The East Carolinian, November 3, 1981






�toe �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 21
Tuesday, November3, 1981
Greenville.N.C.
10 Pages
A Former Hostage Remembers
By TOM HALL
N�j Idilor
I
Tomorrow marks the second
anniversary of the militant
takeover of the American em-
bassy in Iran. The immediate
reaction of many ECU students
was anger � from banners from
dorm windows like this one, car-
rvina an effigy of the Ayatollah
Khomeini down College Hill
Drive to silent protests in front of
(he Student Supply Store. Gary
I ee (right), speaking to members
of an ft I honor fraternity last
weekend, recalled his experiences
as a hostage and expressed his
feelings about Iranians and the
crisis ten months after his release.
(Top Photo By Chap Gurley)
First of Two Parts
Two years ago Wednesday, Gary
Lee walked to work. He slipped
through a larger than usual group of
protesters and into the security of
the high protective walls surroun-
ding his office. It was the last taste
of freedom he would get for 444
days.
The date was Nov. 4, 1979, and
Gary Lee worked at the U.S. em-
bassy in Tehran, Iran.
"The last time I saw this many
college students, they were scream-
ing for my death Lee told
members of the Phi Sigma Pi na-
tional honor fraternity in
Washington Friday. The former
hostage was the keynote speaker at
the fraternity's national convention,
which 27 East Carolina students and
faculty members attended.
"I wish I wasn't a part of
history Lee said of the ap-
proaching second anniversary of the
Iranian crisis. "It reminds me of
what the Iranians did to
diplomacy
The 38-year-old Lee has spent
most of his life in foreign service.
He lived in India when his father
was a missionary and joined the
State Department in 1971. Lee
worked in Oman, Syria, and South
Yemen as well as the United States
before volunteering for an assign-
ment in Iran to "clean up the mess"
from the Feb. 14, 1979, attack on
the embassy.
Lee was in charge of the leftover
contracts, cars and household ef-
fects of the 44,000 U.S. citizens
evacuated from Iran. He went to
Washington for a brief period and
returned to Iran in September. Then
came October 22 � the day Shah
Mohammed Reza Pahlavi was ad-
mitted into the United States for
medical treatment.
That brought anti-American sen-
timents in Iran to a boiling point,
Lee said. He does not question the
move, saying the shah was an ally,
but questions the way it was done.
"Some of us commented that we
should evacuate all nonessential per-
sonnel (from the embassy) Lee
remembered. "That would leave
about 10 people. Unfortunately, I
would have been one of the 10 left
Lee's "guesstimate" is that a
group of 90 percent students and 10
percent "hard-core" terrorists
stood outside the embassy gates on
that fateful day in November. With
his beard and long hair, the dark-
complexioned Lee claims to have fit
in easily with the protesters as he
walked to work.
"I wish I knew how to chant
'death to America admitted Lee,
who does not speak Farsi, the Ira-
nian language. After the militants
began climbing over the walls and
throwing teargas grenades, he and
five co-workers went out the back
door of the main building and into
the crowd. "A kid spotted us and
yelled, 'CIA, CIA and someone
forced us back to the embassy " Lee
said.
The former hostage said the
Marines at the embassy did not fire
at the attacking Iranians because, as
at all U.S. embassies, "the purpose
of the Marines is to hold out until
the country gets their police there to
take over After charge d'affaires
Bruce Laingen was told that help
was not coming, he told the Marines
not to fire, according to Lee.
"If we had fired into the mob,
they would have killed us (after the
ammunition ran out) Lee said.
"That was the one thing that would
really incite them. Mr. Laingen's
decision kept us alive
"The first night was like a
slumber party he added. "The
Iranians had us tied up . . . they wat-
ched themselves on TV taking over
the embassy. By the third night,
they knew they had us and had us
good As the emotional intensity
rose outside, Lee said that "leaning
against the wall, I could feel the
bricks vibrating. The students were
in a state of semi-panic. They ex-
pected something to happen
After the hostages' third day of
captivity, the Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini gave his backing to the
terrorists. Lee spent the next two
months tied up in the basement of a
warehouse. It was not until the
following March that he was moved
to the main embassy building and
allowed to speak to his colleagues.
One of them was wearing a watch
that showed the date; Lee had been
using tally marks on the wall and
was pleased that his estimate of the
date was correct.
The days wore on. Lee and the
five other hostages with him
"whiled away the hours" with play-
ing cards, books and Scrabble.
"There are 24 hours in a day he
said, "and there's no way to speed it
up
On April 13, 1980, Lee and some
other hostages were allowed to
See FORMER, Page 3
Appropriations Committee Sets Rules
By 1)1 AM; ANDERSON
4siMani Nr�s rdnor
1 he SGA appropriations committee, at a legislators'
meeting yesterday, submitted a set of guidelines for
funds appropriated through the 1981-1982 school year.
Among other rule, these guidelines call for every
�rganization applying for funds "to submit a constitu-
lion and he recognized by the SGA Legislature Fur-
ther, organizations are urged to use all available money-
pi oducing opportunities before approaching the SGA
for ajlocatio
Representative Bob Mills presented the
"Requirements for Student Government Recognized
(Organizations to the legislature, explaining that many
organizations don't know how to properly write and
Mibmit a constitution.
"Some people just throw a constitution together to
get money, and they don't think about it like they
should Mills said.
The bills that have been under consideration by the
appropriations committee so far this year will be
presented at the November 9 session of the legislature.
Mitch Daub, chairman of the student welfare com-
mittee, stated that his committee's "major objective is
to get the student loan fund re-enacted as soon as possi-
ble He suggested that the student loan fund and the
medical fund be divided into two separate bills.
"We foresee some problems with the medical fund.
There has been some discussion about people not being
honest with their use of the funds Daub said. "We
want to make it more difficult for people to use it
The student loan fund provides a $25 loan to students
who apply for particular needs. The medical loan fund
will provide up to $150 to students who apply with
medical expenses. "We are hoping that it will be re-
enacted within the next two weeks stated Daub.
The 1981-82 honor council members were sworn in at
the meeting yesterday. The members and alternates are
Mike Swaim, Jeff Foster, Sheila Francis, Betsy Steinert,
Marina Zigousky, Elizabeth Robinson, David Brown,
Gary Henry, Earlene Nicholson, and Tim Burns.
Dr. Elmer Meyer, Vice Chancellor for Student Life,
showed a short film to the legislature entitled "Meet the
President Filmed at Cornell University, it outlined the
process for selecting a chancellor.
According to Meyer, the film was "shown as a
thought provoker, to think about what a university is all
about The film has also been shown to several
members of the chancellor selection committee.
The legislature unanimously approved a resolution
entitled "Extension of the Voting Rights Act" to be sent
to Sens. Jesse Helms and John East. The resolution
states, "Be it therefore resolved: That the Student
Government Association of East Carolina Universitv
supports the extension of the Voting Rights Act of 1965
and urges the United States Senate to concur with the
vote by the House of Representatives The House
voted 389 to 24 in favor of extending the Act on Oct. 5.
Constitutions were approved for the Police Reserve,
Geology Club, Occupational Therapy Student Associa-
tion, Print Group, Law Societv, and Students for
Christ.
Chancellor Proposes Change
A & T Departments Upgraded
By MIKE HUGHES
Mif f W nltr
The new chancellor at North
Carolina Agricultural and Technical
State University has proposed
several changes in that school's
policies in an effort to move
"toward the promised land of
academic accomplishment
In his first convocation address at
A & T on October 7, Chancellor Ed-
ward B. Fort pointed to several
areas where he plans to institute
changes.
Council
Election
Today
Greenville voters go to the
pods today to elect a mayor and
six members of the city council.
Light other Pitt County towns
are also holding elections today.
Incumbent Mayor Don
McGlohon faces former mayor
Percy Cox and Beatrice C. Terry
in his bid for election to a second
term.
Eleven candidates � including
incumbents William Hadden,
Judy Greene, Louis Clark and
Dick McKee � will vie for six ci-
ty council seats. Joe Taft Jr. and
Clarence Gray are not seeking re-
election.
Other candidates for the coun-
cil Janice Buck, Ed Carter, Lucy
Jones, Oscar Moore, George
Pugh, Stuart Shinn and Wallace
Wooles.
Polls will be open from 6:30
a.m. until 7:30 p.m.
Curbside voting will also be
available for voters who cannot
make it to a polling place.
Foremost on his agenda, Fort
asserted, is that the A & T School of
Nursing's requirements for admis-
sion and graduation will be upgrad-
ed. Students seeking admission to
the nursing school will have to have
achieved 750 on the SAT and a "B"
average prior to application. To
graduate, nursing students must
meet a 2.6 rade point average.
The changes in nursing school
policy were done in an effort to bet-
ter prepare that school's graduates
for the North Carolina State Board
Nursing Exam.
In the past, A & T nursing
graduates have done poorly on the
licensing exam. Last year, for exam-
ple, only eight of 24, or 33 percent,
passed tne test.
In a mandate issued in 1977, the
University of North Carolina Board
of Governors said it would close the
nursing programs at A & T and two
other predominantly-black state
schools � Winston-Salem State
University and North Carolina Cen-
tral University � if at least two-
thirds of their graduates did not
pass the licensing exam on the first
attempt.
W-SSU and NC Central showed
more significant increases than A &
T � their passing rates for July
1981 were 64 and 54 percent respec-
tively � yet all three universities
failed to meet the mandate.
However, the Board of Gover-
nors has granted additional time to
the three schools to upgrade their
programs.
Since last year, the nursing pro-
gram at W-SSU has been revamped.
NC Central has a new curriculum
instituted by a new program direc-
tor, and A & T has a new
chancellor, vice chancellor and nur-
sing school dean.
UNC President William C. Friday
and the Board of Governors Plann-
ing Committee have said the pro-
grams deserve more time to improve
their rates.
As far as other proposals for A &
T, Fort announced new plans for
the enlargement of the engineering
school, expansion of the School of
Industrial Technology and the con-
struction of a new library.
