The East Carolinian, November 5, 1981






On The
Inside
Former Hostage Gary Lee:
Now Living In Freedom,
He's 'Glad To Be Alive'
Page 3
ECU'S Party Weekend:
What's Happening and
Where You Can Find It
Page 5
3M
Pirates And Bucs:
Teams Clashing Over
Homecoming Bounty
Page 8
She izaat (Eamliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 22
Thursday, Novembers, 1981
Greenville,N.C.
10 Pages
Mendenhall Associate Director Leaves
Breitman Accepts New Position
Photo by JON JORDAN
Paul Breitman, associate director of Mendenhall Student Center
By DIANE ANDERSON
Auburn V� Milur
Associate Director of Mendenhall
Student Center, Paul Breitman, has
accepted a position as Associate
Dean of Students and Director of
the student centers at Rutgers
University in New Brunswick, N.J.
His new position takes effect
December 7.
"ECU is like home to me Breit-
man said. "I'm going to miss it
Breitman attended ECU from
1966 to 1970, graduating with a
degree in business. While a student,
he was very involved in campus ac-
tivities. He went to work for the
school in July of 1970 as assistant
director of student activities. At that
time the offices were located in
Wright Auditorium. His office
moved into Mendenhall in August
of 1974.
Rutgers, with a student popula-
tion of 19,000, is broken up into an
old campus and a new campus. The
old student center, one of two that
Breitman will be responsible for, "is
about three times the size of
Mendenhall and contains recrea-
tional areas, food services, meeting
rooms and a pub The newer stu-
dent center houses a Hardees, an art
gallery, and other facilities.
"I was very impressed by the
physical and financial resources and
the people 1 met stated Breitman.
"I was really at the right place at the
right time
His new title will be Associate
Dean of Siudents and Director of
the Student Centers. He will be a
department head in the division of
student affairs. "They are also of-
fering me the opportunity to com-
plete my Ph.D. at no cost he ex-
plained.
"1 feel very fortunate to have an
opportunity like this. As excited as I
am, 1 will always have fond
memories of ECU. The administra-
tion, staff, faculty, and especially
the students have always been a
pleasure to work with. They have
been more than receptive to the
assistance and guidance that I am
there to provide for them. 1 have en-
joyed that
In regard to his reasons for leav-
ing, Breitman stated, "There are a
lot of folks that are leaving because,
word has it, thev have to. The
reason I am leaving is to further my
career goals and to me they are ver
positive
Breitman's responsibilities will in
elude the operation of two student
centers, all entertainment program
ming that takes place at the centers
and on campus and ultimate respon-
sibility for student activities. These
include 200 student organizations
and the necessary SGA offices, etc.
To help him with these respon-
sibilities will be a full-time staff of
23 people and 250 student
employees.
"My position is one of an ad-
ministrator, but 1 consider myself
NAA CP Chapter Meets
B PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
"We do not need spineless,
backboneless people in the
NAACP stated D.D. Garrett, Pitt
Countv Chapter president of the
NAACP.
"Change is something that takes
a long time � unless you help it
along added Virginia Carlton,
president of the ECU Chapter of the
organization. "You're gonna have
to sacrifice. You're gonna have to
miss a party or two. You're gonna
have to get it together she said.
The tone of Tuesday evening's
East Carolina NAACP meeting was
set. More than 60 students and
faculty members were present when
Garrett, Carlton, and Elmer Meyer,
ECU vice chancellor for student
life, shared their hopes and aspira-
tions for the new organization.
Carlton called on Meyer to ad-
Chair Gives
Criteria For
Chancellor
By JIMMY DuPREE
MiMKiat KHor
Responding to questions raised by
the ECU Faculty Senate, Chancellor
Selection Committee Chairman
Ashley B. Futrell outlined Tuesday
some of the criteria which will be us-
ed and some of the characteristics
necessary for obtaining the job.
The Faculty Senate approved a
resolution requesting the committee
to include "expertise in shared
faculty governance, a significant
research record, demonstrated
teaching effectiveness, expertise in
extra-mural fund raising and signifi-
cant regional and community ser-
vice at past places of residence
"It is impossible to get a person
with all these qualifications
Futrell said. "I am sure every one of
these questions will be put to the ap-
plicants, though
When asked what characteristics
he considers important, Futrell said,
"academic bearing, leadership, per-
sonality, good strong supporter of
athletics � these are all important
qualities
"This is a great university and
we've got to have the best
(leadership) we can come up with.
dress the group on issues related to
the functions of the division of stu-
dent life. Meyer began his discus-
sion by recalling experiences from
his college years that he said had
made a permanent, painful impact
on him.
"First, you have to know where I
stand and what my attitudes are
Meyer said. He spoke of his
childhood in Green Bay, Wiscon-
sin We had one black family in
the whole city � a city then the size
Greenville is now Meyer said. He
and a friend had heard Roy Wilkins,
executive director of the NAACP
speak in 1948. "We were the only
whites in the audience he said.
Meyer and his black roommate at
Howard University were once
denied entrance to a movie. "I
wanted to buy the tickets and I
couldn't do it Meyer said as his
voice cracked. The audience, sens-
ing the high emotion in Meyer's
statement, became completely
silent. "Those things left deep im-
pressions on me about people and
the way we treat one another he
added.
Meyer then appealed to the
students to speak up and air their
complaints. "I think the NAACP is
important here he said. "If you
believe that there is something
wrong, you've got to say it. There
are things that can be done. 1 for
one am willing to help
Later responding to a student
complaint concerning a dorm
represenative, Meyer said, "There's
a process you can go through.
We've got to hear these things �
we'll take action. Talking comes
easy
Carlton mentioned her
dissatisfaction with the East
Carolina University Bulletin of
Minoritiy Information. Some
statements made in the bulletin were
erronious Carlton said, and "not
representing the facts This could
easily mislead new applicants to
ECU, according to Carlton. "As
long as we don't do anything, things
like this (the minority bulletin situa-
tion) are going to happen Carlton
stated. 'I want you all to know who
the leaders are, on our campus, and
in the black community. Know who
the decision-makers are and go to
them
Garrett spoke of the honor in be-
ing member of "one of the oldest
civil right organizations in
America The NAACP was
organized in 1909. "We are also the
most feared organization in
America" he continued, referring to
the respect the organization com-
mands from the American political
system. "This is our reputation he
said.
The Greenville chapter president
told the students to "be consistent
� be visible � make sure you have
the facts before you draw a conclu-
sion. When you move, people will
know that the NAACP is on the
See MINORITY, Page 2
�aan -
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��

I .
. �
Paint the Town Purple and Gold
some ECU students took this theme literally and painted a buccaneer on College Hill Drive
he said
and we will he said. "Whoever is
chose as chancellor will have to have
some knowledge of politics as well.
This person has to deal with the
legislature in Raleigh, so that's
essential
Other sections of the resolution
requested the "evaluation criteria be
made part of the job description"
and the deadline for application be
set as Feb. 15, 1982. The committee
has set Dec. 15 as the deadline, but
Futrell added it could be extended if
necessary.
"We can always extend (the
deadline), but we cannot move it
up ne said. "We will not rule any
people out because they are a few
hours late
Questions asked by senate
members included if the committee
will be locking for a North Carolina
resident and when the selection pro-
cess may be completed.
"If someone from this area is
evaluated to be tops Futrell said,
"then he will get the job.
Geography, of itself, will not be a
determining factor
"Because the deadline has been
set for December 15, I do not feel
we will get to interview until after
an educator. A student center to mc
should not be a fun house. That is
part of it, but the important part is
its educational value he said.
Breitman's family � Aaron,
Laura, and his wife Anne are also
excited about the prospect of mov-
ing to New Jersey. "Now that he
(Aaron) knows we can take the dog,
he's really excited
Anne Breitman teaches junior
high school English. Regarding her
husband's new job she said, "1 rr
really excited. It's going to be a
challenge in more ways than one
"1 want to thank the students,
staff, and faculty of ECU for the
pleasure of living, learning and
working in an atmosphere that I
have felt very conducive to my per-
sonal and professional growth
Breitman continued, "1 am excited
and looking forward to the
challenge, but 1 am going to mis ii
here
The citizens of Greenville cast their votes for mayor and cit council
members in the elections.
Cox Is Mayor
Pkuln � �.m rATTHKiO
the first of the year he said con-
cerning the committee's timetable.
"Some applications can be turned
away because they are not qualified,
Futrell added. The first application
we received was from a retired
Salvation Army man who had not
been to college. 1 think we'd all
agree he's not qualified
Futrell told the group the final
four applicants would be brought to
ECU to meet with all interested
groups. He added that the final
recommendation of the group
should be made to the UNC Board
Of Governors in April.
By PAUL COLLINS
MtorlaOM
Greenville elected a new mayor as
Percy Cox outpolled incumbent
Don McGlohon in Tuesday's city
election. Voters also chose three in-
cumbents and three newcomers to
serve on the city council.
Of the current council members
running for re-election, only Dick
McKee was unsuccessful. Current
members Judy Greene, William
Hadden and Louis Clark won re-
election and will be joined on the
council by Janice Buck, George
Pugh and Stuart Shinn.
Clarence Gray and Joe Taft Jr
who currently serve on the council,
did not seek re-election.
Unofficial returns indicate that
slightly more than 39 percent of
Greenville's registered voters par-
ticipated in the election, matching
1979's turnout. According to unof-
ficial returns, 5,554 of the city's
14,063 voters turned out.
Cox, who previously served as
mayor from 1975 until 1979, receiv-
ed 2,667 votes to McGlohon's
2,246. Beatrice C. Terry trailed with
506 votes.
Newcomer Janice Buck garnered
the most votes in the race for city
council. She totaled 2,916, 315 more
than Greene who received the next
highest number.
In the race for the sixth slot, Pugh
outpolled Ed Carter by 20 votes.
Members of the city council arc
selected on a city -wide basis, and the
six candidates with the highest vote
totals are elected.
In addition to his two previous
terms as mayor, Cox also served on
the city council for six terms prior to
1975. During the last four he
dousted as mayor pro-tem.
Weekend
Weather
Mostly cloudy with a 60 percent
chance of showers today and
tonight, highs in the 60's, lows in
the 40's. Partly cloudy through
Saturday with highs continuing in
the 60's.





