The East Carolinian, October 27, 1981






Sfoe iEaat CEamltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 19
Tuesday October 27, 1981
GreeavtUe, North Carolina
10 Pages
Raising Legal Drinking
Age Unfair To Many
By MIKE HUGHES
Mill Vnlci
1 hough a joint resolution cur-
rently before the North Carolina
state legislature proposes studying
the results of raising the legal drink-
ing age for beer and wine to 21, there
are no proposals for reviewing the
adverse effects of such a change.
When a similar proposal to raise
the drinking age arose in Georgia in
1980, a group of universities in the
state conducted its own stud entitl-
ed Arguments gainst Raising the
1 ega! Drinking Age (AAR1 DA)
This study cited facts in support of
� sal to keep the drinking age
he whole idea is to tr and
� p alcohol out of the high
schools sas Steve Koval, student
bod) president of Atlanta's Emory
University . "Raising the legal drink-
b age to 19 would accomplish this.
So win penalize the 19 and 20 yeai
olds b raising it to 21?
'National research showed thai
raising the drinking age does not
keep alcohol out of the high
schools Koval said.
The Georgia stud points to eight
states which have raised their legal
dunking ages since 1979. "The trend
of our sister states seems to favor
raising the age to 19, not 21 the
stud) revealed.
Not only would a raise in the
drinking age affect persons aged IS
to 20. but the AAR1 DA reports
that restaurants, package stores and
bars would also suffer.
"Effects on these businesses will
be significant the report said,
"with resulting loss of tax revenue
to the state
The Georgia stud. which was
presented to that state's General
ssembl last year, also proposed
alternative methods oi battling
teenage alcohol abuse, such as mak-
ing alcohol education mandatory in
the state's schools. Other sugges-
tions were to encourage greater
parental tesponsibihtv for teenage
children, and to increase enforce-
ment ol current laws regarding the
legal drinking age
The AARI DA states that the ma-
jor cause o increasing alcohol
abuse is not the lowered drinking
ages in main states but changes in
social standards and increasing
pressures.
"It is unfair and inconsistent that
the law makes lS-to-20-vear-olds
responsible for their actions as
adults in so many ways while this
bill would say that they are in-
competent to lune a glass of beer
the studv said.
ri�. i�� �.�� minwis
h It Art Or
The photography exhibition on the second floor of Mendenhall Student (enter has brought mixed reviews. Kor
more about the show, see page 5.
ECU Students Attend Peace Assembly
people
pilgrim
nual as
The
cern of
01
mil
tended
Bv PATRICK O'NEILI
Northarolina residents, including five
East Carolina, recently attended a "peace
age" in Richmond, Va. The event was the an-
sembh ol Pax Christi, an international organiza-
al works on peace- and justice-oriented issues.
possibility of a nuclear war was the major con-
most participants. " V tar as focus on issues go,
neev
and there's no solution
said John Gardner, an ad-
alol eECl division of Student I ife who at-
the meet. ' 1 have vet to see a solution that would
mencan people "
en the current trends, it's basically inevitable
ause p ple are malicious � it's iust that 1 don't
think they perceive the end result of where we're head-
ed Gardner said.
Gardner's comments followed a similar line as those
ol peace activist Daniel Berrigan during his recent visit
to North Carolina. Berrigan stated that the United
States had five years to address the nuclear war issue or
be confronted bv such a war.
The Pax Christi assembly held workshops on disai
mament strategies, "just world order conscience and
the draft and "non-violent conflict resolution
"It was a very positive experience noted ECU mass
communications student Kaitv Kazar. "1 liked the idea
that so many people are involved in peace issues
Concern about the nuclear weapons issue has been
growing lately in many circles and across some political
hues "The recent developments in western Europe
show thai main other people around the world are also
quite concerned about nuclear proliferation and the
renewed arms race Gardner said
Gardner was referring to the series o anti nucleai
weapons demonstrations thai have attracted almost one
million people in numerous western European cities.
Kaar said she was skeptical o the views o the peace
conference when she arrived in Richmond. "1 felt that I
held a different view - that we've got to protect
ourselves in any way possible � then 1 realized what the
harm was Kaar said.
"I asked questions and I got answers she explained.
"What I realized was that the Soviets were human be-
ings, t.m We wouldn't be bombing just another coun-
try � we'd be bombing other human beings just like us.
hen ii m� � i ighl dov n to it. it's not g ling to matter
who uses them (nucleai weapons). Nobo,v can win
"It was real encouraging to see that many people out
Plan Developed To Strengthen
Off-Campus Housing Program
By SAFARI MATHENGE
Matt U nltr
Plain are being developed to
�gthen the existing off-campus
housing program, according to the
�: n charge o off-campus hous-
non-traditionaJ and foreign
students and commuters.
The program was initiated this
this year by the division of Stu-
dent I ife to help non-reMdent
jents find suitable housing in
senville and the surrounding
is.
� iot of students don't know
office exists and that they
me to us and get instant infor-
n on off-campus housing
: Or Lucie Wright in an inter-
s with The East Carolinian.
Wright is the assistant to the vice
chancellor for Student 1 ife.
"There is a lot of information on
housing that can be found here
W right said. "1 andlords and people
looking for roommates come here
and tell us about their houses. We
have listings of vacant houses and
rooms, pirn we offer request forms
lor those who are looking for
preteral roommates (non-smokers,
non-drinkers, etc.)
East Carolina's residence halls
only have a capacity of not more
than 5.582 students. At present, of
the 13,264 students that enrolled at
ECU this fall, only 5,447 student
live in the dormitories.
"The rest live in Greenville and
surrounding areas Wright adds.
"If we knew what their needs were
and can identify them, then this of-
fice could more effectively help
them in their search Wright says.
Plans are also underway that will
develop activity programs for the
non-traditional students. These are
students age 25 or older who return
after discontinuing their college
education. last vear the student
body had 26(H) such students, one of
them "2 years old. according to
Wright.
"Sometimes these students come
to school feeling awkward or a little
out of place Wright says. "We
like to help them meet each other
ROSE (Returning Older Students
in Education) is a student organiza-
tion geared to provide the special at-
tention that non-traditional students
may need.
Dr. lucie Wright urges students to take advantage of the services offered b
the off-campus placement office located in room 211. Whichard building.
(at the assembly) Gardner said. "People from a- fai
away as Nebraska and Minnesota � they all didn't
come across like radicals
I lie North Carolina contingent was also impressiv
Gardner. "Getting 4 North Carolinians to give up a
weekend for a cause shows a certain amount of dedica-
tion he said. "It was educational. We learned a lot.
Recently statements concerning the possibilu.es of a
limited nuclear war have been surfacing from officials
in Washington. When asked for his opinion about
limited nuclear war. Gardner said, "the more thev
(government officials) think it's possible, the more like
lv it is that we will have one
Gardnei said he saw a greater danger from nu
wai hi othei area "I see the biggest problem in poten-
Se DlsRMAMKNT. Page 3
Security
Relocating
This Week
B GREG RIDEOl T
SUM W m�r
The Campus Security and Traffic-
Office will close at 4 p.m. this after-
noon. It will reopen at its new loca-
tion, 1001 East Fifth Street, on
November 2.
Police operations will continue at
the present location until October
30. Traffic tickets given out after
this date will not be able to be paid
until November 2.
The 72 hour-grace period, which
enables the traffic violator to pay a
half-price fine, will be excluded dur-
ing this period. It will begin again
on Monday, November 2.
The new offices are located in
Howard House across from the
Spilman Building
Anniversary For President
wti
UNC President William C. Friday
Friday Celebrates 25 Years
GHAPFI HILL (UPI) - and championed causes such as in- "If he gave you two minutes, you degree, he was hired as assistant
William C Fridav celebrated his tegration and labor unions. felt like he had given you an hour dean of students.
