The East Carolinian, October 29, 1981






On The
Inside
Legal Stimulants:
Drugs Clouding
College Campuses
Page 3
Beaux Arts Ball
Masqueraders
Get Potted
Page 5
Mountain Showdown:
Pirates Feud With
WVU This Weekend
Page 8
�he �a0t (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 20
Thursday.Ociober 29, 1981
Greenville.N.C.
10 Pages
Draft Resisters Get Counseling
VK P VIUK-ON
One ECl student, napping between classes. ma be dreaming of the day
when we hae a fall break.
Bv PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff Wriitr
More than one year has passed
since Reagan first indicated his op-
position to Jimmy Carter's renewal
of registration for the draft, and still
there has been no action taken by
the administration to end the
registration process.
Many people opposed to registra-
tion and the draft are convinced that
the process will soon become effec-
tive in its entirety. "We feel very
strongly that the draft will come
back and more pessimistic people
say as early as in 6 months com-
mented Barbara Mann, a volunteer
draft conuselor with the Draft In-
formation Service (D1S) in Raleigh.
"The primary purpose of the DIS
is to provide draft counseling and
information to persons of draft
age she continued.
DIS also counsels parents of draft
age children and pre-draft age men.
"We feel it's essential that those of
draft age have a resource for infor-
mation regarding the draft and
military service other than the Selec-
tive Service System and the
military noted Mann.
The DIS promises confidential,
anonymous help to anyone who
needs it free of charge because, ac-
cording to Mann, the organiza-
tion' strongly opposed to registra-
tion for and reinstitution of the
draft, however all counselling done
by DIS counselors is done from the
non-advocacy position, allowing
each individual to make their own
decision
According to Dannia
Southerland, a staff person with the
War Resisters League in Durham,
the Justice Department is conduc-
ting "selective prosecution" of
some resistors "to try to scare other
people into complying with the
registration process Southerland
also claims that "it's clear they
(Justice Department) can't pro-
secute everyone who doesn't
register
The War Resisters League is an
international pacifist organization,
and unlike the DIS, they advocate
outright resistance to military ser-
vice. "We do resistance counsell-
ing she states.
Further, Southerland says that
government estimates put the
number of men now resisting at
600,000. "Other sources, such as
The Boston globe, say it's upwards
to one million" she continued.
The capacity of all federal prisons
is 25,000, making it appear impossi-
ble for the government to jail every
resistor.
"The War Resistors League
believes the draft cannot be stopped
without resistance. You cannot have
an army to fight an immoral war if
people of conscience refuse to
become a part of it vows
Southerland. "The generation who
refused to participate in Vientnam
taught us that
Southerland advises anyone who
has received a letter about non-
compliance with registration "from
the Justice Department or the U.S.
attorney to call a lawyer. War
Resistors League is also willing to
help you get in touch with a
Lawyer's Guild attorney if you call
us she continues.
Information concerning registra-
tion and the draft is also available to
ECU students and local residents
from the Greenville Peace Commit-
tee, who are "willing to share their
knowledge of the registration and
draft processes with students and
others who are facing it com-
mented spokesperson Edith Web-
ber. "Three of our members took
part in a Draft Counseling
Workshop in Raleigh and - e have
literature and materials available
she continues.
Sister Helen Shondell says the
Catholic Newman Center also offers
counseling and written resources to
students concerning this subject. "I
would be delighted to help anyone
think through their position as to
whether or not they are a conscien-
tious objector said Sister Helen.
"If they decided they were a CO.
then I would help them start a pro-
cess for documenting that reality
Documentation of a conscien-
tious objector position is an impor-
tant criteria demanded by the Selec
tive Service System. "When you get
called up by your draft board you
must have documented information
and proof of it she said. "I would
also encourage all students to reach
out to their campus ministers if they
want counseling along this line
Honor Council Acts As Student Jury
By TRACY GRAY
Si�f f � niw
Many students at East Carolina
don't realize that there is an honor
council. Even those who are aware
of the council's existence may not be
sure why it exists. As stated in the
Student Government Association
Documents handbook, "the Honor
Board has original jurisdicion of
cases of lying, stealing, cheating and
other violations of the Code of Con-
duct and disciplinary offenses
The heart of ECU'S judicial
system is the honor code. This code
states that students are on their
honor not to steal, cheat or lie.
Anyone caught breaking this code
or any rules and regulations could
be asked to appear before the
Blotter Shows
Crime 'Light'
For This Week
By GREG RIDEOUT
Stiff � nlr
The campus security "police blot-
ter" for the week of October 21
through 26 was relatively light, ac-
cording to one police officer. The
following reports are those of dorm
area residents and of related in-
cidents.
October 21. 1:30 p.m. - George
B. Timmerow of 442 Jones reports
the vandalism of his car that was
parked in the freshman parking lot
on 14th and Elm Streets.
October 22. 10:05 a.m. - Sean
Morrissey reports the theft of his
bicycle from the north side of
Mendenhall Student Center. 4:38
p.m. - A "controlled substance par-
ty" in Jarvis is reported by an
unidentified person. 5 p.m. - Linda
Ann Boate of 250 Slay reports the
theft of personal possessions from
her room.
October 23. 1:55 a.m. - Officer
Anderson reports the vandalism of
the glass on the front entrance to
Aycock. 12:30 p.m. - Sharon Marie
Frazelle reports the vandalism of
her 1977 black Volkswagen in the
parking lot at Fourth and Reade
Streets. 2 p.m. - Terri Marie Pulley
of 223 Fletcher reports the theft of
her bicycle from outside the
residence hall.
October 24. 4 p.m. - William
Carson, a coach in the athletic
department, reports the theft of a
vehicle registeied in his name and
Honor Board. This code of conduct
can be found in the SGA documents
handbook.
At least 72 hours prior to an ap-
pearance before the council, there
would be a preliminary hearing.
This hearing would be attended by
Dean of Men James B. Mallory, and
an attorney general and public
defender appointed by the SGA ex-
ecutive council. Attorney General,
Clint Barnes, would open the hear-
ing by reading to the student his
rights of the accused. Barnes would
ask the accused student if he com-
pletely understands or if there are
any questions pertaining to his
rights. If there are no questions, the
attorney general informs the student
of the offense or offenses that he
has committed.
The student is then asked if he or
she requests the services of the
public defender, Hank Littld, whose
duties are similar to that of a
lawyer. If the student does not want
to use the public defender, he may
select another student to perform
these services, or he may do so
himself. The student cannot hire a
practicing lawyer because the cam-
pus judiciary is run by students.
"The Honor Board has
original jurisdiction of
cases of lying, stealing,
cheating . . . "
On the predetermined court date,
the student is brought before an un-
biased and impartial jury of his
peers. This jury, the Honor Coun-
cil, is selected from the student
body. A maximum number of six
students are selected as alternates in
the event of an absence of a regular
board member. The chairman
presides over the meeting and votes
only in a tie.
If there is a person on the council
who has personal feelings towards
the accused or feels that he cannot
cast an unbiased vote, he is on his
honor to remove himself from the
board for that particular case. Fur-
thermore, the attorney general or
the public defender also has the
right to remove any two members
from the board if they feel that there
is sufficient reason to do so.
If a majority of the Honor Board
finds the student guilty, they will
then determine what type of punish-
ment should be imposed. This final
decision is reached in a closed ses-
sion.
If the student feels that the board
imposed too harsh a penalty, he can
appeal the decision to the review
board, which is also composed en-
tirely of students. The review board
may ascertain that the honor board
was justified in its decision. If this is
so, the student then has the right to
appeal once again to a vice-
chancellor. Should the student wish
to appeal a third time, the last step
in the judicial process is the ECU
chancellor. The chancellor's deci-
sion is final and cannot be appealed.
A heavy punishment such as ex-
pulsion from the university can be
suggested by the Honor Board, but
only the chancellor can impose this
punishment.
Attorney General Clint Barnes
says the SGA office is now taking
applications from anyone desiring a
position of the Honor Board.
Barnes claims that any student with
serious intentions and willing to
spend a few hours a week with the
council can apply.
"I would like to see as many as
one hundred students apply for
these important positions stated
Barnes in an interview last week. "It
is important that we get as many ap-
plications as possible because the
student body needs the best Honor
Council possible Applicants will
be screened through the executive
council of the SGA.
Auto Accidents Rank As
Fourth Leading Killer
ECU campus security department is now moving to these new headquarters at 1001 E. Fifth St Police opera-
tions wWconZue a, the old location until Friday. October 30. Traffic tickets given out .to weekend cannot be
paid until Monday and must be paid at the new office.
owned by Joe Pecheles Volkswagen,
Inc. 9 p.m. - Officer Gurly reports
the vandalization of a parking meter
north of White.
October 25. 11:05 a.m. - Gregory
Powell of 230 Aycock reports the
breaking and entering of his room
and the theft of his stereo. 12:38
p.m. - Amanda E. Smith of 902 Cle-
ment reports the vandalism of her
vehicle at the Scott parking lot. 1:45
p.m. - Stephen C. Smith of 158
Jones reports the theft of his wallet
from his room. :30 p.m. - Dorothy
Gardner reports the theft of her art
supplies from her lockers at the
Jenkins Fine Arts Center.
October 26. 12:15 p.m. - William
Ray McKeithan of 137 Jones reorts
the theft of his bicycle from the rack
outside the residence hall. 9:30 p.m.
- Cheri Louise Staton reports the
theft of her bicycle outside of
Speight Building.
The campus security department
urges all students to report any
crime or suspicious incident.
Cooler, Clear
This Weekend
Cool, breezy nights and sunny days
through Saturday, with highs in the
60's and lows in the 40's. No chance
of rain through Saturday.
Bv MIKE HUGHES
Staff Vtnltf
If you are between the ages of 20
and 24 and drive a small car,
statistics show that you are more
likely than others to be killed or
seriously injured in an automobile
accident.
Every 16 seconds, another
American is injured in a motor vehi-
cle accident, and once every 10
minutes, a car crash claims another
life in the United States.
According to statistics released by
the National Safety Council, 51,900
deaths were caused by motor vehicle
accidents last year. Of the total,
37,900 deaths involved collisions.
Nearly 23,000 Americans died last
year in accidents involving two or
more cars, the safety council
statistics say. More than 9,000
pedestrians and about 1,000
bicyclists were also killed in motor
vehicle collisions.
Approximately 1,000 persons
were killed when their motor
vehicles hit or were hit by trains.
And approximately 3,500 car
passengers died in collisions with
fixed objects.
California posted the most traffic
deaths last year, with over 5,300,
while Vermont and Alaska shared
the figure for the fewest in 1980,
with 127.
In North Carolina, traffic ac-
cidents claimed 1,510 lives last year,
representing the ninth highest figure
in the U.S.
Nationwide, motor vehicle ac-
cidents rank as the fourth leading
killer behind heart and artery
diseases, cancer and stroke and
cerebrovascular diseases.
In some cities, such as San Ber-
nardino, Calif and Lubbock.
Texas, traffic accidents claim as
many as 30 lives per 100,000
residents per year. Madison, Wise
however, shows one of the lowest
rates of motor vehicle death. Ap-
proximately 3.6 per 100,000
Madison residents are killed each
year in traffic related accidents.
In a report titled "Accident
Facts the National Safety Council
determined that more drivers aged
20 to 24 die in automobile accidents
than any other age group, including
drivers under 20.
Officials of the National Highway
Traffic Safety Administration said
that the increasing numbers of small
cars being purchased each year by
Americans could bring an increase
of as much as 25 percent in highway
fatalities by the end of the decade.
Last year, the agency conducted
tests to determine the degree of pro-
tection provided by several makes of
small cars. Of the 12 automobiles
tested, only two � the Chevrolet
Chevette and the Fiat Strada �
were deemed to have sufficient pro-
tection to save the driver from death
or serious injury in a 35 mph crash.
Cars failing the test were the Hon-
da Civic, Audi4000, Mazda 626,
Volkswagen Rabbit, Honda
Prelude, Subaru GLF, Datsun 310,
Datsun 300X, Toyota Corolla and
the Toyota Tercel.
t