Fort also hopes to bring masters'
and doctoral degree programs in
engineering.
MM ly OAKY PATTERSON
The Copy Center offers a wide variety of quality printing services at
reasonable prices.
Print Shop Provides
Quality Services
Behave Now, Boys
or downtown Greenville will be closed again on Halloween.
�V CHAP OU�L�Y
By MIKE HUGHES
Staff Writer
Are you tired of supporting the
habits of dime-hungry copy
machines on campus?
The Copy Center, located in the
ECU Print Shop across from Joyner
Library, has a money-saving alter-
native.
With the center in its second week
of operation, Ray Davis, Director
of Printing, says he recommends
the services offered by the ECU
Print Shop Copy Center for last,
quality duplication at very
reasonable prices
Services include single-side copy-
ing, duplex, or double-side copying,
stapling or stitching, single or dou-
ble folding and drilling holes for
three-ring binding.
Other services offered at the
center are typesetting, layout, art-
work and form design and bookbin-
ding. Requests for these services
must be made at the Print Shop Of-
fice.
The Copy Center is open Monday
through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m.
The cost per copy for one-side
printing is three cents. Each copy
printed on two sides is five cents.
Theses can also be copy printed on
100-percent rag bond at a cost of
$.06 per sheet. These prices refer to
8 or 8 inch sheets. Charges for other
services vary.
Bound books cannot be copied on
the center's system, the Xerox 9400,
because the cover is rigid. And
Davis maintains that Copy Center
personnel will not tear or cut pages
from books or magazines for copy-
ing purposes. All tearing and cutting
is to be done by the customer.
In order to get copying done at
the center, students, faculty and
staff must go to the Print Shop Of-
fice, fill out a service order and pay
(cash) for the services required.
Receipts are provided.
T
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1981
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
l you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
p'ease send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroll
man in care of the news editor
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited
The deadline tor announcement
anSpm Friday for the Tuesdsay
paper and S p m Tuesday for the
Tnrusdasy paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
TRAFFICOFFICE
The ECU Traffic Office.
� iently located m the old laun
dry building, will close a' the end
he business day on October 27.
l�81 and reopen tor business on
N vember 2. 1981 in a new location
a 1001 East Fifth Street across
from the Spilman Building
Police operations will continue
the oid laundry building until
October 30 A dispatcher will be on
. a! the present location to pro
ess emergency traffic matters
. intil October 30 The seventy
two hour period on traffic citations
will be extended to exclude the
period the Traffic Office is not
operational
AH ponce traffic and mfor
ItfOfl services will be moved to
1001 East Fifth Street by the end of
the Business day on October 30.
198)
COMMUNITY ARTS
MANAGEMENT
The Community Arts Manage
men! Maiors will meet Movember
! i�81 at e 30 p m m Jenkins
Auditorium Scott Parker,
Manager of the East Carolma
iversity Playhouse will be the
U atured speaker
ASCENT OF MAN
The Ascent of Man series o
" -teen SO mmute films are being
rwn earn Monday at 12 noon in
'he Jenkins Fine Arts Building
Room 132' ; Third floor East wing)
"hese films have been shown on
educational TV in recent years
The autho
ot
the films Dr
Bi ��� � sk offers a per
. !� on . eveiopment of
expression of the
Is "at characterize
: mat have made man uni
imong animal species
se feel free to bring your
� i- to this noon hour screen.ng
f the I � " here is nr charge to
attend
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
S'udent Union Travel Com
T'tfee is now accepting appiica
� � membership All persons
l rested in joining can pick up
application at the Student
office, room 234 MendenhaM
student Center
SLC
The ECU Sign Language CluD
held 'ts regular bimonthly
fevered d.sf supper and meeting
Sunday Novemot 8 at the
enhall Student Ce'e' Mult'
j'oose Rooiri The soppef will
at 6 p m with a short
' isiness meeting ano captioned
to follow
The meal ano meeting are open
�r , .nterested student, faculty
bet or a menrber ot the com
n fou do not need to know
. j.age to attend, but
Its who are taking sign
ianguage classes or who have
'sxen them m the rst are en
ouraged to attend The purpose of
fHe SLC s to allow sign language
students ana hearing impaired
students and community
ers to socialw ano develop
'I'Tumcstion skills
SGA
The tiim g deadline tor both
dorm and day student legislators
has been extended to November 2.
Applications are available at the
SGA office at MendenhaM Student
Center
MINORITY LAW
The UNC Law School invites
undergraduate minority students
to participate m a Law School In
formation Day on Nov 20. 19�t
The day long comterence will be
held at the UNC Law School in
Chapel Hill, and is open to any
minority person who is thinking
about attending law school
Registra'ion forms art available
in the Career Planning and Place
ment Office. Bloxton House
THE WAY
Do Ou thmk some people need
to change their attitudes? Do you
want to be more positive, confi
dent, and less tearful? The Bible
contains the real key for atttude
adtustment Read Romans.
Chapter 12 16. especially 12 2
That is what we are doing chang
mg our old attitudes to line up with
those m the Bible (I Cor 13) Come
by and see Thursday. Oct 29.
11 30 a m in room 212 and 7 30
p m m -n 22 MendenhaM Stu
dent Center
ECU HUNGER
COALITION
The Hunger Coalition wishes to
thank all the students who took the
time to participate in World Food
D.iv activities last month We
have many activities planned on
campus ana m the community tor
the coming months
Various proiects such as a wood
cutting program to provide tuel
tor local elderly citizens, baskets
ot food to distribute to needy
families at Christmas time, guest
speakers at our weekly meetings
to discuss top.es related to nutrik
tion ano hunger as well as the
posibihty of suooporting one of our
members who is now working in
Honduras. Latin America
Our latest protect will be the an
nual Ostam Amer.ca Fast For A
Wono Harvest coming up on
Nov 19 On that day we ask people
to go without food tor the day or
skip a meal The money that they
would have spent is then donated
to A�tam s Self Help relief pro
iects m poor countr.es Can you
help us' if so please give us a call
at 7S2 4216 or attend our Thursday
mght meetings at 7 3C at 9S3 E
10th St (The Newman House!
OA
Are you addicted to food? Do
you eat when you're not hungry?
Do you go on eating binges for no
apparent reason? It your weight
affecting the way you live your
life? If so. come to en overeaters
anonymous meeting every
Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. at the
First Presbyterian Church
(corner of 14th and Elm streets.
REBEL
The ECU Literary Magazine
REBEL is looking for an Associate
Editor, Prose Editor and Art
Editor. Applications can be picked
up in the Publications Building n
the Media board secretary office.
Any major is acceptable.
Lacrosse
The ECU Greenville Lacrosse
Club will have a team meeting
Wednesday. Nov 4 at 4p m at the
bottom of college hill to elect of
ficers and play some stick ball in
case of rain the meting will be held
at 603 E 9th Street Any questions
call 757 1366 and ask tor Tom
APPEALS BOARD
Deadline tor filing tor Appeals
Board position is 5 p.m on Tues
day. November 3. in Room 228 of
MendenhaM Student Center
GRE
The Graduate Record Examine
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
December 12, l��l Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 96 R, Princeton, NJ
08540 Applications must be
postmarked no later than
November 6. 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECu
Testing Center. Room 105, Speight
Building
LSAT
The Law School Admissions
Test (LSAT) will be offered at
East Carolina University on Satur
day. December 5, Mil. Appiica
tions blanks are to be completed
and mailed to Law School Admis
Sion Service, Box 2000, Newtown,
PA 18940 Applications must be
postmarked no later than
November 5, 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Room 105, Speight
Building
DELTA SIGMA THETA
Coming Soon I Harambe 81
Fashion Show Would you Ilka to
modal? Do you have a talent? if
to, contact Marllynn, Cynthia or
Karen at 757-3350, or Maryann at
741 8927 before November 4
CEREBRAL PALSY
The United Cerebral Palsy is go
ing to have a square dance and
auction out at the Carolina Opry
House, Tuesday, Nov to, between
the hours of 7 p.m. 11 p.m. for the
benefit of the UCP Center of
Greenville. Come and loin us if
you don't know how to iqvaru
dance, we'll teach you I Jerry
Powell, caller The Ambush Band
will be playing from II p.m on.
Donation Ii 00 at the door
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron chapter of Phi
Beta LamDda will hold its meeting
on Wednesday, Nov 4. at 4 p.m in
Rawl 30 AM membership dues
must be paid at this meeting See
you there'
NCSL
The NC Student Legislature will
meet T uesday Nov 3 at 7 p m in
room 212 MendenhaM All
members please attend
KYF
The Kings Youth Fellowship
will hoid a meeting on November 5
at MendenhaM Student Center
from 8 10 p m m room 248 The
topics of discussion will include
the coming of our Lord Jesus
Chr.st Everyone is mv.ted and
refreshments will be served at the
end of the meeting
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
unce 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ng the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: S20yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building en m� campus ot ECU,
Greenville, NC
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville. NC 27834
Telephone. 757 6344, 6167. 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville. North Carolina.
I INCOLN, Neb.
11 I'D � A city coun-
cilman is sponsoring an
ordinance that would
make it leg;l for
homeowners to carpet
their bathroom floors.
Councilman Bill
Danley proposed the
ordinance when city
mousing code inspectors
began citing
homeowners for having
carpeting instead of
linoleum on their
bathroom floors.
Inspectors said they
are well within the law
to hand out such cita-
tions, since the city's
minimum housing code
now provides a
bathroom floor should
be "reasonably imper-
vious to water
Thev
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
Appt's. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL
1-800-321
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues And
Shirts. Sleeping Bags
Backpacks Camping Equip
ment. Steel Toed Shoes. Dishes
And Over 700 Different New And
Used Items. Cowboy Boots
"rmy-navy
ISO! S. Evans
St-eet
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 14
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
SUS.OO Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For fur
frier information call UJ-0S1S
(Toll Free Number
�00 221 -mm between t
and J P.M Weekdays.