M nivnironnr But Graham's style won him the said the Rev. Robert Summey, a Friday befriended Graham and
dent of VhTunivrsily of North kind of enemies Friday has avoided Baptist minister in Gastonia who rose quickly through the ranks. In
rSotina rateSLtonesyra through an unwillingness to take grew uP with Friday. 1956 he succeeded Gordon Gray as
brhbsasonheM- sides until necessary and a thorough Born in 1920 in his mother's president of UNC.
totttetad one of knowledge of the state's political hometown of Raphine, Va Friday Friday said he never intended to
SsufeVmiSSacia climate. grew up in the Gaston County town remain president of UNC for a
Fridav now 61 took office as the "Bill Friday is extemely conscious of Dallas. His father was vice presi- quarter of a centry
voun�est sie university president of the pulse of the political leaders dent of a textile manufacturing firm "I think it's too long 1 real,v do
tatoMtiSHe h� �tS tonger of North Carolina said William inthecounty. for the health of an mstut.on. he
han anyone else mas e minding a Aycock, a law professor and former Friday worked well with people said. But then he mentioned several
TcaZns TslcmVth 117,000 chancellor of UNC's Chapel Hill winning the presidency of his high struggles he became involved in over
l?ZT:nAS0rnLnbu. campus. "He's not going to alienate school class He also excelled in �� �� �
To do that he has had to please the leadership debateandathlet.es. There just was never an ap
and sometimes soothe what he calls To gain that knowledge, Friday He started his college education at Propriate time to walk away.
the eight publics: the alumni, has built what many believe is the Wake Forest College, but soon ��
parents Legislature, students, best intelligence network in North transferred to what is now North f TIlO InClffP
facuhy' administrators, staff and Carolina. Carolina State Univensty to major UP IE J5HK
press all constitutencies that must "He knows what is politically in textile engineering and win the
be dealt with separately - and sue- feasible at any given time said senior class presidency by one vote. 0pinions4
cessfully. John L. Sanders, director of the In- After serving in World War II as c s Forum4
His only equal in stature in stitute of Government and a former a Navy lieutenant loading ammuni- F �
UNC's history is Frank Porter UNC vice president. tion in Virginia he wen. to Law a g
Graham, the fiery liberal who ran Friday also is talented at stroking School in Chapel Hill. In 1948, JPons
the university in the 1930s and 1940s egos and making all feel important. while his wife worked on a master s Classifiedsiu





v!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 1981
Announcements
SHRIMP SALE
Attention: All ECU Organize
tlonsl The Student Athletic Board
� exploring me possibility of hav
ing a wholesale shrimp sale on
Friday Nov. 13, before the William
& Mary football game These
medium sized shrimp would be
delivered to Minges Coliseum
directly from the boat. The exact
price per pound will be determin
ed by the interest of your organiia
tion in making such an order
Please let us know of your interest
by calling Pam Holt at 757417
This is not a firm order, just an
estimation tor pricing purposes
We need to hear from you by Fri
day Oct 30.
CORSO
There will be a Corrections
Social Work (CORSO) meeting on
Thursday. October Wat 3:30p.m.
in Mendenhall m All social work
and corrections majors and in
tended majors are urged to at
tend'
VOLLEYBALL
TMe PRC Society and Jetfery's
Beer and Wine will be sponsoring
a Co Rec Volleyball Tournament
at Minges Coliseum on October 31
from 13 p m. There is a ten dollar
entry fee. First place, keg. second
place, pony keg Other prizes will
be awarded Sign up at the PRC
building (Behind McDonalds and
across from Hardees on Cotanche
St.) Deadline Oct 79 Teams must
consist of six persons with at least
two females per team.
ENERGY COMMISSION
The Greenville Energy Cornmis
sion will hold a special call
meeting on Wednesday, Oct 28 at
7 30 p.m. In the first floor cor
ference room at City Hall on the
corner of Fifth and Washington
Streets
ILO
All ILO Members meet a'
Multipurpose room in Mendenhall
at 4 p.m on Wednesday 28 tor
preparations and decoration for
the OktobM-fesf Please be 'here
TEAM HANDBALL
Men's and Women's Team
Handball Club will have an
organizational meeting Thursaay,
Oct. n at 4:30 p.m in Memorial
Gym. room 105. All interested
newcomers and veterans are in
vlted. For further information call
Stuart at 753831.
THE WAY
Do you think some people need
to change their attitudes? Do you
want to be more positive, confi
dent, and less fearful? The Bible
contains the real key for afttuov
adjustment Read Romans,
Chapter 12 16. especially 12 2
That is what we are doing, chang
ing our old attitudes to line up with
those in the Bible (I Cor 13) Come
by and see Thursday, Oct 2.
11 30 a m in room 212. and 7 X
p.m. in room 242, Mendenhall Stu
dent Center.
INFLUENZA
influenza vaccine is available at
the Student Health Center. The
cost is 3 for each injection
Students with chronic illnesses,
diabetes, asthma, or those who are
on chemotherapy for malignant
diseases and those having unusual
exposure should come by the Stu
dent Health Center between 8 am
and 5 p.m Monday through Fri
day during October or November
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday, Oct. 27, in
the chapel of St Paul' Episcopal
Church, 40 4m Street (one block
from Garrett Dorm) The service
will be at 5:30 p.m with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev Bill
Madden, celebrating.
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student union Travel Com
mlftee Is now accepting applica
tions tor membership. All persons
interested In joining can pick up
an application at the Student
Union office, room 234 Mendenhall
Student Center
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
Wanted: Male, musicians,
singers, dancers, poets, or
whatever your talent, to par
ticipate in The Student of the Year
Pageant, sponsored by Alpha Kap
pa Alpha Sorority, Inc The
deadline for contestant applica
tions will be October 29 So on
November 17, be prepared for
another AKA Affair!I Alpha Kap
pa Alpha is also looking forward to
the students' presence at their
dance which will be held October
24 from 10 p m ti! 2 am , at the
Cultural Center Come "jam"
after the game! We also en
courage more minority students to
participate in SOULS "Please
NYCTRIP
The deadline of registration for
the Student Union Travel Commit
tee sponsored New York City trip
has been extended until Nov. 2. All
persons interested in going, should
pick up an application at the Cen
tral Ticket Office, locatred in
Mendenhall Student Center.
BAKE SALE
The King's Youth Fellowship of
ECU is -onsoring a bake sale on
Novembt. 2 from 9 until 12 30 at
the ECU Bookstore
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigrra Freshman Honor
Society will hold committee
meetings on Tuesday. Nov 3 at
S 00pm m room 212 Mendenhall
Student Center All members are
urged to attend
SIGMA TAU DELTA
The National English Honor
Society, will hold a meeting on
Thursday. Oct 29 at 7 30 p m in
Mendenhall Coffeehouse On the
agenda are induction of New
Members and a Panel Discussion
on "SUPERSTITIONS" featuring
Drs Karen Baldwin. Charles
Sullivan, and McKay Sundwaii of
the English Department All new
members are asked to attend,
along with present members and
any interested person
COMPUTERS
The ECU chapter of ACM will
meet ttus Thursday. Oct 29 at 3 30
in room 221 Austin This week, Mr
Glenn Crowe the director of the
ECU computing center, will speak
on the plans and priorities of the
center Anyone interested is in
vited to attend
TRAFFICOFFICE
The ECU Traffic Office,
presently located m the old laun
dry building, will close at the end
of the business day on October 27,
1981 and reopen for business on
November 2, 1981 in a new location
at 1001 East Fifth Street, across
from the Spilman Building
Police operations will continue
in the old laundry building until
October 30 A dispatcher will be o
duty at the present location to pro
cess emergency traffic matters
only until October 30 The seventy-
two hour period on traffic Citations
will tie extended to exclude the
period 'he Traffic Office is not
operational
All police, traffic and mfor
maiton services will be moved to
100) East Fifth Street by the end of
the business day on October 30,
1981
PICTURES
Buccaneer Babes will tiave a
photographer on campus Sunday,
Nov 1 from 1 to 6 Pictures will be
taken by the fountain, and are
$10 00 for a packet of five (5) 4X6
Group pictures will be limited to 3
people For more info, call
Allyson, 757 1659 or Rachael,
752 2126
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Gamma Sigma Sigma Pledge
Class is having a Bake Sale on
November j at the Student Supply
Store Please come out and help us
raise money tor the Pledge Pro
ject
BIG APPLE TRIP
The deadline to sign up for the
New York City trip has been ex-
tended until Nov 2. The trip is
scheduled for Nov 25 through
Nov 29
SCANDINAVIAN
SEMINAR
Scandinavian Seminar is now
accepting applications for its
1982 83 academic year abroad In
Denmark, Finland, Norway, or
Sweden. This unique learning ex-
perience is designed for college
students, graduates, and other
adults who want to study in a Scan
dinavian country, becoming part
of another culture and learning its
language. A new one-semester
program, only in Denmark, is also
now available.
After orientation In Denmark
and a 3 week intensive language
course, generally followed by a
family stay, students are placed
individually at Scandinavian Folk
Schools or other specialized in-
stitutions, where they live and
study with Scandinavians of
diverse backgrounds. The Folk
Schools are small, residential
educational communities intended
mainly tor young adults. Bom
historically and socially, these
schools have played an important
part in the development of the
Scandinavian countries. Midway
through the folk school year, all
the Seminar students and staff
meet in the mountains of Norway
to discuss progress and make
plans for the spring. A final ses-
sion is held at the end of the year to
evaluate the year's studies and ex
periences
Because the Scandinavian coun
tries art small, open, and accessl
ble, the year provides an unusual
opportunity for the student to ex
plore his or her particular field of
interest by doing an independent
study project. On the basis of a
detailed written evaluation of
their work, most college students
receive full or partial academic
credit for their year.
The fee, covering tuition, room,
board, and all course connected
travels in Scandinavia, is 15,900.
Interest free loans are granted on
the basis of need, as are a few par
tia scholarships.