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 29. 1981
Announcements
CORSO
There will be a Corrections
Social Work (CORSO) meeting on
Thursday. October � at S:30 p.m
in Mendenhall 211. All social work
and corrections majors and in
tended majors are urged to at
tend!
VOLLEYBALL
THe PRC Society and Jeffery s
Beer and Wine will be sponsor.ng
a Co-Rec Volleyball Tournament
at Mirtges Coliseum on October 31
from II e p.m. There is a ten dollar
entry fee. First place, keg second
place, pony keg Other prizes w!i
be awarded. Sign up at the PRC
building iBehind McDonalds and
across from Hardees on Cotanche
St.) Deadline Oct 29 Teams must
consist of six persons with at least
two females per team
TEAM HANDBALL
Men's and Women's Team
Handball Club will have ar
organizational meeting Thursday
Oct 29 at 4 30 p m m Memooa
Gym. room 105 All inferesfec
newcomers and veterans are in
vited Por further information call
Stuart at 75a 3831
THE WAY
Do you think some people need
to change their attitudes? Do you
want to be more positive, conti
dent, and less fearful' The Bible
contains the real key tor atttude
adjustment Read Romans.
Chapter 12 16. especially 12 2
That is what we are doing, chang
mg our old attitudes to line up with
those m the Bible (I Cor 13) Come
by and see Thursday. Oct 79,
11 30 a m in room 212. and 7 30
p m m room 242, Mendenhall Stu
dent Center
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student union Travel Com
mittee is now accepting applica
tions tor membership All persons
interested in joining can pick up
an application at the Student
Union office, room 234 Mendenhall
Student Center
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
Wanted Male, mjsicans,
singers, dancers, poets, or
whatever your talent, to par
t.cipate in The Student of the Year
Pageant sponsored by Alpha Kap
pa Alpha Sorority, inc The
deadline for contestant applica
tions will be October 2� So on
November 17 be prepared tor
another AKA Affair Alpha Kap
pa Alpha is also looking forward to
the students presence at their
dance which will be held October
24 from 10 p m til 2 a m at the
Cultural Center Come "jam"
after the game' We also en
courage more minority students to
participate in SOULS Please
NYCTRIP
The deadline of registration tor
the Student union Travel Commit
tee sponsored New York City trip
has been extended until Nov 2 All
persons interested in going, should
pick up an application at the Cen
tral Ticket Office locatred in
Mendenhall Student Center
COMPUTERS
The ECU chapter of ACM will
meet this Thursday, Oct 29 at 3 30
in room 221 Austin This week. Mr
Glenn Crowe, the director of the
ECU computing center, will speak
on the plans and priorities of the
center Anyone interested is in
vited to attend
TRAFFIC OFFICE
The ECU Traffic Office,
presently located in the old laun
dry building, will close at the end
of the business day on October 27,
1981 and reopen for business on
November 2, 1981 m a new location
at 1001 East Fifth Street, across
from the Spilman Building.
Police operations will continue
in the old laundry building until
October 30 A dispatcher will be on
duty at the present location to pro
cess emergency traffic matters
only until October 30 The seventy
two hour period on traffic citation,
will be extended to exclude the
period the Traffic Office is not
operational.
All police, traffic and infor
maiton services will be moved to
1001 East Fifth Street by the end of
the business day on October 30,
1981
BAKE SALE
The King's Youth Fellowship of
ECU is sponsoring a Oake sale on
November 2 from 9 until 12 30 at
the ECU Bookstore
BOARDOF DIRECTORS
The semi annual meeting of the
board of directors of the ECU
Foundation will be held at noon,
Fr.oay, Oct 30 at the Greenville
Country Club
PICTURES
Buccaneer Babes will have a
photographer on campus Sunday,
Nov. 1 from 1 to 6 Pictures will be
taken by the fountain, and are
$10 00 for a packet of five (5) 4X6
Group pictures will be limited to 3
people For more info, call
Allyson, 757 1659 or Rachael.
752 2126
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Gamma Sigma Sigma Pledge
Class is having a Bake Sale on
November 2 at the Student Supply
Store Please come out and help us
raise money for the Pledge Pro
iect
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli
man in care of the news editor
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited.
The deadline for announcement
are 5pm Friday for the Tuesdsay
paper and 5 P m Tuesday for the
Thrusdasy paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments.
INFLUENZA
influenza vaccine is available at
the Student Health Center The
cost is $3 tor each injection.
Students with chronic illnesses,
diabetes, asthma, or those who are
on chemotherapy tor malignant
diseases and those having unusual
exposure should come by the Stu
dent Health Center between 8am
and 5 P m Monday through Fri
day during October or November
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Honor
Society will hold committee
meetings on Tuesday, Nov. 3 at
5 00 p.m. in room 212 Mendenhall
Student Center All members are
urged to attend
SCEC
Student Council for Exceptional
Children will be having an
organizational meeting Monday.
Nov 2, at 4 p m Val Carm.ne.
from Caswell Center in Kinston,
will speak to us on the
��InsideKM" program This m
teresting presentation will be held
in Speight, Room 129
CEREBRAL PALSY
The United Cerebral Palsy is go
mg to have a square dance and
auction out at the Carolina Opry
House, Tuesday. Nov 10. between
the hours of 7 p.m. 11 pm tor the
benefit oi the UCP Center of
Greenviiie Come and iom us if
you don't know how to square
dance, we'll teach you! Jerry
Powell, caller The Ambush Band
will be playing from 11 p m on
Donation 81 00 at the door
ATTIC
South � 1 "ock
No 6 im Niflhtciub
PRC Society
Wayne Weston, President of the
North Carolina Recreaton and
Parks Society, will speak at the
Next PRC Society meeting on Nov
2 1981 at 7 30 pm in
Mendenhall'smulti purpose room
Mr Weston will speak about the
NCRPS and its 37th annual State
Convention Nov 15 18, 1981 A
covered dish supper will follow
COOP
The Smithsonian Institution in
Washington, DC currently has iob
openings for juniors, seniors, and
graduate students with 3 0 GPA's
or above for Spring Semester In
terested students are urged to app
ly at the Co op Office, 313 Rawl to
day Deadline for application is
November 1
OA
Are you addicted to food? Do
you eat when you're not hungry?
Do you go on eating binges tor no
apparent reason? Is your weigin
affecting the way you live your
life? If so, come to an overeaters
anonymous meeting every
Thursday night at 7 30 p m at the
First Presbyterian Church
(corner of 14th and Elm streets
REBEL
The ECU Literary Magazine
REBEL is looking for an Associate
Editor, Prose Editor and Art
Editor Applications can be picked
up in the Publications Building n
the Media board secretary office
Any major is acceptable
HOMECOMING MUMS
On sale Oct 26 Nov 5 at the
Student Supply Store Only 85 00!
Sponsored by Fletcher Dorm
BLACK RUSSIAN
If you're still curious about our
winter guarde Come see us on
Halloween at Carolina East Mall
Performances at 12 30 p m and
5 30 p m See you there!
BIG APPLETRIP
The deadline to sign up tor the
New York City trip has been ex
tended unt.i Nov 2 The tr.p ��
�heduled tor Nov 25 through
Nov 29
NAACP
The ECU chapter of the NAACP
will have a membership drive all
day October 26. 27, 28, and 29 .n
front of the Students Supply Store
Please support and iom the
NAACP today
SKI SNOWSHOE
All persons planning to ski
Snowshoe during Christmas break
should contact Mrs Jo Saunders
at 757 6000. 205 Memorial Gym
Deposits are due on Tuesday, Oc
tober 27 at 4 00 P m m Memorial
Gym 108 Balance due on Thurs
day. November 19 There is
limited space available
�astl
nedJ
The East Carolinian
Srrwflf � campus commuiuiy
unct 192)
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during me academic
,ear and every Wednesday dur
,ng the summer
The East Carolinian is the W
ficial newspaper of E
Carolina University, owned
operated and putoi'Shed for and!
oVme students of East Carolina
University
Subscripts Rate tw yearly
The East Carolinian offices
,re located the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville, NX.
POSTMASTER Send addressl
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building, ECU Green
vine, NC 27814
Telephone 75734. M7. JW
Application �o mail at second
class postage rates �� pending at I
r.r��nville North Carolina
SIGMA TAU DELTA
The National English Honor
Society, will hold a meeting on
Thursday, Oct 29 at 730 p m in
Mendenhall Coffeehouse On the
agenda are induction of New
Members and a Panel Discussion
on "SUPERSTITIONS featuring
Drs Karen Baldwin, Charles
Sullivan, and McKay Sundwall of
the English Department All new
members are asked to atiend.
along with present members and
any interested person
THURSDAY
NO
.VACANCY
FRI. A SAT. .
SUBWAY!
Have You Done It Yet!
TKE RUSH
MONDAY NIGHT
November 2, 1981
9-12
At TKE House � 951 E. Tenth St.
BARRE, ltd.
Dancewear Specialty Shop
3HC
DOC
See us for all
of your Halloween Seeds.
422 ARUMGTOfl BLVD
GREENVILLE. NX. 27834
(9191 756-fvK70
Private Sector Has Jobs
roast
(UPI) - Job prospects
should be good for
1982 college graduates
in the private sector,
particularly in
engineering and com-
puters, but they may
likely be bleak in the
slashed-back federal
government.
A few years from
now, this new wave of
American workers,
along with those
already in the
workforce, could see
slashes in cost-of-liing
raises as the result of
the government chang-
ing its method of
calculating the inflation
index.
A College Placement
Council official said
Tuesday the employ-
ment outlook for this
spring's college grads is
good for most fields,
especially engineering,
business and computer
science.
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM IJ U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
tlti.M Pregnancy Teal. �irrh
Control and Profclem
Pregnancy Counseling For fwr
tkar mformatte call Ujasjs
(Tell Free Manser
�oe-jit 2S mw AM
and S PM WiawEiy
11 IK
Greenviiie Square
Shopping Center
ACROSS FROM K-MART
TWO ARBY'S KING SANDWICHES
FOR $2.49
Limit 1 Coupon Per Customer Per Visit.
Not Good In Conjunction With Any Other
Offer�Good At Arby's, E. Greenville Blvd.
Pitt Plaza Shopping Center�Expires Nov. 4t
Pleas present coupon before ornerine
WHATAWEEK!
Bveibai Student a HyeWtai!
�1981 Pabst Brewing Company, Milwaukee. Wisconsin and other cities
MON.
TUES.
WEDS.
THURS.
FRI.
SAT
SUN.
Domino's Pizza goes crazy starting
Monday, November 2 through Sunday.
November 8. Each coupon is good for one
day only, so look for your favonte specials
We deliver free of charge in 30 minutes
or lets.
Call us: 758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd- Limited delivery area
� Our drivers carry less than $20 C98i DonmfaPaz,
FREE DOUBLE CHEESE on any 16
pizza $119 value'
One coupon per pizza
Good today, November 2 only
Fast, Free Delivery
1201 Charles Blvd. 758-6660 itim 5530
FREE PEPPERONI on any 16" pizza
$119 value' One coupon per pizza
Good today. November 3 only
Fast, Free Delivery
1201 Charles Blvd. 758-6660 itimssm
J
L.
r
$1.00 OFF any 16" 1 item or more pizza
One coupon per pizza
Good today, November 4 only
Fast, Free Delivery
120 Charles Blvd. 758-6660 ins swo
J
$2.00 OFF any 16" 2 item or more pizza
One coupon per pizza
Good today, November 5 only
Fast, Free Delivery
� 1201 Charles Bivd, 758-6660 '7134530
$1.00 OFF any pizza ordered during
lunch, 11 AM - 4 PM
One coupon per pizza
Good today, November 6 only
Fast, Free Delivery
1201 Charles Blvd, 758-6660 171345
I
$ .50 OFF any pizza
One coupon per pizza
Good today. November 7 only
Fast, Free Delivery
1201 Charles Blvd. 758-6660 irtatssa
L.
$1.50 OFF any 16" Deluxe or Vegi pizza.
One coupon per pizza.
Good today, November 8 only
Feat, Free Delivery
e 1201 Charles Blvd, 758-8880 17,34,5530
I
rru
m
I
j
I
drl
I
I
I






