Emorv is optimistic
about the fact that onlv ten seniors,
including just seven starters, will be
completing their eligibility Satur-
day.
But those that are leaving will
leave a void, Emory said.
"It's senior day on Saturday and
I must say that we are really going to
miss those guvs said the second-
year head coach. "They have so
much invested in finishing on a win
ning team. I hope they will be very
determined and show the other
players that
The Pirates are corning off a big
66-23 win over East Tennessee State
this past Saturday. Emory said he
has no visions of a like occurance
this Saturday against a 3-6 William
and Mary team.
"It was kind o hard early this
week getting the kids back down
from that big win he said. "But
they had to come back down
because that score is just not going
to happen again this week. Coach
(Jimmye) Laycock will have them
ready for us
Emory has good reason to believe
that Laycock's 'roops will be brew-
ing. After last season's 31-23 win
Laycock complained to the press
about 1;C I"s calling of a timeout
late in the game, when the Pirates
had an eight-point lead
The Indians' defense is also a fac-
tor that has Emory worried. The
club runs what he calls "a
Maryland-type" defense, with eight
men on the line of scrimmage.
"We play exactly what they want
to see Emory said. "That defense
is great at stopping the run. And
they've done a good job with it. It
works. Just look at how good
Maryland is doing with it against the
run
The Pirates are relatively healthy
heading into the contest. Only
defensive tackle Steve Hamilton was
injured in the East lenncssee game.
sprained ankle will keep him out
of Saturday's game. Also out are
running back Earnest Byner and
center Tony Hensley, both of whom
have been sidelined since the early
part of the season.
Ten Pirates Finish Careers Saturday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports r drlor
A group of ten seniors will
complete their careers as East
Carolina football players Satur-
day when the Pirates play host to
William and Mary.
Seven of the ten are starting
players. Head Coach Ed Emory
has labeled Saturday "Senior
Day in honor of the ten.
Each of the seniors was inter-
Elliott
Davis
viewed this week and was asked
two questions: 1) "Later on in
life what will you remember the
most about your career as an
ECU football player? and 2)
"What are your plans for the
future?"
The responses:
Marvin Elliott � (Starting
defensive safety; Alexandria,
Va.)
Memory� My teammates.
There's no doubt about that. I'll
always treasure the work we went
through together
Future Ambitions� "I'd like to
see about trying out for a pro
team. If I don't make it in the
pros I want to finish up here at
school. I'm a business major but
someday I'd like to go into a little
bit of coaching. 1 want my degree
in case the coaching doesn't go so
well
Mike Davis � (Starting defen-
sive end; Charlotte)
Memory�"Being a transfer
and a walk-on I'd say I'll always
remember when I started my first
game two years ago against
Carolina (game ended in a 24-24
tie). That has been the most ex-
citing thing for me. Being a
transfer I had no idea I'd get a
chance to play so much so soon.
It was just great
Future Ambitions�"I have
another year before I graduate. I
may try to student coach here
next year. But as far as playing
football is concerned, I think this
is it. I am an industrial tech ma-
jor and would like to get a job in
the field someday, maybe
teaching
Bud LaCock � (Starting of-
fensive guard; Wilmington)
Memory� "That 1 was able to
start and contribute to the pro-
gram, that I was able to play ma-
jor college football. 1 guess the
game that sticks out is my first
start last year against Florida
State (a 63-6 Pirate loss). It was a
pretty good experience starting
out against a team like that. It
had a positive effect on me
Future Ambitions � "I plan to
graduate from school. After that
1 basically just want to take it
easy for awhile before 1 settle
down for a career. Eventually 1
plan to get into management
Glenn Morris � (Starting
linebacker; Greensboro)
Memory� "That 1 didn't quit. 1
made it. I can say to myself when
1 am 63 that I made it. That'll be
the most important thing to me
because there were a lot of times 1
felt like 1 wanted to do something
else
Future Ambitions� "I would
like to get a shot at pro ball. If
not, I'll stay here and get my
degree in Psychology. Maybe I'll
get married in a few years
Chuck Bushbeck � (Kicking
Specialist; Philadelphia, Pa.