For further information, please
write to: SCANDINAVIAN
SEMINAR, 100 East 85m Street,
New York, N Y 10028
VOTE
Are you registered to vote in
Greenville? Come hear all the can
d'dates for Mayor and City Coun
cil, Tuesday, Oct 27 at 8 p.m
First Presbyterian Church, the
corner of Elm and 14th Streets.
The local League of Women Voters
is sponsoring a CANDIDATES
FORUM for the public to learn
first hand what the candidates
think and to ask questions.
INCREASED
LEARNING
A new program for increasng
Learning Efficiency will be of-
fered by Or. George Wefgand
beginning October 2. 1981 There
will be two groups. On will meet
on Monday and Wednesday at I 00
p.m. and the other will meet on
Tuesday and Thursday at 1:00
p.m. In Room 305 Wright Annex,
the class is available to all
students. Attyendanc is volun-
tary - no formal registration la re-
quired.
CO-OP
The Smithsonian Institution In
Washington. DC currently has job
openings for luniors. seniors, and
graduate students with 3.0 GPA's
or above tor Spring Semester In-
terested students art urged to app-
ly at the Co-op Office, 313 Rawl 'o
day. Deadline for application Is
November 1.
HOMECOMING MUMS
On sale Oct 24 Nov 5 at me
Student Supply Store Only iSOO'
Sponsored by Fletcher Dorm.
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Mr Robert Messner, Secretary
Treasurer of First Federal Sav
ings and Loan, was the guest
speaker for the Omicron Chapter
of Phi Beta Lambda on Wednes
day. Oct 21
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
The Lamba Chis would like to
congratulate Delta Zeta sorority
on winning the Lambda Chi Alpha
CloHhes Orive.
Lambda Chi Alpha thanks all
sororities with special thanks to
Sheila Collie, Wendy Skellie,
Marry Ann Best, Renee Dixon,
Carolyn Hughes. Helen Floyd.
Terry Moore, and Melissa Baker
for being such good sports with the
kidnapping. Thanks girls!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroli-
nian in care of the news editor
There is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited
The deadline for announcement
art 5 p.m Friday tor the Tuesdsay
paper and 5 p m Tuesday for the
Thrusdasy paper
The space is available to jii
campus organizations and depart
ments
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
The semi annual meeting of the
board of directors of the ECU
Foundation will be held at noon,
Friday, Oct. 30, at the Greenvilie
Country Club.
ILO
ILO's Oktoberfest is Wednes
day, October 28 from 30 to 10:30.
it will be held in the Mendenhall
Multi Purpose Room. The
"Schmufzlgs" will provide music
and German food and beverags
will be served.
Tickets art available at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, the Foreign
Language Dept. BA 431, and from
any ILO member. No admission �
limited number of tickets.
GAY?
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity will be holding its third
meeting Tuewsday October 27 at
7:30 pen Regular meetings are
held every second and fourth
Tuesday of every month. The
meeting wll be held at the
Newman Center 953 E 10th street
Everyone interested is welcome!
WORSHIP
Sunday mass for Catholic
students on campus will be held In
the Biology Building lecture hall
at 12:30 beginning November I.
The Newman Community would
like to mvite all Catholic students
to come to the Newman mass and
meal on Wednesdays at 3:00 over
at the Newman Center 953 East
Tenth Street.
OA
Are you addicted to food? Do
you eat when you're not hungry?
Do you go on eating binges for no
apparent reason? Is your weight
affecting the way you live your
life? If so, come to an overeaters
anonymous meeting every
Thursday night at 7 30 p.m. at the
First Presbyterian Church
(corner of 14th and Elm streets
REBEL
The ECU Literary Magazine
REBEL is looking for an Associate
Editor, Prose Editor and Art
Editor Applications can be picked
up in the Publications Building n
the Media board secretary office
Any major is acceptable
SCEC
Student Council for Exceptional
Children presents speakers on
"autism" and their related
organlzattns. Marjorie Riddle will
be speaking on EARTH, and Max-
me Rothrock will present informa
tion on TEACH Refreshments will
be served. Everyone is nvited to
attend this fantastic program on
Monday, October 19th, at 4:00p.m.
in Speight 129.
Bausch & Lomb
soft contacts
Includes
() Fitting by eye doctor
() Easy care cold disinfection
() Refund policy
() Wear lenses home same day
NOW LOOKING GOOD COSTS LESS
3995
MMUVmON
includes frame and
plastic lenses over 100
frames to choose from
12
00
KtATOHtUAID
Scratch Resistant
coating for plastic
lenses
175
00
jAUSCH LQMB
BIFOCAL
SOFT CONTACT
LENSES
195��
PAUXHfLQMJ
SOFT CONTACTS
FOR ASTIGMATISM
ALSO
rtHMAUNS
EXTENDED WEAR
SOFT LENSES.
ABOVE PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE EXAM FEE
OPTOWCTWC
CWCAftEOSNTCR
GrMnvilte
228 GrMiwHHi Blvd.
Call: 756-9404
Dr. Peter W Hollis
Comprehensive Eye Exams
includes glaucoma test
cataract check
CONVENIENT EVENING
AND SATURDAY HOURS
15 ECU DISCOUNT
on eyeglasses
?OTHER DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY
ASSIST ANTSHIPS
The institute for Coastal and
Marina Resources is now accep
ting applications for two assistant
ships scheduled to begin in late fall
of 1W1.
Graduate Asslstantships, Office
Coordinator�Field Team Coor
dtnator. will coordinate field team
activities, and assist investigators
in data collection and analysis.
Background in behavioral or
social sciences preferred.
Undergraduate�Graduate
Assisiantship, Data Analyst, will
assist Investigators In the analysis
of data. Must have background
and familiarity with computer
programming and statistics.
Please contact Dr. Jeftrey
Johnson or Mr. Marcus Hepburn,
Mamie Jenkins building, ICMR at
757-etlO or 7S7 4220 An equal op
portunlty, affirmative action
employer.
CALLAGHAN DATE
CHANGE
The date of the lecture oy me
James Callaghan, former prime
minister of Great Britian, has ben
changed. Callaghan was slated to
appear onthe East Carolina
University LEcture Series on Oc-
tober 2. 101. His appearance has
been postponed until March 29,
MM.
Other personalities appearing
on the series include Buckminister
Fuller, Congresswoman Shirley
Chishotm, and syndicated colum-
nist James J. Kilpatrlck Season
tickets for the lecture series are on
sale in the Central Ticket Office
and are priced at V 50 tor ECU
students. Si 1.00 for faculty and
staff, and iis.00 for the public. For
reservations or additional Inor
mation contact the Central Ticket
office at (91) 757)411. Ext 24
NAACP
The ECU chapter of the NAACP
will have a membership drive all
day October 24. 27, 21. and 29 in
front of the Students Supply Store
Please support and join the
NAACP today.
SGA
Anyone Interested In filing for
Honor Council or Appeals Board.
please come by Room 22. in
Mendenhall between 100 em and
5 oo p.m.
SKI SNOWSHOE
All persons planning to ski
Snowshoe during Christmas break
should contact Mrs. Jo Saunders
at 757000, 205 Memorial Gym
Deposits are due on Tuesday, Oc
tober 27 at 4:00 p.m. in Memorial
Gym lot Balance due on Thurs
day. November 1. There is
limited space available
BLACK RUSSIAN
If you're still curious about our
winter guard Come see us on
Halloween at Carolina East Mall
Performances at 12 30 p m and
5:30 p.m. See you there!
DRAFTING
TECHNIZUES AND
TOOLS
All interested students and
faculty are welcome to attend a
demonstration and lecture by Mr.
Mark Hitchcock from KOH-NOOR
Repidograph. INC it Is sponsored
by the Dept. of Geography and
planning and the Student Supply
Store and will take place on Tues
day. October 27, m in Flanagan
307 at 9:00 am and in Brewster
B 102 at 330 p.m
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in true, art -
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-�V
e
10
9
IS
9
Oktoberfest
Is Celebrated
On Wednesday
B KRISHNA
VASQUEZ
SMI Vtnirr
ast Cat olina's In-
ternational 1 anguage
Organization is spon
soring an Oktoberfest
which will be held in
the Mendenhall Multi-
p u i p o s c R o o m
Wednesdsay from 6:30
p in until 10:30 p.m.
The Oktoberfest
began in the early 19th
century, and it was a
surprise birthda) parts
foi a young princess
who was the wife of the
reigning monarch. It
has been tradition evei
since, and it is
celebrated in Havana
and Munich, Gei mam
The celebration con
sists of two pails; the
first of these is held in
large tents, and is at
tended b thousands ol
people. Inside the tents
everyone socializes
while drinking beet and
eating various wuists
1 his acts as a pi elude to
the second pait the
carnival. 1 his second
part is enjoyed as much
b the oldei people as il
is b the sou ne
children.
Much like the
Oktoberfest held an
nuallv in Germany,
there will be food and
music V ednesda
night. 'cw ot the
foods that will be ser
ed are knockwurst, ger-
man tolls, potato salad,
and creams deserts.