I HI I AS I i Ak �l INIAN
)( FOhr R 29, ISX1
Drugs Are Dangerous But Legal Rush
n
i
j
n
j
J
n
j
1 o�V� Vm Vnn
"The) sell like
cra sas an editoi
�t! High I i mo s
magazine.
"They're some oi t he
most dangerous drugs
mi the market today
savs an Illinois publu
health, official
"We're giving the
public foods, not
drugs claims a com
pans president.
1 he controversial ob
jects in question are so
.ailed "legal bods
stimulants pseudo-
d i u g s w h ich h a v e
reportedly been sweep
ing college campuses in
pularit the past year
or so. The products,
which b and large are
quite legal, usually take
the form either ot
"look-alike" capsules
and tabled designed to
re sent" am-
phetamines. Quaaludes
r butyl
idizing
as
' that
or coca: lie.
nitrite
agent
small !
i .
ai
out
r�t
a
� i n e
les and
contain
oi oi cal
phynyl
prop; ne (an an-
11 h i s t a m i n e) a n d
ephedrii fate The
pr o ers w i I h
i "high" to
them as being
genuine artiv le,
bogus pilK
u less
line am-
nes 1 he puK
the stimulant
ileni ' "perhaps
satit
1 i
Administi
brief
blood
.u r to !eei
, dd and euphoric for
it two mi n tit es
before returnng to nor-
I ai
eutical companies
i e been
n g i ng up like
fire during the past
year, flooding the col-
lege market with pills
and incense, often
advei openly in
campus newspapers
with promos for large
helpings of stimulants.
It is questionable tot
the moment just how
prevalent student use of
the legal stimulants and
look-alikes has
become. or how
dangerous it ai all
such products actually
are
�-1 haven't heard of
these drugs hitting our
campus says student
counseloi Kent Poey of
the University o 1
Massachusetts. "We
haven'i really seen
anything around here
savs ilham C. White,
director 0f
psychological sen ices
at Cornell. It
shouldn't be very big
among our students
"I've heard no men-
tion of it agrees
I niversity of Michigan
staff psychologist Evie
authier, "though
maybe it's just thai
we're not asking about
it. Mavbe kids who are
into it aren't coming to
us
On the othei hand.
Bill Olson of the
I (niversity ot Colorado
counseling service saw
an increase in usage
during the past year.
" rhey were pretty
popular last spring
he notes, although we
haven't had anyone
come in experiencing
problems, strung out
on the stufi
"There have been at
ast five deaths nation-
w ide as a result oi cat -
tome drugs contends
Di. John Spikes, chief
toxicologisi at the 11-
nois public health
depart men t. w hose
state recently initiated
legal action to prohibit
sales of look-alikes.
"And there are others
that probably haven't
H
A
P
P
Y
y
been reported, simply
because people didn't
leahe what had trig-
gered the victim's reac-
tion
"There have been
some deaths confirm-
ed agrees Chris
Smith of the Food and
Drug Administration,
"although some of
those may have been
deliberate suicides
"You'd have to be
cautious of repeated
usage of (butyl
nitrite) warns Dr.
Charles Sharp of the
National Institute on
Drug Abuse, citing
evidence of a number
of deaths among
homosexuals who, he
savs, are the most fre-
quent i n cense i n-
dulgers. By and large,
thouch, he concedes
"most people can pro-
bably get by without
problems
"Our product is
among the most benign
substances you could
find, as benign as tap
water exults W. Jay
Freeer, San Francisco
based manufacturer ot
Rush, the most popular
butyl nitrite inhalent
"The chemical gets
nowhere near t h e
brain
"About twenty states
have conceded (in court
cases) there's no pro-
blem with Rush says
Freeer, who claims his
product is now legal in
every state etcept
Massachusetts and
Georgia.
"In effect Freezer
proclaims, "we're the
third legal hedonistic-
product in America,
along with tobacco and
alcohol
Marc Bernstein,
whose MSB
Associates manufac-
ture stimulants such as
foot. Zoom and Relax-
U, takes almost a
guru's attitude toward
his products. "Zoom
was first extracted from
exotic plants by South
American Indians he
claims, while "Relax-U
is a synthesis of foods
used in ancient times.
Its ingredients are
similiar to dietary
preparations taken by
millions of people
"It's difficult to pro
ve a new drug is
dangerous admits
FDA's Chris Smith,
"but there are other
measures w e r can
take Generally
unable to make a case
on drug abuse grounds,
the agency is now pur-
suing a different
angle counterfeiting
"The phony drugs
are designed to look ex-
actly like the real
thing says Smith,
whose agency seized the
products of nine dif-
ferent stimulant
manufacturers in a sur-
prise raid September
30. Most ot the com
panies were located in
New York and Penn-
sylvania, with the town
of Milroy, Pa. fingered
as "the centei tor most
nation wide stimulant
activity bv Smith
Smith traces
stimulant manufactui
ing to around 1975,
selling almost ex-
clusively to truck
drivers. "It wasn't until
the past vear or so these
things caught on
around college cam-
puses, partly due to the
general diet pill craze
among college kids
; Tis Hie Season to be SPOOKY!
We have books for the
Fearless Reader . . .
�CUJO
by Stephen King
�SHADOWLAND �UNFORGIVEN
by Peter Straub by Patricia J MacDonald
�GHOST RIG
by Cfiff Patton
H
A
L
L
O
W
E
E
N
Elbe and Alpha Sigma
Beer Bong Contest
Tues Nov. 3
Doors open at 8:30
Lots of Prizes
$50
$25
$10
1st
2nd
3rd
r
iSSSSS&8t&S8S&S&S3&&eS3&S3S

Cl CamewfM�e Fati�ue Aim
Sfc.rU. Sfeeimif, ����
Backpacks Camp.ne Equ.p
men! Steel Tee Shoes Dist�es
And Over ft Different New And
Used Htmt Cowfcoy ����
ARMY-NAVY
ijoiEvan
All you
can eat
Popcorn
Shrimp
499
ABORTIONS
.4 weed termination
Appt s. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321 0575
.r n1e"3rar!u
� A, student, may "
ompte tor several r-undred
a r Force scholarships Thf
�noiarsrp are to te ewerd
to to students accepted into
menrai schools as ?'�eshrrien
or at me OeV) ,h"r
sophmore year The scholar
p provdes tor to.t.orv
oocis. iao fees .no equ-p-
allowance investigate �h�
linanciai alternative �o the
n.gh rost of med.cai educa
t,on Contact
y S A f HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
BECRUITING
SUITE OH, OH NAVAMO D
RA4.EIOHNC J7�
PHONE COLLECT CfWm-fW
�7SMwP
Dean I at inter, taking two or three
assoeiate editor of High cups of Turkish coffee
Times magame, is It doesn't do much of
skeptical about the anything
stimulants' value,
" I hese things will keep
vm awake, impair vour
diet, and you'll build
up a total tolerance
within two weeks he
scoffs "l used to be a
speed treak. and taking
this new stutt is like
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
GET HEAPING PORTIONS
AT A PRICE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
October 29 Thursday tO IS
C HIC KEN N DUMPLINGS.
2 vegetables
H-tober 30. Triday SO 5 9
TROUT ALMONDINE. 2 vegetables . i.
October 31 .Saturday �0sQ
CHOPPED SIRLOIN STEAKZ
2 vegetables
November 1 Sunday SO 29
TURKEY & DRESSING
2 vegetables
November 2. Monday S049
COUNTRY-STYLE STEAK
2 vegetables
November 3. Tuesday �,O09
BROILED CALF'S LIVER�
2 vegetables
November 4. Wednesday $009
BAKED SPAGHETTI. 2 vegetables Z
��
;T�sAt�7
' w
Carolina East Mall
Mn 1 I IINt H 1 lam 2 ISpm 51 t't't K
1 (0pm Sf.m 8:30Fn Sal ftSvnllaaa IpaBcotttimi - �Sa
rVGB
ooj
ROXYMUSIC ARTS & CRAFTS CENTER, INC.
presents
The 7th Annual
Halloween Masquerade Ball
Saturday, October 31. 1981 at Roxy Theatre Albt mark A venue 9:00 P.M. 2:00 A M.
Ft aturing
GILLESPIE - HAMER BAND
MIKE "LIGHTNING" WELLS
BL UES PL US
STUDIO
fW SPECIAL GUESTS
sound by ECONOTRONICS SS
�Forinformation call 752 6327
GENERAL ADMISSION $5.00 tl00 Prize for best costume
ROXY MEMBERS $4.00 Tee Shirts & Refreshments will b, for sale S5�" 2nd Place
The Roxy Music Arts & Crafts Ccrf r, Inc. is a nonprofit organization.
f