Came to the Pirates for this
season after Villa nova dropped
its football program. Is suffering
from Hodgkin's Disease, a
cancer of the lymph nodes. Chose
to play the season out despite
numerous side effects of radia-
tion treatment.)
Memory� "This is definitely a
year 1 won't forget. Just playing
out the whole year will be
something I'll remember. I made
the statement at the start of the
season that I'd play the season
out. Even though things got
rough 1 remembered that when 1
make up mv mind I don't change
it
Future Ambitions�"I don't
know what the future holds.
Right now I'm just taking things
day-by-day. I have some long-
range goals but I'm not going to
worry about them. Too much is
going on right now for me to
worry about the future
Dexter Martin � (Linebacker;
Cocoa, Fla.)
Memory�"I will always look
back at the guys I've been here
with. I came along with them as a
freshman. The feeling of excite-
ment I've experienced just being
here will stay with me
Future Ambitions�"My objec-
tive is to graduate and then pur-
sue a job, some type that will be
profitable for me. 1 don't really
know what I want to do at this
time, but 1 will use my industrial
tech major in some way. I think
maybe I'd like to go into
teaching
Billy Parker � (Center; Wilm-
ington)
Memory� "Starting the first
game at Duke last year. It was the
first time I'd ever started and we
beat them pretty bad (35-10)
Future Ambitions� "I'm really
not sure. I will graduate in
December. I'd like to find a job,
maybe go to graduate school in
the future
Harold Blue � (Starting
halfback; Laurinburg)
Memory� "The opportunity I
had this year, finally getting a
chance to be in the starting
lineup. It's important for me to
know that people will know
Harold Blue was a starting runn-
ing back at East Carolina in 1981.
I played behind some great backs
here, like Anthony Collins, and I
am not bitter about that. It was a
great experience, but so was star-
ting this year
Future Ambitions��"A couple
of pro scouts have been talking to
me. 1 just want to get the chance,
just get that one tryout (for a pro
team). If that doesn't work out 1
will be back in school here next
year working on my early
childhood major
Fee Griffin � (Starting nose
guard; Tabb, Va.)
Memory� "When 1 started my
first game against Duke Universi-
ty last year and we beat them.
That was a real big win for us,
over an ACC school. It was also a
big day for me
Future Ambitions�"1 will
come back here for one more
semester and finish school. 1 am
majoring in urban and regional
planning, and hope to get a job in
that field after I graduate
Tootie Robbins � (Starting of-
fensive tackle; Merry Hill. A pre-
season All-America candidate.
Has been chosen to play in the
prestigious Blue-Gray All-Star
Game, to be held in Mon-
tgomery, Ala. on Christmas Day)
Memory� "When I look back
someday 1 will remember the
days we had to get up at 6:00 in
the morning and get ready for
practice. I can see now, when I
get up in the morning (in later
years) I will say 'If 1 was at East
Carolina now, I'd be getting
ready for practice
Future Ambititms�l hope to
get the chance to play on a pro-
fessional football team. The
scouts have told me if 1 continue
to play well, my chances in the
(National Football I eague) draft
will get better. If that doesn't
work out 1 want to coach football
at some junior or senior high
school. I'd like to teach young
kids some of the things I have
learned. I'd really like to help so-
meone else's child reach their
goals
Bushbeck
Martin
Parker
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A





THE EAST CAROl INIAN
NOVEMBER 12. 1981
S
ut
Falcons'Benett Refuses To Throw In The Towel
' . � � �r e A U� ,li i, ��� ti iho liuiiim K. � c the Pali'HIK
SUWANEE, Ga.
(UP1) ' Leeman Ben-
nett refuses to throw in
the towel.
Never mind that
Atlanta has lost five of West, and has six tough
its last seven games, is foes remaining on its
three games behind schedule. The Falcons
division-leading San coach still is thinking
Francisco in the NFC plavoffs.