AM
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
?17 West Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C.

SAAD'S
SHOE
REPAIR
Pi fl
113 Grande Ave
758 1228
Quality
Repair
Cacti Sale
3 4" & 6" potted Cacti
' ' C and up
� Over 40 varieties to choose from.
m
Greenville Flower Shop
1027 S. Evans � 758-2774
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Honor
Society will hold committee
meetings on Tuesday, Nov. 3 at
5 00 p.m. In room 212 Mendenhall
Student Canter. All members ere
urged to attend
ACT
The American College Testing
(ACT) will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
December 12. 1M1. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration. P.O
Box 414 , Iowa City, Iowa S2240
Registration deadline is
November 13. ml Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center. Speight Building,
Room 105
INFLUENZA
influenta vaccine Is available at
the Student Health Cantor. The
coat Is S3 for each Injection
Students with chronic illnesses,
diabetes asthma, or those who are
on chemotherapy for malignant
diseases and those having unusual
exposure should come by the Stu
dent Health Canter between lam
and S p.m. Monday through Frl
day during October or November
PSICHI
Psi Chi. the national honor socle
ty in psychology, will met Tuesday
night, November 3 at 7 p.m. in
Speight 129. Or Thomas Durham
of the psychology department will
speak. Members and guests are in
vited to attend There will be a
brief business meeting to discuss
future Psi Chi activities
P.E.MAJORS
There will be a meeting,
November 4, at 7 p m in room Us
Minges This will be used to plan
the trip to Appalachain State
University, tor the State P E Ma
tor's Convention. It will Involve
the weekend of November 30 All
P.E. maiors era Invited to attend.
old and new alike Come loin us
and get involved l
AED
There will be a meeting of the
Pre dental�Pre medical Honor
Society In Room 307 Flanagan
Building on Tuesday Nov 3. at
7:30 p.m. Robert M. Boudreaux.
Director of Student Financial Aid.
will be the guest speaker.
FOUND
Calculator in the General Col
lege office during Change of Maior
week May claim item by properly
identifying Come by the General
College office - Brewster A 101
HOMECOMING MUMS
On sale Oct 24 Nov 5 at the
Student Supply Store Only 15 001
Sponsored by Fletcher Dorm
SOCI�ANTHRO
The Sociology -Anthropology
Club will meet Wednesday. Nov 4
at 4 30 p m in Brewster D 302
Club members and their guests
are invited A speaker is planned
CANNED FOOD DRIVE
The sorors of Eta Mu Chapter ot
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority will
be having a Canned Food Drive tor
a destitute fam.ly m Raletgh Tn
tamily is without Food. Cloth,na
and Shelter We will be coming
around to the dormitories tor
donations on Nov 3. 19tl Any
Donations in food or other items
will be greatly appreciated
PROSE CONTEST
The Rebel and another sponsor
will hold a Prose Contest Submis
sions of Fiction Essay, ano Non
fiction may be left m the Mec�
Board or Rebel offices Cesr
priies to be awarded Details to be
announced net week
( l
&
Legal Carpet Supported
carpeting is often used
to cover defects in con-
struction of homes and
apartment buildings.
They also say someone
using an electrical ap
pliance while on wet
carpeting could suffer
anelectrical shock.
T!aaff
may now I
ral hundred I
Current urmrqradii
medical students
compete for sever
Ar Force scholarships These
scholarships are to be award
ed to students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophmore year The scholar
ship provides for tuition,
books, lab frees smd equip-
ment, plus a S530 monthly
allowance Investigate this
financial alternative to the
high cost of medical edoca
tion Contact
USA F. HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
RECRUITING
SUITE GL l.liatNAVAHO Oft
RALEIGH. NC. 276�f
PHONE COLLECT (�'�) 7SS-41K
tmttttmt
Ntf to nvr
is the comedy
hit of the season.
You'll laugh your
head og"
IPG
This Weekend
BEDROOM
CONCEPTS
is now open
in Greenville
a complete Waterbed Shop
to serve you
Free Layaway, Visa & MasterCard
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IDRIVE
chapter o�
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1981
�AS
Former Hostage Recalls Captivity
Continued From Page 1
to speak with Red
Cross workers � their
first contact with a
group not allied with
their Iranian captors.
Then, on April 25, Lee
was suddenly moved to
a spot 90 miles from the
Persian Gulf. With him
was Col. Lee Holland,
who correctly guessed
that an "Entebbe-like"
raid had failed.
"We learned in July
that eight people had
been killed (in the
thwarted U.S. rescue
attempt) Lee said.
"We could not unders-
tand how eight people
had died and nothing
had happened He
later called the rescue
attempt a "sheer
suicide mission
Lee was moved back
to Tehran in August,
this time to a
downtown prison. On
September 22 the war
between Iran and Iraq
broke out, and Lee said
he "figured for sure we
were dead. We thought
the Americans were at-
tacking
The city was blacked
out that night. "The
guards were all excited,
and our tea was about
two hours late Lee
remembered. "At this
point we didn't care
who was coming to get
us out. We thought it
was the Russians
Lee said it was about
this time that he and
several of his colleagues
were sitting around the
table in a cell one night.
The transom was open,
and their guard was
standing outside the
door. "We talked
about how all Iranians
were terrorists, in-
cluding a few words
that couldn't be
repeated in mixed com-
pany Lee said. Ac-
cording to the former
hostage, the guard, ob-
viously shaken by the
attacks on Tehran,
burst into the room and
screamed "you speaka
too loud Jimmy
Lopez yelled back just
as loudly, "you listen
too loud
As the first anniver-
sary of their imprison-
ment approached, Lee
said he and his
cellmates "knew you
people were voting for
� we hoped � a new
president At 7 a.m.
in Iran � 11:30 p.m.
Election Day in the
United States � Lee
was told Ronald
Reagan had been voted
in and Mount St.
Helens had erupted.
The hostages' second
Christmas in captivity
came. "The six of us
that were together
decided that we didn't
want to see an Iranian
on Christmas Day. We
wrote them (the cap-
tors) a note. They
honored our request �
we didn't get fed that
day, but they honored
our request
Lee called Jan. 20,
1981 � the day of
Reagan's inauguration
� "a make or break
day. It was my day to
do the dishes. I said 'if
I do the dishes tonight,
we'll probably be here a
couple more years "
Between 6:30 p.m. and
7 p.m Lee was told to
pack and to put on his
shoes. The hostages
had worn "flip-flops"
during most of their
captivity, Lee said.
Lee and the remain-
ing 51 hostages were
taken to the Tehran air-
port. "There the Ira-
nians had their last shot
at us � screaming
'death to U.S " he
said. Lee remembered
that the stewardesses
on the Algerian plane
they boarded were the
first women the
Marines had seen since
they had been taken
captive.
The stewardesses
brought out cham-
pagne. When the plane
landed in Algiers, Lee
was surprised by the at-
tention the now former
hostages were getting.
"I thought the cameras
were for local TV he
said.
Lee now says he held
the Carter admistration
responsible "from day
one" for the hostages'
captivity. As Jimmy
Carter greeted the
hostages at Weisbaden,
West Germany, Lee
said his wife Pat told
him, "now, Gary, be
polite. Remember
you're a foreign service
agent. Don't take a sw-
ing at him According
to Lee, Carter told the
group "it was my job
and I did it the way I
thought I should have
done it taking
responsibility for his
actions. "If he had
come in and waffled,
we might have thrown
him out the window
Lee said.
The welcomes in
West Germany,
Ireland, and West
Point in the United
States "stunned" Lee,
but none seemed as in-
credible to him as the
reception the hostages
received in
Washington. "And I
guarantee you, nothing
excites the city of
Washington Lee said
of the crowds that lined
the streets.
NEXT: Lee talks
about his life since his
release and his thoughts
about Iran, the Middle
East and diplomatic
policy.
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2He East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, tdaucw
Jimmy DuPREE, .vf0�,�v w�w
Chuck Foster, sm� ��� Charles Chandler, -� �,�,
Chris Lichok, ����� �t�ifr Tom Hall, ,v�diw
Alison Bartel. rrrnm ��� Steve Bachner. ����� �i.w
Steve Moore, p��.�� ��,� Karen Wendt, ! ��,
November 3. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Bigotry
Merideth 's Walk Not Over Yet
The date is July 9, 1966, and civil
rights leader James Meredith is
walking down U.S. 51 in Mississippi
� his native state � with a Bible in
his right hand. His destination is
Pleasant Hills.
His is a hero to his fellow blacks
in this Southern state because he
was the primary force behind the
desegregation of the University of
Mississippi in 1962. He has come
back to finish his work: to conquer
the fear that has prevented
Mississippi blacks from voting.
He is obviously worried about the
type of homecoming he will receive.
'Always he says, regardless of
the number of times I enter
Mississippi, it creates within me
feelings of joy, hope, sadness,
hatred, love
He is waving to black farm
workers, showing a smile that has
warmed thousands of hearts during
such a violent time in this country's
history.
He gazes at the countryside, his
straw hat shielding his face from the
hot sun. "This is the only country I
call home, " he says. "1 would have
a share in my hand or die trying to
get it
As he walks he notices a group of
whites a few hundred yards up the
road. They have turned out to jeer
and curse him with shouts of
"Nigger and "Boy
He continues walking and sud-
denly a shotgun blast hits him in the
back. Two more shots are fired,
striking him in the legs, causing him
to fall on the asphalt highway � his
tool for freedom.
He pulls his bleeding body off the
highway onto the Mississippi mud
and grasps part of his land in his
hands.
He calls for help, and a minister
friend responds. As Meredith waits
in the ambulance, he murmurs,
Oh God, my God
Luckily, the wounds are super-
ficial. After 60 shotgun pellets are
dug from his flesh, he is released
from the hospital. A 40-year-old
white man has confessed to the
shooting, saying he didn't know
why he did it.