1 tie "Schmutzgigs"
vaiII provide the music
vita) to good drinking
songs, and the) will
play from 7:30 p.m.
until 10:30 p.m.
1 ickets must be
presented at the door.
If sou do not have your
ticket, they may be
picked up for free at
the Central Ticket Of-
fice in Mendenhall. the
Foreign L a n guag e
Department in
Brew stei A 431, or ans
member of 11 O
1 ickets are going
quickl)
THl ASI K il INI V-
(x l� �M k
The hast Carolinian
smtr 1931
Published ever Tuesdo,
Thursday during 'he � tKU ��
year and rr 1 WK)n6
ing the summer
The Eas' C�rot.nian s �� �
tic ia respap� Ol E�1
Carolina Unlveri �
operated and published fOf and
by the students �
Uhi ver lity
Subscription Rate llCir-4"�
The East Carolinian oltices
are located m the Old South
Bu'ldmg on the campus ot ECU
Greenville N C
p. � V �. -
Cha
Old So h Building. I
�. i '934
Telephone til llit at' tlV)
Application to mail at second
class postaqe rates s pending at!
Greenville North Carolina
ATTIC
South �
No 6 1
Hock
Nightclub
A fternoon Delight
Two ECU students keep warm during the first chilling weather of tall.
Phi H- I.4IO PMIKIsllS
GLISSON
ME O �, ' M ' i u b
NO VACANCY
SUBWAY
Disarmament Discussed
Artworks Presented
The w a i e r c o I o r
works of Walter
Anderson, twentieth-
century Mississippi
painter, will be the
� a slide presen-
d interpretive
talk bs Susan
Donaldson on rhurs
day. Oct. 29, at 4 p.m.
in room 244 o! the
Mendenhall Student
Center Donaldson's
de-talk is the first
a series ol programs
sponsored b) the
English Departmei
Quality ol
Committee.
Waiter -V.
reclusive paintei
astonii y prolific
S
New - �' ea
jsippi and
ennessee His approx-
8,000 wal
� ; I which
uere .ered only
death, are
drawing i n creasing
notice from ci itics and
; holars outside
ve Mississippi.
Trained at the Pe
ii ia caderm ol
n the 1920's,
�ndetson studied brief-
ly in fiance, where he
was strongly drawn to
the prehistoric case
paintings at 1 es Eyzies
Eventually, he produc-
ed murals, block prints,
sculpture and draw-
ings, as well as watei
colors, and was
associated with the
family-owned Shear
water Potters in Ocean
Jprings, Mississippi.
Anderson is best
known for his in-
candescent, representa-
tional watercolors ol
the landscapes.
seascapes, flora and
ina Of the Mississippi
.it coast and the bat
riei islands, especially
Horn Island, where he
worked from 1948 until
s death in 1965. Pro-
ssoi Donaldson will
include passages from
Anderson's Horn
Island I ogs in her talk.
Professor
Donaldson, a Georgia
native and a specialist
in American Studies, is
one of six seholar-
consultants to the
ireinia Museum ol
Fine Arts for the Pain-
ling in the South ex
hi bit ion which will
open in Richmond in
1983. Two of her recent
presentations are: "The
Pastoral Vision ol
Waltei I. Anderson
delivered at the College
A11 Association
meeting in New
Orleans. 1980, and
"Meditations by the
sea Seascapes by Walt
Whitman and Martin
Johnson H e ad e
de 11s ered at the
Southern College Art
Conference in Oxford.
Mississippi, 1981. Her
dissertation on roman-
ticism and pastoralism
m twentieth-century
Southern literature and
painting is in prepara-
tion for the American
Civilization Program at
Brqwji University.
There will be a
discussion period
following the presenta-
tion and Donaldson
will provide a browsing
library of exhibition
catalogues and other
materials relating to
Anderson.
Continued From P�ge I
tial for an accidental
nuclear war ot being
sucked into a third-
party war that could
escalate to the nucleai
level
The Pentagon's
MAD (Mutually
Assured Destruction)
policy, which suites
that no reasonable na-
tion would considei a
nuclear first strike
because the result
would be suicide, does
not reassure Gardnei
"At some point one - �1
the countries will see
their deterrence as in-
adequate. 1! we lose
faith in our deterrence
we mas decide to suc-
cessfully mount a first
strike he says.
sou can trust the Rus-
sians Gardnei adds.
�' 1 hat's whs it's such a
nasty problem
"Our only option is
disarmament and try
ing to get the govern-
ment to realize this (is
our only option)
Kaar says. "I feel it's
a sad situation when
people don't know
what's going on around
them she added.
Gardnei hopes that
non- iolent altei natives
m ill be studied and con-
sidered. "There's lots
of money available foi
figuring out how to
build more weapons,
but we sure don't pas
enough people to work
foi peace he says.
" I he cow ai d's vsav out
is to build more and
1 reallv don't believe
b l g g e i
wear
nuc leat
Both Gardnei and
Kazai suggested con
crete steps they believed
should be taken to
resolve the buildup of
nucleai arms. "1 plan
on getting involved in
the Greenville Peace
Committee and work-
ing with a state-level
disarmament group
Kazai said.
� "1 want to study this
more Gardnei add
ed. "But we need to go
ahead and unilaterally
st ait a treee in the pro-
duction of new nucleai
weapons Gardnei
has also laid the
lundwoi k for a local
chaptei ol Pax C hristi
to work on the nucleai
weapons issue.
"1 would like to see
more students eel as
tisels involved in con-
sidering and debating
the largei vsorld ques-
tions he continued.
"More interest in stop-
ping the arms race Ol
alleviating world
hunger � than in
swallowing goldfish
would be an improve-
ment around here
PITTSBURGH PAINTS
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COSMETICS A
i FRAGRANCES
16�,
"l





Qtt?� last Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chuck Foster, Doctor oj Adornum
Chris Lichok, tnuw umm-
ALISON BARTEL, Production Manage'
Steve Moore, gkvmm mj-ww
Paul Collins, mmmcm
Jimmy DuPREE. mj���hwu�
Charles Chandler, sporuednor
Tom Hall, �� �"�
Steve Bachner. giiwiwiiwi wm1
Karen Wendt, so &���
October 27. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
AWACS
U.S. Arms Sales Unnecessary
Should the United States sell five
AWACS surveillance planes to
Saudi Arabia?
The debate over this question has
now stretched over two months
while politicians, Pentagon officials
and editorial writers have argued
for and against the sale from almost
every conceivable angle.
President Reagan and others who
support the sale argue that it is
necessary to maintain friendly rela-
tions with the Saudis. Most op-
ponents argue that the United States
should not sell strategic weaponry
to such an unstable nation.
Rarely, though, do we hear the
argument that the United States
should not be in the business of sell-
ing arms to anybody. But this has
become a pressing question now
that the world, with the help of the
superpowers, has armed itself to the
teeth.
Since 1970 the United States has
sold more than $5.3 billion worth of
major weapons systems to Third
World countries, and the Soviets are
not far behind with almost $4
billion in sales.
In the past three years Zambia, a
typically poor African nation, has
spent SI00 million buying fighters
DOONESBURY
and tanks from the Soviet Union.
Military experts estimate that the
Palestine Liberation Organization,
still considered a terrorist group by
many nations, received at least $100
million worth of arms last year.
And even tiny Brunei, with a
population of 212,000, recently
bought 17 helicopters and two sets
of missiles.
These statistics are evidence of a
trend in which the sale of weapons
has replaced economic aid as the
primary diplomatic tool for dealing
with poor nations. You're people
may be starving, but you're navy's
sure in great shape.
The world has gone weapons
mad, and conventional weapons are
doing a good job of keeping up with
their nuclear counterparts as a
threat to the future of humanity.
But what can be done?
As Time magazine said in a recent
story, "The first step toward a solu-
tion has to be a realization, by each
country involved in the trade, that
pursuing what it sees as its own best
interest creates a monster that is in
no country's best interest
We can only hope that the rest of
the world is not far behind in com-
ing to this realization.
by Garry Trudsau
- - BAD NEWSFELL6S
UrYTT'S GOINO 7D HtWE US STW-MINEV g
Internal Chancellor Search Desired
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leSCAffl
By ROBERT M. SWA1M
For the second time in less than four
years we find ourselves in the midst of a
search for a chancellor.
There is a need to re-open old wounds
here concerning the resignation of Thomas
Brewer, no use in beating a dead horse.
However, one cannot begin to discuss the
present chancellor selection process
without a review of some of the failures of
the current administration. This is primari-
ly because a majority of the members of
the university family (alumni, students,
and local supporters) want a chancellor
who will reverse some of the trends that
have taken place in the Brewer administra-
tion.
Anyone who was present at last week s
public hearing of the Chancellor Search
Committee could read between the lines of
most of the speeches and conclude that the
people want someone entirely different
from Brewer and his associates.
Some 17 people spoke at the hearing, in-
cluding myself. Although there were some
different ideas about what kind of
chancellor we should have, a majority of
those who spoke did seem to agree on
several points.