I Ml I AM i KOI IM W
N() I MM K 5, 1SS 1
Announcements
Ex-
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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ACT
Alpha Rho
the best n a I �
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to Wl � all

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following '�
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GRE
The Graduate Record Examma
tion will De oiler ed at fcas'
Carolina University on Saturday
mber 12 1981 Application
blanKs aic to De completed and
mailer) to Educational Testing
Servue Bo 966 R Princeton NJ
1540 Applications must be
m i' kea no later than
November 6 I981 AppU rftions
may be obtained trom Ibe ECu
resting i entet Room ins Speight
POETRY FORUM
v ill m� el ' I obi ai 7 p m n
, � ;48 Mendenhall Open to
, �, , itet t-sted in poet' y
ronigbl is a very important ies
vn Please . ome!
HOMECOMING MUMS
L S A1
ItftrtflbSMfcNT
�' � .14
"
V
ECU HUNGER
COALITION
� ' . Hung! Coalition wsties to
rhi ludents who took the
hme to part pati a Id Food
rav activities last month rVc
. irined on
impu ' II ' ' tor
� � j mi n!
. . " as a wood
'o provide luel
lei . tizens hasKets
� ire ' needy
It Cl quisi
� ui weeklv meetings
. � . elated to mjl
hi nget as aim as the
ne ot our
a i� woi k ig m
.
be the an
Fast For A
a � Harvest oming uf
s, . iy we ask people
s la r or
neal The n
nated
a Kta r - � Hell reliel pro
po, �� Can voi
, al
� � � . � at 953 1
PROSE CONTEST
The Rebel and another sponsor
will hold a Prose Contest Submis
sions ol Fiction. Essay, and Non
tiction may be lelt in the Media
Board or Rebel otlices Cash
prizes to be awarded Details to be
announced next week
MINORITY LAW
the UNC law School invites
undergraduate minority students
;o participate m a Law School In
formation Day on Nov 20. 1981
The day long comference will be
held at the UNC Law School in
fhapei Hill and is open to any
. unoritv person who is thinkmq
about attending law school
Registration forms are available
n the Career planning and Place
ment Ottice Bloxton House
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student Union Travel Com
mittee is now accepting apphca
tions tor membership All persons
interested in loming ran pick up
an application at the Student
Union otlice. room 234 Mendenhall
Student Center
KYF
The Kings Youth Fellowship
will hold a meeting on November S
at Mendenhall Student Center
from 8 10 p m in room 248 The
topees of discussion will include
the coming ol our Lord Jesus
Christ Everyone is invited and
retreshments will be served at the
end ol the meeting
INFLUENZA
Influenza vac c rte is available a1
the Student Health Cente' The
cost is S3 lor each miection
Students with chronic illnesses
diabetes asthma or those who are
on chemotherapy lor malignant
diseases and those having unusual
exposure should come by the Stu
dent Hea'th Center between Sam
and S pm Monday through Fn
day during October or November
COMMUNITY ARTS
MANAGEMENT
inp Community Arts Aanaue
n enl VaiO'S will meet November
9 I9�! a' 6 30 p m in Jenk.os
Audit or.um ScoM Parker
Manager it me East Carotma
1 Diversity Pidr'house will be 'he
ieatu
SLC
The ECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
cvered dsh supper and meeting
on Sunday. November 8 at the
Mendenhall Student Center Multi
Purpose Room The supper will
begin at 6 p m with a shor'
business meeting and captioneo
film to follow
The meal and meeting are open
to any interested student, faculty
member, or a member of the com
munity You do not need to know
s.gn language to attend, but
students who are taking sign
language classes or who have
taken them n the pst aie en
couraged to attend The purpose of
the SLC is to allow sign language
s'udents and hearing impaired
students and community
members to socialize and develop
comunication skills
ASCENT OF MAN
"The Ascent ot Man series of
thirteen, SO minute lilms art being
shown each Monday at 12 noon in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Building
Room 1327 I Thud Moor East wmgi
These lilms have been shown on
educational TV in recent years
The author of the films. Dr
Jacob Bronowski. offers a per
sonal view on development of
sc.ence as an e�pression of the
special gifts that characterize
man and that have made man uni
que among animal spe
Please teel tree to bring your
lunch To this noon hour screening
ot 'tie films There is no charge to
attend
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will hold a
meeting Nov S The meeting will
be held In Mendenhall 221 at 6 p m
All members please be there
PEP BAND
The ECU Athietn Department is
m the prrx ess ot assembling a Pep
Band tor all men and women's
basketball games Those of you
who are interested, please c ontac t
Pam Holt at 7S7 6417
REGISTERS
SGA F reshman Registers have
arrived You may pick one up In
Room 228 of Mendenhall '
Center
FRISBEE
the Second Annual Frisbee In
vitational will be held Sunoar
Nov 8 Look for posters -i
campus lor more �� � � ition The
club will have it's ,����? ly � � '
Monda t NOV 9 3 p �
Men.tenhsl! Room 24 B�
Aloha
SURF CLUB
Meet .Ada,s N
18 Der 2 and I
Mendenhall at 7 p m
rged to at'eno B
REBEL
The El U terary m� .
(� I BE L is looking for an Ass '�
Aft
i � . �
� , � ont Building n
Any major s accepta! Ii
GAY

anott er E ' G " eel ng E it tl �
hand
; genera1
i! needs a �
� ii '
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� � ��
fa-
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. . , � � � . r i
PIG PICKIN
AE D Pre Med" a' M
A IfXJOSOf a Ba' B Q I
day Nov 1 It vm
N B Of MB
I
can t- . - ' ' '
p m (
ga -re
H I
CEREBRAL PALSY
The United Cprebrai Palsy s go
mg to have a square dance and
auction out at the Carolina Opr 1
House Tuesda, Nov 10. between
the hours of 7 p m 11 p m for the
oenel I of the UCP Center of
Greenv He Come and icm us il
you don't know how to square
dance we'll 'each you! Jerry
Powell caller The Ambush Band
will be playng from 11 pm on
Donation tl 00 at the door
FOUND
Calculator in the General Col
lege office during Change ot Maior
week May claim item by properly
identifying Come by the (
College off i e Brewste' A 101
OMEGA PSI PHI
On November s the Omega PSi
Phi Fraternity and the Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority will have a
"Family Throw down S'ep Show
at S p m on Mendenhall Patio
Also on Nov �" there will be the
First Annual Beware of the Dog
Jam at the Roxy. from 12 p m
until Admission is J? Free
Beverages. Be There1
ARTS MANAGEMENT
COMMITTEE
Scott Parker manager of the
ECU Playhouse and ECU Summer
Theatre will speak to the Arts
Management Committee Monday
evening at 6 30 p m in the Jenk
Fine Arts Center auditorium
Parxer ami 'alk about the ne�
'ernsh.p set up at 'ne Drama
lepa'tment and � �� points
thflt are not covered ,n tne Arts
Vana um
STUDENT ATHLETIC
BOARD
D rectors mee' � . � -
10 1 p m m Pam Holt s offn i
unable to to attend cal � Ity al
752 8S49 Also, the SAB a'
an,one n'erested in helping
with basketball this seas
i ome to the meet nv � n lav N .
9 at 5 30 Mmqes Roon U2 U'
�f Quality Rep.r
SAAD'S
SHOE REPAIR
U3 Grande Ave
758 1228
I he haslarolinian
. �


Subscription Rate SJ0 yn
The East Ca'o'in.ar �
are located in the Old Sou
Builflinq on the campui Ol
Greenville N C

�8-34
Telephone '5 � �i�' �Mr�
Applic�t�on tc. ma,i it second
ciasi postafle rates is pending a'
GieenviMe North Carolina
ABORTIONS
I 24 week terminations
Appt s Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
Gl Camoull�l�� Fati�j��es
Shirts te��m� ��� I
Backpack Camp.na tou.p
ment Steel To� $�� O.shes
And Ovr 7��0tfn1 Mew hn
Used Items CowBo� Boots
ARMY-NAVY
isoi S tvans
Crime Reported In Residence Halls
B �'M (. RIDKOI 1
,Mi de
an
i

ai
l.
c
L
�t al
.ers
-
ilems stolen
"The
rime
hen Investigatoi
firsi receives
ihe repon o a larceny,
. tune He says thai
hould repon
a nine a- soon as
, bl( v iggins or in-
v 1 hcc then
.uul
in.
numbei � crime
same in
and women's
i
S iggins. He
i. �� � ent ol
:
ne
i
Sci'