Meredith is angry and vows one
day to finish his march � "but with
a gun and not a Bible. "
Civil rights leaders rush south
after hearing about the shooting
and take part in the march Meredith
started. One man's walk has turned
into an enormous flow of public
concern. But there are no guns �
only Bibles.
There is a resurgence of ethnic
strife in this country � 20 years
after memories still exist of racially-
motivated murders and violence
that divided a proud people.
A body of a black youth has been
found hanging from a tree in
Mobile, Alabama. Near Chicago, a
white man has been charged with
murdering three Laotian refugees
by setting their house on fire. An
avowed racist has been linked to a
chain of attacks in six states aimed
at black men who keep company
with white women.
Extremist groups such as the
Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan have
had a significant climb in member-
ship. Members have been trynig to
recruit high school students to join
their despicable "cause Thankful-
ly, educational leaders across the
country are providing strong
resistance.
We cannot tolerate groups and in-
dividuals who infest a great country
with ethnic hatred. To put an end to
this bigotry, we must rally around
each other. We must publicly de-
nounce such hatred. We must learn
to work together � regardless of
color of skin or nationality or
religious beliefs.
Because James Meredith's walk is
not over yet.
DOONESBURY
by Garry Trudeau
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'Dream' Stifles Dignity Fertilization
By MICKEY SKIDMORE
It has been one week. And after careful
assessment of the situation and a
"sorting-out-of-feelings I have come to
a conclusion during this week � America
is alive and well. Yes, America, land of the
free, home of the brave, etc where
citizens of this country not only have the
right to think anything they wish but also
have the privilege to say what they wish as
well. No where else on this planet can this
be done more freely � ah yes America!
Well dear readers, now it is my turn �
to commend, yet condemn, to question,
yet to somehow be non-threatening, to be
gentle, yet firm. Now my fellow students,
it is my turn to assert my rights and
privileges and leave with you some
thoughts of my own.
For a little more than two years now, it
has been my belief that the majority of the
people in this area (especially students)
simply did not and do not want to face the
issue of world and domestic hunger. Much
like death, we simply do not wish to dwell
upon it, consequently the issue is denied
and never really dealt with.
I truly must applaud Kim Albin and
Mack Paul at least on the sincerity of their
opinions. I must also commend them on
their courage to present the side of the
issue that has yet to be expressed (at least
in writing) at this university. Albin raises
some very vital points which really cannot
be argued, however, her perspective of the
issue is all wrong. The issue is world
hunger, not who is to blame.
I also think the word "ignorance" needs
to be explained. It baffles me to think that
we are supposed to be intelligent college
students yet are offended whenever the
word is pointed in our direction. When so-
meone calls us ignorant it simply means
"we are lacking knowledge" or "we are
Campus
Spectrum
not aware of It is not an insult at all. So
it is in this light that I must also condemn
both Albin and Paul for their ignorance.
It has been ingrained for more than 200
years that everyone can and should live out
the "American Dream But somewhere
along the way the American Dream got
pushed aside and lost in the "lust for
money
If the enchantment of the Americn
Dream stifles the fertilization of human
dignity then I think we have some serious
thinking to do.
Neither the Greenville Hunger Coalition
nor anyone else is trying to blame the
United States for anything. However, the
time has come for us to look at the entire
situation � not just the limits of our own
little world.
It is time we realized that the "rich white
man" is the minority of the world. Two-
thirds of the world is non-white! (As
Americans we do not like to think of this
very much, if at all). The United Nations is
made up largely of Third World countries
� all non-white.
Let's be realistic, we are the minority!
When we have a situation like this where a
very small percentage of the world controls
a very large percentage of the world's
resources I think we have to ask ourselves
some questions.
As with any other problem of this
magnitude, the only hope of solving it is to
educate the people who can do something
about it. This is the goal of the Greenville
Hunger Coalition (not to blame). I would
think that as Americans we would be pro-
ud and honored to be one of the few na
tions in the world that have the technolog
to even begin to solve this holocaust.
I suppose the American Dream has real
ly helped to make this country what it is.
But somehow it seems wrong to me to
develop such a high standard of living at
the expense of others. It also seems wrong
to me that this concept of Social Dar-
winism has seeped through the wallets of
big business and is prevailing in the social
order just as it does in the natural order
and in the business field. The surviva:
the world as we know it will depend on
those individuals whose outlook is no:
grotesquely ignorant. As dignified human
beings we should be able to reason nd
function on a level much higher than the
natural order. There is plenty o everything
to go around for everyone, there is
reason for anyone to perish.
Albin may be comfortable with her con-
science (or should I say her lack, of it), but
again I stress that maybe she should think
again. If you're concerned with the troubl-
ed spots of the world you had better be
concerned with hunger. If you're concern-
ed about the economy and unemployment
you had better be concerned abou;
domestic hunger. If you're concerned
about the possibility for WW1I1 you had
better be concerned with hunger (The
Presidential Commmission on World
Hunger has stated that "world hunger is
the greatest threat to world peace toda)
If you only take the time to read the facts it
is absolutely frightening to see how inter-
related all these issues really are.
America � land of the Free, home of
the brave � frontier of greed and
selfishness. America � which has crucified
the dignity of two-thirds of the world � I
salute you.
-Campus Forum
Author's Motivation Questioned
The only facts Charles Sune
"proved" in his Campus Spectrm article
about Marvin Braxton is that the only
Major Attraction in Sune's life deals
with the committee and not political in-
telligence. How can you, Mr. Sune, be
so stupid to try to prove S.G.A.
Presidential candidate's motivation?
For that matter, why would you? You
not only think you are godly enough to
declare his motives as being solely for
image, but you also write, "I for one,
have little concern for Marvin's public
image But, that opinion was quite
hypocritical, considering you devote the
entire 13 paragraph editorial towards
proving the opposite.
Furthurmore, I always thought a per-
son in the United States is entitled to
think absolutely whatever they want,
without recriminations. And with
motivations being a thought, people are
entitled to be also motivated for
whatever reason they want, without
recrimination. Actions are what a per-
son is and should be accounted for, not
thoughts. But with your infinite political
wisdom, Mr. Sune, I'm sure you will
figure out a way to restrict and control
everyone's thoughts.
But what is even more stupid than
adamently proclamining you know ex-
actly how the evil Marvin Braxton
thinks, is how you go about proving it.
Do you honestly think anybody with an
independently working brain would
believe your first example about Mar-
vin's conference with a U.S. Con-
gressman? I mean, where is your proof
he lied? Why don't you name your
sources? Why should we accept your
story telling?
Your next "proof example shows
altogether immature logic. Let me get
this straight: Because Marvin Braxton
writes in to the East Carolinian to ex-
press his opinion more so than the
average student, he therefore is not only
a ridiculous "Lone Ranger but also an
"opportunist of the worst kind Well,
that's certainly sound logical Mr. Sune.
But then came the ultimate proof that
S.G.A. Presidential candidate Braxton
is an egotistical, two-faced scoun-
drel He expresses a commonly � felt
displeasure towards some explicit art
showed at Mendenhall!
Let me now say I am not a Marvin
Braxton supporter. I am familiar with
his basic political philosophy and I am
against it. Nevertheless, as a person,
Marvin deserves better treatment.
JAMES A. LIPPITT
Sophomore, Political Science
EDITOR'S NOTE: A member of Con-
gressman Jones' staff spoke with The
East Carolinian last week and confirmed
that Mr. Braxton did, indeed introduce
himself as SGA President. Mr. Braxton
denies the accusation.
Football Defense
I am writing in respect to the article
concerning Larry O'Roark's quitting the
ECU football team. There are a few
points Mr. Chandler appears to have
omitted. This is not the first time Larry
O'Roark has quit football. Once at
Frostburg St. and twice at ECU. Mr.
O'Roark not only quit the team, but also
quit school. I did not realize that the
"inner structure of ECU football" dealt
with earning a college degree. The real
problem seems to deal with Mr.
O'Roark's maturity, or lack of it, which
brings us to Mr. Chandler.
Personally, as a alumni of ECU, I am
tired of people using ECU in a negative
way to better themselves. Mr. Chandler
released his article to the Greensboro
newspaper. It appears odd that Mr.
Chandler is trying to obtain employment
on the Greensboro paper.
East Carolina has always been a strug-
gling university. Trying to obtain a cer-
tain lofty status. To achieve this type of
status, "class" and maturity are a must.
An ingredient Mr. O'Roark, or Mr.
Chandler does not seem to possess.
CHARLES A. TALLEY
Class of '75
EDITORS NOTE: Charles Chandler
has been a correspondent for The
Greensboro Daily News for the last two
years.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.

t
�1





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I
I Ml 1 '� i Akul INIAN
Entertainment
NOYEMBl R3. 1981
Page
Caligula's 'IT
Puts Tabs On
Bloody Drama
"Goodbye Children, Hello
Donald Sexauer
I he above reproduction of a print bv the renowned Donald Sexauer is
just one of many works that will be auctioned off at the Sixth Annual
Print Auction to be held on Sunda night. November 15, in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center Auditorium. Money raised at the auction will be used
to benefit the studio area and to provide workshops and speakers in
printmaking. Prints will be previewed from 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
ByKATHYWEYLER
MaffWnlrr
The $17.5 million Guc-
cioneRossellini extravaganza of
decadence, Caligula has finally been
released for mass audiences and is
currently playing at the Buccaneer
in Greenville. Having been stripped
of a considerable amount of explicit
sex and violence, the film sports an
R rating. But plenty of boobs and
blood remains. �
Caligula is not a film to be en-
joyed. lt a film to gawk at, marvel
at. It amazes and appalls. Watching
Caligula is a little like viewing a
multi-million-dollar freak show.
Malcolm McDowell stars in the ti-
tle role in this film abaout the brief
but horrendous reign of Gaius
Caligula Caesar. The contrast bnet-
ween his handsome, Pan-like ap-
pearance and the totally warped and
perverted personality of Caligula is
startling and highly effective. Evil
is, after all, often extremely attrac-
tive, and McDowell's excellent per-
formance makes the viewer con-
stantly aware of this.