Among the traits mentioned that would
be desirable in a chancellor were:
�A proven record of teaching ability and
administrative experience.
�The ability to tap outside resources and
raise money.
�Strong political connections.
�A dedication to a growing and quality
athletic program.
�The abililty to muster support for the
university from alumni and local citizens.
�Close ties to ECU and the state of North
Carolina.
These were characteristics that most of
the speakers advocated. Strong indications
have already come from the committee
that the next chancellor will indeed be a
North Carolinian. Sources close to the
committee have also indicated that can-
didates from within the university will be
given very strong consideration.
Someone noted at that meeting that Dr.
Jenkins, Chancellor from 1960 to 1978,
was from New Jersey, not North Carolina.
This is true. However one must realize that
Dr. Jenkins did not come to East Crolina
Campus
Spectrum
University as Chancellor. He came here as
dean of the college when we were still
ECTC (East Carolina Teachers College).
From there he worked his way up the lad-
der to become president of ECC (East
Carolina College) in 1960 after 13 years as
dean and vice president. He was promoted
from within.
So when those like myself advocate fill-
ing the slot with "one of our own we
don't necessarily mean that the person has
to have been born in this state. Rather, we
are saying the next chancellor should be so-
meone who has been here for a while.
Former U.S. Senator Robert Morgan
once remarked that "Leo Jenkins was not
born in North Carolina, but no one is more
of a North Carolinian than he
This is a wise path for the committee to
follow, for several reasons.
The overwhelming factor in the
downfall of the Brewer administration was
their absolute lack of loyalty to ECU and
North Carolina. At times it appeared that
Brewer and his people had nothing but
contempt for North Carolinians and
especially for anybody who had been
around during the Jenkins years.
After Brewer's resignation Vice
Chancellor Elmer Meyer remarked that
Brewer "was a man of integrity, but
evidently integrity doesn't mean very much
in Eastern North Carolina How wrong
Dr. Meyer was. Indeed it was our belief in
integrity ana loyalty to ECU that led to
Brewer's downfall.
I am greatly reminded of the now
famous headline that ran in Time
magazine after President Reagan's elec-
tion: "How about a little class this time
around This same thought is in the
minds of many people as we enter the
search for our new chancellor.
The people, especially the students, want
the door to the chancellors office to open
up again as it was during tenure of Dr. Leo
Jenkins. For three years now we have been
cut off from our chancellor who locked
himself in an ivory tower. Our next
chancellor cannot make that same fatal
mistake.
In talking with literally a couple oi nun
dred people the overwhelming concensi;
seems to be that we need one of our own to
guide this institution, someone who, in the
words of our distinguished board of
trustees chairman Mr. Ashley B. Futrell.
will "sweat purple and bleed gold
Ther has been little growth in the la:
three years in the realm of academic pro
grams and athletics as compared to the
Jenkins years, one need only check the
statistics available at the department of in
stitutional research. The athietic depar
ment is a monument to the ineffectivene-
and indifference of the Brewer administru
tion When Dr. Jenkins retired there was a
surplus of about $280,000 We now face a
deficit of over $300,000 according to
sources in the university business office.
A strong case can be made for pro
moting from within the university. Who
better could serve ECU than someone who
has toiled in the trenches already for ten to
twenty years? That in itself is a testimonial
to their loyalty and devotion.
Let us take note of the fact that last year
when Dr. Ferebee Taylor, chancellor at
UNC-CH, retired he was succeeded by Dr.
Fordham who was the dean of the UNC-
CH medical school and also an alumnus of
Carolina. If its good enough for Chapel
Hill, then its good enough for Greenville.
Carolina made a wise choice. Who could
possibly be more dedicated to that school
than an alumnus who had taught there and
served as dean of its more prestigious pro
fessional school.
I believe that the students here at ECL
and especially the alumni would like to see
our search committee follow the path of
their Chapel Hill counterparts and choose
someone from within our own school.
Perhaps our best days lie ahead of us it
only we choose a leader who is dedicated to
renewing the days of growth and glory that
under Dr. Jenkins, brought us into the
limelight as a great university.
(Robert Swaim is a senior business major
from Greensboro.)
r- Campus Forum
Hooray for Kim Albin's article on the
ECU Hunger Coalition! She was right
on target when she said that we as
Americans are tired of being blamed for
problems we didn't create. Having a
high standard of living doesn't mean we
have an "obligation" to help others less
fortunate than us.
America was founded on the premise
that everybody had a right to receive ex-
actly what he earned. Poor nations have
not earned our support by supplying us
with an equally valuable commodity. Of
course, many people will argue that they
cannot deal with us on a value for value
basis. But that is irrelevant. What is rele-
vant is that they don't offer us goods
and services in exchange for money.d
The free-enterprise system is not only
the best system of exchange in the world,
it is also unfair in that it is oblivious to
what "should" be and deals only in
what "is That is neither good nor bad,
it is simply a fact. I believe that
everybody should have a happy mar-
riage, that everybody should drive a
Rolls-Royce, that everybody should live
forever. Unfortunately, reality has a
way of not cooperating with what
should be.
I certainly have nothing against an in-
dividual helping the poor if he wants to
� that's certainly his right. The problem
starts when a group of people join
together and decides that everybody
should help the poor. Each individual
has a right to decide for himself whether
he should help the poor. And if a person
does decide that he wants to help the
poor, group action, such as that of the
Hunger Coalition, would be a very inef-
ficient way to do it. That is because each
member of the group has a slightly dif-
ferent idea of who is poor and what
should be done to help them, thus the
group's platform is not truly represen-
tative of each individual member's
beliefs.
Helping the poor would be much
easier, faster and more effective by each
person determining for himself who is
poor, determining what should be done
to help them, and then implementing his
plan on his own without wasting time
getting involved in the muddled
bureaucracy of an organization, where
he would have to confer with others over
who qualifies as poor and what should
be done for them.
Miss Albin's article did an excellent
job of exposing the useless attempts of
the Hunger Coalition to solve a problem
that we, as Americans, are not responsi-
ble for. 1 look forward to more excellent
reporting from her in the future.
MACK PAUL
Sophomore, Speech
Art Critic?
A funny thing happened to me the
other day. 1 was walking along, minding
my own business when Marvin Braxton,
vice-president of Student Government,
walked up to me and asked me if he
could speak with me. 1 politely con-
sented even though I had no idea what
this conversation would lead to.
It turns out that Mr. Braxton felt of-
fended on behalf of the student body by
the art show that the Art Exhibition
Committee had hung in the Mendenhall
Gallery. Marvin, who obviously knows
nothing about art, felt that the show was
in bad taste. I naturally refused to
remove the show.
Members
For those who are not aware of the ex-
hibit it is titled "Silver Interactions" and
was obtained from the Southern Arts
Federation. The exhibit is composed of
about 50 photographs from nationally
and internationally known
photographers. Many art professionals
have expressed their delight with this ex-
hibit about societal interaction!
Since my original talk with Marvin he
has tried to go over my head and have
the show removed from the gallery wall.
Of course, no one will perform this task
because that act would constitute cen-
corship! Several days ago I approached
Mr. Braxton and asked him if his opi-
nion about the show had changed and he
quickly replied, "1 think it sucks
Well, so much for the vice-oresident
of Student Government. Obviously, he
is just trying to round up votes for this
spring's election and he does not know
art from a tasteful vocabulary.
JULIAN G. FAHRBACH
Chairperson of Art Exhibition
Nudity
What ever happened to censorship in
journalism? I, along with several other
of my friends were appalled at the
photograph of the girl from the wet tee-
shirt contest in the Octob" 22, 1981 edi-
tion of The East Carolinian. If the cam-
pus community wanted to see girls in wet
tee-shirts they could have gone to
Chapter X. 1 think The East Carolinian
could have found a more appropriate
means of illustration. A nude woman
can be a beautiful form of art, but The
East Carolinian did not tastefuly exhibit
a form of art. A photograph of a girl
with a wet tee-shirt on is definitely not
appropriate in a newspaper, especially
under a subtitle called "STYLE
CHERYL L. FISHER
Senior, English
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office m the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s).
jnL
pii
o
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Entertainment
OCTOBER 27. 1981 Page 5
Honored 'Tess'
Plays Hendrix
On Wednesday
Tomorrow night, Octobei 28, at 8
p.m. in Mendenhall Student
center's Hendrix rheatre, the Stu-
dent Union 1 ilmsommittee will
prevent one of the finest films o1 the
year, Roman Polanski's breathtak
ing Tess
Following
the student ce
Hester, cha
Departmen
mal dis.
doughnuts will hi
terested student-
are welcome to i
.?
iz
through the window walls of his
Paris apartment. 1 he aroma of
freshl ground coffee seemed the
air He asked me to join him at
breakfast, and seated ai a bleached
oak table, he broke a crisp crois-
sant and we l1 ol h,s
a film Tess 1 '
Oi
i
K
� wnuirv
Hah'
� m stai i
I
. Repulsion,
( hinatown
;nd.
the following excerpt, from an
cle h Harlan Kennedy, originally
appeared in American Film
Magazine shortly before tht reh
of "Tess Reprinted b permis-
sion. Ml rights reserved.