The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community since 1925.
Paul Collins. Eduo,ick
Jimmy DuPREE, m ���,
Chuck Foster, dco, �r Charles Chandler, we"
Chris Lichok, r � -n m Tom Hall. ,����,
Alison Bartel, �,�,��. Mawr Steve Bachner. t
Steve Moore, (��,�. -n LJ Karen Wendt. s,jr�i
Oclobcr 29. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Northern Ireland
Hope For Peace Since Fasts Are Over
Yes, Northern Ireland, there is in-
deed a state of tranquility � com-
monly known as peace.
On one weekend in early October
a dove finally perched � for a mo-
ment � on a country that is riddled
with violence and dissention.
There were still skirmishes in the
streets but a glimmer of hope
toward everlasting peace was resur-
rected when the Irish nationalist
prisoners gave up their hunger strike
and the British government began
developing a new program for
prison reform.
The reform programs do not meet
all the prisoner's demands. They
will not be declared "political
prisoners" � thanks primarily to
British Prime Minister Maragaret
Thatcher, who rightfully refused to
do so because terrorist activities
would, in fact, be condoned.
The British government insisted
that they would not make any con-
cession until the fast was ended.
DOONES8URY
When the seven-month-old parade
of death was over, the British did
not declare victory and instead step-
ped in the right direction to relieve
poverty and improve work laws.
The gunmen of the Irish
Republican Army were also in a
slight position to declare victory.
After all, they received worldwide
attention and publicity with their
protest � even though they paid a
heavy price with the deaths of Bob-
by Sands � who became a symbol
for the Irish fight for independence
� and his followers.
But the losers in this long series of
tragedies is Northern Ireland. The
fasts ended all prospects for any
movement toward ending sectarian
conflicts and polarized the province
� hardening positions within the
Roman Catholic and Protestant sec-
tors. But the search for continuing
peace must go on � and the
"compromise" was a start in the
right direction.
by Garry Trudeau
W?9
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WWE?
Campus Forum
Hunger
Braxton
Already Campaigning?
By CHARLES M. SLNE
Marvin Braxton wants to be ECU's first
black SGA President, and his campaign
for that office has already begun. I have no
problem with one's aspirations for higher
elected office or the use of incumbency for
political advantage � nor should you. To
the contrary, I would think Braxton to be
of poor presidential timber if he did not
use the opportunities of his vice presiden-
cy. No problem thus far.
The problem with Candidate Braxton's
campaign is that he is willing to do
anything to bolster his public image and
thus help him attain his ultimate goal of
goals � the presidency. His tactics conger
up our worst images of politicians as in-
dividuals who are concerned with nothing
but the acquisition of power, prestige and
wealth. His tactics give all politicians a bad
name.
Now you're probably saying to yourself.
"But Charles, how can this be? He seems
like such a nice guy � you've gotta have
him mixed up with someone else. Why, he
was the first one to speak up when . . .
Well, Candidate Braxton is an oppor
tunist of the worst kind. He is not so con-
cerned with the substance of an issue in-
volved in a particular situation as with the
opportunity to boost his image. His con-
cern for his image is not limited to Green-
ville either.
� Example One � Mr. Braxton Goes to
Washington: Prior to Braxton's departure
on a recent trip to see Congressman Walter
B. Jones, he contacted Jones' office to
make an appointment. So far, so good.
When Braxton made the appointment, he
'Bulge In The Carpet Remains' Due To Negligence
I would like to comment on Mack
Paul's article concerning world hunger
and the ECU Hunger Coalition.
A nation has a moral obligation to
supply aid to less fortunate countries. A
state which has sufficient means at
disposal to counter suffering and does
not, is by ignoring the problem, allowing
it to spread and fester like an open
wound. Must a needy country first supp-
ly resources (commodities) before it
earns the right to be helped?
Mr. Paul states that a price tag should
be placed on aid, but what price does
one place on a human life? In regard to
his assessment that group action is
useless, the opposite holds true. Groups
act as a focal point to funnel issues
together. Groups are a more compact
and logical means of combating the pro-
blem of world hunger, then allowing
countless millions of individuals to pre-
sent millions of alternate plans.
Perhaps Mr. Paul believes that hunger
will go away by sweeping it under the
rug; however, the bulge in the carpet re-
mains.
MIKE WEST
Junior, English
Pen-Pals Wanted
Two former students of ECU would
like to correspond with anyone who is
interested as pen-pals. We were con-
victed of drugs and now we are in prison
in Raleigh.
Anyone interested, will greatly help us
because it is lonely and will brighten �. ui
days and give us sunshine.
Here are our names and addresses:
Ronnie C. Smith
835 W. Morgan St.
Raleigh N.C. 27603
Donald Henderson
835 W. Morgan St.
Raleigh, N.C. 27603
Thank you for your time and I hope
you can help us.
RONNIE SMITH
DONNIE HENDERSON
Braxton Defended
I find it personally irrigating that the
chairperson of The Art Exhibition Com-
mittee had to belittle Mr. Braxton in the
East Carolinian. I am sure that he was
only carrying out his duties and respon-
sibilities as a representative of the
students at East Carolina.
Having taken Art Appreciation (ART
1910), I felt that 1 could look at this ex-
hibition with a learned eye, but alas, ap-
parenlty not. For some reason I perceiv-
ed you were addressing all students that
agreed with Mr. Braxton that we know
nothing about art.
There are many individuals (students,
staff, and faculty) that found this
"exhibition" offensive. Please take
note, Art Exhibition Committee, many
of us Did Not Like This Exhibition!
Please remember, you do not think
for the students � please allow them to
express themselves.
BOB MATTHEWS
Grad Student, Sociology
Coalition Backed
I would like to clarify the misconcep-
tion created by Kim Albin's editorial
and Mark Paul's follow-up letter to the
editor that criticized the ECU Hunger
Coalition.
The whole idea of hunger and
malnutrition is not only an economic
(free enterprise) issue stated by Mark
Paul. It is a life and death reality.
Praising Capitalism is fine but failure
to recognize that 50,000 human beings
die each day is the issue that confronts
us.
The Hunger Coalition has served
Greenville citizens for 11 years. We have
been a productive and well-organized
group. Kim Albin's editorial stated, "I
just can't give them my support without
even a clue as to how their actions help
solve or at least alleviate world hunger
The Hunger Coalition raised $7,100
last year through the Walk for Humani-
ty. This money was divided with half go-
ing to domestic malnutrition right here
in Pitt County and the other half going
to Oxfam America. Oxfam does not
supply food but works with Third World
Countries in self-help programs.
The final point I would like to make is
that we are not trying to make anyone
feel guilty about participating � that is
your decision.
People should not cut down an
organization that has worked efffective-
ly for 11 years on domestic malnutrition,
as well as world hunger, before they
have seriously studied the issue and are
familiar with the root caused of hunger.
THERESA DULSKI
Sophomore, General College
Campus
Spectrum
made it claiming to be ECU's current SGA
president. Furthermore, upon arrival he
introduced himself as the current SGA
president. We are lucky that a member of
Jones' staff is familiar with ECU politics
and was able to correct Marvin on his
questionable 1 o s s - o f - m e m o r y - c u m -
fantasy.
One thing is for sure, Braxton's claim of
being the current SGA president should tell
us something about the great lengths he
will go to boost his image � even lying in
the office of a U.S. Congressman.
� Example Two � The Media Campaign:
On occasions, Candidate Braxton has con-
tacted The last Carolinian in an attempt
to portray himself as the great defender of
students, the White Knight (no slurs in-
tended); the I one Ranger; Superman and
any other images of heroism you can think
of. It is critical to remember that it was
Marvin who contacted The East Caroli-
nian and not The East Carolinian who con-
tacted Marvin. Remember, Mohammed
went to the mountain, the mountain didn't
come to Mohammed.
The fact that Braxton has contacted The
East Carolinian tells us that it was he who
expected to be interviewed and he who
would thus be in a good position to
manipulate the media to his advantage.
When contacting this newspaper. Braxton
intends to make himself appear heroic.
Last week our hero was at it again.
Upon seeing the new art exhibit in
Mendenhall, he seized another opportunity
to make himself look good. The candidate
contacted the The East Carolinian claim-
ing to be appalled by the explicit nature of
the exhibit. This time, his event met with
success because the exhibit became con-
troversial almost exclusively at his own
hand.
Now before anyone decides to threaten
my life or slash the tires of my car, allow
me to justify my apparent unpnnoked at-
tack on "your friend and mine Marvin
Braxton. Braxton's concern is not tor the
issues involved but the opportunity to look
good politically. I for one, have little con-
cern for Marvin public image. There is
no substance in his manv opportunistic
positions.
He is operating under the delusion that a
successful politician need only be concern-
ed with political rhetoric and the ap-
pearance of being a successful leader
rather than the hard work that ultimately
leads to genuine success.
Successful politicians, whether they be
conservative or liberal, operate from some
semblance of a plan based in theory, at
least, upon their respective political
philosophies.
Braxton has no plan except to take op-
portunities as they come. His success v.ill
depend upon his ability to manipulate us.
Our success will depend upon our ability to
see through that manipulation.
(Charles Sune is a senior political science
major from Raleigh j
Beauty Of Beaux Arts Ball Ruined
Due To Dangerous Conditions
By KIM ALBIN
Did anyone miss the Beaux Arts Ball?
If you did miss it, did you hate yourself
the next day? Did you feel sorry and pro-
mise you'd go next year? Did you spend all
day last Saturday wondering what you'd
missed?
Although I am reasonably certain that
everyone who is anyone in Greenville was
indeed in attentance at the Beaux Arts Ball
last Friday night, I won't swear to it.
Everyone said they were going, but I didn't
see anyone there.
There were too many people. There were
hundreds and hundreds of people packed
inside Papa Katz, all pressed together as
closely as their costumes would allow. And
not just you ordinary folk, mind you, these
were mostly artsy types-drama majors, art
majors, English majors-and you know
how much space we require. Lots and lots.
If anyone showed up with the idea of
having his own stage from which to display
his costume, or of at least with the idea of
having six inches of air on all sides to pro-
vide ventilation and make conversation
with the next person at least as expedient as
kissing them, then he was probably sorely
disappointed. For space at the Beaux Art
Ball was at a premium, and the supply was
limited within the confines of Papa Katz.
Papa Katz, by the way, has an occupan-
cy limit which is 515.
All of this is not to say that it was im-
possible to have a good time at the Beaux
Arts Ball, for many of the party-goers did
have a good time. But it stands to reason
that not only were the conditions there of-
fensive, they were also unhealthy and
dangerous.
As I entered Papa Katz I was surround-
ed by a colorful and entertaining crowd.
The costumes that I glimpsed were
magnificent. Soon, however, 1 was swept
into the line of people who were making
for the bar: It took me twenty minutes to
get back to the door so that I could look
for my friend, who I had lost. Ten minutes
later she pushed her way over to me.
"Look I said, "I'm a little concerned
about this crowd. If this place doesn't burn
down tonight then everyone in Greenville
is going to wake up tomorrow with mv
cold
"Oh God, Kim, get over it. All of these
people are in dance classes. They take
vitamins. You're NOT having a bad time,
are you?"
"Oh, course not. It's just that, well, I
don't think anyone we know is here. I
haven't seen anybody
"Everybody's here, Kim
"Okay, but I can't stay here. It's too
crowded. It's hot, and all 1 can think of is
the germs we're passing back and forth
As 1 left I was horrified to discover that
people were still arriving outside, but 1
resisted the temptation to warn them about
the mob. While driving home it occured to
me that if all of my friends were indeed in-
side Papa Katz, I should go back and save
them before they all get lost in the crowd,
or picked up the latest local disease, or
were witness to the conflagration which
was sure to occur at any moment. 1 drove
on, realizing that I couldn't pick out my
friends in that assemblage anyway.
The next day I felt silly for having lett o
soon. My friend came over and told me
what a wonderful time she'd had, and I
could defend myself only by saying that at
least I'd gotten some sleep and my cold
had gone away.
Since Saturday I've been wondering
what it is about us small town folks that
makes us flock towell, to flock. The
scene at Papa Katz Friday night was a
Greenville rendition of the ever-popular
Grand Central Staton of a larger city, ex-
cept that the Beaux Arts Ball was supposed
to have been a social event instead of a
human traffic jam. Had it been held
someplace other than Papa Katz, the
Beaux Arts Ball would undoubtably have
been a huge success.
My friend caught a terrible cold there