In fact, all the performances in
Caligula are outstanding. Helen
Mirren, England's foremost
Shakespearian actress, portrays
Caligula's wife, Caesonia with a
combination of reptilian coldness
and soft, graceful femininity. Other
stars of the British Isles, Peter
O'Toole and Sir John Gulgud, give
marvelous performance5: as the
syphilitic Tiberius and the world-
wearv senator Nerva.
The imperial career of Caligula
was marked by unprecedented sex-
ual excesses and cruelty and violence
of every conceivable kind. Pen-
thouse's Caligula leaves almost
none of this to the imagination, par-
ticularly in the uncut, X-rated ver-
sion. The R-rated version now
available for viewing retains the
horrifying, fearsome mood of the
film despite extensie cuts of purely
gratuitous sex and gore.
As one might expect.aligula has
generated its share of controversy.
One group, Morality in Media,
fought the film's opening in 1980
tooth and nailunsuccessfully.
Other groups and individuals have
loudly voiced their outrage that this
"$17 million trough of rotten
swill as Rex Teed called the film,
is being shown in first-run movie
theaters.
Yet the film, with its modified
rating and modified sex and
violence, continues to be shown.
There is no solution for the con-
troversy surrounding Caligula. No
doubt many will find it offensive.
But it must be kept in mind that
Caligula offers a frighteningly ac-
curate portrayal of one of the lowest
points in human history. The hor-
rors and perversions to be seen on-
screen are not the figments of the
imaginations of director Tinto Brass
or original screen playwriter, Gore
Vidal. They are history. Producers
Guccione and Rosselini have created
a stunning picture of that frightful
time, one which is definitely worth
seeing.
Juke Joints, Gin Mills, Roadhouses And Dives
Bv ROBERT PALMER
Ne "fk imr r� n�tvii f
LITTLE ROCK. Ark. � Juke joints, gin mills,
dives � call them what you will, these
tblt and often dangerous establishments are the
bed � ' merican popular music. Tomorrow's rock
start out in juke joints. In fact, rock'n'roll
them.
1 .ing in New York, one tends to forget that such
- exist. Musicians who perform tn New York
nigh tbs d to perform with one eye on their au-
e and the other on a favorable review or a recor-
u lucky breaks that only an urban media
bestow,
in Arkansas, the writer's honiestate. musicians
ing m juke joint for an audience composed
! their friends and neighbors. Sometimes
and neighbors start feeling fractious and
r each other with knives and broken bottles;
nes juke-joint audiences are better behaved.
mes 'he music is a dull rehash of the latest top-40
imetimes it's sheer magic.
rica's popular music is a spotted mongrel with an
bly tangled pedigree, and juke joints encourage
Mianon. Back in early '50s, white country-and-
i ds in the South and Middle West found that
id to piav faster, with a more pronounced beat,
jngei dancers who had been listening to black
rom across the tracks.
Hei
are
At the same time, black blues musicians began ampli-
fying their guitars and harmonicas and cranking up the
volume in order to be heard over the din of a typical
juke-joint Saturday night. Most of the nation's public
facilities were rigidly segregated in those days, but that
didn't keep white and black musicians from listening to
and playing with one another in roadside juke joints
and small-town taverns. And out of their fraternizing
came the mongrel music called rock'n'roll.
Music
W Cstt
The Whitewater Tavern, a rickety, frame building on
an umpaved Little Rock back street, is a typical juke
joint. And last Saturday night at the Whitewater got off
to a typical start, with a band of white longhairs playing
loud blues-rock for an audience of rowdy young beer
drinkers. But gradually musicians began drifting in, and
the music changed.
First came Cedell Davis, a black blues guitarist in his
early '50s. Davis was crippled by polio early in life and
learned to play the guitar the only way he could, by
picking with his right hand and using his withered left
hand to run a table knife up and down the strings.
Over the years he has become a virtuoso with the table
knife. He uses the edge of the blade when he wants one
kind of sound and the flat of the blade when he wantts
another. The scraping of the knife along the strings of
his bright yellow electric guitar makes a kind of metallic
gnashing sound that conspires with his patched-together
guitar amplifier and his utterly original playing techni-
que to produce some of the grittiest music imaginable.
Soon Gary Gazzaway, an animated young trumpet
player, joined the group. Gazzaway has recorded and
toured with Flora Purim, Milton Nascimento and other
leading lights of Brazilian pop, but when he isn't on the
road he lives in his hometown, Pocahontas, Ark.
Gazzaway's playing is a misturee of modern jazz,
Brazilian influences and strange huffing and bellowing
sounds that remind some listeners of mating elephants.
Th.s writer, who had played the clarinet with CeDell
Davis a year earlier in a Mississippi juke joint, managed
to squeeze onto the W hitewsater's makeshift stage,
along with an unidentified trombonist. The writer's
sister Dorothy got up to sing, and so did a folk singer
named Linda Lowe, who recently returned to her native
Arkansas after living and performing for several years
in Austin, Texas.
The music was a little like one of those John Cage
compositions that pile sound on top of sound and event
on top of event until one cannot possible take in the
whole and has to focus on some of the parts instead.
The blues-rock band was playing bluesprock. CeDell
Davis was playing wild, keening blues guitar. The horns
were exploring an unmapped territory somewhere bet-
ween Dixieland, "50s rhythm-and-blues and the most
clamorous free-form jazz. The singers were singing old
blues verses and making up new ones. And the members
of the audience were either dancing in the narrow space
between the bar and the pinball machine or standing on
chairs and tables and screaming their lungs out.
Juke joints are like that. At their best, they are still
places where the most disparate musical styles get slosh-
ed together and new mongrels are born.
It's a 2-hour drive from Little Rock to northern
Mississippi, where the juke joints tend to be rougher.
See JUKE, Page 7
Vive La Classics!
Movie House Plays The Oldies
By JOHN WEYLER
Mall V�rl-t
�'Hollywood High Part ll just does not turn me on as
entertainment" says Roy Griffin, manager of the Plaza
I heatre in Greenville. As an antidote he offers his Great
Cinema Classics series, which beginning November 6, at
the Plaa. will present such honored films as On the
Waterfront, The Guns of Savarone, The Bridge on the
River Kwai, and Dr. Strangelove.
Cinema
"I really feel the public is being cheated out of top-
notch entertainment" says Griffin. "Why not go back
and pick up some of the old cinema classics and show
them at a reduced price?" Though all of these films oc-
casionallv air on television, Griffin hopes that the rare
chance of seeing them uncut, uninteruppted, on a large
screen, will lure people from the TV. The four films will
run for one week each, with admission set at $1.00
everyday until 3:30 p.m after which the price goes up
to S2 00 for adults. If this limited series is successful,
Griffin plans to give other old classics a new lease on
life.
The series opens with On the Waterfront (November
6 - 12), the movie that swept the 1954 Academy Awards,
gathering Best Picture, Director (Elia Kazan), Actor
(Marlon Brando), Supporting Actress (Eva Marie
Saint), while it's entire male supporting cast (Lee J.
Cobb, Karl Maiden, Rod Steiger) were all nominated
for Best Supporting Actor.
Budd Schulberg's screenplay was also Oscared, being
based a Pulitzer Prize winning series of articles by
Malcolm Johnson on waterfront corruption. T he film
is both an indictment and expose of that corruption,
and the stirring story of one man (Brando) who dares to
confront it.
Regarding On the Waterfront, AH. Weiler wrote in
The New York Times that, "while this explosive indict-
ment of the vultures and the meek prey of the
docksidesoccasionally is only surface dramatization
and an oversimplification of the personalities and evils
of our water front, it is, nevertheless, and uncommonly
powerful, exciting and imaginative use of the screen by
gifted professionals
Dates for the other Cinema Classics are as follows:
The Guns of Savarone, an intellectual-high adventure
film based on Alistair Maclean's novel, starring
Gregory Peck, will run November 13-19; The Bridge on
the River Kwai, an epic war movie which in 1957 won
the Oscars for Best Picture, Director (David Lean), and
Actor (Alec Guinness) will play November 20-26; and
Stanley Kubrick's nightmare comedy about nuclear an-
nihilation, starring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott,
will appear from November 27 to December 3.
Plaza Cinema's Great. Cinema Classics Series Beginning
A scene from 1957 Academy Award Best Picture winner The Bridge on the River Kwai. Pictured (left to right)
are Alec Guiness (who won the Best Actor award for his role in the film), William Holden, and Jack
Hawkins. The film will be shown as part of the Plaza Cinema's Great Cinema Classics Series this fall.

?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1981
Learning Aeout College The Harp Wai
by Qwip A)orris
SuoCtT VOUft (Loom ?
vgHir A pump
6V tUC WAY, 'M Ruoaw)G
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The
Power Behind
The Throne
E SOltr MAS A U0U5UIL
IajA( 0FCAApGOAiG
m ���oi
This Weekend
Hendrix Theatre
FREE
An SU Films
Production
Quartet Renders Mozart Music
The Sunday, Nov. 1
concert of the East
Carolina University
Symphony Orchestra
featured a faculty
quartet in a rendition
of Mozart's "Sinfonia
Concertante
The concert was
scheduled for 8 p.m.
Quartet members are
David Hawkins, oboe;
Deborah Chodacki,
clarinet; Jon Pederson,
bassoon and James
Parnell, French horn.
Robert Hause is sym-
phony conductor. All
are members of the
ECU School of Music
faculty.
Other works on the
program were the Over-
ture to Mozart's opera,
"The Magic Flute
the Berlioz "Roman
Carnival Overture"
and Respighi's "Pines
of Rome
One of the most
beloved musical com-
positions of the 20th
century, The Pines of
Rome was a symphonic
celebration of the an-
cient dignity and
grandeur of the Eternal
City. In the words of
the composer, nature is
used "as a point of
departure in order to
recall memories and vi-
sions. The century-old
trees which dominate
the Roman landscape
become testimony for
the principle events in
Roman life
The work has four
sections, played
without pause, which
evoke visions of
children at play, mour-
ning at a catacomb, a
nightingale singing on
a moonlit night and an
army marching to the
Capitol at dawn.