"Obviously 5-5 is not division, 5-5 would be
a good place to be when so what. But I still feel
you're three games we have a chance to
behind said Bennett, make the playoffs
"If everyone in our Bennett said
Lady Pirates Travel To Chapel Hill For Tourney
hollomaACHR,S
Maff Writer
The East Carolina
volleyball team will
start its second season
this Friday at Chapel
ment or by receiving an
at-large bid from the
AIAW. East Carolina
is currently being con-
sidered for an at-large
bid despite the outcome
of the tournament at
sity.
Volleyball head
coach Lynn Davidson
feels that the tourna-
ment is a chance for the
Pirates to raise their
stock in the state in the
sport of volleyball.
"We will be trying to
shoot for the top three
places in the state tour-
nament she said.
"We want to raise our
standing in the state
If the Pirates are of-
fered an at-large bid,
the regional tourna-
ment will be held on
Friday Nov. 20 and
Saturday Nov. 21.
although the figures
show San Francisco "is
the probable division
champ, I don't think
this thing is over yet.
There are a half doen
teams still in the runn-
ing for a wildcard berth
and we play three of
them
Bennett admitted los-
ing 17-14 at San Fran-
cisco this past Sunday,
a loss that meant the
difference between be-
ing one game behind
and the current three.
has the Falcons
"somewhat down.
"We were expected
to be much better (after
going 12-4 ' .st year)
he said. "When that
happens, you get down
on yourself. When you
look ahead at what ap-
pears to be a very tough
remaining schedule,
you keep getting down
on yourself.
"I hope we have the
charactor to rise to the
occassion
Polo University
by Ralph Lauren
Hill as the I ady Pirates UNC.
participate in the
NCAIAW Division 1
State Tournament.
For the Pirates, who
finished fourth in the
State AIAW and 10-21
overall, the tournament
represents one of two
chances to advance to
regional volleyball ac-
tion The Pirates can go
to the regionals by
either finishing in the
op three in (he tourna-
East Carolna will be
facing Duke in the first
round of the tourna-
ment, a team they have
beaten twice already
this year. The teams to
beat in the tournament,
however, will be state
AIAW champ N.C.
State, second place
UNC-Chapel Hill and
third place Ap-
palachian State Univer-
Golfers Set
High Goals
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
Intramural
Sports-N-Shorts
BY GREG MELTON
Distance Race
Popular Event
As part of the ECU Homecoming activities,
the Intramural Department held its 3rd annual
"Cross-Campus Run" on Saturday,
November 7. There were two races, consisting
ol a 2.5-mile run and a 5-mile race. Both races
were open to all ECU alumni, faculty-staff
members and students. A total of 43 par-
ticipants came out and enjoyed perfect weather
and running conditions.
In the 2.5-mile race. Ted Thomas came
across the finish line first in a time of 13:36.
Charles Pooler took second place with a time
of 1V57, and Sammy Hancock placed third in
a time of 14:27. All three of these runners are
students at ECU.
In the women's division. Pat McGuigan
finished first in fine style at 18:13 followed by
Martha Howard at 20:26 and Kathy Hardy
with a time of 20:32. McGuigan is the women's
track at ECU and had quite a cheering section
prevent to add to her victory.
I he 5-mile race produced a particularly
notable accomplishment by the winner. Bill
White. White took first place with a new
course record time of 26:22, better his own
course record by almost a full minute. Eddie
Herford finished second with a time of 28:01,
and Paul Bailey took third with a fine 28:16.
White and Herford are both ECU alumni
while Bailey is a student now.
Kathy Edwards took honors in the women's
division, crossing the finish line in 38:23. Cely
Shands finished in 42:38, and Elizabeth Davis
finished in 44:25. All of these girls are students
at East Carolina.
For those runners interested in future IM
runs, the Intramural Department sponsors this
type of activity during both the fall and spring
semesters. We are proud to have such a nice
course combining a scenic run through the
Ivfinges Coliseum and Ficklen Stadium areas
along with some wooded territory. It was
designed by Bob Fox (Assistant Director of In-
trmaurals) at ECU. Bob did a terrific job of
sonstrueting the course, and the entire IM staff
welcomes anyone to utilizew it at any time.