?
i
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
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OCTOBER 29,1981
Page 5
Halloween Festivities Beginning Early
Costume Contest Brings Out
Unusual; Varied Characters
Halloween began early for some
ECU students as the Elbo Room
and the Sigma Nu fraternity held a
Costume Contest on Tuesday night.
Unexpected entertainment came
from several sources, mainly from a
very close duplicate of Dr. Franken-
furter from The Rocky Horror Pic-
ture Show who danced to the "Time
Warp" and "Sweet Transvestite
(You have to have seen the movie to
understand the significance.)
The competition started later than
expected but by the end of the com-
petition there were clear winners in
both the Men's and Women's divi-
sions.
Taking first place in the Men's
divisions were Siamese Clown-
Keith Simmons and Pam Jenkins.
(Ms. Jenkins could not be reached
for comment.)
Second place went to Transvestite
(Dr. Frankenfurter) Matt Powers
and third prize went to a conehead
Scott Perry.
In the Women's division first
prize went to Miss Piggy, Lisa
Ratliffe. Second prize went to the
Old Lady Lydia Thomas and third
prize went to the Joker, Tracy
DeLuis.
It was not all fun and games
however. One member of the
Siamese clowns said that she and her
partner were struck by a car and
knocked down and that the car
almost ran over their feet. Jenkins
said that two Greenville Police of-
ficers helped them up but didn't do
anvthing about it.
"Four cops saw it � two on the
car. They didn't do anything; they
laughed said Jenkins. She said the
�he license number of the car was
not recorded by either of the of-
ficers either. No one was reportedly
injured in the incident.
There are some rules to remember
if you are going to be enjoying
Halloween in downtown Greenville
this year. Most clubs have rules that
will not allow you to wear a mask
that fully covers your face in the
club. And as is always the rule, they
will not allow you to carry any type
of weapon, even if it is part of the
costume.
Greasepaint and heavy make-up
are not forbidden and if you have a
mask you can carry it with you but
be warned that if you put it back on
inside a club you my be asked to
remove it.
Club owners do not anticipate
any trouble this year, and there was
no major trouble last year, the first
year that the dow town clubs open-
ed since a Halloween riot occured in
1975.
The Winners
of the Sigma Nu � Elbo Room C
ostume Contest.
Beaux Arts Ball Popular Attraction
Hitler Was There; Were You ?
Tattoo You
or is it just a new art course
Mendenhall
By JOSEPH OLINICK
Staff Witai
On Friday, October 23, the foors
of Papa Katz were opened to a
crowd of exotically dressed people.
The seventh annual Beaux Arts Ball
had begun, and truly, it turned out
to be an evening of unique fun for
everyone at the party. Certainly, it
was an evening that was unique in
this area.
Several days before the Beaux
Arts Ball, Kris Gunderson, the stu-
dent who was in charge of orgnizing
the ball, had some things to say
about the ball: "I am hoping that
the arts ball will be bigger and better
than last year. This year we are in-
corporating a poetry forum into the
ball. Last year we brought in music
and drama. We want to incorporate
all the arts into the ball. The com-
bination of art, music, and drama
students really makes the ball in-
teresting. Those people tend to be
creative, and everyone is trying to
do something unique. It takes a lot
to stand out, 'hough
"Each year we want the ball to
get bigger and better. We just want
people to have a good time. It's a
non-profit party. We just make
enough to start the ball next year,
and that's all. Most of the people in-
volved are donating their services,
so those attending can have a good
time
Concerning last year, one art ma-
jor said, "Last year was wild. The
first time that I went in the men's
bathroom, there were two girls in it.
The next time, there were three girls
in the men's bathroom. People were
going wild
"This year the atmosphere will be
totally different. It is a night club
setting. The new place is going to be
a big change. It will either go over
big or be a disaster. It should go
over big. The art department is very
hyped up about the ball
In the week before the ball, and
even on the day of the ball, the big
question that was echoing through
the halls of the art building was,
"What are you going to wear to the
Beaux Arts Ball?" According to
some art students, a lot of people
were putting their costumes together
hours before the arts ball. In any
case, there were many interesting
and creative costumes at the ball.
At the entrance of Papa Katz,
there were quite a few upset people
because IDs were being strictly
checked, and a lot of people had left
there IDs at home. So, a lot of peole
had to go home and get them, which
upset a lot of people. Papa Katz
seemed to be a bit too strict about
checking IDs. As one person
pointed out, "My husband has grey
hair and they wouldn't let him in
until he got his ID Really, a lot of
people had no place to carry an ID
in their costumes.
Inside Papa Katz, there was an
ecstatic atmosphere. Everyone had
been waiting for the Beaux Arts Ball
all year. Finally, it was taking place,
and everyone was ready to have a
good time and parade around in
some exotic costumes.
Truly, there were some amusing
and interesting costumes at the ball,
and just seeing some of them made
the evening interesting. Among the
many costumes at the baT, there was
a Hitler, a medusa, a camera, a
sandwich, a cave man, a nun, a cou-
ple guys in drag, a lot of sheiks, a
box of No-Doz, a multitude of
others. The costumes that aroused
the most interest among some were
the costumes of sexual nature. For
example, there was a giant condom
at the ball, a rubber tree that was
composed of branches and con-
doms, and there were two people
dressed up as female breasts. Also,
there was a flasher who went
through the crowd, fondling a long
rubber penis in front of him; he
definitely aroused some interest.
One man who was wearing a brazier
was constantly being bothered by
women, coming up to him, and
squeezing the breasts of his brazier,
but he got even with them by rubb-
ing the phalic symbol that he was
wearing on their breasts.
In the costume competition, the
faculty members who were judging
it had some interesting choices. A
king size sandwich won the best-in-
show title. A person, dressed up like
the Lone Ranger, won the most
original and creative title. A giant
tampon won the most disgustng ti-
tle. A man in drag won the most
provocative title, and a person,
dressed up like an ECU pirate won
the most common title.
During the first hour of the ball,
most people got in a good mood
with a few beers, talked with their
friends, and mingled through the
crowd, looking at all the various
costumes.
As many people will attest, the in-
terior of Papa Katz was hot and not
See BEAUX, Page 7
Riff Raff
attending a guest.
Has
Help
By BRIAN RANGELEY
Mart Wntfr
Nearly 1,200 people frequent
Mendenhall Student Center every
day; people come to find entertain-
ment, a quiet place to study, or to
make new friends. The Center is run
during the week days by a profes-
sional staff of about 60 people.
However, it is the students who
manage the facility during the even-
ing and weekend hours.
Running Mendenhall during these
hours is no small feat, since even-
ings and weekends are the busiest
times of the week. Student
managers Ellen Hiedenriech, Pam
Cole and Ben Singleton alternately
supervise Center activities after the
professional staff has gone. "We
are trained to do everything says
senior Singleton, "I can work the
pool room, the bowling alleys and
the music listening room � I'm not
so good at fixing the machines in the
bowling alley, so sometimes I just
ask the person to wait until the
regular attendant gets back
Student managers have their try-
ing times; they usually take the
brunt of a complaintants blast when
a problem suddenly and unex-
pectedly arises. A performer may
not show up to the Coffeehouse, or
the performer may have some new-
found dispute with his contract. Oc-
casionally some belligerent drunk
will make passes at the ushers, and a
security guard may even have to be
called in to help.
The student ushers aren't often
accosted, however more often they
deal with people smoking and eating
food in Hendrix Theater. While
they are most often seen checking
ID's and holding doors at movies,
they also perform other duties as
well. "We help out with special
events at Minges, we usher at the
lecture series and we help with the
Madrigal Dinner. We're the ones in
costumes The Madrigal Dinner is
Mendenhall's most successful event,
selling out ahead of time every year.
Much of the planning and presen-
ting of activities and events is done
by the committees compromising
the Student Union. The committees
are made up of 5-15 members, all
students except for one staff
member from the center. There is
also a position open on each com-
mittee for a faculty advisor from the
various departments. For example,
an instructor from the School of
Arts would serve on the Art Exhibi-
tion Committee.
There are more than 80 students
serving on 10 committees; however
the committees are expanding and
See MENDENHALL, Page 7
First Date
Memories
Painful Ones
Go Trick Or Treating With Martin
Is he a sex-starved adolescent or an 84-year old vampire? Whatever the
answer, George Romero's Martin is worth getting to know. Martin (The
Pittsburgh Vampire) is a special Free Halloween Late Show this Friday
and Saturday night at 11 p.m. In addition to Martin, the regular weekend
�free Flick is the modern day classic Halloween. The film will be shown
Thursday night at 7 p.m and Friday and Saturday nights at 5, 7, and 9
p.m. Both movies will be shown in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix
Theatre. Admission is by student ID and activity cards or MSC member-
ship. The films are sponsored by the Student Union Films Committee.
By JULIE MORGAN
Do you remember your first date?
My biggest fear was Dad's reaction
to the young man. My house seemed
to turn into a police station in-
cognito. As soon as the boy entered,
the interogation by the sergeant
began. After the line of questioning
was concluded my date always
seemed less enthusiastic about tak-
ing me out. The evening was off to a
grand start, no thanks to my
parents. Meeting or dating new peo-
ple here at ECU, however, has made
me think twice about the way my
parents chose to handle my social
life.
The downtown scene is the best
place to go if you want to meet new
people. The music, small rooms,
and the intoxicating beverages seem
to lure people there. The acquain-
tance you make downtown;
however, may not be those you
choose to make lasting relationships
with. Although your new friend
could make one night more en-
joyable.
There are a few lines a girl should
watch out for when meeting a new
guy. The words that first tumble
from his mouth are the most impor-
tant. This could determine whether
or not you should join into the con-
versation.
A couple of weeks ago I fell for a
line that has been used several times
by guys for openings of conversa-
tions. If a guy strolls up to you at
Happy Hour and says, "Julie, I've
been wanting to meet you for a long
time make a quick get-away. First
of all, how did he know my name?
What an impression that made on
me. He must really want to meet
me. Second, an eerie feeling crepted
up my spine when he said "for a
long time Had he been watching
me for along time? Was that good
or bad? It came as a compliment to
me, of course. (What a sucker!)
As the conversation progressed, I
noticed how he nudged himself
closer and closer to me in more ways
than one. After a fifteen minute
discussion, a date was already set up
for the following night. Was 1 losing
my mind? I really did not think he
would call me back the next morn-
ing. Boy, was I wrong.
Eleven o'clock the phone rang,
arid guess who it was � really go
ahead guess because for the life of
me 1 couldn't even remember his
name. I decided it was time to take a
chance in life, and again accepted
his invitation for that night.
I took time getting ready for the
date. We were going out-to-eat, and
to a movie. 1 was glad for a night
See DATING, Page 6