The 70-member East
Carolina Symphony
Orchestra consists
primarily of advanced
student instrumen-
talists from the Schcol
of Music, along with
several
members
musicians.
faculty
and local
Noted Youth Composer Gillock
Doing Workshop This Friday
come join us
for our
SURD�
William Gillock,
noted composer of
piano literature for
young students, will
present a piano
workshop Friday, Nov.
6 at East Carolina
University.
The workshop will be
held in Room 101 of
the Fletcher Music
Center beginning at 9
a.m. and is open to all
interested persons.
Gillock's topics will
be "Techniques for the
Beginning Student"
and "Developing Style
in the Intermediate
Pianist Also included
will be discussion of
selected solos and col-
lections from early
elementary through ad-
vanced intermediate
levels.
A foremost com-
poser in the field of
music education,
Gillock frequently
tours the nation con-
ducting workshops for
piano teachers. He has
been a director of the
Music Teachers Na-
tional Association and
has held offices in other
national and regional
music educators
organizations.
thce
TO(H)S & GWS
510 cotanche st.
752 3411
y
hours: 10 30-6 00 mo nsat
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An Even
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DATE - NOVEMBER 20
CONCERT TIME - 9:00
at Minges Colisium
Tickets Go On Sale Exclusively
at Mendenhall on Wednesday
On Sale at Major Outlets Beginning This Weekend
Students - $7.00 Public - $9.00 At The Door - $9.00
Ju
On
( onti
and more
locate, thi
Whiiewater
playing mi
joints wheni
has never oi
them, and
teache
univer
the sidi j
Looxahonu
The
road, whicl
gra J
a 1� i
square, w'
of cind i
for a
bar be
the bar ar
one
The
al! �
the eld
iru'
and

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age
cha
gUl!
ha
womei
old
engan
piaye:
Mempl
older 1
dnace
hips I
listene
mu
"1 can
Wilsi '
said the
that
pla
horn
playe
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and late
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I





THt EAS1 l AKOI IMAS NO VI MHI W ' IM
Jw&� Joints Spawn
Original A mericana
( ontinaed from Page 5
and more difficult foi outsiders to
tie, than city, joints like the
Whitewater Bui this writer was
playing music in Arkansas juke
joints when he was 15 years old and
nevci outgrown his affection foi
their and when a friend who
ches folklore at a Memphis
university and plays blues guitai on
the side told him about a joint neai
1 ooxahoma, Miss . he set out for it
The joint was at the end ot a dirt
?ad, which was at the end of a
ve road, which was at the end oi
a local two lane blacktop. It was a
uare, windowless structure made
of cinderblocks, with an oil drum
tor a stove, a woman selling
barbecued goat sandwiches behind
te bar and a small bandstand in
one comer
I he customers were all black and
ages, from preschool toddlers to
elderly 1 he children ran whoop
ig in and out of the place in threes
id tours, or sat quietly at the
int's lone picnic tables, sipping
tolas and watching then
Jers with undisguised interest.
Behind the joint, in the glow of a
Coteman lantern, a numbet of
ing, not-so-young and middle-
aged men were throwing due. and
wads of dollar bills were rapidly
anging hands
Jessie Mae Hemphill, a blues
tarist and singer from Senatobia,
Miss . who wears leopard skin
veled black cowboy
tndful of
women still ; ming dron
stvle country blues, played an
backed by a bass
nearby
Memphis. Her blues pleased the
ler members of the audience, who
dand the snake
hip-
� I
. ike Otis Redding and
� ; and all those guys
'1 can play all
stuff said the '
iver. "1 think 1 can remember the
hon d the write who
in dozens of
iddle

B x Tops' No. 1 one
: arrently enjoys a
cult following among new wave
rock tans m New York and I ondon.
He had come to I ooxahoma
because he is inordinatley fond of
Hike joints.
nd so. from scratch, a soul band
uas born. ! he bulk of the audience,
which had remained sealed during
the blues set. got up and danced and
shouted then encouragement as
soon as they heard the first un-
mistakable strains of the soul classic
"In the Midnight Hour
Juke joints are not always fun
and games. Around 13, when the
writer was 17, he was working with
an otherwise all-black band in a 1 it-
tie Rock doe called the South Main
Businessmen's Club. I be
'�businessmen" were actually
working class whites who wore
1-shirts with the sleeves rolled up,
the better to reveal the tattoos on
their impressive biceps. One night a
bedraggled, unshaven man came in
and requested a country -and-
western song, "it'd sound mighty
good to a man on the run he said.
The band played the song, the
i left and a tew minutes later a
hew of state policemen arrived hot
on his trail. It seems he had just
escaped from the count penal
farm. Nobody seemed to have notic
ed which way he went.
few weeks later, the writer ar-
med at the club on an off-night
looking for a friend, didn't see
anyone he knew, and left. He had
walked a block and a half down the
street when he heard a sudden ex-
plosion of gunfire. Several of the
club patrons that night had been a
ink robbers, and several
had been plainclothes detectives.
rhey settled their differences by
turning the tables they sere sit-
ting at and shooting at one another.
leaving two bystanders dead and
several others wounded.
The resulting publicity painted
the club in a decidedly unfavorable
light and it closed a few nights later.
Juke joints are like that, "hey came
and they g
But � ints ate important,
hev ate the last bastions of
everything that is quirky and unique
�ut regional music and musicians.
has never know
inl experimentation and
- nnovation with anything
less than noisy enthusiasm � unless
ans wre intoxicated and-
inept, in which case they got the
jeers, catcalls and flying bottles they
erved
Paige Weaver, recent ECl1 graduate, is playing I aura in Stephen B. Fin-
nan production of The Class Menagerie by Tennessee Williams.
Tickets are carrenth available through the Central Ticket Office at
Mcndenhall. The production opens November 10 at the Methodist Stu-
dent (enter.
HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST.
The Fleming Center has been here for women
of ail ages since 1974. offering understanding
and help to anyone faced with an unplanned
pregnancy day or night. Services include.
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekday 6 Saturday Abortion Appta
Bvenin Birth. Control Hour
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
The Fleming Centex
We're here when you need ua.
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY COST A RICA PROGRAM
FINAL DATE FOR MAKING APPLICATION
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER "�'
You spend the Spnnq Semester !��? is n ECU student in Costa
R.ca tor about the same cost as Uv.nq on campus m Greenville
�CLASSES TAUGHT IN ENGLISH AT
THE UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL
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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION STOP BY OR CALL
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Items and Prices
Effective thru Sat
Nov 7, 1981
L'6pyngn� UM
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Quantity Rghts Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
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.v � �- � ���

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Complete Automotive Service
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Charles
Chandler
Playboy Rates
Cagers Highly
Noting the Pirates:
The East Carolina men's basket-
ball team ranks as the number one
Independent in the South, says the
December issue of Playboy
magazine.
The Pirates, of course, are no
longer an Independent, having join-
ed the ECAC-South two months
ago. When Playboy went to press,
though, the conference ties had not
been made.
The magazine ranks the Bucs
ahead of Bill Foster's South
Carolina team. Georgia State ranks
third.
"It's nice to be mentioned in that
breath ECU head coach Dave
Odom said upon hearing of the
ranking last night. "1 don't know
about that, though. I don't put a lot
of credance in things like that this
early in the year. It's probably
beneficial to us, though. It's certain-
ly a nice compliment
Odom says the Pirates are beginn-
ing to "get a feel for each other" as
pre-season practice rolls along.
A few minor injuries have slowed
the progress somewhat, though
none should keep anyone down very
long.
"We are progressing just about
like I'd hoped Odom said. "We
will be Looking at combination-type
lineups in the next eight to ten days.
We have some ideas, but there's no
way to tell at this point who will be a
regular and who will not
Luck Leads
WVU To Win
to the Mountaineer 20. After
freshman fullback Scott Lewis pick-
ed up three yards, another freshman
running back, Stefon Adams, pick-
ed up seven, placing the ball on the
West Virginia 16.
Stewart then gained one yard on a
keeper, and the Pirates faced a
third-and-five situation on the
Mountaineer five. Stewart eluded
several West Virginia defender and
spotted split end John Feltonin the
back of the end zone, but the ball
was tipped by two defensive backs
In The Pocket
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Ajafctaai Sporti MMor
MORGANTOWN, W.V. - The
Pirates of East Carolina travelled to
a picturesque setting in moun-
tainous Morgantown, W.V Satur-
day with more than one hill to
climb.
Hill number one was the explosive
and highly-favored Mountaineers of
West Virginia, and hill number two
was an injury list that resembled
casualties at a MASH unit.
But in the end, it was West
Virginia who had the most Luck in and Felton could not hoW on
quarterback Oliver Luck - who Faced with a � a�
threw for one touchdown and ran situation, Chuck Bhbeckas sen
for another in a 20-3 Mountaineer in for a field goal J D�
win that had 41,364 fans gasping for hold. Stewart � J-Mo
Early in the fourth quarter with my Waiden who was stopp�if or no
the Mountaineers ahead 10-3, East gam. That play aid Mo a n�
Carolina had possession on the coach Don Nehlen, was crucia,
wJst Virginia 35Pafter a bad punt. "I thought that our def ense top-
On first down, quarterback Greg ping their mudd.rhuddk ne. ;hc
Stewart hit tight end Norwood Vann
West Virginia quarterback Oliver Luck (12)
waits patientlv in a pocket created by the
Mountaineer offensive line. Luck completed
21 of 32 passes against the Pirates to lead
WVU to a 20-3 win Saturday. The win,
witnessed bv bowl scouts, pushed the Moun-
ties' record to 6-2. (Photo By Gary Patter-
son)
Nostalgia Present As Women
Set For Alumni Cage Contest
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Head Coach Ed Emory and the
East Carolina football team can
have no doubts about how good the
Miami (Fla.) football team is now.