ti tht
S iggins
. h then
said.
.
Ii
men's

also add
cent to
-
ommitied hs stud
howc . ' � the ma
; students who
commit crimes are rare
would con
ard core
II. ing the
n �liv. blotter for the
week oi Oct. 28 to Nov.
2. rhese are dorm-
related reports.
(t 28. 1:55 a.m. �
I c o female students
reported that a white
male had exposed
himsell to them near
Caireii Dorm. 12:50
p.m. - Willie 1 yndal!
i 48 st reported the
theft oi his sociology
hock from the dor-
mitoi y laundrv room.
Oct. 29, 2 p.m.
Douglas C. Moose ol
4 ycock reported
the larcenv o parts
tictm Ins motorcycle,
ich was parked in
c bike shed behind
lones Dorm. : p m.
i ieorge Dugdale
oi 512 Scot! reported
the larceny of personal
property from his
room. 10-02 p.m.
Susan 1 Sullivan of
419 lyler reported the
larceny of her bike was being anda. ed in
which was parked near the lones parking lot.
Minority Quota Imposed
( ontinued from Page I
began i - - the
rity quota system
: .iarolina, and the
; i system, by the fed
; � Carolina must in-
linority enrollment b
3 percent. "You are a m
live!sit .is the univer-
you Garret! told
hence. " I he quota is to put
o ei
mone into the college treasury.
Don't let anybody think thev are do-
ing you a favor by letting you in
Garret! pointed out that "we're
all brothers and sisters. 1 here's no
such thing as a white person or a
black person we're all colored
people" he commented. "It people
misrepresent you � just polite!
correct them. You don't have to be
uelv - be firm
the Ciraham Building.
Oct. 30. 12:12 a.m.
� Angela Powell, the
head resident of Gar
ret! Dorm, reported a
"peeping lorn" on the
southwest side of the
dorm. 1:45 p.m. �
Scarlett H. Jackson of
426 Fletcher reported
the theft of tour wheel
covers off hei vehicle
while i! was parked at
the parking lot on Fifth
and Reade Streets. 3
p.m. � Charles K.
Park ham ol 404-D Belk
teported the breaking
and entering of his
vehicle and larceny oi
an equalizer.
Nov. I. 12:30 a.m.
I wo males students
reported being
assaulted on the band
practice field at the bot-
tom oi College Hill
Drie 3:40 a.m. - Of-
ficer Burrus reported
the larcenv of a tire ev
istinguisher from Belk
Dorm.
Nov. 2. 12:01 a.m.
� Laurie Austen, the
head resident of larvis
Dorm, reported the
vandalism of the dor-
mitory's curfew door.
11:40 p.m. � Steven
D. Ennis of 473 Jones
reported that a vehicle
In addition to these
reports, there were
three arrests to r
larcenies and one for a
cur tew violation.
Accu-Copy
Resume Special Coupon
10 oH
Typesetting charge & copy
Expires 11481
ECU Students & Faculty only
HELD OVER
2ND
BIG WEEK!
cinemaP2'3"ena23
PITT PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
From The People Who Brought You "HALLOWEEN
More Of The Night He Come Home.
mm JUMD PRESETS A HO K MM CORP IM
IM� lit CURTIS
MWPIUW; ��,��
ft JOHN CARPENTER DEBRAII PROOUCTiON -101IMPEIUIUMBIMI
EXCITING SHOWS DAILY
3:30 5:20 7:10-9:00
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THE EAST CAROL INI AN
NOVEMBER 51981
;kin'
-tonor Society
Jue on Satur
tie held at trie
M4 Bypass
re Bar 6 Que
MM 4 to 6 30
, M ' er the
irolinian
i jeidai and
it academic
iesiav Jut
East
' � owned.
for and

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n.an offices
O'tf South
pus ot ECU
address
i htan
? �1�? .JOT
. � vecoAd
s pending al
'a
4 Fafie,uv And
ieine, Bq
dmp.nij tn�.p
-a Shoes Dishes
.tferenl New And
Codov Boots
NAVY
ISOi S Ens
Street
le
Cacti
s� from.
w Shop
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Ex-Hostage Lee Speaks On Iran and Freedom
By TOM HALL
Ne�tE4Mr
Last of Two Parts
"I can't speak for
everyone, but for
myself � 1 belong to
the American people
for the next two weeks.
If some little kid wants
my autograph, he's go-
ing to get it. I'm glad to
be out. And I'm glad to
be alive
These were the words
of Gary Earl Lee short-
ly after his release from
Iran after 444 days of
captivity. More than
nine months have pass-
ed since his January
homecoming, but Lee
still accepts speaking
invitations and is eager
to share his experiences
� and appreciation.
"If you, the
American people,
hadn't cared, I
guarantee you we'd still
be in Iran today Lee
said at an honor frater-
nity banquet in
Washington Friday.
"We got out only
because the American
people wanted us out
Pat Lee called her
husband a "scrawny
turkey" after their reu-
nion. He had lost
almost 30 pounds and
claimed that the hint of
gray in his beard was
put there in Iran. Now
a few pounds heavier,
his emotions about the
Iranians are as strong
as ever.
"1 hated them Lee
said. "If I ever get a
chance to get back at
them as a diplomat, I
will � not as a per-
son
"I don't think any
other country is going
to try (the imprison-
ment of foreign
diplomats) Lee add-
ed. "A country that
will try something like
that will fall apart.
Their leaders are think-
ing (as if it is) 4,000
years ago. But oil
makes the world go
on
The clergy in Iran
has been waiting for
hundreds of years to
gain power, according
to Lee. "They will kill
and continue to kill as
long as they are in
power. Like the shah
for 27 years, they will
kill off their opposi-
tion
The Iranian revolu-
tion was falling apart
economically at the
time of the embassy
seizure, Lee said. "We
kept the revolution go-
ing. We were the
lodestone
"Those desert people
are very strong Lee
added. "We take our
religion very casually.
They live their
religion
When asked if he
would return to Iran at
the government's re-
quest, Lee replied, "I
hope you mean my
government. I don't
think it would be con-
ducive to send any of
the hostages back to
Iran in any shape or
form. Twenty years
from now when we re-
establish relations, I'll
be retired
Hotels and resorts
have offered free vaca-
tions to the former
hostages, but Lee said
there has been no at-
tempt for a "reunion
"I only saw eight or
nine of the other
hostages the whole time
we were being held
Lee said. When the
freed Americans board-
ed the jet at the Tehran
airport, the political
unit, the economic-
commercial division,
the consular officers,
the administrators, the
Marines and other em-
bassy personnel split in-
to sections just as they
had been before the
takeover, according to
Lee. "Most of us are
scattered over the
world he said. "It's
business as usual
The former hostage
also said he has never
tried to catch up on
what happened in the
rest of the world during
those 444 days. "I'm so �
happy to be alive today
and living tomorrow, I
don't care Lee ex-
plained. "I might read
up on what happened
on a rainy day
"There's really no
way to get (those days)
back Lee said. "My
daughter went from 10
to 12. My wife chang-
ed. I changed
Lee now lives in Falls
Church, Va where his
family stayed during
his imprisonment, and
is still working for the
State Department.
Although he said he
had lived and worked
in the area of the Mid-
dle East for most of his
life, Lee admits he still
does not completely
understand it. He is
scheduled for an
assignment in Europe
but said he is looking
for a position
southeast Asia.
"I've never con-
sidered leaving the
diplomatic life Lee
said. "I've lived a more
interesting life than 99
percent of the rest of
the world. I don't know
any other
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to seeing you, it will be a great
time Va. Tech won its homacom
mg game, we'll see how ya'll do.
Love Dave.
BANICK�GLAD you enjoyed the
dinner and study session. Hope we
can have a lot more. Plan to have
a super time at Homecoming�I
know I will. Love, "The Kid
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Love, Mrs. Dougie and Miss
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TO THE sisters of Alpha Omicron
Pi. what made us friends in the
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TONY, SURPRISE! Thanks for
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Happy anniversary) Love, your
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Seems like you cannot name that
tune. Don't worry about it and
keep your mind occupied. Team
handball is calling you.
RICKI WHAT is your favorite
sanwich? The sone with two buns
of course! Who is the kinky kit
kat? D.T. was wild and crazy and
you can believe I am still smiling.
All l want to be is a star. Need a
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HEY, SAILOR GIRL: sorry I was
such a mess Friday but now you
can see what all that massive stu-
dying will do to you. Remember to
hold on loosely but don't let go.
PIPELINE : THE place to be so be
there aloha! The food is good, the
wine is fine, and the times are
great. See you there for a little
afternoon delight
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:





Qttje �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community
1923
Paul Collins, mmcmt
Jimmy DuPREE, � W
Chuck Foster. Dmm Chaales Chandler. sh ��.
Chris Lichok. flluw� ����,� ToM Hall, mm ��
Alison Bartel. r r m�v Steve Bachner, in m � � �
Steve Moore, cm. mj. Karen Wendt. �
November 5. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Art
It's In The Eye Of The Beholder
"I disapprove of what you say, but
I will defend to the death your right
to say it
�Voltaire
The Student Union's Art Exhibi-
tion Committee usually labors along
in relative obscurity. Two weeks
ago, however, it was shoved rather
rudely into the limelight as the result
of a show it was displaying in
Mendenhall Student Center.
The committee frequently ex-
hibits art in the student center; that
was nothing new. What was new
was the fact that several of the
photographs in the show featured
nudity. Shock. Horror. Outrage. Or
some would have us believe.
But according to Julie Fahrbach,
the junior who chairs the commit-
tee, the controversy surrounding the
show was mostly manufactured,
and she said it was caused by SGA
Vice President Marvin Braxton. "I
believe that the controversy was in-
itiated bv Mr. Braxton rather than
by people voluntarily seeking him
out and voicing their objections to
the show
Fahrbach said that though some
students objected to the show, they
were far outnumbered by those who
reacted to it favorably.
But still, should the exhibit have
been displayed in Mendenhall even
though there were some students
who objected to it?
Yes, most certainly.
The committee that chose the
show is entrusted with presenting
the student body with a range of art,
but in attempting to fulfill this
responsibility it cannot always chose
art that appeals to everyone.
Something in this week's alumni
show will offend someone who
views it; the same is true of any
piece of art. For every person who
was offended though, there will be
those who love it.
"It was a great art show
Farhbach maintained.
Art, you see, is in the eye of the
beholder.
Nancy Versus Rosalynn?
Much has been said and written
about Nancy Reagan going
checkbook-happy in the White
House. Examples: refurnishing liv-
ing quarters, purchasing new China
($200,000 worth), giving a $75,000
bowl to Prince Charles and Princess
Diana as a wedding gift and having
a $40,000 gown made for the cou-
ple's ball.
Who does she think she is, the
Queen?
Afraid so, but we don't have one.
George Washington, the father of
our country, thankfully saw to that.
So let us analyze the situation a
little more carefully. Maybe Nancy
is at a disadvantage.
What? Her? A ohe-time actress,
married to a millionaire. One of the
most well-known residents of one of
this country's most glamorous
states. Resides on an elaborate
ranch. Has all the taxpayer's money
at her disposal. Ordered designer
gowns and minks. (Come on, it
doesn't get that cold in Washington,
does it?)
Sure. She's at a disadvantage.
Look who she is following:
RosalynnCarter. A real lady. The
First Lady of all First Ladies.
Always a smile, never a harsh word.
She wore neat, attractive clothes �
no designer gowns or minks. She
didn't waste our money on
elaborate functions or balls. She
always made you, the taxpayer, feel
you were a part of the First Family.
Oh, I wish I was in the land of
cotton
She was a real Southern Belle.
That's it. A Southern Belle. She's
from the South. A good, down-
home country lady. One of us.
She's from Georgia, right in the
heart of Dixie. Where old men still
salute General Stonewall Jackson
and Confederate license plates are
evident on pickup trucks.
Old times here are not forgotten.
She's from our region. A region
of good, hard-working country
souls who enjoy fried chicken, col-
lards and cornbread and do not
have the taste for pate defoie gras,
caviar and lobster canapes.
Look awayLook awayLook
away, Dixie Land.
Rosalynn made us feel important.
We could see her eye to eye, smile to
smile. Our necks can't be bent back
far enough to see Nancy. We can't
get too close, now. Might dull her
diamonds.
Maybe we should elect the First
Lady.
ws& m Mhi sraecH vjsm w u.s. m& buildup? i � it's
AROUUD HHte SOMYBPUCftJ
r- Campus Forum
Hunger Coalition Defended
Why are people so offended by an
organizaton that is saving peoples' lives?
I see no need to place the blame for star-
vation upon anyone. Pinpointing the
blame for world hunger would take a
long time, my time is best spent on
feeding people who are malnourished.
1 am a citizen of the U ,S. A a country
in which six percent of the world's
population lives. A country which con-
sumes approximately one third of the
world's primary resources. I do feel a
responsibility for humanity. I cannot
make any of you feel this responsibility.
Joining together with others who are
concerned with hunger helps me to con-
trol the anger and frustration I feel when
people turn their eyes from the misery of
other human beings. A group effort is
also the most functional in a country
founded upon a "majority rules" spirit.
Since I have been a member of the
Greenville Hunger Coalition we have
operated in several ways: (1) fund raisers
used to support a local emergency kit-
chen and Oxfam-Amrica, an organiza-
tion promoting self help-projects. (2)
educating the community, since many
are unaware of hunger problems, and (3)
by supporting legislation oriented
towards alleviating the world hunger
situation.
Starvation is not nice to think about,
nor is it easily stopped. You can ignore
starvation, get angry at those who are
asking for your support, or even feel
guilty. I just wish you would help.
MARION SESSOMS
Junior, Home Economics
Marvin Supported
After reading "Braxton � Already
Campaigning?" 1 took it with a grain of
salt just like everything else The East
Carolinian prints. I figured half of it was
lies and the other half greatly exag-
gerated.
Then I got to reminiscing, when 1 first
came to ECU, I knew only two people
that had ever been to school here and
one gave me some very good advice. He
said, "Joe, there are three things you
need to know to survive at ECU. 1)
Learn to wear your clothes two or more
days before washing. 2) Never eat at
Jones cafeteria and 3) Never ever believe
anything the Fountainhead (now The
East Carolinian) prints
As I was reading the article 1 could tell
Charles Sune was just overcome with
jealousy. Now if you've followed ECU's
political farce over the last couple of
years you're probably saying to
yourself, "Joe I see what you mean,
Charles is such a nice guy. But I
remember when he resigned as Student
Union president and the time he resigned
as Media Board chairman and the time
he resigned as Major Attractions Com-
mittee chairman and the time when his
Iranian hostage club collapsed
1 am still amazed that he was allowed
to hold and quit so many positions. I'm
surprised he didn't quit writing that arti-
cle right in the middle of it. I would like
to congratulate Charles for finally
finishing something he started. Hip Hip
Hooray!
You are probably wondering how he
attained all those positions. Remember,
Mohammed went to the mountain, the
mountain didn't come to Mohammed.
Now before anyone decides to
threaten my life or slash the tires of my
car, allow me to justify my apparent urn-
provoked attack on "your friend and
mine Charles Sune. Sune's concern is
the smearing of Marvin Braxton's name
because Marvin has tackled the duties of
vice-president with ease, while Sune
couldn't even hold a committee chair-
manship. Sune is obvious operating
under the delusion of smearing someone
else's name won't make me look as bad.
I would like to give Charles Sune some
advice. Don't go knocking down
anyone's castle unless you're sure your
straw hut can't be blown away. Face the
facts, you can't hang around ECU the
rest of your life.
JOE FINK
Junior, Pol. Sci.
1 am writing in response to Kim
Albm's editorial about the "Apathy
Drug Ms. Albin condemns marijuana
on the grounds that it heightens apathy,
creates illusions of security and well-
being and slows down the creative pro-
cesses. Ms. Albin also speaks of the re-
jection of the "Apathy Drug" as a hap-
py ending to a fairy tale.
What Ms. Albin has not yet realized is
that there is no happy ending. We arc
not in a fairy tale � this is the real
world, and sometimes its harshness
needs a little temperance. Sometimes, a
truly sensitive person feels as though he
will explode if he doesn't find some
relief somewhere. These arc the time.
when a little induced apathy can be -� -
therapeutic. From past experience, w
have found that mankind generaWy
tends to find some outlet or relief for his
frustrations. And 1 feel that pot is a
much less destructive outlet than
criminal homicide, family abuse, true
narcotics, and even alcohol.
I am well aware that pot is abused as
much and as frequently as any other
drug. But ther are many people for
whom marijuana provides a necessary
escape � people who also know where
to draw the line. So those of you who
cannot draw that line, please do not con-
demn those of us who can. There is a
very appropriate saying for you:
"Reality is for people who can't handle
drugs
KATHER1NE K1MBERLY
Junior, English
Art Or Pornography?
Although I may not agree with the
choice of words used by Marvin Braxton to
describe the "Silver Interactions" exhibit,
I wholeheartedly agree with his sentiment
that the show is in bad taste. I see no dif-
ference between this type of "art' and
hard-core pornography.
EDWARD A. SELLERS
Junior, Accounting
Miss Piggy And "Kim's Secrets Too
DOONESBURY
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By KIM ALBIN
In the last several weeks I have been ap-
proached by many people who have asked
me to divulge my means for maintaining
egocentricity. Well, the questions have not
exactly been worded just that way at first.
After a few minutes of conversation,
however, the word "complacent" is usual-
ly hurled at me across the ever-expanding
void. At that point I realize that I am being
misunderstood.
I explain further, if I am allowed. Now
the questions sound more like: "Kim, how
can you be so opinionated and yet so
serene?" To all of those to whom my
retorts have been flippant and merely witty
instead of properly pedagogic, I shall here
bequeath Kim's Young-Age Secrets for
Serenity- . �.
These are for the purpose of uplifting
souls to nobler states and amusing anyone
who can bear with me until the end of this
column while I laugh at myself and at the
world.
One method of maintaining a serene
outlook on life, an especial favorite of col-
lege students, is to numb oneself through
the use of drugs. This works well for most
people who try it. They are able to forget
the pressures of school, family and parking
tickets and concentrate on what is really
important to them in life, sitting around
stoned.
Another means of staying calm is to just
stop worrying about whose property is
whose and begin feeling as though you are
entitled to anything anyone else has. This
will alleviate silly fears about the future;
one's next meal will come from
somewhere, it will be financed by
somebody. After all, the world must owe
something to college students.
Neither of those methods gets the gold
star from moi, but here is one that comes
close.
When 1 find myself in a truly
dehumanizing situation, I carefully
analyze my position and determine possi-
ble alternatives for solving the problem. I
evaluate the alternatives. 1 then do
whatever it is I feel Miss Piggy would do,
given the same alternatives.
This can be a marvelous way of handling
oneself in those instances when one could
be bothered by little details like when to
eat, how to dress, whether or not to date
the same guy twice. Miss Piggy has weigh-
ed such issues carefully and given us her
best solutions in her Guide to Life.
With reading and a little practice, one
can easily begin to apply Miss Piggy's
precepts to real-world situations and stop
having to think up one's own standards of
etiquette. This frees time and, of course,
conscience for walking around shoving
one's highest ideals down the throats of
lesser beings such as liberals, members of
Greek societies and pot-smokers.
Hold your horses, I'm not finished. Miss
Piggy's book is just a scream, but before
you go rushing off to buy it (if you haven't
already), let me tell you the moral of this
story.
Why live like a pig when you have a
choice? Why reject responsibility for your
life at this young age, when you might
want to take credit for your actions later?
If you let someone else write the term
paper of your life, then even if you get an
"A" on it you'll have to live with the
knowledge that you did not write it.
There are ways of taking control � of
living life as a series of consistent, rational
choices instead of as a muddled, fretful
disaster.
Ruskin said: "In all the arts and acts of
life, the secret of high success will be