Finally, anyone interested in seeking advice
and information on jogging, cardiovascular
fitness and exercise is encouraged to come by
the IM office. The staff would be glad to talk
to anyone interested in these areas.
10
ECU
Student
Discount
on
glosses
By THOMAS BRAME
Staff Writer
"We had a very
disappointing fall
season analyzed East
Carolina golf coach
Bob Helmick.
The fall season for
Pirate golfers is a time
for experimentation
and studying. Helmick
says he puts academics
as the team's first
priority.
Two reasons for the
Pirates' poor start is
the emphasis placed on
a rough class load and
exposure of new
members to tourna-
ment experience. In ad-
dition, the NCAA
Selection Committee
concentrates on the spr-
ing results for the rank-
ings of the teams.
Coach Helmick used
all 12 members of the
golf squad in fall tour-
naments to expose his
team and find out
which set team works
well together.
Getting their grades
up is important due to
the amount of time
missed because of tour-
naments. "The golf
team misses more
school than any team
on campus Helmick
proclaims. During the
fall semester, golfers
miss 10 days from
classes. Fourteen days
are missed during the
spring.
Helmick boasts,
"Our golf team is
among the top three
out of 17 teams at ECU
in academics The
team requirement is to
have at least a 2.0 grade
point average.
The team's budget is
another problems.
Compares to Atlantic
Coast Conference
schools, the ECU
budget is basically five
times less. Helmick in-
sists that the budget
situation is not an ex-
cuse for poor results.
"We have very capable
golfers on this team
said the ECU coach.
"We can compete with
any team we plav this
vear
Cl Camouflage Fatiquei Ana
Shirt Stffpinq Bji�
Bacfcpacks Campinq Equip
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And Over 700 Different New And
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ARMY-NAVY
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Street
Come by or call
xutiluk
ABORTIONS
1-24 week terminations
Appt's. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
t 800-321-0575
TODAY and set
up an appointment
for a free workout
100? EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE. N C 37834
for men and women
Current undVrgrd�ja� prt
medical ������ ��� ���
comewtt for atvef-ai hwndrad
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ed to ttudnf� acceplad Into
medical cw�� �� fra
or at ma bagt"��t"9
sophmore aar The scholar
�hip provide �or tuition.
books, lab �ree� � ��
ment. Pu a 1530 moolhlv
allowance investigate mi
financial alhK"�1lve o me
hioh coat or medical educa
tiort. Contac
U.S.A.P.HCALTM
PROFESSIONS
� ecuuiTiNO
SUITS OL I. IW MAVAHO O
KALCIOM. N.C.naW
PHONf COLLECT �i7SS-4iJ4
I'
Stretching Exercise Classes
M-W-F 10:00& 11:00
T-Th. 5:0046.00
Aerobics and Dancerciie Classes
M-WTh. 3:00-4:00
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
November 1 - $35
December 17
Features Included: Male & Female
Instructors 'Nautilus Machines
(12 of the most sophisticated
exercise machines made)
OLYMPIC BARBELLS
�COED HOURS -FEMALE HOURS
AND DUMBELLS -SAUNA,
SHOWERS, AND LOCKERS
WHIRLPOOL -DIET PLANS
AT NAUTILUS FITNESS ISOUR
SPECIALTY 1002 EVANS STREET,
GREENVILLE�758 9584 i
H.L.
HODGES
210 E FIFTH ST
752-4156
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
218 ARLINGTON BLVD
756-6001
-tr&i
Located close to
Greenville
Athletic Club
V.
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AND TOUGH!
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Let us make you an appointment
with the doctor of your choice.
752-1446
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VtSA
OPTICIANS
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TO KEEP WITH IT,
YOU NEED US!
H.L. HODGES & BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
has top quality racquctball equipment that you need to stay with the game. You'll
find everything you need from shoes, racquets, racquetballs, and much more! Not
only is our racquetball equipment of the Finest quality, but at prices you can afford.
Come in and see us today!
RACQUETBALL SPECIALS
MNGBI
RACKETReg. 29.95-SALE
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AT A PRICE
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Nurmbrr 12, I tiursd� til.