The Hurricanes downed the Bucs
in Ficklen Stadium on October 24
by a 31-6 margin and then went
back home to the Orange Bowl to
defeat top-ranked Penn State this
past Saturday, 17-14.
Two staff members of The East
Carolinian were on hand at the con-
test. Editor In Chief Paul Collins
and Managing Editor Jimmy
DuPree were attending a convention
of the Associated Collegiate Press at
Miami Beach and made it to the
Orange Bowl for the clash.
"Despite occasional downpours
of rain said DuPree shortly after
his return to Greenville, "the Miami
fans never left the stadium. Even
when the defense gave up two
touchdowns in the fourth quarter,
the crowd stayed behind them.
W hen they finally locked it up with
an interception the crowd really
raised hell
The Hurricanes are sure to move
well above their number 19 national
ranking of a week ago.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
AufaUat Sports Kdilor
Whoever said history could not be
repeated should go to Minges Col-
iseum at 8 p.m. Saturday night.
Debbie Freeman will. Kathy Riley
will. Rosie Thompson will be there.
And don't forget Gale Kerbaugh.
Or Sheila Cotton.
Oh, nastalgia.
The occasion is the Lady Pirate
Alumni Basketball Game, and East
Carolina's greatest will play this
vear's team.
"We're really excited says Lady
Pirate coach Cathy Andruzzi. "This
game will give us the chance to in-
troduce our news players to our old
ones and to the public. This game
will hopefully give us the opportuni-
ty to have more like this one in the
future
The alumni roster brings back
many memories. Joining Thompson
on the team is Marcia Girven �
thus the only two 1000 point-1000
rebound players in Lady Pirate
history �, Gene Mobley, Mane
Shamblee, P.J. Taylor, Lorraine
Rollins, Susan Manning, Heidi
Owen, Laurie Sykes and Brenda
Dail.
Included is every player in Lady
Pirate history who has scored 30
points or more in a game, has 15 or
more rebounds in a game and the
top nine career scorers.
Andruzzi says one factor influen-
cing the start of the alumni classic is
nof only the rising success of the
Lady Pirate program but the general
improvement of women's basket-
ball. "We have a lot of things going
for our program t.iis year she
notes. "This game just gives us an
opportunity to recognize the
athletes. We have so many fine
athletes of the past that it's going to
be a great thrill having them here.
"Our kids have spent an awful lot
of time working, and we want to
recognize them.
"Our program has grown leaps
and bounds and is moving along as
well as can be expected
Riley, who will fly in from Texas
for the game, should generate some
crowd excitement, Andruzzi says,
since the former all-around Pirate
has been named the winner of the
Broderick Award as the nation's
besi slow-pitch softball player.
There will be no charge for the
game. Also, Lady Pirate fans may
purchase season tickets but the
employees at the ticket office
recommend people buy them before
the contest to cut down on conges-
tion.
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la�a�l-37.�lan 5-24.1 ���:� WN . oa.cU 14e.
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Bck 1-20. Browa 1-1
goal may have been the turning
point he said. We had seen it, and
we were prepared for it. Containing
that play really made a difference
for us
" The waterbucket play was
there stated East Carolina coach
Ed Emory, whose Pirates are now
4-5. "They gave it to us. We just did
not execute it well. When we got the
ball, we just stood over it. They
made a good defensive play. Three
points wouldn't have been the dif-
ference in the ball game
Emorv was impressed with West
Virginia "They're a fine football
team. And Luck is every bit as good
as anybody we've played against.
He's a fine athlete
Emorv reflected on the East
Carolina injury problems. "I'm not
making excuses, but stating fact
See PIRATES, Page 9, Col. 1
� � �
Lady Pirate practice is coming
along "pretty good Andruzzi
says. East Carolina is preparing for
the season-opener against Ap-
palachian State in Minges Coliseum.
"As far as content Andruzzi
says, "we're very, very basic. Our
freshmen have come along a great
deal.Our veterans have been ex-
tremely hard-working
Andruzzi says the success of the
team depends on "how well the
newcomers adapt to certian situa-
tions.
"Our upperclassmen have done a
tremendous job. They have been
responsible individuals on and off
the court and paved the way for the
newcomers
WVU tailback Mickey Walczak (42) is chased by Pirates
Wanted The Win
Bucs Not Cheering
In The Trenches
East Carolina offensive tackle Tom Carnes
(66) stands his ground in protection of the
Pirate backfield in the club's contest with
West Virginia. Mountaineer linebacker
Darryl Talley, an All-America candidate,
converges on Carnes. Carnes, a transfer
from Miami (Fla.), and the ECU offense
was impressive despite the team's 20-3 loss.
The Pirates totalled 298 yards in total of-
fense against the ever-tough Mountaineer
defese. The only WVU losses this year have
come to a pair of nationally-ranked clubs,
Penn State and Pittsburgh. (Photo By Gary
Patterson)
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Autsiaal Sports Mttor
MORGANTOWN, W.V.
There were no cheers and no
laughter coming from the East
Carolina dressing Saturday after
another "one that almost was" got
away.
The Pirates had played West
Virginia to a standstill for three and
a half quarters before Tangerine
and Hall of Fame Bowl scouts until
Mountaineer quarterback Oliver
Luck got his vaunted passing game
on track.
East Carolina coach Ed Emory
said he would have nothing to do
with a moral victory. "We didn t
want one. 1 want a win - a 4w . We
came up here to win the damn game.
We didn't want a moral victory. The
young kids played hard, but we
made a lot of mistakes
Another disappointed Pirate was
split end John Felton who couldn t
hold on to a deflected pass in the
end zone early in the fourth quarter.
Felton said his job was to clear
out on that particular play. "1 turn-
ed around he said, "and the ball
was almost there. The guy (West
Virginia defensive back) deflected
it I was getting ready to jump, and
it hit me in the chest. 1 still felt 1
should have caught it
Emory was pleased with the play
of freshmen running backs James
Bunn (59 yards), Scott Lewis (41),
Stefon Adams (47). "I was real pro-
ud of them he said.
Inexperience at the quarterback
position plaved a big roll. Emory
said. "Thev put lots of pressure on
Kevin (Ingram). He tried to do a lot
of things by himself and didn't let
the team help him
Inexperience was another reason
quarterback Carlton Nelson �
bothered by an injury - was in-
serted for a while Saturday, even
though he did not start, Emory said.
"We were trying to go to ex-
perience. We thought Nelson could
give us the intellectual read, ln-
gram's been here less than a season,
and Nelson's been here almost
two
"We're not playing percentage
football he continued. "If we
were not struggling, we would not
do some of the things we do
Even with the line play � "great
pass protection says Emory � the
Pirate coach said his players were
very disappointed. "It's a big let-
down. But we're going to have to
make it happen the next two
weeks
One person who was not disap-
pointed was Mountaineer coach
Don Nehlen, whose team was
guaranteed its winning season since
1975. "We called it over-the-hump
week he said. "The big things is,
if we'play like we did out there to-
day a year ago, we lose. But the
good teams find a ay to win games
like that, and that is really impress-
ed me about the team today
The Mountaineer coach was con-
cerned with his team's three tur-
novers. "1 hate to say I know it was
coming, but we hadn't made a lot of
mistakes in seven games, and I'm
just happy we were able to over-
come things. When we eot that first
touchdown so quick 1 thought, 'I'm
not sure whether that's good or
bad
"We told the kids all week it they
ran that play right, they'd score and
when it happened, 1 think it might
have affected them a little.
Nehlen went out to praise his
team's defense. "I thought we
played pretty good, but offensively
we made too many mistakes. We
dodged a lot of bullets this after-
noon, but we finally got it (winning
season) he said. "You know, I'll
take a win any way 1 can get it, but
this was really a big win for us
Luck finally got "it" too � the
all-time West Virginia leder in pass
yardage, "passing" Dan Kendra's
previous record of 4,781 yards with
his 257-yard performance. He now
has 4,983 yards passing and 5,382
yards in total offense.
His favorite target, tight end
Mark Raugh caught nine passes for
90 yards and moved into sole
possession of third place on the
single-season pass receiving list He
has 43 catches this season and needs
only eight more receptions in three
games to eclipse the Mountaineer
record of 50 catches set by Oscar
Patrick in 1968.
Pin
( oniimi
he said "We
starters tod J
home We arc
only had one sel
the trip
rh
leading rusher
guard Bud 1 a(
end K
the game
back (.an
The 1
� freshmen rur
Waldei
ran hard
aga
deli
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Bu
10 tim
added 44
ed up -
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fullba
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to
perin
anal.
The Pi
finished !
team;
Fa
mc
w hi
tour'
dr. :
John
Tei �
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$: �





IHI I Sr K)1 IMAN
NOW MHf-k J, 1981
, k
kl
:i
a
i jm
trie
He
eeds
three
new
Impressive
PITTSBURGH PAINTS
i ontinued From p. 8
he saul "We played without 10
starters toda Six of those were at
home We are pretty beat up. We
onl had one senior on offense on
the trip
I he Pirates played without
leading rusher Harold Blue, right
guard Bud I aCock, freshman split
end Rickv Nichols and for most of
the game, without starting quarter-
It Carlton Nelson
1 he Eastarolina Youth Troops
freshmen running backs Adams,
Walden, 1 ewis and James Bunn �
hard the entire afternoon
againsi an aggressive Mountaineer
defense as the Pirates picked up 208
,ii ds i ushing
Bunn, a Goldsboro native, rushed
10 times foi 59 yards while Adam
ded 4h in seven tries. I ewis pick-
up 41 yards on 12 attempts in
Env s termed the "best
lba�.
Ia we've Had this year.
s , � m thai young backfield
Aas quarterback Kevin Ingram, the
Viltanova transfet who started his
first game as a Pirate He rushed 10
times for 37 yards and hit three out
of seven passes for 40 more.