found, not in a fretful and various ex-
cellence, but in a quiet singleness of justly
chosen aim That's aim � you get to pick
it yourself.
It is true that I am an egoist, but this
peaceful-looking smile on my face is not to
show complacency, just acceptance of my
nature. That's easier to say now that Miss
Piggy has made self-acceptance a popular
notion. She also teaches, how subtly, the
joy of choosing our own lives with care.
H
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� -pathy
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apathv.
well-
e pro-
f the re-
5 a hap-
a.ized is
We are
real
larshness
ptimes. a
ugh he
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be very
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ople for
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' ou who
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"here is a
for you:
handle
.1BERLY
, English
with the
IBraxton to
Is" exhibit,
sentiment
(see no dif-
"art and
I SELLERS
counting
e throats of
members of
lers.
inished. Miss
but before
you haven't
lorai of this
you have a
ility for your
you might
ictions later?
file the term
if you get an
llive with the
rTite it.
control � of
bent, rational
idled, fretful
Its and acts of
Iccess will be
various ex-
cess of justly
ou get to pick
501st, but this
face is not to
tptance of my
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;s with care.
THE EAST CAROLINJAN
NOVEMBER 5.1981 ?&
Beer Bong?
Unusual Idea Spawns
New Drinking Contest
By KAREN WENDT
Slyk MMw
A Scene From The Past
Photo By JON JORDAN
from last years homecoming parade
Homecoming
Thursday, November 5
�7:30 p.m. �Pep Rally at
Ficklen Stadium
�8:00 p.m.�Brice Street at
Hendrix Theatre
�10:00 p.m.�Movie;Nine To
Five at Hendrix Theatre
� Delta Zeta Best Buns Contest
at the Elbo Room
� Thrush at the Attic
Friday, November 6
� 5:00,7:00 ' 9:00 p.mMovie; � Brice Street at the Attic
Nine To Five at Hendrix Theatre
�9:00 a.m.�Cross Campus Run
� 10:00 a.m.�Homecoming
Parade�The parade will begin at
Rose High School, turns left onto
Fifth Street, turns right onto
Reade Street and stops at the Willis
Building. About 70 and 75 attrac-
tions will be featured in the
Saturday, November 7
parade.
�2:00 p.m.�Homecoming
Game: ECU vs. East Tennessee
State at Ficklen Stadium
� 8:00 p.m.�Concert;
Slave. SOS. and Grainger at
Minges Coliseum. The tickets are
on sale at the Central Ticket Office
at Mendenhall Student Center.
The tickets will also be on sale at
local outlets.
� 5:00,7:00 and 9:00 p.m.�
Movie; Nine To Five at Hendrix
Theatre
� Brice Street at the Attic
Sunday, November 8
� 2:00-4:00 p. m .�Concert;
Chairman of the Board on the
Mall
� AK at the Attic
I have covered a lot of . . . well . . . bizarre things in
the past month or so; wet t-shirts, bare chests and
chocolate pudding wrestling to name a few. But Tues-
day night the Elbo Room brought another first when the
Alpha Sigma Phi First Annual Beer Bong contest was
held with ten (yes ten) participants.
A Beer Bong? Yeah, I thought you'd ask. A Beer
Bong is an item that is like a funnel with a plastic tube
running from the narrow end. You pour beer into the
funnel and then 'chug' it from the end of the tube. It
would seem simple but there were some tricks to it.
First of all there is the advantage of having a wide
diameter tube in your beer bong. The advanage? The
foam rises to the top faster the wider the diameter. And
what is the advantage in having the foam rise faster?
Because if you drink it with too much foam in it, then it
tends to make you sick. Something that more than one
contestant found out rather quickly.
The contest went like this. Each contestant had three
minutes to down as many beers as he could through his
(or her) beer bong. A member of the Alpha Sig's held
the bong and filled it for the contestant but the contes-
tant decided when to drink the beer and how much he
could get down.
Actually it only takes a few seconds to drink a beer
from a beer bong, if you practice. But getting down that
much that fast with that much foam is the tricky part.
And one of the rules was that you could not get sick dur-
ing the three minutes (if you got sick after the three
minutes it was allowed). The contest was run in two
heats with five contestants competing against each
other.
Some contestants brought their own bongs with a
considerably larger diameter than those provided by the
Elbo Room. As a matter of fact the guy who won, John
Modenbach had his own bong.
Modenbach claims that he first got involved in using
Beer Bongs from using one in Chapel Hill and then he
and a friend brought the bong to Greenville.
Besides having the effect of making some of the par-
ticipants sick, it also had the effect of making them
rather tipsy. In the interest of fair play we won't tell you
any of the contestants comments after the contest, but
let it be known that they were 'happy
In all, Modenbach downed eleven Stroh's for the first
place finish and the $50 first prize. Steve Emory took se-
cond place (and $25) downing nine beers and Keith Tacy
won the run off with the only female contestant Patty
Hewitt to take the $10 third prize. Hewitt received a six-
pack and a year's pass as a consolation prize.
One of the contestants claimed he had an 8:00 class
Wednesday morning, but it is unknown whether or not
he madr it to it.
When asked how the participants would be getting
home, Elbo manager Kirby Bryson said, "I don't know
. . they've all got friends 1 hope
The Winner
demonstrates his technique.
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Roxy's Halloween Unique Masquerade
B JOSEPH OL1NICR
Miff nlrf
On Halloween night, the usually
dark and empty Roxy Theatre came
alive with the sounds and sights of
the seventh annual Roxy Halloween
Masquerade Ball; for the first time
in two years, the Roxy Ball was be-
in e held at the Roxy.
In the past two years, the Roxy
Music Arts and Crafts Organization
has had problems, getting the Roxy
Theater for the ball. As Bill (Shep)
Shepherd, the coordinator of the
organization, explains. "We have
had a lot of problems with the
owner of the theater; he thinks we
are a bunch of degenrates. We just
want to bridge the gap between cam-
pus and community, provide a place
for artists to perform and exhibit
their art, and enrich the community.
The owner of the Roxy does not see
it that way. He had a fit of rage
when he came to the ball and saw all
the people and the things that were
taking place
"It was crowded, but people
handled it. People came out, even
though we didn't have any publici-
ty"
"Some people complained about
the $5 admission fee, but almost all
the money made on the ball was us
ed to stage it
At the entrance of the Roxy. some
people seemed hesitant to pay the $5
cover charge. The entrance fee did
not include beverages. In other
words, there were no kegs to empty.
If you wanted booze, you had to br-
ine it or else slip the guy selling soft
drinks a $1.50, and he would spike
your coke. Some people were upset
that free beer was not included in
the entrance fee. As one person put
it, "For five dollars, they should at
least include beer In any case, the
unannounced byob policy did not
dampen the party.
The atmosphere inside the Roxy
Theater was wild and wide open.
' Nine To Five' Works This Weekend
Band Causes Film Delay
Tonight's 7 p.m. showing of the
weekend film, Nine to Five, has
been pre-empted in order that local
band Brice Street may perform from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in the Hendrix
Theatre. However, Nine to Five will
be shown this evening beginning at
10 p.m. and will run until 11:30 in
the Hendrix Theatre.
The film will also be shown on
Friday and Saturday nights at 5, 7,
and 9 p.m. Admission is by student
ID and activity cards or MSC
membership.
As a comedy team, Jane Fonda,
1 ily Tomlin and Dolly Parton are
simply unbeatable in the hilarious
Mne to Five. Taking on the giant
( onsolidated Corporation in
general and their despicable boss
Frank Hart, Jr in particular
(Dabney Coleman of Mary Hart-
man, 1ary Hartman), the three
modern musketeers � abused and
harassed secretaries all � decide to
make their secret fantasies come
true: they're going to get rid of their
chauvinistic superior.
With endless creativity, the trio
considers different schemes to ac-
complish their deed. Appearing in
her first film role ever, the country
and western superstar Dolly Parton
(who also wrote the song "Nine to
Five") shines as Doralee Rhodes,
the boss's executive secretary.
Actresses Fonda and Tomlin are
equally wonderful in one of the fun-
niest, most biting and entertaining
comedies to appear in quite some
time.
People were shouting and screaming
and trying to raise as much hell as
possible. The Roxy Ball was taking
place, and at the Roxy, too. People
were ready to have a good time; it
was obvious. Cooler after cooler of
beer and wine was flowing into the
theater to fuel the festivities. Those
without a cooler or beer in their
hand had a fifth of wine or liquor in
their hand, turning it up every few
moments. Truly, people at the ball
were in good spirits.
Actually, the Roxy Ball ceemed to
fit the image of an outdoor concert.
Most people seemed to be sitting in
tight groups that revolved around a
cooler and tended to remain in their
cliques, listening to the music and
drinking.
When the bands began to play,
the ball seemed to pick up. The area
in front of the stage filled with uni-
quely costumed people, dancing and
partying to the up-tempo blues and
rock that were played.
Definitely, there was a good
variety of bands at the Roxy Ball.
Blues Plus, Studio, Gillespie-Hamer
Band, and Mike "Lightning" Wells
played at the ball, and they seemed
well suited to the situation and
seemed to please the crowd.
The costume contest produced a
very avant-garde winner: a leopard
women. Actually, she was not wear-
ing a costume. She was not wearing
anything. Her nude body had been
painted to look like a leopard's and
the painting was very well done. Se-
cond place in the costume contest
went to a snowfiake, which was also
well done.
In general, there were a lot of dif-
ferent costumes at the ball. For ex-
ample, Darth Vader, Uncle Sam,
Tarzan and Jane. Captain Chaos,
an executioner, a lot of shieks, and
many others were there.
As the night progressed, the Roxy
See ROXY, Page 6
Weather Blamed
For Student's Marks
Parton Js "Nine To Five" Showing Tonight at 10p.m.
Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Dolly Parton, and Dabney Coleman star in "Nine to Five" this Friday and Saturday
nights at 5 7, and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre. Tonight's 7 p.m. showing has been pushed back to
10 in order'to accommodate local band Brice Street who will perform from 7:30 until 9:30 p.m. Admission to the
film is by student ID and activity cards or MSC membership. The film is being sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee.
By JULIE MORGAN
v.ff Writer
Have you started marking "X's"
on your calendar yet? Is everything
caving in on you? Have you already
come to the conclusion that you will
inevitably fail your final exams, so
extra credit reports are beginning to
take shape. If you have groaned yes
to one, or even worse, all of these
questions, then you are part of a
growing, suffering majority of
students on the ECU campus. This
illness is commonly known as:
"Schoolwork Withdrawal
I think the only way to overcome
this epidemic illness is to look at the
bright side of everything. With all
that has happened to me since I've
been here, I have had to look at the
bright side or else 1 would have been
in the ground long before now. The
old cliche "every cloud has a silver
lining should be remembered
when trouble strikes.
The waiting for vacation is what
kills me. During the week, time
seems to stand still. The "Monday
Blues" surface right into Tuesday
making both days seem like eternity.
My theory is if we can all make it till
Thanksgiving, then we only have
about two weeks till Christmas
vacation. Am 1 pushing it too
much?
Sometimes I feel like the teachers
are punishing us for them not relay-
ing the material quick enough. Ac-
cording to my syllabus we are sup-
posed to be on chapter seven. How
come we are only on four? Oh well,
we'll just cram eight chapters in this
month. We can do it. I have nothing
else to do, but read. It will be fun to
have a test everyday. 1 never did like
to sleep.
Sure, we can do extra credit
reports; if we have them in before
Thanksgiving. Our professors
always say they are optional papers,
but why are we reminded of them
everyday? Our grades must be worse
than we thought. Has your teacher
ever used this line on you: "If you
have an "A" average then extra
credit reports aren't necessary
(and then in the same breath)
"however, some "A" students have
been known to fail their finals
You can't win, can you?
See WORK, Page 7