R
-ki opt
sun!
1 riomas H; I nineteenth-
century tragic novel Tess oj the
D l rb'ervillt s
"1 have bee' -da great
b surrealism and the theatre oi
the absurd Polanski said "But
now that the world itsell has become
urd and almost u real, 1 want to
i
See 'Polanski's . Page "
In M ,�ne from M-U1 I U M� Tess. p.aved by Nas.assi, KinsK seeks refuge for .he �l,hl S.onehenRe.
'v m
East ('ai
cis pci form
For less than
I n; ersity 's 1981
b six of the nai
ensembles
The series opens this Monday, November 2-
Piedmont Chamber Orchestra
Harsanyi. Established in
N.C. School of the Arts
toured widely throughou
Its performances have inc
C enter in ashington D (
York and major concei
In addition theene semi
such note as C laude Iran, l
and has a new ox recoi -
. Hadn.
. - and music
the
onducted b Nicht
,68 b the Rockefellei a
jundations,
the east l S
t- � 11 I. � � � �' . � k. .
( Harsanyi, formerly music director of the
lnu V . ;is Academy Orchestra and conductor o
the Bach ria Group, has won critical acclaim
throughout the U.S Canada and Europe.
Second or, the series is the Norman Lubott Choir, a
ral ensemble whose range is unparalleled. Its pro-
set foi November 19. will include works by such
rs as Bach and Moart. contemporary com-
and Luboffs own arrangements of popular
� tunes and folk songs.
composed ol highly versatile singers.
forms as main as 100 concerts pel season.
list nctie choral interpretations have been heard on
than 75 recordings during the past two decades.
.ear-old Manhatten Woodwind Quintet will
, ECl lanuarv 19. Winner o the 1978 Artists
International Competition, the group is in great demand
and is recognized for its special audience rapport as well
as its musical integrity.
Its members, all graduates of the Juilhard and
Manhatten Schools of Music, are Susan Deaver, flute;
Jessica Murrow, oboe; Richard Shapiro, clarinet; David
Granger, bassoon; and William Barnewitz, horn. The
Quintet's repertoire is wide-ranging, stretching from
Renaissance music through contemporary chamber
works.
Dutch soprano Emily Ameling, performing at tLU
Februarv 23, has been recognized as the world's
foremost female singer of German lieder. Since her
American debut at Lincoln Center in 1968, she has per-
formed with most of the leading symphonies and ap-
peared as guest artist at several major music festivals.
Her current season will include performances with the
Cincinnati and San Francisco Symphony Orchestras
and three appearances with The Hague Philharmonic
during its American tour. Celebrating 200 years of
uninterrupted friendship between the U.S. and Holland,
these concerts are sponsored by Queen Beatrix of The
Netherlands.
Ameling has recorded for 14 European and American
record companies, and several of her recorded perfor-
mances have won major awards.
Guitarist Michael Lorimer, a protege of Andres
Segovia, will perform March 18 at ECU. Consistently-
rated among the world's top classical guitarists, he is the
Monday
first American guitarist invited to perform in the Soviet
Union, which he toured in 1975 and 1977.
Lorimer has presented the American premieres of
several guitar concern and solo guitar works, including
compositions by Andre Prcvin and William Bolcom.
He is featured in a PBS special. "The Artistry of
Michael Lorimer" and writes a classical guitar column
in "Guitar Player Magazine
Pianist Shura Cherkassky will conclude the ECL Ar-
tists Series April 13. Acclaimed as one of the greatest
pianists since the grand Romantic tradition, Cherkassky
began his performing career with a 1923 debut tour and
a command performance at the White House tor Presi-
dent Harding. .
A native of Russia who emigrated to the U.S. as a
voung man, the pianist has been an audience favorite
throughout Europe where he has performed at
prestigious music festivals. He has also toured in the Far
East and in Australia, Africa and India.
Since returning to perform in Russia in 1976, he has
been invited for three subsesquent concert tours.
Cherkassky's interpretations of 19th century piano
music have been recorded by six major record com-
panies.
Public season tickets for all six concerts are available
at the ECU Central Ticket Office at $20 each. All con-
certs arc scheduled for 8 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre of
ECU'S Mendenhall Student Center.
Band 'Glissons!
Road Tough For Area Group
B JOHN WEYLER
SUff Writer
Editor's note: What is it like, being in a rock and roll
band9 To answer this all-important question, The East
Carolinian coerced reporter John Weyler into conduc-
ting an exclusive interview with the local rock band
Glisson The group members requested that it be made
clear that not all statements made during the somewhat
incoherent interview be taken at face value, especially
by girlfriends and parental units.
While going On The Road may have made Jack
Kerouak famous, it has made Glisson semi-notorious
and extremelv nutty. At least, that is the impression
made during the interview with the three-man combo.
Audiences can judge for themselves whether their
notoriety is justified, when Glisson performs at the At-
tic Tuesday, October 27.
They call their energetic, original sound "hard rock
fusion a mixture of several different rock styles with a
few jazz overtones. They perform both rock standards,
and originals, which are written by The Brothers
Glisson, Tom and Fred. Powerful percussion is supplied
by Kyle McBride. Tom, Fred and Kyle are all ECU
graduates, having studied management, biochemistry.
"SUver Interactions" On Display In Mendenhall Gallery
Si,ver .nteractions" is the !
orn� O-miUeend isn loan from the previous southern Arts Federate.
and music -ducation and therapy, respectively.
Glisson got together in the summer of 1980,
specifically to enter a Battle of the Bands co-sponsored
by a Jaycees chapter and radio station WSFL in
Washington. They beat the other bands, but had to
fight another battle when the co-sponsors refused to pay
them. Glisson sued, the case was settled out of court,
and the group was finally paid around $500, supposedly
much less they were promised.
Despite winning another Battle of the Bands, such
enterprises have left them feeling embittered. Such
words as "rip off "scam" and "setup" spice their;
conversation when referring to Band Battles. They re
either political or moneymaking for the people who set
it up says Kyle.
After their award-winning entry into the music and
rip-off industry, Glisson began giging, playing in small
clubs covering most of eastern North Carolina, though
they'll travel as far as funds and fans call for. Life on
the road is exhilirating, exasperating and occasionally
c r 11 CM 811 n S
Commom problems encountered "on the road" in-
clude mechanical failure in the middle of nowhere at
midnight, club owners who short-change and cancel on
short notice, bad motel rooms and food, and perhaps
most painful, lack of good groupies. Regarding the lat-
ter Tom wishes it to be known that "we have an open-
ing for a full-time road masseus. for those late-night
Another problem is the low cultural intellectual level
in some of the bars they have performed. The group
recalls one Saturday night at a club "somewhere in the
boonies" when a huge brawl broke out among the
natrons. The trio just sat and watched the improvised
entertainment, giving the brutal ballet a standing ova-
tion when no one was left standing. The following
Saturday night, another near-riot occurred at a club
they were playing. "We came to the conclusion that our
music was driving people into a frenzy says Tom.
Glisson has a unique method for arranging hotel ae-
comadions, involving one person hiding in the back seat
of the '68 Cadillac they travel in, while the other two
rent a room. Once inside, they utilize a rotation system
to overcome the obstacle of three (sometimes more)
people sharing two beds. Despite the questionalbe
morality in not fully paying for motel rooms (they once
had 28 people in a room rented to two), Fred wants to
make it clear that "we don't skip checks in restaurants .
we're not that bad
Other road experiences include running into a deer
late one night; seeing their names scrawled on restroom
walls ("That's when you know you're good"); perform-
ing without a qualified sound man (which they're cur-
rently in the market for), and encountering the Lynyrd
Skynyrd syndrome (the most popular music in this area
is southern rock, which Glisson ain't).
Sex-and-drugs-and-rock-and-roll are the foundations
of modern society, and no one can accuse Glisson of be-
ing anti-social. They usually have a little party after a
gig but "we play straight. We don't advocate drug use
� it limits you, your sensitivity, if you're high on
anything says one band member who should know.
Glisson's plan for the future is to keep playing mostly
small clubs, concentrating on giving the best perfor-
mance possible, till they can afford to upgrade their
equipment and show. Meantime, the bars are slowly get-
ting bigger and better: "at one time our audiences were
into Quaaludes and falling down � now they just fall
down drunk, with occasionally some "came (cocaine) to
lift them back up
t�






THE EAST CAROL INI AN
OCTOBER 27, 1981
ECU Student Lands Key Role
Production Of Glass Menagerie
Animation Lives
This original animation eel painting features
(clockwise from left) Daffy Duck, Porky Pig,
Flmer Fudd, Bugs Bunny, Wile E. Coyote and
Koadrunner. It is signed by animation wizard
Chuck Jones. (C) Warner Brothers, Inc.