West Virginia's vaunted passing
attack was not on track in the first
hah even though Luck was 7-11 for
78 yards. The Mountaineer quarter-
back hit Rich Hollins on two long
passes but the wide receiver was
unable to hang onto the ball and
fumbled twice with the Pirates
recovering.
West Virginia wasted little time in
opening the scoring. After an East
Carolina drive was stopped by a
fumble, I uck passed on the Moun-
taineers' first play from scrimmage,
hitting running back Mickey
Walczak for a 2-yard touchdown
putting West Virginia up. Murat
Tercan added the extra point for a
7-0 Mountaineer lead
The Pirates retaliated with a drive
of their own behind the play of In-
gram. On second and 11 on their
own 19, Ingram kept the ball for an
11 yard gain After an incomplete
pass on second and 12, he spotted
tight end Norwood Vann for a
15-yard gain.
Ingram again came up with a big
play after a personal foul penalty
against West Virginia moved the
ball to the Mountaineer 28 when he
gained 11 yards on a keeper.
The drive stalled at the West
Virginia six, however, and Chuck
Bushbeck came in to kick a 23-yard
field goal to cut the deficit to 7-3.
The Mountaineers closed the
scoring in the first half on the next
possession which was keyed by the
Mountaineer running attack. Backs
Dane Conwell and Walczag were the
cogs, each cracking the line for
gains of five yards repeatedly.
The drive stalled on the East
Carolina 25 when Luck as sacked by
cornerbek Gerald Sykes. Tercan
came on to kick a 40-yard field goal
and push West Virginia's lead to
10-3.
The second half was all West
Virginia and Luck. After a scoreless
third period, the Mountaineers
received the ball after the Pirate's
fake field was stopped. Luck hit
tight end Mark Raugh for a gain of
14 yards on second and 13 and later
spotted running back Curlin Beck
for 20 yards, putting the ball on the
ECU 39.
After three Luck passes were
broken up, Tercan came on again
and added a 42-yard field goal to
give the Mountaineers a 13-3 lead.
West Virginia iced the contest
with a 64-yard drive that Luck cap-
ped by running the final seven yards
for a touchdown with 3:40 remain-
ing.
"We felt like we were in an upset
situation Emory said. " We felt
until the middle of the fourth
quarter that we could win. We made
a lot of mistakes that hurt us. Our
execution was not good at times
The Pirate coach then set his
sights on a winning season. "What
we have to do now is pull out two
'must' wins he explained, referr-
ing to the two remaining games with
East Tennessee State Saturday and
William and Mary the following
week.
"Our backs are against the wall
again
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port,
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K t
OD1
. na-
tionally earlier in tne
season
rhe win over ODU
left the Pirates needed
wins in both o' their
last two games to finish
at the 500 mark.
Christopher Newport
took care of thai
possibility on Saturday.
:hout;h.
rhe Bucs will try to
end the year on a winn-
ing note this Wednes-
day when they travel to
N.C. Wesley an for the
finale.
At Mendenhall.
pffffffffffffft
your head qfj.
-mm to ������-
OollyPortonmokea
terrific team.
KatMrrnCon-oll.
NF VORK
OAIlVNtwS
Helmick !Sot Pleased
Bx IHOM S BR-VMl.
"Y ot play
n due
no set
��' e x -
. i
! I
mick.
ite golfers
finished l Mh out ot is
'
I N( .
I the
� 's in-
-
1 asi
t was se-
cond, followed by
North c arolina State.
Based on the five Fall
urnaments, the
leading five Pirates foi
spring team are
Don Gafner, Chris
Czaja, Don Sweeting.
Jerry 1 ee and I SI
transfer Jon Riddle.
All 11 players on the
cam played in Fall
tournaments. All are
capable of playing in
the spring. Helmick
sugggested "dedication
and practice would
determine who is on the
spring team
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1981
WVU QB Oliver Luck (12) Fires Pass
Liberty Bowl Eyeing
Play-By-Play
Typist
Wanted
Typing Skills
Required
Type Play-By-Play
For Football
Game
$20
Free Entry
Free Meal
919-757-6491
Big 10 iSPORTSWOBAD)
MEMPHIS, Tcnn.
(I PI) I iberty Bowl
officials are taking a
close look at finding a
Big Ten member to in-
vite to this year's post-
season classic in Mem-
phis.
liberty Bowl scouts
will be at three Big Ten
games this coming
Weekend, Michigan-
Illinois, Wisconsin-
Indiana and Ohio
State-Minnesota.
Liberty scouts will
also be in attendance
for the Southern
Mississippi-Mississippi
State contest, the
Arkansas-Baylor tilt,
the North Carolina-
Clemson clash and the
Texas-Houston mat-
chup.
"I think we're in
great shape for a Big
Ten team Tim
Treadwell 111, chair-
man of the Liberty
Bowl selection commit-
tee, said Monday.
Treadwell said bowl
officials believe they
have a good chance ot
pitting a Big Ten
representative against a
team from the
Southern college ranks.
"We wouldn't be
spending so much time
and monev scouting
teams like Ohio State,
Michigan and Wiscon-
sin if we didn't think
we were in the ball
game Treadwell said.
Arkansas and
Mississippi State also
have earned high marks
from Liberty Bowl
scouts, Treadwell said.
ECU
ECU
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
� BEACH BAND 'SHOW BAND 'MUCH MORE
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75 6452 leave name and number
on answering service.
WEEKEND HOSEPARENTS
WANTED Married couple to
supervise handicapped adults
Call 758-4188
MATURE DEPENDABLE AT
TRACTIVE FEMALE Must be
able to work 12 00 � p m Monday
Friday and 9 00 � 00 on Satur
days Call H C Hodges and Co for
appointment at 752 415
WANTED Female resident
counselor Must complete tranng
and internship in short term client
systems Payment m kind (room
utilities local phone) Call The
Real Cns.s Center 758 HELP
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen years experience wants
typing to do at home Reasonable
rates Call 75 30
TO AL GROH Mr G'Oh, you
must (eel terrible Your team
(Wake Forest) took a real ass
whuppin Irom those Clemson
Tigers Your team must really
reek You must really reek The
score (82 24) made you guys look
like the Wake Forest Dead
Deacons Where were you all
anyway1 Who took your place on
the field Saturday Sorry I iust
can't believe you all are that bad
It's obvious Wake is having
"grohing pains'
WEEKEND HOUSE parents
wanted Married couple to super
vise handicapped adults Call
758 4188
HEAVY METAL � lead guitarist.
hot vocalist needed for heavy
metal band Group experience and
seriousnes a must Call Larry
175 9595) or Paul (744 34111.
LOST WATCH Swiss steel case
leather band unusual day datef
with moon cycle If lound please
return it to Bill Wilson 312 B Scott
Dorm 752 9431 Reward, no ques
tions asked
THE ALPHA PSI pledge class col
lected for the Unicef Halloween
fund on October 29 Thank you
girls from the sisters ot Chi
Omega
LAMBCHOPS � EATING tace to
public is a no no or were you giv
mg lessons on how to be a star
Who loves ya baby- AMF
CHI OMEGA would like to thank
the Alums tor their attendance at
the sorority s annual Alum
Weekend on October 24 and 35
YO ADRIANNE' Let Calgon take
you av.ay again' Get kinky and
wear your crinoline again Care
for chapter room wrestling again2
Tell Vicky hello
D C is No 1 the blanket
club taywalking the grand
tour ol Fort Marcy ostrich egg
rolls cake in your shoe
DC is stripping on 14th Street
and at Thomas Circle (with a little
help Irom your friends I a
Secret Service agent who likes tall
and short girls d.d mg it at the
White House looking for a li
quor store
DC is cramming 10 brothers
and one Irishman m a cab Hip
luice unlocked doors and
bathroom floors using your
head as a door knocker I hours
of sleep let s decide next year
a whoopee chair
DC is this is the moo cow
drinking from the ice bucket
qettmg your head caught in the
cooler a photo that crops up
everywhere . tap dancing at the
Jefferson Memorial
DC is . . 45 minutes to see the
Smithsonian sticking your gum
under the White House furniture
"wouldn t it be awful after all
he's been through tor him to die
Irom one ol our mugs" no cool
popi or even a shower
DC is the soul stroll at Craiy
Horse a special deal Irom a
street vendor more obscene
phone calls ladies lock out
sorry, there s no record of the bill
being paid lost again, and 30
miles from home Thanks lor the
memories El Rod
The DELTA ZETAS want to invite
all interested persons to help us
find the gentleman with the Best
Looking Buns on campus I Come to
the Elbo Room on Thursday. Nov
5, from 7:30 to 9 and chectt it out;
ft
SAAD'S
SHOE
lk REPAIR
Mvi
wit
DAM
113 Grande Ave
758 1228
N
Quality
Repair
.
0nly3O
rc
Homecoming
Mums
S
On Sale at the Student Store
(cash only)
Pick-Up At Fletcher Dorm
Fri. (5-11) and Sat. (9-11)
CAS
Your student ID
is worth $130
at the brand new Greenville Athletic Club.
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SitVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
&RINC
ISSUED
Jcrm Doe
123 Your PI.
Greenville, NC 27834
Of KBY SALES COINc
401 S. EVANS ST. -fESSS
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHUIMfc lOt-SOt
I 'YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
Because with your student
ID, you wont ever have to pay
a penny in initiation fees at this
outstanding new athletic facility.
What's more, as a student,
your $30 monthly dues will be
pro-rated from the day you join.
In other words, if you join on
the 20th, you need only pay 11
days dues for the first month.
Why ECU students should join
the Athletic Club.
Ever try to get a racquetball
court in Minges? With eight new
racquetball courts at GAC, you
won't have to spend hours on
the phone to get a court.
Plus there's exercise classes,
a Nautilus center, saunas, hot
tubs�even an indoor track.
Best of all, the GAC is open
7 days a week to aH members.
The GAC is a great deal for ECU
students. So, come by and show
us your $130 ID card today!
Greenville
Athletic Club
140 Oakmont Drive
For further information, call 756-9175






Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.159
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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