t
r
t





1 Mi KM I XKOl IMAS
NOW MBk-K 5, 1WI
Roxy In Disguise
�hoto By GARY PATTERSON
The Roxy
the scene of a Halloween hash
Continued From Page 5
Ball became more and more crowd
ed, and the people grew more and
more wilder.
About the ball, one person said,
"I can't cut it down, but I didn't en-
joy it. A lot of people did, though
People went to the Roxy with their
frinds, cooler in hand, often times
without costumes, and most ot them
remained in their own groups. A lot
of the people were members of the
college of yesteryear. Also. I didn't
like having to carry my own beer in-
to the ball and having to keep an eye
on my cooler
Another person said, "We're lov-
ing it. lamming. Wide open. Best
party of the year. Great party
One other partier said, "Good
vibe. Music is good. Grassroots par-
ty. It's the best
Another person said, "It's back.
It's back. It's back at the Roxy
Another partiers said, "We've
been coming for six years. I love it.
The most exciting thing is talking to
people you don't know. It's like
becoming a child again. It's very
creative that people can come here
and make up all this shit
Overall, almost all o the people
at the Roxy Halloween Ball had
something good to sav about i; and
seemed to be having a good time.
SPECIAL SALE ON ALL IZOD
IACOSTE SHIRTS FOR MEN,
WOMEN, AND CHILDREN.
ALL IZOD SWEATERS BUTTON UP AND
PULLOVER - EARLY BIRD SALE ON SKI EQUIP
MENT. See
Gordon Fulp
LOCATED AT THE GOLF SHOP
AT GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
7560504 OPEN 7 DAYS
everybody
loves
N
7V
r
Good Luck
Saturday
Pirates
MARSH'S
SURF N'SEA
New Location
Downtown Fifth Street
Within Walking Distance
of Campus
( ome See t For All
Your Action Sportswear
Monday thru Saturday
10 6
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10
ECU
Student
Discount
on
glasses

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- EYEGLASSES -
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SINGLE VISION
PLASTIC OR GLASS
LENSES
UPTOPLUSORMINUS5D
Any Tint 34 IS
EYEGLASSES -
BIFOCALS
select group of frames
glass or mastic
AMY TINT
SELECT GROUP
OF FRAMES
GLASS ONLY
UP TO PLUS
OR MINUS SO
95
54.95
Let us make you an appointment
with the doctor of your choice.
O'FtCf hOOBI
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752-1446 MLgu- l'U�
OPTICIANS
A
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PHvSlCIANSOUAORAMGi (
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tthe
COFFEEHOUSE
a night of
JAZZ with
Sold
Seeds
ofJOove
.�The 14K gold
'LOVE GIFT
that everybody
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FOUR GUYS
NAMED MO"
Friday, Nov. 6 9:00 11:00p.m.
Rm. ISMendenhaM Admission 50c
see your
neckchaln
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more special
more beautiful,
ol ore valuable A
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!4K Corrjj.ttd B��J�. 1 K
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AWiN CO
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PIZZA & SPAGHETTI BUFFET
v - -� lues 5 30 8 00
i Fr 11 30 2 00
Wed - All you con eat Spaghetti 5:30-8:00 $2.69
Thurs Lasagna-One Reg. Price�Second One
$1.00
Shoney's
Located Beside the Ramada Inn
264 By Pass
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c





I HI EAS1AROLINIAN
MiU MHI-K V IV I
IV
L�MaJa)6 )6ouT CocuT6�
- 7�- Hnp AJjfi
Work Withdrawal' I attic
IF THAT JERK. BrtnDLEY
6�TS �L�CTeTC
IS OUR HK-��T,
And Weather Are
Grading Culprits
"
ECU Literary-Art Magazine
sponsoring
STUDENT WRITING CONTE
JUST HOPE THAT
SOME&orr'b KUv)UI0G
feip
C ontinued From Pane 5
This year, I believe, "Schoolwork
Withdrawal" has taken on an even
more serious dimension The
weathei is to blame foi this. At eight
o'clock in the morning you bundle
up for class, preparing for an
treacherous weather you may en-
counter. By three o'clock you're out
in the suncourt catching some rays.
1 he summer energy has not yet fad-
ed from your body. How can so-
meone study when the tennis courts
are calling? If the weather would
just stay one way or another it
would help a great deal.
The cure for "Schoolwork
Withdrawl" has not been
discovered yet. I really don't think it
ever will. The only thing we can do
is ease the pain a little bit. Maybe 1
ought to go stand outside the
medical building, and meet a doc-
tor, and get married. Then my il-
lness would be cured wouldn't it?
Oh well only 21 days left, turkeys!
PROSEPOETRY
1st Prize 2nd Prize$125. $75.1st Prize 2nd Prize
3rd Prize Two Honoraries$25. $10.Two Honoraries
Subrrvt typed entries to Media Board
or Rebel offices by Nov. 30.
n
4?
p
V
Stephen B Finnan in Association
With the Wesley Foundation of Greenville
Presents
p,
G(AMf A CAMPU
hxit
The
Glc MenEgpnc
by Tennessee Williams
One of the best American plays ever
written - New York Times -

i � i � � �!
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tti
6v 0)v AW�s
If 1
Place
MefhoOist Student Center
SOI st Fifth Street
Greennlle H C
Time
NsitRikf 10 14 at 81SPM
nce-br IS it 2 1SPM
Ticket Information
Central Ticket Office
ECU
7S7-MU lit 2�
10 OOMT 4 00PM
Methodist Student Center
7SI7010
900UT100PM
Ticket Prices
S3 SO Generil Admission
ST SO Stitdents
Croap Discounts Available
PIRATES CHEST
THAT WILL BE SOLD AT SATs GAME
ECUVS.TENN.
$20-SOLD BY THE BUCCANEER BABES
GREAT FOR JEWELRY BOX OR POCKETBOOK
Items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
Nov 7. 1981
The
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Quantity Rights Rese
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r
Y
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COSMETICS A
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16�(
UP
TO
T