Animation
Sale Slated
If you are a fan of Bugs Bunny, Wile E.
Coyote, Winnie the Pooh, or a hundred other
cartoon characters, there's an exhibit that's sure
to win you over.
Hundreds of animation eel paintings from
Hollywood cartoons are the subject of a special
Exhibit and Sale to be held Thurs. thru Fri Oc-
tober 29-30, 1981 from 10 a.m. until 7 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. The public is in-
vited.
Animation eel paintings, called "eels are the
paintings actually filmed in making the animated
cartoon. Each character is painted by hand on a
clear sheet of acetate, usually 11" X 14" or
larger, then placed against a background and
photographed one-by-one to produce a reel of
motion picture film.
Cels are one-of-a-kind, not prints or reproduc-
tions. They are the culmination of the artistic
process � the final image that is photographed
by the camera.
This Exhibit was authenticated by Gallery
I.ainzberg of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the nation's
best-known specialist in this unique art form. A
representative of Gallery Lainzberg will be on
hand to answer questions.
The Exhibit Sale will feature a selection of eels
from feature-length Walt Disney films, including
The Jungle Book. Robin Hood, Winnie the
Pooh, fhe Rescuers, The Aristocats, and the
recently-released. The Fox and the Hound.
Original pencil animation drawings from some of
Disney's early films of the 1930's and 1940's will
also be offered.
Original Disney art work has long appealed to
a broad range of collectors. In reporting an auc-
tion of Disney animation eels at Sotheby Parke
Bernet Galleries in I .A the L.A. Times
(7 3 81) wrote, "The eels commanded stiff
prices, reflecting the rising demand for Disney
memorabilia by art dealers and Disney collectors.
And the value seemed to have little to do with the
age of the pieces
Today many people are investing in animation
eel paintings of all kinds, especially signed pieces.
Of particular importance at this Exhibit is a col-
lection of eel paintings featuring the popular
Warner Bros, characters � Bugs Bunny, Daffy
Duck. Wile E. Coyote, the Roadrunner, Pepe Le
Pew, and the Tasmanian Devil. Some of these
paintings bear the signature of Chuck Jones,
widely regarded as one of America's foremost
animators.
Competing for the collector's attention are
animation eels from Ralph Bakshi's best-known
productions: American Pop and H izards. Some
of these eels have been signed by Ralph Bakshi.
Another highlight of this ExhibitSale is the
artwork from Gnomes, an imaginative and
popular fantasy film based on the best-selling
book.
Finally, the ExhibitSale will include eels from
dozens of other cartoons from vintage Kiazy
Kats and Betty Boops to eels from current televi-
sion shows.
The interest in animation art work as a collecti-
ble and as Fine Art has burgeoned in recent
years. Part of this growth has to do with the
generally reasonable prices for original art work.
Writing in Rarities (Summer 1981), a magazine
devoted to Collectibles, Leonard Shannon ex-
plains, animation art is still affordable. All
kinds of paintings can be bought for less than
$50.00. But, regardless of price, any artwork
created for an animated film is, by its very
nature, unique and collectible
Permanent collections of animation art may be
found in major museums across the country such
as the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan
Museum of Art and the San Francisco Museum
of Art. Original animation art was the subject of
a two-month Exhibit at the Library of Congress
in Nov. 1978 and this summer, an elaborate Ex-
hibit was held at the prestigious Whitney
Museum of Art in New York City, attracting
enormous interest.
Gregory A. Watkins, currently a student in the
Writing Program at ECU, was recently cast as
the gentleman caller in Stephen B. Finnan's pro
duction of The Glass Menagerie. This will be
Greg's initial acting assignment. His experience
as a writer, however, gives him an unusual
perspective on acting and he has found the transi-
tion a difficult, yet interesting, challenge.
"My First impression was that acting and
writing have a lot in common. Each is a creative
process, and each is primarily concerned with
story-telling. But there are as many differences as
similarities
"Writing is essentially a personal process. An
author creates a reality in his mind, re-creates it
on paper, then submits it to the reader. The com-
munication that takes place as a result, if it takes
place at all, does so over a great distance, and in
emotional isolation
"In acting, on the other hand, that com-
munication takes place in an emotional context
created by the actors and the audieniee. Where
the writer has condensed a reality into words, an
actor must expand words into a real'ty, bv re
creating an experience of those words ami shar
ing it with each member of the audience The ex
change between actor and audience is intense,
direct, and immediate
Stephen B. Finnan is very enthusiastic about
Greg's progress. "Greg has a wonderful sensitivi-
ty and intelligence which he is actively applying
to his work in this production. He possesses an
interesting and rather profound stage presence
and has provided us with a professional commit!
ment to do his best. 1 am very pleased to be work
ing with him
The Glass Menagerie opens November 10 at
the Methodist Student Center. Tickets are air
rently available through the Central Fickel Of-
fice at Mendenhall Student Center ("757-6611,
ext. 266) and the Methodist Student (enter
(758 2030).
Lew
Conducter and Artistic Director George Trautwein will conduct the Pied
monl Chamber On lustra �n Monday, November 2 in th Hendrn
fheatre. I r more details about the riists Series, s. p i
S 7SB0711
ii a i

OCATEO BEHINO THE L BO BOO
Wed. � Ladies'Night
wAIan Handalman
Thurs. � College Night
The
Gillestie-Hamer
Band
SPECIAL both nights
with college l.D.
�-�-
;SUSCH. The official beer of The Charlie Daniels Band
i
!
.
C Anheoser Buscti Inc Si Lous Mo





�he Pied-
Undrix
LrofOG About Coiug� Tnr Whip (A)frf
0OOT HWC TO uJor( ;
Stroce i HAe a
OOES IT HAVJC ALfiitthS,
gj PWJIP A)ORtt
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 27, 1981
AW� B �T HA A
0�AP 6ATTEW A0
A0 CrtfTy GA5 TWfc f
S0Mf� Special
Of The
Week
Stop In For
A Special Lunch
Polanski 9s Tess' Playing
i onlinutil Krorn Page 5
Polanski picked up a
paperback copy of the
novel. "7m is above
all a great love story
he said. "What hap-
pens to Tess in the story
is very much the raw-
bones of Victorian
melodrama: She is
seduced when young,
bears a child who dies,
is deserted by the man
she later marries, and
finally is sent to the
gallows for the murder
of her seducer. But the
flesh Hardy puts on
those bones is
astonishing. He links
the girl to the rhythm
of nature, within a Vic-
torian society at odds
with everything spon-
taneous and natural
Polanski got up and
walked to the window.
He looked down reflec-
tively into the busy tur-
moil and said, "Tess is
regeneration and conti-
nuance. But the social
times she lives in are
out of joint. By con-
trasting her with her
mother. Hardy points
this up marvelously.
Listen
He walked back to
the table, opened his
well-thumbed copy of
Tess, and found the
passage:
"Between the mother,
with her fast-vanishing
lumber of supersti-
tions, folklore, dialect,
and orally transmitted
ballads, and the
daughter, with her
trained National
teachings and Standard
knowledge . . . there
was a gap of two hun-
dred years as ordinarily
understood. When they
were together the Jaco-
bean and the Victorian
ages were juxtaposed.
"The contrast is all
there said Polanski
triumphantly. "The
mother belongs to the
past. Tess belongs to
the present, to the
modern age, to you and
me. She is the first truly
modern heroine
"As for what you
asked about my films
he said, putting the
book on the table,
"yes, Tess is a new
departure. It is, as I
have said, the film of
my mature years. I
shall be sorry if people
have such a limited idea
of what my style as a
director is like � and
my preoccupations �
that they cannot accept
something different
from me. In the
cinema, directors can
be typecast as well as
actors. The point will
undoubtedly be raised
at the Cannes Film
Festival . . .
"Tess, you must
remember he con-
tinued, "was a pure
woman. It was Hardy's
subtitle to the book.
She broke Victorian
moral codes, but she
responded to natural
law, to nature, her
nature. That's what the
whole book is about.
The film is an accusa-
tion of the hypocrisy
and injustice of that
rigid society � and by
extension of any rigid
and repressive socie-
ty
SONIC SPECIAL
HAM & CHEESE
Regular Tater Tots
Med. Drink
$2.09 -��
Good Oct. 26th Nov. 1
With Coupon
618 Greenville Bivd
-Only
SONIC.
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IN COLOR
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Co-Ed Outlet
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Located next to Plitt Theatre
AAonSat. 10 9 Call 335 242



i
i
l:J
HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT MOST.
The Fleming Center has been here for women
of all ages since 1974, offering understanding
and help to anyone faced with an unplanned
pregnancy day or night Services include:
Free Pregnancy Tasting
Weekday ft- Saturday Abortion Appts.
Evening Birth. Control Hours
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
The Fleming Center
We're here when you need us.