CHICKEN N DUMPLINGS9
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2 vegetable
BROILED CALF'S LIVER�"
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We are pleased to introduce to Eastern North
Carolina a new concept in young men's clothing
POLO and Ralph Lauren mean distinctive taste which
translates into a special feeling m clothing POLO
UNIVERSITY is a new extension of this feeling This
clothing group is developed around an appearance
look that especially appeals to the university man
Tweeds and flannels, form the basis for this present
tion And ery importantly this collection is pri �
fit a young man's budget Sport Coats from $i 40 . and
Suits from $290 . all with the special stamp of Ralph
Lauren inspired merchandise We think you will like il
and our experienced staff will be happy to shew if re
At ai our fine stores
CareHM Lmm Mall
Moa-Frl LUNCH 1 laaa ljpaa. SUafEU
i (IM Frl). St. S�j� t Urn - ap
MS�S�t)
offimoni
MEMS WEAR
TARRYTOWN MALL. Rocky Mount
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
CAROLINA EAST MALL
thereat
being up the
Give That Student a Hue
$?ki
L.Cio�npon& !&JI&Hfa teamft ord tfwr'&ttet.

t






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 12. 1981
Fearless Football Forecast
WILLIAM & MARY AT ECU
N.C. STATE AT DUKE
MARYL AND AT CLEMSON
MICHIGAN AT PURDUE
IOWA AT WISCONSIN
IOWA ST. AT NEBRASKA
OKLAHOMA AT MISSOURI
SOUTHERN MISS. AT FLA. STATE
AUBURN AT GEORGIA
ARIZONA ST. AT UCLA
SOUTHERN CAL AT WASHINGTON
ALABAMA AT PENN STATE
CHARLES CHANDLER
(90-27-3)
ECU 38-14
N.C. State
Clemson
Michigan
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Fla. State
Georgia
UCLA
Southern Cal
Penn State
WILLIAM YELVERTON
(83-34-3)
ECU 56-0
Duke
Clemson
Michigan
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Fla. State
Georgia
UCLA
Washington
Alabama
CHUCK FOSTER
(83-34-3)
ECU 31-10
Duke
Clemson
Purdue
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Southern Miss.
Georgia
UCLA
Southern Cal
Penn State
CHRIS HOLLOMAN
(78-39-3)
ECU 48-10
N.C. State
Clemson
Michigan
Iowa
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Southern Miss.
Georgia
UCLA
Southern Cal
Penn State
JIMMY DuPREE
(73-44-3)
ECU 42-10
N.C. State
Clemson
Michigan
Wisconsin
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Fla. State
Georgia
UCLA
Southern Cal
Penn State
Classifieds
FOR SALE
WATERBEOS LOWEST prices
�n NC and SC on fine wood
waterbeds and accessories. Com
piete beds with IS year warranty
for as tow as 179. Delivery
available. Call David tor more in
formation 75S 240�
LIKE NEW Fender guitar with
handshell case and all ac
cessones 76-3105
LIKE NEW, I year old. Arthur
Fulmer motorcycle helmet call
TO Mil.
BRAND NEW twin sue boi spring
and twin sue mattress and brand
new bed frame tor S7S. Catl
7S� HJ9.