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER?, 1981
Page 8
Pirates' Hopes For Winning
Season To Be Tested Saturday
Bv CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports r dilor
The East Carolina football team,
4-5 on the vear, has but two games
remaining on its 1981 schedule. The
Pirates "must win" both said Pirate
head coach Ed Emory at his weekly
press conference Wednesday.
Emory added that the Pirates,
ECU HEAD COACH Ed
Emory is cautious, yet
hopeful that his Pirates can
win their last two games
coming off a 20-3 loss at West
Virginia last Saturday, were in good
shape for this Saturday's
Homecoming contest against East
Tennessee State and the stretch run
toward a winning season.
"We feel like after nine games
against great competition he said,
"we're in the best health of any
team I've ever been associated
with
Emory said that winning the last
two contests would not be an easy
task. "Anybody who thinks these
are sure wins is wrong he said.
"They (ETSU and William and
Mary) won't lay down and give it to
us. We've got to take it
The Bucs were rather banged up
heading into last week's game with
West Virginia's Mountaineers. Most
of the personnel missing from that
contest will be back to face the Buc-
caneers on Saturday.
There is even a possibility that
star halfback Earnest Byner, who
has been out for over a month with
a knee injury, could return. Byner
has been working out with the team,
but his status for Saturday's game
will not be known until very late in
the week.
Freshman split end Ricky
Nichols, a 4.4 speedster, is still on
the doubtful list. If he cannot go, as
was the case last week, John Felton
and Reggie Harden will share time
at the position.
The Pirate offense will try to get
cranked up again after going the last
eight quarters without a touchdown.
During that time the club has suf-
fered losses to now llth-ranked
Miami (Fla.), 31-6, and to the
Mountaineers, 20-3.
"We have spent a great deal of
time this week with our offense
Emory said. "We are concerned
that we have not put the ball in the
end zone. We intend to do that
Saturday
Emory acknowledged, possibly
for the first time, Wednesday that
the Pirates are getting further and
further away from a true wishbone
attack.
"No, we're not running much of
a full wishbone anymore he said.
"We do a lot with wings, slots and
motion to open up the offense. We
don't want to have a dead
wishbone
Emory was not sure Wednesday
what quarterback will get the star-
tiV, call to direct the offense on
Saturday. Carlton Nelson started
the first eight games but sat out
most of last week's contest due to a
a shoulder injury that still hampers
him.
If Nelson cannot go either junior
Greg Stewart or sophomore Kevin
Ingram will get the nod. Both are
expected to see substantial playing
time regardless.
Emory compared his team's op-
ponent to a couple of other clubs
that the Bucs have faced � and
beaten � this year.
"East Tennessee State compares
with Toledo and Southwest Loui-
siana the second-year head coach
said. "There maybe a little better
than Southwestern. They're es-
pecially tough on defense. They're
very quick and get good linebacker
and end play
Kickoff time for the Homecom-
ing game is 2 p.m.
Stewart A Starter?
ECU QB Greg Stewart, shown here in action against N.C.
State, is expected to see considerable playing time Saturday
as starting QB Carlton Nelson is suffering from a shoulder
injury.
ETSU Coach Says Pirates
Of
B W 11.1.1AM YELYERTON
wtsittnl spt�rts dif�r
It you listened to East Tennessee
State coach Jack Carlise, you would
think the Indians should have been
hie underdogs against General
Caster and his troops at I idle Big
Horn
"East Carolina the Buccaneer
coach saw. "is completely out of
oui clasv Heck, most of our players
have never been to Greenville, but
ihe know what kind of team East
Carolina has got
East Tennessee State travels to
Greenville Saturday for a
Homecoming encounter with the
Pirates. Seen years have elapsed
since the last time the schools played
each other.
In assessing his team's 5-3 season,
Carlise says solemnly, "1 guess it's a
little better than 1 thought. We were
picked to finish last in our league
(Southern Conference), and it's ob-
vious that we'll finish better than
that East Tennesse State has a 3-2
league record.
"This season has gone about the
way I expected it to
The Buccaneers won their open-
ing game against Tennessee Tech,
31-22, but lost the next two contests
to Louisana Tech, 31-3, and 21-0 to
the Paladins of Furman.
However, four straight wins were
recorded over Marshall (14-10), the
Citadel (17-13), Western Carolina
� the only similar school both
teams have played � and Wofford
(34-8).
Carlise did not seem impressed
with the winning streak, though.
"Marshall he says, "wasn't very
good. The Citadel is a defensive-
minded football team, and Wofford
is a NAIA school
Last Saturday, East Tennessee
State was shutout � 17-0 � by
Tennessee-Chatanooga.
Which brings the Buccaneers to
the Pirates of East Carolina.
How does it look, Jack?
"Not real good he says. "East
Carolina is in a different league than
we are. The play a major college
schedule � we don't. They have ab-
solutley more talent than w� do. But
I knew that when we scheduled
them
East Tennessee State will have to
play without their quarterback,
Scott Nault, who separated his
shoulder against Tennessee-
Chatanooga last Saturday, Carlise
says. Nault has thrown 89 passes
this season, completing 48 for 525
yards and four touchdowns.
If the starting quarterback is
unable to play, freshman backup
Walt Bowlin will take his place.
Bowling has completed 6 of 13
passes for 80 yards and no intercep-
tions. He has only seen one quarter
of action this season, that coming
against Tennessee-Chatanooga last
Saturday.
The East Tennessee State running
game is paced by Earl Ferrell, a 6-0,
185-pound sophomore, who has
rushed fo 534 yards on 96 attempts,
scoring four touchdowns. His
backfield mate is Richard Dill, a
junior, who has carried the ball 79
times for 293 yards for two
dicated. We all know what Miami
did to Penn State.
"And not many teams are in the
same class with North Carolina he
continued, recalling the Pirates
56-0 defeat at Kenan Stadium.
"East Carolina is a major college
football team
The rivalry dates back to 1954
when East Carolina was in the
Southern Conference and East Ten-
nessee State was a member of the
Ohio Valley. That first game pio-
duced a 6-6 tie, but the Buccaneers
won four straight games from 1955
to 1970. The Pirates won the last
meeting between the two schools,
24-8, in 1974.
touchdowns.
Reserve flanker Keith Ohveira is
the team's leading receiver with 11
catches for 168 vards. Shelby Cor-
nelius is one behind his teammate in
catches with 11. accounting for 168
vards. Running hack Ferrell has
caught 14 passes this season for 110
yards.
Several areas of the East Carolina
team has impressed Carlise. "Their
sie they're pretty big he savv.
"And their speed. One of the things
that has impressed me the most is
the teams they've played � some of.
the best in the country.
"From looking at the films oi the
West Virginia game, East Carolina
was in that game. They certainly
had their chances. And the Miami
game was closer than the score in-
But Says Adversity Commonplace
Emory Says Story Might Hurt Program
ECU guard Charles Watkins drives !� action from Wednes-
day's basketball practice.
Records Fall As Booters
Take Finale From Wesleyan
The atmostphere at Ed Emory's
weekly press conference Wednesday
was somewhat different than the
previous eight that have been held in
the Pirate Club meeting room.
ECU's head football coach and
his program have received some not-
so-lovely publicity of late following
the blasting of Emory by former
Pirate split end Larry O'Roark.
Information concerning
O'Roark's complaints, and those by
other players, was published last
Thursday in this column. A more
detailed feisty report of O'Roark's
arguments appeared in Tuesday's
edition of The Daily Reflector.
In the story O'Roark said that he
had "lost respect" for Emory. He
claimed that one of the incidences
that led to his disrespect for the
coach involved an incidence in
which a player struck the head
coach following a game earlier this
season.
Emory responded openly to ques-
tions about the article. He was ask-
ed if the report was having an affect
on the squad.
"Yes, it has affected the team
Emory said. "I don't know how
much. Personally, I didn't think the
story was newsworthy. But I'm a
Charles
Chandler
Emory did seem concerned that
the article and its contents could
hurt his staff's recruiting efforts.
"I know some schools will copy it
a million times he said. "They'll
give it to their recruits. Who's to say
how a young kid will react to
something like that? I really think it
will hurt us recruiting.
"That's what bothers me
Emory continued. "You can hurt
Ed Emory � call me anything you
like. But don't hurt this University
or this team
The East Carolina soccer team
ended its season cm a good note
Wednesday, downing North
Carolina Wesleyan 3-0 and setting
several school records in the pro-
cess.
The Pirates finish the season at
7-9-1. The seven wins equal the
school mark for most wins in a
single season. The club won seven
games last year and in 1974.
The Bucs jumped on top of
Wesleyan with three first-half goals
and were never threatened. Duane
Degaetano got the first Pirate goal,
scoring from the corner on an assist
from Bill Merwin.
Brian Winchell and Mike Swan
got the other two ECU goals.
The final two scores allowed the
team to set a new record for goals in
a season, with 30. The previous
mark of 28 was established in 1979.
The team also finished the year
with record 18 assists, two better
than the mark of 16 set in 1978.
ECU goalie Steve Brown recorded
his seventh shutout of the season
agaisnt Wesleyan, breaking the
school record of six that he set last
season.
The Pirates were dominant in the
season-ending victory, taking 23
shots at goal to 12 for N.C.
Wesleyan.
RECORD-SETTING Pirate
goalie Steve Brown knocks
down an opponent's shot. He
finished with a school record
seven shutouts this season.
football coach and not a reporter.
Right now, though, we're concerned
with the 153 guys on our squad. We
do wish Larry the very best,
though
The article stated that there ap-
peared to be a "groundswell of
discord and discontent" in the
Pirate camp. Emory said that this is
the case on any football team.
We're not in a Utopian-type
situation here he said. "You can
go to any football team in America
and find adversity. Heck, you can
go to any family and find adversity.
"On most football teams he
continued, "about two-thirds of the
players are unhappy because only
one-third are playing. You don't
downgrade those players, though,
because you want them to believe
they're good enough to be playing.
They just have to realize that they
have to work toward getting better.
Sometimes they just have to be in
the right place at the right time
Emory said he docs not know
whether the recent publicity will
have a positive or negative effect on
his team.
"Who knows? he suggested,
"this might turn out to be a positive
thing. It might make us evaluate our
unity. We've never said that we're in
complete harmony, though. We
would never advocate that
Emory said the article would not
cause a downfall on the part of the
Pirates, who need wins in their last
two games to have a winning
season.
"Adversity will not make or
break us he said. "This will not
make or break East Carolina, our
squad or Ed Emory. I just hope we
are mature enough to know adversi-
ty should make us stronger
Former Lady Pirate star Kathy Riley is only one of many
former ECU women's basketball stars that will be on hand
for Friday's Alumni Game. The former stars will take on the
1981-82 Lady Bucs. A related story can be found on page 10.
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a He 10,
THE EASTCAROUNIAN
NOVEMBER 5, IWI
ECU Hall Inducts First Woman
The East Carolina
University Sports Hall
of Fame will induct
four new members this
Saturday, including its
first female.
The induction of
former wo rrue n' s
basketball great Sheila
Cotten highlights the
eighth class of inductes
into the Hall, which
was initiated in 1974.
Following Saturdays
induction, the ECU
hall will consist of 34
Swimmers Open
Campaign Friday
The hardest work
ing team on campus,
bar none, is the swimm-
ing team boasted
East Carolina coach
Ray Scharf.
ECU, a charter
member of the Eastern
Intercollegiate Swimm-
ing I eague, has a lot of
potential and a great at-
tutude entering this
season.
"They are a great
bunch of kids on trm
team he proclaims.
The two best all-
around swimmers,
analyzed Scharf, are
Kevin Richards, who
broke three freshmen
records last ear and
Doug Nieman, a senior
and co-captain this
With a good
rec r u i t i ng year,
freshmen to watch are
Scott Eagles. Doug
MacMillan, Joe Nelson
and Stan Williams.
Pirate mentor Scharf
predicted. "A lot of
varsity and freshman
records should be
broken by this year's
team
With this outlook the
swimming Bucs do not
expect to repeat their
first losing season in 14
years. The team's goal
is to capture seven
meets this year. The
Pirates have a bright
outlook with all things
considered.
I ast Carolina meets
James Madison Friday
at 7 p.m. for the Pirates
first and only home
meet of the year.
former coaches and
players.
In addition to Cot-
ten, the following will
be inducted: Jack
Boone, former football
and baseball coach;
Robert Kingrey, former
national diving cham-
pion; and James
Speight, an ex football
star.
The induction
ceremonies will take
place in conjuction
with Homecoming ac-
tivities during halftime
of this Saturday's
I CU-East Tennessee
State football game.
Cotten's selection as
the first woman in the
ECU Sports Hall Of
Fame stems from her
accomplishments as a
1 ady Pirate from
1971-75, when she
played under former
ECU coach Catherine
Bolt on.
Cotten became the
first I ady Pirate to
eclipse the 1,000-poinl
total, finsihing with a
1,270 for her career.
She still holds two
school records, for
most points in a single
game (39 s. Western
Carolina in '74) and for
most field goal at-
tempts in a contest (33
vs. Tennessee in 1975).
ECU compiled a
47-18 record while Cot-
ten was on the squad.
Cotten is now the head
coach of the Eouisburg
Junior College
women's softball team.
Boone stands as the
fifth winningest head
coach in ECU football
history. He was very in-
strumental in the
Pirates' move into the
Southern Conference.
Boone is also given
credit for the develop-
ment of the power "1"
formation, one he used
successfully at ECU.
Boone currently
serves as a volunteer
coach for Ed Emory's
Pirate staff and is a
member of the ECU
faculty. Interestingly.
Emory played for
Boone in the 50's.
James Speight, who
also played under
Booone, rushed for a
career total of 2,700
yards and ranks third
on the all-time ECU list
in that category.
In a 1959 game with
Norfolk Navy Speight
ran for four
touchdowns and a two-
point conversion,
which comes to a total
of 26 points. That
figure still stands as a
school record.
Speight now resides
in Greenville after retir-
ing from the Air Force.
Robert Kingrev came
to ECU in 1960 and
quickly made his mark.
The
Power Behind
The Throne
Only a freshman,
Kingrey won a NAIA
national title and,
along with it, All-
America honors in '60.
The Pirates finished
third nationally that
year.
Kingrey was named
AU-American again in
1961 and '62. He now
resides in Dhahran,
Saudi Arabia, working
for Lockheed Aircraft
Corp.
asst
MEN,
SPECIAL SALE ON ALL
LA�fi5H ifilRIi FOR
WOMEN, AND CHILDREN.
ALL Ofifi SWEATERS BUTTON UP AND
PULLOVER - EARLY BIRD SALE ON SKI EQUIP
MENT.
i-� i�.
14' T'l?
See
Gordon Fulp
LOCATED AT THE GOLF SHOP
AT GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
756-0504 OPEN 7 DAYS
This Weekend
Hendrix Theatre
FREE
An SU Films
Production
Looking for Something to Perk Up
Your Dorm Room? Consider
Designer Marimekko Fabrics at:
arao
RJPNiTLKEUSAa
TM
GRAND
OPENING
Plaza Shell
610 Greenville Blvd.
Phone 7 5� 303
Hrs.
Mon-Sat. 7-it
Sun. 110
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
(Foreign & Domestic)
Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
Prices
HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST.
The Fleming Center has been here for women
of all ages since 1974. offering understanding
and help to anyone faced with an unplanned
pregnancy . . day or night Services include:
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekday fr Saturday Abortion Appts.
Evening Birth, Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
The Pleming Center
We're here when you need ue.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Nov. 7, 1981
Bring Good Things Home
For A Good Deal Less
Road and Wrecker Service
SHELL'
DiscountsOn Repairs With I.D. wv �
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
. GET HEAPING PORTIONS
AT A PRICE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
� �EACH BAND �$MOW BAND -MUCH MORE
"IT WILL STAND" "M-21-4"
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6
SHOWTIME 9:00 P.M.
rOME EARLY FOR PEACHES. PRIVATE CLUB
THE BEST SEATS GREENVILLE SQ SHOPPING CENTER
V � nlU i S Unit sda
CHICKEN N WMt'l INGS.
'I wcgetabW
November b i ndrtv
TROUT ALMONDINI 2 uegetabtef
Nweinbti 7 Satiudu
CHOPPED SIRIOIN STEAK
2 vegetable
Nouerabei 8. Sundav
TURK! N & DRESSING.
2 uegetablei
S. �� ml I 4 MoiHltti
( OUNTHY STYLE STl AK
2 vegetables
November 10 Tuesday
BROILEDALFS LIVER.
2 wj�iblr�
.V.� mbei 11. Wednesday
BAKED SPAGHETTI 2vegetable
2
IS
$2
$22
�249
S2W
$20
Coffee Table $85 Library Table $85 Bedside Corner Table $90
Table $80
Good luck to the Pirates!
Happy Homecoming!
10 Discount with I.D. through Nov. 14
Register for a free Marimekko Wall Hanging
CARGO FURNITURE
P. O. Box 1159
Greenville, N. C. 27834
I
Caroliaa East Mall
MotFri LUNCH 1 lam 2:15pm. SUPPER
4.30pm 8pm (8:30 Frt). Sat & Strn 1 lam 8pm continuously (8:30 Sat)
The
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WESTERN SIZZLIN'
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2 Locations � 201 & 10th � 752 4445
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MONDAY -
CHOPPED STEAK
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fm x
TUESDAY -
BEEF TIPS
M.99
� � �
THURSDAY -
STEAK SANDWICH
n.69
HAS A NEW SUPPLY OF THE
PIRATE PRIDE TOWEL
WEDNESDAY -
CUBED STEAK.
H.89
FRIDAY - w.
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
3.79
SATURDAY -
BARBEQUE RIBS
2.99
FREE
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF ANY SIZE OR STYLE PIZZA
AND YOUR COLLEGE I.D.
LIMIT ONE PER PIZZA
WHILE SUPPLY LASTS
Free
Tea
with
ECU I.D.
SUNDAY -
STEAK ON A STICK
n.99
All Meals are
complete Includmq
Baked Potato or
French Fries A
Texas Toast
Taaa Out Sarvtca
14 �vaa��- 7S ����
hkwi II am 14 p.m.
MaaTbvrv
14a.mII p.m. Fri. Swa
�P
i