I





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PATHS & VO fo j-
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Opposite Sex Can lie Troublesome
Dating Situations Vary
�nlinued � rom l'jt 5
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I returned to m pened. Maybe m
am at eleven o'clock parents hadn't been
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ah on m bod "Sergeant Morgan"
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Students & Facu
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Have You Done It Yet!
TKE RUSH
MONDAY NIGHT
November 2, 1981
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George A Romero s
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See if with
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FREE Late Show Friday And Saturday Night 11PM
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Sponsored By The Student Union Films Committee
0Y DAVIP AJoKKlS
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BLACK
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HALLOWEEN!
Come See Us.
Carolina East Mall
1 Oct. 31,1981
Performances
12:30 & 5:30
E.C.CD.E.C.
WINTERGUARDE
Pi Kappa Phi
PRESENTS
"THE BIG EVENT"
Friday, October 30 9:00 - 1:00
HALLOWEEN PARTY
Featuring
TICKETS:
S4 00 IN ADVANCES5 00 AT DOOR
GET YOUR ADVANCE TICKETS AT THE
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE DAILY OR FROM
ANY PI KAPPA PHI Call 756 3S40
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Country City
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PIPSI COLA fLOWERS (r FRAMES
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BELK TYLERS
UK1H-
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Home Builders Supply King Sandwich
First Federal First State
Deans Photograph
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Tree House TaH OHice Equipment Beta Theta Pledges
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SPECIAL THANKS TO THE r M X 1VFOR BAND ARRANGEMENTS
and PANTANA BOBS for thfir generosity
I.D. REQUIRED PROCEEDS NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
St
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 29, 1981
U
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Annual Beaux Arts Ball Successful
Continued From Page 5
well ventilated, and at times, the
beer service was rather slow. As one
partier said, "I almost died because
it was so hot, and it was a hassle to
get beer sometimes Another par-
tier put it more bluntly when he
said, "Papa Katz sucked. The party
was great However, it should be
noted that, despite the heat and slow
beer service, everyone seemed to be
having a good time and agreed that
it was a great party. Really,
eeryone was having such a great
time that the heat seemed like a
minor problem.
The entertainment that was pro-
vided by members of the dance
department was superb and well
suited to the situation. A variety of
dances from modern disco-like
styles to modern Broadway styles
were presented, and both were done
extremely well in the limited space
of the dance floor. Overall, the
crowd seemed to like the dance per-
formances, and the dancers should
be congratulated on their perfor-
mances.
The scheduled poetry forum did
not take place because there was not
Student Center Is
Manned By Students
a mike set up in the proper place.
Actually, the atmosphere did not
seem condusive to poetry reading.
So, at the end of the performance by
the dance department, the ECU
Jazz Band began to play.
Opinions about the Jazz Band
were mixed. One person said, "I
think the music is to slow. I would
like to hear something that is fast.
Something that I could dance to
Another person said "I think the
Jazz Band is perfect In general,
opinions varied. It seemed like the
number of people on the dance floor
doubled when the Jazz Band stop-
ped playing and the recorded music
started to play
With each passing moment, the
Beaux Arts Ball just kept getting
better and more livlier. Even the
most conservative souls were out on
the dance floor, vibrating, swaying
and moving to the music, as if some
ecstatic charge had filled them.
When the dance floor had become
filled, some people began dancing in
the aisles around the dance floor. It
was the Beaux Arts Ball, and
everyone was out to have a good
time. Certainly, everyone had
positive comments about the ball.
One masked character said, "I
think this is really great. A whole lot
better than last year. A whole lot
better
One woman, dressed as a camera,
said, "I'm having a great time, and
it's better than last year. The beer
service is the worst I've seen. Still.
this is a great party, and I'm having
a great time. I've been coming for
five years, and this is the most im-
pressive
Another partier said, "I'm enjoy-
ing myself immensely. The dancers
did an exceptional job
One person, perhaps not in this
world at the time, said, "Life is
bizarre, and I'm not from this
world
Another person said, "I've been
to a lot of masquerade balls, and
this is the best I've seen
Such comments were dominant at
the Beaux Arts Ball.
When the DJ signed off and Papa
Katz started to close, no one seemed
anxious to leave. Everyone wanted
to stay and party some more. No
one seemed to want this year's
Beaux Arts Ball to end, for it would
be another year until the next one
took place. Still, the ball had to end,
and eventually everyone left, taking
with them the memory of the good
time that they had had, and began
to think of next year's Beaux Arts
Ball.
Continued From Page 5
looking for more volunteers.
Chairperson Cathy Edwards of the
Special Events Committee speaks of
their work: "We work together to
select, promote and present events.
We brought Keith Berger, a
marionette show, and we coordinate
Barefoot on the Mall Other com-
mittees work to bring concerts lec-
tures and films for purposes of
entertanment culture and minority
awareness.
Student Union activities seem to
be aimed more towards popular ap-
peal while MSC faculty organizers
bring more cultural or educational
events. "It is not aimed this way
savs Ron Maxwell, president of the
Student Union, "it just evolved this
uav " Next year, however, the two
organizations will be merging, so
students and faculty can work with
each other to enlist the best in stu-
dent activities and events, not op-
posite each other.
Rudolph Alexander, Director of
University Unions, and Associate
Dean of Student Activities, says that
the students are mainly responsible
for the activities held at the Center.
Alexander comments on the jobs
that the students perform, saying
that it is not a controlled classroom
experiment, it's real. If they
don't do their jobs, things fail. They
have to bear the responsibility
Lidch student must do his or her task
professionally.
Alexander goes on to say, "1
think we have the best social
sciences laboratory on campus. It
gives students a chance to work in
real-life situationsthey work on
committees who have the respon-
sibility to bring to the University
practicality all of the programs
Aside from programs, students
also work in the snack bar. They do
approximately half of the prepara-
tion, cooking and cleaning.
Students are also becoming indirect-
ly involved with the food service at
the snack bar; representatives from
each of the dorms are being
gathered together to bring out ideas
for new and different dishes.
In the downstairs section of the
Center, students occupy official
posts with the games. Robin Jones
works in the bowling alley. "I keep
things clean, I pass out shoes and
scorecards, and I'm also part
mechanic. I fix the machines, if it's
something simple. I also work in the
billiards during lunch. 1 do just
about the same things over there
Betty Bates is the keeper of the
arts and crafts room. In that room
she assists people in their various
pursuits. Some are working with
wood, some with clay, some in the
darkroom. Occasionally a student
will teach a class in some particular
skill.
Regardless of where one may find
a student working, one will pro-
bably find that student content.
Most all of them seem satisfied with
what they are doing. In the words of
Miss Bates: "I enjoy it. I'm in-
terested in the things that go on
down here
All Proceeds Donated to the
Decky Ledford Memorial Fellowship
Fund in Reading Education. East
Carolina University, Dept. of Education
DILL LYERLY BAND, SUPER GRIT COWBOY BAND,
COULTERS, LARRY FRANKLIN BAND,
JOHN D. WALKER BAND, GLENDON,
DANNY JO REAGAN
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HALLOWEEN II
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1





)