BRANO NEW and used Hence'
snow skies. Kenwood 45 watt
receiver Must sell lit 5S9
FOR RENT
ROOMS TO rent 3 blocks from
campus Female roommates
needed Walking distance to
downtown shopping $7S fter per
son utilities paid Call 7SJ 0495
ROOMS AVILABLE Methodist
Student Center is taking applca
tions tor spring semester Please
call 758 2030
HELP
WANTED
WANTED! RESPONSIBLE, en
thusiastic person to manage a
small campus photography
busmes Must own 3Smm camera
and have 3 years experience
Make M 110 pe hour Requires
working some weekend nights
Have lun with your hobby! Send
resume to Campus Camera Boi
833. Carrboro. NC 27510
PART TIME: make JS00 per 1000
mailing our circulars Also share
m profits For information ap
plication, send self addressed
stamped envelope to Global
Wealth Enterprise, Box 7308,
Lawrence, Ks. M04S
WORK AVAILABLE Students 73
or older wanted to do general
housecleanmg Prefer students
who have families within 100 miles
of Greenville or who have well
established references in Green
ville area. Call 752 4043 late night
or early morning
DOLLARS FOR your writing
Rebel Prose and Poetry Contests
Sponsored by Budweiser and the
Attic Cash before Christmas
Deadline November 30 Great
chance to be published
CLOSET POETS bnng the Rebol
your verse, three to five poems,
for better or worse. If you write
well, in our tudges' eyes, you could
walk off with the MO first pnie
The deadline is November 30, so
don t delay, pick up your pens and
start writing today
IF YOU are interested m being
your own boss and you like helping
people help themselves then Esti
Lite, Inc Products are tor you We
specialise in demonstrating free
non surgical face lifts If you like
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enioy experiencing this new Pro
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Call Lawrence Eugene after 8
p m. 758 7708
PERSONAL
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen years experience wants
typing to do at home Reasonable
rates Call 754 30.
(74 3411).
FREE YOUNG FEMALE
Guinea Pig Large wooden box
provided Call 752 0904 after � p m
WHO IS the ugliest man on cam
pus?
TYPING FOR students pro
lessors, etc Kempie Dunn 1019 E
Wright Rd , Greenville NC 27834
Call 752 4733 after 1 p.m.
CONGRATS TO the SNU'S for
painting such a masterpiece in
purple and gold. The car was a
success, but heard you had some
pushers on the street How bout
them Sigma Nus? Dutch and
Benatar
CIRCLE K, there was a myth that
it was a cowboy ranch out in
TYPING THESIS, manuscripts
reports, all types and quantities
professional quality� reasonabe
rates Call 75 378
RIDE WANTED to New York City
for Thanksgiving Will share ex
penses. can drive. Call now
752 984
HOT DOG day Thursday is dog
day at the Methodist student
Center Hot dogs are served from
12 until 2 at 50 cents each Enter by
the Holly Street door on the corner
of 5th and Holly.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST will
type at home Call '5 "B3
TWAS SUNDAY night we
devestated your yard So our
social lite you tried to retard You
may think calling off our get
toqether made all the Snus feel
under the weather, but in truth the
event kept us in stitches so why
don't you go to hell Tn Sig bitches
HAWKES YOU asked tor it, you
got it! Are you happy now' Love
ya Skippy
TO ALL those Wednesday night
punkers what does Thursday
morning mean? A Super Freak
headache and a Benatar
hangover! Thanks tor a wild one!
J.B. �IS it really Snowshoe or
bust? Fly Robin fly to Snowshoe
in the sky . We may be right, you
may be craiy See you later, later.
Don't lose my poles.
COOMES: WHERE the he'l is
your P- ipeline? Seems you have
a cash flow problem. Bud
RIDE wanted to NEW YORK for
Thanksgiving and'or Christmas
Will share expenses and driving
Call 75� 8 Ask for Gregg.
fflJ
PtratePrkk'
NAME BRAND
SHOES
at 50 & 60
OFF
BASS THOM McCANN
AND MANY OTHERS
NEXT TO EVANS SEAFOOD
U HAS -j
OYSTERS
IN THE
SHELL
203W.?thSt.
752 2332
Morgan: Not In Running For Chancellor
DURHAM (UPI) -
Former Sen. Robert
Morgan has ruled
himself out as a can-
didate for the
chancellor's post at
East Carolina Universi-
ty-
'JJ don't have the
academic
background Morgan
said during a visit to
Durham.
Despite speculation
during the past month,
Morgan said he has
never been in the runn-
ing for the job being
aeated by Thomas
Brewer next summer.
Ashley Futrell, chair-
man of the ECU
trustees, last month
said several people had
nominated Morgan for
the job.
Futrell a i d ,
however, anyone car
nominate a person for
the ;ob and only those
actively seeking the job
would be considered.
Morgan, a 1947 East
Carolina graduate who
also served as chairman
of the school's trustees
for 10 years, had in-
dicated some interest.
But he said Tuesday
he would not seek the
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 12, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 12, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.162
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57440
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