10
1HI- I AS1 CAROLINIAN
NOMMHl R5. 1981
Fearless Football Forecast
EAST TENN. ST. AT ECU
CLEMSON AT N CAROLINA
PENN STATE AT N.C. STATE
DUKE AT WAKE FOREST
GEORGIA AT FLORIDA
ILLINOIS AT MICHIGAN
PURDUE AT IOWA
MISSISSIPPI ST. VS SOUTHERN MISS.
BAYLOR AT ARKANSAS
TEXAS AT HOUSTON
WASHINGTON AT UCLA
MIAMI (Fla.) AT FLORIDA ST.
CHARLES CHANDLER
(81-25-2)
ECU 31-7
N. Carolina
Penn St.
Duke
Georgia
Michigan
Iowa
Miss. St.
Arkansas
Texas
UCLA
Miami
WILLIAM YELVERTON
(75-31-2)
ECU 28-0
Clemson
Penn St.
Duke
Georgia
Michigan
Iowa
Mississippi St.
Arkansas
Texas
Washington
Florida St.
CHUCK FOSTER
(73-33-2)
ECU 3-0
Clemson
Penn St.
Duke
Georgia
Michigan
Purdue
Southern Miss.
Arkansas
Texas
UCLA
Miami
CHRIS HOLLOMAN
(70-36-21
ECU 38-10
Clemson
Penn St.
Duke
Georgia
Michigan
Iowa
Mississippi St.
Arkansas
Texas
UCLA
Florida St.
JIMMY DuPREL
(66-40-2)
!U 21-18
(lemsoii
Perm St.
Duke
Georgia
Michigan
Pun ue
Southern Mi
Arkansas
I cas
Washington
Miami
A lumni Game Set Friday
Some of East
Carolina's greatest
women basketball
players will take part in
ihe 1 ady Pirate Alumni
Classic Friday night at
8 00.
The game wilt not he
held Saturday as
;o po i t e d Tuesday.
Mso, students will be
Pirates
Win
Opener
I he 1 ad Pirates o
Lasiarolina 'opened'
theii 1981 season with a
76 46 whipping oi
I ouisburg in the First
irt of a specially-
consti ucted scrimmage.
In the opening
period, a 40-minute
regulation type game,
I: asl Carolina
itscored I ouisburg,
,i the I ad Hur-
: k anes outshot the
l ad Pirates, 18-9, in a
10-minute game.
admitted free, but there
will be a $1 charge for
children and a $2 ad-
mission for adults.
Players returning to
Minges Coliseum in-
clude Debbie Freeman,
Kathy Rilev, Rosie
Thompson, Gale Ker-
baugh, Sheila Cotton,
Marcia Girven, Gene
Mob ley, Marie
Shamblee. PJ. Taylor.
I orraine Rollins, Susan
Manning, Heidi Owen,
1 aune Sikes and Bren-
da Dail.
According to head
women's basketball
coach C'ath Andruzzi,
the game will be used to
showcase past I ady
Pirate stars and to in-
troduce the new edition
of the 1 ady Pirates
'We're really ex-
cited she said. "Our
kids have spent an
awful lot Of time work-
ing, and we want to
recognize them
Included on the
alumni roster is every
player who has scored
30 or more points in a
game and has 15 or
more rebounds in a
contest. Also, the top
nine scorers in ECU
women's history will be
present.
Girven and Thomp-
son, the only two 1000
point-1000 rebound
players in Lady Pirate
history will play.
"We have a lot of
things going for our
program this year
Andruzi adds. "This
game gives us the op-
portunity to recognize
the athletes. We have
so many fine athletes of
the past that it's going
to be a great thrill hav-
ing them here
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM U l�
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
iS.00 Pregnancy Tti. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For tut
ther information call ill 0S15
(Toll Free Number
too 221 2SMI between t A M
and iPM. Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
� 17 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N C
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION'
fm
REAL Crisis Interventio
24 HOUR SERVICE
758HELP
1117 Evans Stre�t
Greenville, N C 7834
ATTIC
Ji
Mack Impresses Officials
Former ECU basketball star OLIVER MACK
has earned a starting position with the National
Basketball Association's Dallas Mavericks.
Mack is starting at the second guard position
for the Mavs. and is averaging 5.3 points per con-
test alter the club's first three regular season
games.
Mack, known foi his acrobatics and shooting
abilities, has been without his shooting touch thus
far. He has connected on eight oi 24 shots from
the field, which translates to a disappointing 33.3
per cent accuracy
Though a starter. Mack has been splitting play-
ing tune with rookie Rolando Blackman. an All
American last year at Kansas State
PIRA TES
in the pros
STU
ECU Literary-Art Magazine
sponsoring
NT WRITING CONTESTS
Mack impressed Dallas officials with an ex-
cellent showing in training camp.
A Maverick official said Wednesday that head
coach Dick Motta had full confidence in the
former Pirate and that Mack seemed set as a
regular despite his earls shooting woes.
PROSEPOETRY
1st Prize$125.1st Prize$80
2nd Prize$75.2nd Prize$50
3rd Prize$25.
Two Honoraries$10.Two HonorariesMil
Subm't typed entries to Media Board
or Rebel offices by Nov. 30.
Happy Homecoming, ECU!
SHOPOVERTON'S FOR YOUR
FAVORITE BEVERAGES�KEGS
AVAILABLE TOO! ALL AT
EVERYDAY LOW, LOW PRICES.
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS.
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats1
Prices Good Nov. 5-Ncv. 7
PIRATE COUPON-5 DISCOUNT ON
Any Food Order Regardless o Size
Present this coupon and show
your ECU ID to cashier.
Offer Expires Nov. 21st, 1981
Name.
ID no
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t





Title
The East Carolinian, November 5, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 05, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.160
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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