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 29, 1981 Page 8
Pirates Await
Last Chance
For An Upset
One Of The Wounded
ECU running back Milt Corsey (40) drives for yardage last
Saturday in a 31-6 Pirate loss to now-l9th-ranked Miami
(Flaj. Corsey is one of several Pirates who may miss this
weekend's game with West Virginia due to injury. (Photo By
ken Martin)
Luck Is Behind WVU's Attack
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
There's the Luck of the Irish.
Beginner's Luck. And bad luck.
And then there's Oliver Luck, the
sling-shot armed quarterback of the
West Virginia Mountaineers.
The senior senior-called has com-
pletely re-written West Virginia
passing records. He broke the
record for most touchdown passes
with 36 (previously 33 by Mike Sher-
wood) and total offensive yards in a
career with 4,966 in an impressive
27-6 win over Virginia Tech two
weeks ago.
Luck has already set record this
season for passes attempted and
total offensive plays in a career and
is nearing new career marks in
passes completed (348) and
touchdowns responsible for (48).
So far this season, Luck has com-
pleted 120 passes out of 226 attemp-
ted � a 53.1 percent completion
rate � for 1409 yards and 10
touchdowns. He has thrown only-
seven interceptions through seven
games.
Even with his Ail-American can-
didate under a watchful eye by pro-
fessional scouts. Mountaineer coach
Don Nehlen is worred about this
week's opponent � East Carolina
� and their wishbone. West
Virginia has not played a wishbone
team since Billy Sims and the
University of Oklahoma in 1978.
"The wishbone will present some
problems, but 1 believe that it will
all boil down to blocking and tackl-
ing Nehmen admits. "And I think
that East Carolina has a very fine
football team
"1 think the public may think that
since they've won four games and
lost four and we've won five and
lost two, that that means we're a
much better football team. But that
doesn't mean we're better. 1 would
say it's an even football game.
"East Carolina has an explosive
football team � a real explosive of-
fensive attack. Their quarterback
(Carlton Nelson) is dynamite. And
they have great, great speed. They
may have as much quickness on
their football team as anybody
we've played
"Quick is a word that has been
used to describe Nehmen's own
Mountaineers, too. Heading the
"quick" list is West Virginia's deep
threat � also Luck's favorite target
� wide receiver Rich Hollins, who
has caught 28 passes this season for
576 yards and six touchdowns.
Tight end Mark Raugh is another
outstanding performer for West
Virginia as he has accounted for 322
yards while pulling down 2$ recep-
tions.
West Virginia is primarily a pass-
ing team which is evident by the 133
yards a game rushing. The Moun-
taineers throw for an average of 212
yards per contest.
West Virginia was undefeated
(4-0) before a trip to the University
of Pittsburg that resulted in a 17-0
loss to the now second-ranked Pan-
thers. The four victories were
against Virginia (32-18), Maryland
(17-13 at College Park), Colorado
(49-3) and Boston College (38-10).
Last week West Virginia jumped
out to a 7-0 lead against top-ranked
and unbeaten Penn State before the
Nittany Lions' offense rose to the
occasion, scoring 30 points.
There are no afterthoughts about
Penn State; no looking ahead to
Temple, says Nehmen. "Right now,
they're (East Carolina) the game at
hand he says, referring to a series
that has a new beginning after being
discontinued in 1971. West Virginia
leads the series two games to none
� victories coming in 1970 and
1971.
"East Carolina is number 'six' if
we can get them, and we're going to
play like that. If we djan't get them,
then Temple becomes number 'six
The main obstacle between West
Virginia and number "six is the
Pirates and their wishbone, an ele-
ment of the team that worries
Nehmen. "The thing that bothers
me is we don't have a quarterback
that can emulate their quarter-
back said the second-year coach.
"We don't have backs that can
emulate their running backs because
anybody that we have with any kind
of speed is always playing on the
varsity � not the jayvee � so that's
the biggest problem
Injuries are a problem, also.
"The other problem is, naturally,
that our kids are beat up he says,
referring to tough games against
Pitt, Virginia Tech and Penn State
the last three weeks. "How you
teach them to stop the wishbone
when they can hardly walk right
now is news to me.
"But we'll have somebody who
can play
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport! f 4llor
The East Carolina football team
has its last chance this Saturday
against West Virginia to pull off the
kind of upset it wants so badly.
Pirate head coach Ed Emory said at
his weekly press conference
Wednesday.
"It'll be tough admitted
Emory. "But we need a big, big
win
The Pirates, 4-4 and hoping for a
winning season, travel to West
Virginia to take on a Mountaineer
club that is 5-2. The two losses have
come to the nation's number one
and two ranked teams, Penn State
and Pittsburgh.
Top-ranked Penn State downed
the Mountaineers last week 30-7
after leading at halftime 10-7. Pitt's
second-ranked Panthers disposed of
WVU by a 17-0 margin. Earlier this
season, the United Press Interna-
tional two twenty poll ranked the
Mountaineers 20th.
"I think West Virginia is in the
same caliber as Carolina (56-0 win-
ners over ECU earlier this year) and
Miami (31-6 victors over the Pirates
last week) Emory said. "They
might not be exactly as good as
Miami on offense, but they might be
the type team that can beat you
worse if you let them get on top of
you
Emory said he also had a great
deal of respect for the Mountaineer
defense.
"They blitz a great deal he said.
"They'll send everything except the
kitchen sink at you. They stunt and
have shut down just about everyone
they've faced. Thev stuck it to
Pitt
The Pirates have suffered from
offensive inconsistences of late.
Emory said he feels his defense has
matured and played well enough to
win against Miami. He says an im-
proved offensive performance is a
necessity against West Virginia.
"We've got to get more move-
ment on offense he said. "We
need more protection. If we do that
and get great play out of our defense
we can upset them
Injuries could play a big role in
ECU's attempt to pull off the upset.
Starting quarterback Carlton
Nelson is doubtful, as are split end
Ricky Nichols, offensive guard Bud
I.aCock, and halfbacks Harold Blue
and Milt Corsey.
Also still out is halfback Earnest
Byner, who was a starter before the
he was injured in the team's fourth
game.
Something that may help the
Pirates when they take the field
Saturday, Emory said, was the fact
that they gained from playing
Miami last week � despite the 31-6
(Ss.
"1 think playing Miami was a
very positive thing for us he said.
"1 think we will have a better pro
gram because of it. We are disap
pointed that we didn't win. But 1
know that our defense realizes now
how much they've improved, that
they can play with anybody in the
country. I think our offensive line
has learned the same thing. They
realize that they can block some
good people
Following the West Virginia con-
test the Pirates come back to Green-
ville for two home dates to finish the
season out. The team hosts Las:
Tennessee State on November 7 and
Willam & Mary in the season finale
one week later.
West Virginia Quarterback Oliver Luck
Perhaps Only Time Will Tell The Real Truth
Writers are often faced with
tough decisions and difficult
situations. No decision has ever
been so tough for this reporter as
one that had to be made this
week.
The matter basically concerned
Larry O'Roark, the starting split
end for the East Carolina foot-
ball team before he left the club
following an October 17 game
with Southwestern Lousiana.
I spoke with a discontented
O'Roark on Monday. He was
very upset that his leaving the
club had been described as occur-
ing because of "personal
reasons" in a local paper. He told
me he left the club because he
could no longer respect head
coach Ed Emory, that there were
no "personal reasons" involved.
I took O'Roark's case to
Emory and to some of the Pirate
players for comments. It soon
became evident that there was
discontent similar to O'Roark's
present in some team members.
On the other hand, there were
players that supported their head
coach.
Emory, whose team is 4-4 and
battling to have a winning
season, said he was disappointed
that O'Roark left the squad and
wished the former player "the
very best" in the future.
"We tried to talk to Larry and
get him to stay on the team
Emory said. "When I heard he
was thinking about quitting, I
called him in and spoke with him
for about four hours. That was
before the Soutwest Lousiana
game. He agreed to come back,
but quit after that game
It is hard to judge whether
0'Roark'sdisrepect for Emory
and subsequent dropping offthe
team results from a sour grapes-
type of attitude. Obviously,
though, the ex-split end feels
there are some problems with the
Pirate system.
"The reason-1 withdrew from
school and gave up my scholar-
ship O'Roark said, "was that I
could not take part in something
I thought wasn't right. AH of my
reasons dealt with the inner
�structure of the East Carolina
football team.
"Some people think I quit
because I wasn't getting the ball
thrown to me he continued.
"That's really not it at all. I
caught only six passes last year
and I stayed around. I left
because there were a lot of in-
stances that led me to lose my
respect for Coach Emory. It all
comes down to the main man
O'Roark, who came to the
Pirates three years ago after leav-
ing the Frostburg State team
because "I wanted to play major
Charles
Chandler
college football had shared du-
ty at split end the past two
seasons. �
Last year he'divided time with
starter Vern Davenport. Though
a starter this season, O'Roark
split time with freshman Ricky
Nichols, a 4.4 speedster. He
caught 12 passes during those two
seasons.
Though he admitted that he
was not satisfied with the way he
was utilized on the field,
O'Roark said the overriding
reason for his decision was his
lack of respect for Emory.
O'Roark said he feels his
disrespect for Emory is echoed by
a majority of his teammates. He
added that, in his opinion, the
ECU club and staff comprised
anything but a happy family.
"To me there isn't a whole lot
of team unity over there he
said. "When you talk about team
unity you're talking about
players and coaches all together
like one big family. It's like a
false setting here, far from total
unity
O'Roark said his decision was
a hard one because "I'm so close
to everybody on the team that it's
unreal My talkings with
members of the squad made it
evident to me that a large majori-
ty of the Pirates thought very
highly of O'Roark.
Two of the players I talked
with agreed to go public with
their feelings about Emory,
though both wished to remain
anonymous. One spoke about
Emory in an discontented tone
similar to O'Roark's. The other
seemed to be a strong supporter
of the second-year mentor. Both
are starting players.
"From what I've seen said
the pro-Emory Pirate, "there
hasn't been any instance that
would give me any reason to
disrespect him. I think all that is
really between the players. Some
are using that as an excuse to be
disrespectful to Coach Emory. I
think some of them use him as a
crutch to fall back on
There were others players I
talked with that expressed
similar support but wished not to
become publically involved with
the situation.
There was also a number that I
spoke with that concurred with
O'Roark. Several considered go-
ing public with their feelings. One
did.
"Personally, I don't respect
Coach Emory said the
anonymous player. "I don't
think he's concerned with the
players just so long as they play.
"I think scholarships keep
most everybody on this team
he continued. "I know that's the
case for me. If I was a walk-on I
would have been gone. The
system is just not right. It doesn't
even make you feel like you're
going to win. It's not just a few
of us that feel this way. I've talk-
ed to a lot of the guys and I think
most of us will be really glad
when the last three weeks of this
season are over
This player said his feelings of
discontent were not limited to on-
ly Emory, that he also felt
likewise about some other
members of the ECU coaching
staff.
"I can't say I like many of the
coaches he said. "There's not
many (players) who like too
many of the coaches. Oh, you
can pretend, laugh and play with
them, but on the inside it's killing
you
Emory said that he was sorry
for any lack of respect felt for
him or his staff by any of the
Pirate players.
"Respect is a two-way street
the head coach said. "I have
always respected Larry O'Roark
and the other plavers. We have
approximately 150 kids on this
team. I'm sure there are a few
that are negative. But most of
them are positive
Emory stated that he has
always tried to treat all his
players with proper respect and
fairness.
"I don't treat any of them any
way that I wouldn't want to be
treated myself. I can onlv hope
that my sons will always be
treated as well by their coaches as
we as a staff have tried to treat
our players
I just hope that I as a writer
have treated everyone concerned
with this matter fairly.
The difficulty of my decision
to publish this information stems
from my close relationship with a
number of the P.rate plavers and
indeed, with Coach" Emory
himself. 3
There are two sides to every
story, and there are certainly two
to th.s one. Certainly on every
football team there is going to be
some discontent. Whether or not
the d.scontent that O'Roark and
others say exists on the ECU
toST Wide-spread or n� is hard
One can be sure, though, that
if serious problems exist they wil
eventually reveal themselves On-
ly time will tell.
I I
Ml
Fl C
VA
DI
I S
PITT
from
ECU PurpN
ECU Gold
Pal
m
�Xv






I
THE EAST C'AROl INIAN
fXTOBIR 29, 1981
t
Fearless Football Forecast
CHARLES CHANDLER (71-24-1)WILLIAM VEIVFRTON (67-28-1)CHUCK FOSTER (64-30-1)CHRIS HOLLOMAN (63-32-1)JIMMY DuPREE (58-37-1)
ECl A I WES1 IKC.1N! WV 27-10WV 28-10WV 24-14WV 24 14WV 28 10 Ala. Fla. Clemson Duke LSU Maryland Penn State S. Carolina OSU Washington use
Miss si i A.BAMA 1 1 OR1DA l ! Bl KN K1 1 OKI si i (it MSON DUKE A I GI ORC.IA I1UIAla. Auburn Clemson DukeAla. Fla. Clemson DukeMiss. State Fla. C'emson DukeAla. Fla. Clemson Ga. Tech
1 si M MISSISSIPPI UNC A I 1 R 1 ND PENN STATI T MI MI (Fla.) N. STATI T S. K01 INA OHIO STATI VT PI ROl E SI M ORD 1 V KSHING K N WASHINGTON STATE 1 SOUTHERN CAIISU UNC Miami NCSU OSU Washington Southern CalISU Maryland Miami S. Carolina Purdue Washington useMississippi UNC Miami NCSU OSU Washington useLSU UNC Penn State S. Carolina Purdue Washington use
PITTSBURGH PAINTS
hnm Ih P�lnl I rntri � 0O illn.tn HUd
Trlphon�- 7S 761 1
- SPECIAL
ECU Purple a-atex Flat)
t CU Gold (latex Flat)
Paint the
Town
Lady Bucs Wins Devil Of A Match
HOILOMA!9yCHR1S
Stan vrii�
An improving East
Carolina volleyball
team gave the Duke
Blue Devils a rude
welcome to Greenvile
and Minges Coliseum
b defeating the Devils
in three sets Tuesday
night. The Pirates, vho
are beginning to come
into their own late in
the season, beat Duke
b scores of 15-5, 15-7
and 15-8.
The win over Duke
left the Pirates with a
10-21 record with only
a match with the
Wolfpack of North
Carolina State and the
vtate tournament re-
maining on the
schedule.
In the Duke match,
however, the Pirates,
behind the net play and
serves of Lexanne
Keeter, kept the Blue
Devils off balance most
of the night. The
defense also came
through for East
Carolina as Mitzi Davis
recorded several saves.
After the game, head
coach Lynn Davidson
was very pleased with
the way her team kept
after the Blue Devils on
both defense and of-
fense.
"We played very well
tonight said coach
Lynn Davidson. "It
sure is a nice feeling to
win at home and have
� � come join us �
� for our�
i
wsx
Special prices on
choice items from our
menu served between
5:00 and 7:30
nmRQftaxs

same
Stop In For
A Special Lunch
"sonic special
HAM & CHEESE
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Good Oct. 26th Nov. 1
With Coupon
Tzrmzzsm I
618GrM�vilWIM
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SONIC !
SONIC.
1
people come out and
see the team play.
"I've been saying all
along that we are im-
proving she explain
ed. "I think that we
showed people tonight
just how much we have
improved
"We didn't con-
sistently hit to the
floor, but we had some
very smart shots
Davidson continued.
"We kept Duke on the
defensive most of the
night.
"As far as in-
dividuals are concern-
ed. I thought I exanne
Keeter played very
well Davidson said.
"She played good
defense and had some
good saves.
"Jenny Hauser and
Mitzi Davis also played
very well Davidson
said. "Mitzi has some
great defensive saves.
She is not a flashy
player but she shined
on defense tonight
The win over Duke but a win over the
no doubt helps the Wolfpack would only
tournament seeding improve it.
situation as far as East
Carolina is concerned.
SC Game After Roasting
North Carolina In Kenan
ECU
COll'MBIA, S.C.
(DPI) ' South Carolina
Coach Jim Carlen's
team upset previously
unbeaten and third-
ranked North Carolina
last Saturday but he is
modest about accepting
credit for the victory.
The Gamecocks beat
the Tar Heels 31-13 in a
stunning defeat that
dropped North
Carolina to 11th place
in the United Press In-
ternational board of
coaches poll.
As a result of te vic-
tory, Carlen, whose
team is 5-3, was named
Tuesday as UPI's na-
tional college coach of
the week.
"That's an honor
and it feels good
Carlen said. "But, 1
kind of shv away from
individual honors. The
See NORTH, Page 10
SAAD'S
SHOK
I' �tV REPAIR
i
i j � :
$f U3 Grande Ave
fyft 7wM228
� c$t. Quality
Repair

Items and Prices
Effective thru
Dct 31. 1981
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserv. �
None Sold To Dealers
on

-
Fall means
football, fun, and
fine savings at the
One-Stop-Shopping
Place, Kroger Sav-on!
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
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ting the same savings or a raincheck which will entitle you to
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OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO
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16�,






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 29, 1981
N.C. State Poses Problems For Gamecocks
Continued From Page 9
real credit goes to our
assistant coaches and
the players. They're the
ones who do the work
here
The Gamecock coach
has been at South
Carolina for six years
and has coached a total
of 15 years.
Before moving to
Columbia, Carlen was
head coach at West
Virginia and Texas
Tech. Overall, he is
101-63-6. At South
Carolina, the
Cookeville, Tenn
native, who is also
amletic director, has
posted a 39-27-1
regular season record
and has taken his team
to three bowl games.
Immediately after
last Saturday's victory,
Carlen focused on
South Carolina's
homecoming opponent
next Saturday during a
regionally televised
game.
"Beating North
Carolina was great, but
as of Saturday night I
was thinking of North
Carolina State he
said. "You can't play
on memories.
One of his best
memories includes last
year with Heisman
Trophy winner George
Rogers, one of the
greatest tailbacks who
ever played for South
Carolina.
The Gamecocks' of-
fense has struggled this
year in adjusting to
Rogers' absence, but
jelled Saturday for its
most effective perfor-
mance.
offirnan's
Classifieds
FOR SALE
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in NC and SC on line wood
waterbeds and accessories Com
plete beds with IS year warranty
lor as low as IW. Delivery
available Call David lor more in
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DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR. I
year old. like new tor sale, 170
Call 7S� JMt after � p m
MOVING MUST sale year old
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Imwi $100 Call 7S0-41W;
FOR RENT
FOR RENT targe furnished
room in private home Quiet
neighborhood. lUO month,
utilities included Security
deposit Special deal if gone on
weekends 7J MS (keep trying)
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Roommate to share 2 bedroom
apt on Stanctll Dr. Rent S)20plus
one-half utilities Serious student
tfeiired. Call Cindy at 7S1 40
PERSONAL
WHO IS the ugliest man on cam
pus?
TYPING tor students, professors,
etc Kempie Dunn 101 E Wright
Rd Greenville. NC 27U4 Call
75J 7J3 after 1 p m
PHOTOGRAPHY FOR all acca
MOns � portraits resumes wed
dins, call now tor photos tor
Homecoming Queen contest Call
?4� 45J leave name and number
on answering service
FOUND BEHIND Mendenhall
near Wendy's one religious
necklace May claim at Traffic Of
lice
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
Female to share 2 bdrm lurished
apartment one block Irom cam
pus 100 rent and one third
utilities Cheryl 752 l�5
WEEKEND HOUSE PARENTS
WANTED Mamed couple to
supervise handicapped adults
Call 7St'4)M
MATURE DEPENDABLE AT
TRACTIVE FEMALE Must be
able to work 12.00p m Monday
Friday and I 00-4 00 on f.atur
days Call H C Hodges and Co for
appointment at 7S2 41S
WANTED: Female resident
counselor Must complete traiing
and internship in short term client
systems Payment in kind (room,
utilities, local phone) Call The
Real Crisis Center 7M HELP
NEEDED Ride to and from
Charlotte weekend ol Oct 30 Nov
l Will help with gas Call Karla at
752-I7W
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
ane inexpensive Call Amy at
7S7 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
lifteen years experience wants
typing to do at home Reasonable
rates Call 7S U0
ATTENTION LADIES P and B
Breast Clinic is now offering free
breast examinations Phone
7J2 437� ask for M.V Prencipl.
D B or J R Barrett. D B atten
ding breastologists
GLO you need to bag. so we can
play some titty tag J.M.
JO ANN Can Little Stevie stil
come out and play Loosen up that
Chapel Hill grip!
WHO will go down the hardest this
week
ATTENTION SELECTED
DOWNHILLERS The Poconos
are still there after our trip last
year but this year Beat mi will be
flattened Camelback. Big
Boulder and Elk Mountain will see
all us racers for some smooth
runs First come, lirst bunks Br
�ng your snowhose, candy and
brewhas. See you there.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Beanhead'
From your two windowpeak ad
mirers.
RUPERT You may be loose wild
and free but don t go home for Cor
'land to see Your balls are blue
but what will she do Find the
words tor the Pat ta tat tat Hav
va good Friday, bitch' W heels ap
peals
SNOWSHOE, W V OR BUST At
tention all good looking type
snowbunmed Make your plans
now to road trip to Snowshoe with
one of the wildest crowds ever
Contact Jo Saunders in Memorial
Gym tor more details Girls need
only inquire
TO THE DELTA ZCTA'S: The in
lirmary would like to thank you all
tor providing them with over twen
ty cases of food poisoning
Thankfully we only ate one plate!
Who's for dessert P.K.T
TO THE AID'S: Last mght was a
blast and please don't light a
match because of massive
amounts ol alcohol. Did any one
snatch your pumpkin bum km'
TOUGH NOOGIES to all you bro's
who ain't going to D C We'll drop
you a post card Tell it' WE CAN
HANG' Wooly B
WHO WILL WIN THE
PURPLE PIG AWARD3 Will it be
Nim or Nelf Will it require a photo
finish' Yes. yes, yes. I'm atraid
this will occur
NEAL B is French really your
preference0 Protect your ear
drums cotton will help!
JIM B Rumor has it that Coomes
has chased you up your Cinnamon
Tree with His Pipe-Line! Who is
boss now. bitch
were you talking to one one knee in
the bathroom" Hope you had lun
because you sure did pay for it.
TO THE Campus Police Dept : la!
me be the first to say that you are
some of the most ticket happy ban
dits I have ever seen. You may
have towed my car but wait till I
get a hold of your daughter
Paybacks are AMF
FIELDING: HAVE you done it all
with her it you take war to church'
J.T HAVE you lest your pap l�
you have, hollar SQUMIIIII
JEFF: IF she drivts a Cadillac
does that fake her worth it
JEFF: I'LL give it to yoti. you
always take the underDOG! Rock-
n Roll High School.
ELIZABETH WANNA �0 to
lunch It you can't tqueeie ma in
for lunch how about Happy Hour
Wed. afternocn. Drinks art on me.
Pick you up after a hard day's
work Signed Here but not forgot
teiv
WILL Paula P. get Headless Ric
come out and about on Halloween
Ric please be there with head in
hand
All I've heard tor the last two mon
ths is "Miami. Miami. Miami
Now it has finally arrived. I hope
the friendly adventurers are
satisfied What the hall is so great
about a damn town where you
can't even go to the ZipMart tor a
brew without carrying a baiooka
or a butcher knife Since the
"Jackie Gleason Show was cann
ed nothing goes on in that hot hell
hole. All you do is sit around in the
sun and eat "oranges You can do
that in Greenville And why waste
our money anyway One more
thing: you better bring me back a
nice present and I ain't talking
about no T-shirt with a trickin'
palm tree on it
PAR AT That was sure a
funky rida w hitched on in
Raleigh. And whose bright idea
was it in the first place. You know
what going around in circles can
do tor you. But let's be honest with
each other It wasn't the going
around in circles that hurt, it was
the mass consumption of too much
Evan Williams, Canadian Club
and Seagram
ATTENTION GENTLEMEN: Do
you have the bast looking buns in
Greenville Come to tha Elbo
Room on Thursday. Nov i, and
you'll find out I
KRAM Haven't seen you at ttve
house lately. Come by soon, you're
better than GO Love and kisses,
Skipoy.
BETA ZETAS Thanks tor clean
mg up the yard We'll have to pay
those guys back soon Hope you
had tun last mght at the social By
the way. the skit was good, but I
don't believe Lisa hadn't drank m
two months I'm still waiting tor a
road trip Promises, promises'
You guys are still the best! Love
ya. Mom
and
A Concept
of Dress
by Woolrich
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� All Day Specials �
Monday and Wed. Beef Tips 2.89
Tues. & Thurs. 8 oz. Chopped Sirloin
Both of Above Served wBaked Potato
or French Fries and Toast.
2.09
Monday thru Friday Soup & Sandwich
1AA (Steakburger or
yy Chicken Sand �No Potato)
Great Luncheon Specials
11 A.M.to2 P.M.
Chef Salad 1.99 4 oz. Chopped Sirloin 1.19
Served w, Baked Potatoes
or French Fries and Toast
Fri Sat & Sun.
(Oct. 2 4) Buy 8 oz. Ribeye - Get Free Salad Bar
Petite Sirloin 2.50
Kids under 12 eat Steerburger or child's plate w potato for ���.
Sorry no take outs on specials.
O O

DAILY
SPECIALS
"The
Family
Steak
House"
Famous
Salad Bar
WESTERN SIZZLIN'
MONDAY -
CHOPPED STEAK
H.99
TUESDAY
BEEF TIPS
THURSDAY -
STEAK SANDWICH
n.69
M.99
WEDNESDAY -
CUBED STEAK.
H.89
FRIDAY -
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
3.79
Free
Tea
with
ECU ID.
SATURDAY -
BARBEQUE RIBS
2.99
SUNDAY -
STEAK ON A STICK
1.99
All Meals are
complete Including
Baked Potato or
French Fries A
Texas Toast
Take Out Service
J03E 10th St
rse-tni
244 Bypass�7S� 0040
Hours 11 a.mlOp.m
Mon. Thurs.
10 am n p.m. Fri. Sun.
Our outdoor look is anchored by
WOOLRICH and here we think you will
find function, versatility and value. From
the famous mountain Parka, both lined
and unlined, right down to o soft chamois
shirt or sweater, you'll find a WOOLRICH
outdoor item effectively designed for your
personal needs. The colors are bright and
bold, the styling functional and practical,
and the prices are right.
WOOLRICH Outdoor Wear
at all our fine stores.
oPftncsn's
MErslS WEAR
Monday Saturday 8.30 to 5 30
Monday F"day 10 00 to 9 00
Saturday ?00Ctc600
Rocky Mount - Mon -Fri 10 00 to 9 00
Saturday 10 00 to 6 00
MOONLIGHT MADNESS
SALE
OCTOBER 30 6-10 PM
CURTAINS UP! LIGHT THE LIGHTS
draft
Its Mall Madness
with values at Btfv
hauntingly low prices. JqLX4�il
Be sure & visit the Jaycees Haunted House
right outside the Mall.
and Convenience Centre
264 By-pass on Hwy. 11 Greenville
t





Title
The East Carolinian, October 29, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 29, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.158
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57436
Preferred Citation
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