Presicion
Designs
Stylist Ron Nichols
ECU Student Special
$7 For Layer Styles
$10 Ladies Fashions Styles
219Cotanche - Suite 7
Veranda Room
RAMADA INN
HALLOWEEN
PARTY
Saturday, Oct. 31 9-1
Prizes for Best Costume
GRAND PRIZE�Tripto Wrights �
3 days, 2 nights
Meals & Accommodations
Plus other prizes to be given away.
Free Admission with Costume.
Band � 'TALK OF THE TOWN"
Remote with WOOW Radio
ft
LW
752-1798

ELECTRIC PERFORMANCES,
GRAND FUN,
ELEGANTLY
RAUNCHY, UN-
EXPECTEDLY
TOUCHING
Famous
Salad Bar
-Sheila Benson, LOS ANGELES TIMES
WESTERN SIZZLIN'
MONDAY -
CHOPPED STEAK
�1.99
TUESDAY -
BEEF TIPS
�1.99
THURSDAY -
STEAK SANDWICH
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FRIDAY -
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
�3.79
OUTRAGEOUSLY ENTER-
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-David Ansen. NEWSWEEK MAGAZINE

SATURDAY -
BARBEQUE RIBS
�2.99
WONDERFUL DIALOGUE,
HILARIOUS SEX SCENES,
BRILLIANT ACTING:
�Lir Smith,
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
SUNDAY -
STEAK ON A STICK
�1.99
All Meals are
complete Including
Baked Potato or
French Fries &
Texas Toast
RICH mj FAMOUS
Metro-GoJdwyn-Mayer Presents
A Jacquet-William Allyn Production A George Cukor Film
JACQUELINE BISSET CANDICE BERGEN
"RICH AND FAMOUS" DAVID SELBY HARTBOCHNER Musk by GEORGES DELERUE
Screenplay by GERALD AYRES Based on a play by JOHN VAN DRUTEN Produced by WILLIAM ALLYN
�m j Directed by GEORGE CUKOR k
�saw
Take Out Service
703 E I Oth St
758 2712
264 Bypass- 754 0040
Hours II a.mlOp.i
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NOW PLAYING AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU

t
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t





Sports
,ate Surge
Pushes Miami
i ECU, 31-6
(ira?it"
d Pirate
eekend Has g
s. Downs
r
Passing Game Kl
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is satur-
PIRA TES
in the pros
A.C. Dances, Jukes
Around Redskins
Former East Carolina star running back An-
thony "Tony" Collins brought back memories of
his Pirate days by breaking the 100 yard barrier U
for the first time in his professional career Sun-
day.
Collins, starting for New England, carried the
ball 22 times for 103 yards against the
Washington Redskins. However, the Patriots lost
the contest, 24-22, when John Smith's 53-yard
field goal attempt with 57 seconds remaining fell
short.
The loss put New England in fourth place of
the American Conference Eastern Division with a
2-6 record, one game ahead of Baltimore.
Collins now has 563 yards this season, good
enough for fourth place unofficially among
American Football Conference rushers. San
Diego's Chuck Muncie was the conference's
fourth best rusher, but he only managed 21 yards
on 12 attempts against Chicago.
Overall, again unofficially, Collins bypassed
Muncie and St. Louis' Otis Anderson to move in-
to 11th place among 1981 NFl rushers. Anderson
carried the ball three times for 77 yards aginst
Minnesota, running his total to 556 ards, seven
less than Collins.
Buffalo's Joe Cribbs is in third place in the
AFC with a total of 613 yards after a 113-yard
performance against Denver Sunday.
Collins showed why New England picked him
so high in the second round on the first play from
scrimmage. He took a handoff for a sweep
around the right end and was cut off but reversed
his field and picked up 10 yards.
New Orleans' George Rogers, with 859, yards
is the top first-year rusher in the league.
However, Collins has moved close to the number
two position after Kansas City's Joe Delaney
managed only five yards in 11 carries against
Oakland. Delaney now has 572 yards.
Indians Blank Pirates, 4-0
ffcWHrMW
AunlCBl Sports r4llK
East Carolina coach
Brad Smith made no
excuses when asked
about his team's 4-0
loss to the Indians of
William and Mary last
Wednesday afternoon.
"They were ready to
play, and we weren't.
They came out fired up
and beat us to the ball
in the second half"
The loss dropped the
Pirate's record to 5-8-1
this season. To have
that important winning
season, the Pirates
must win their last four
matches.
The Pirates were out-
shot by William and
Mary, 20-10. Goalie
Steve Brown had five
saves in the first half,
and freshman defender
Danny Curtis added
five more in the second
period.
The William and
Mary goalies accounted
for six saves.
East Carolina hosts
the Paladins of Old
Dominion University at
Minges Field Wednes-
day afternoon. Old
Dominion has been
ranked as high as fifth
in the nation this
season.
"It'll be a good,
physical match Smith
said and added that the
Paladins "have had
about the same pro-
blem as we have in that
they haven't been scor-
ing as much as they'd
like
The match is set for 4
p.m.
ECU Downs Duke
IB �
Anthonv Collins displays some of his
old collegiate moves that are dazzling
professional teams this season. He has
dashed, slashed and danced his way to
563 yards in his first professional
season with eight games to go.
By THOMAS BRAME
Sl�ri Whirr
The Lady Pirates of
East Carolina clearly
dominated Duke's Rac-
quet Club, 8-1, Satur-
day afternoon.
The Pirate men had a
more exciting match
against the Camels of
Campbell. After a 3-3
tie in the single's mat-
ches, the Pirates took
two out of the three
double's matches for
the victory.
"I'm excited about
the teams' ability to
win their three-set mat-
ches coach Carolina
Brown gleemed after-
wards.
The Pirate women
concluded their season
with this victory.
Atlantic Christian plays
host to the men Thurs-
day, Oct. 29 for the
season finale.
ITALIAN NITE
LASAGNA
AND
Inconsistent Play Plagues
Pirates At Duke Tournament
B THOMAS BRAME
suff Wnlrr
The young Pirate
golf team had a disap-
pointing showing the
Durham last weekend.
Inconsistent play pla-
qued ECU in the
Eighth Annual Duke
Invitational and Golf
Tournament.
As a team. East
Carolina finished 18th
out of 20 teams. A
balanced North
Carolina State Univer-
sity team captured the
team honors. Wolf pack
coach Sykes described
his squad as a "good
experienced team with
the ability to be among
the top in every tourna-
ment
Wake Forest coach
Jessse Haddock was
disappointed in his
team's second-place
finish, as was East
Carolina coach Bob
Helmick in his team's
poor showing in the
overall totals.
Jodie Mudd of
Georgia Southern ran
away with individual
honors shooting an
8-under par for the
tournament. Don
Sweeting and Don
Gafner lead the high-
spirited Pirates with
229. Freshman Chris
Czaja followed with a
231 and continued to
improve with each
tournament.
The Pirates travel to
Greensboro for the
Guilford Invitational
Tournament this
Thursday and Friday
(Oct. 29-30) at the Car-
dinal Country Club.
Eighteen teams will be
competing.
A previously
scheduled match with
William and Mary was
counseled.
buccaneer MOVES i3
756 3307 Greenville Square Center
NOW
SHOWING!
I 50TIL5.30
VERYDAY
YOU'VE HEARD
ABOUT IT-
NOW YOU CAN SEE IT!
MALCOLM
MCDOWELL
PETER O'TOOLE
caligulX
II Sun. Testing Equipment Road Service
� N.C. Inspection Station
Complete Automotive Service f
Foreign and Domestic Cars p
COREY'S EXXON)
SERVICE CENTER
2753 East 10th Street 1
758-2913
i
1
10
Discount to All
ECU Students and Faculty
On All Repair Work.
Located beside N.C.
Department of Motor Vehicles
OWNED & OPERATED BY REX COREY
8! "
OTHS
my mqmv, Duffm oooslr
8:OOPM- 2:0OAM -�
?fflSSffir
TJOCKftOLL MUSIC
BLACK
RUSSIAN
HALLOWEEN!
Come See Us.
Carolina East Mall
Oct. 31,1981
Performances
12:30 & 5:30
SPAGHETTII
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
Plus Garlic Bread CQO
WITH
ALL
EVERY WEDS.
E.C.C.D.E.C.
WINTERGUARDE
SH0NEY8
432 Greenville Blvd.
HUNGATE'
PITT PLAZA
HALLOWEEN
HEADQUARTERS
Psssst
Book
Lovers
SPIRIT GUM
'BODY GLITTERS �
HUNGATE'S fangs
r. PITT PLAZA UGe
756 0121 8iOoo
ALSO IN RALEIGH, DURHAM & WILMINGTON
Full line of hardbacks,
paperbacks & magazines
Local & out-of-town
newspapers.
Greeting Cards
For AH
Occasions!
Books, Books
A More
BOOKS
BOTH STORES OPEN ALL DAY
7 DAYS A WEEK
CENTRAL NEWS &
CARD SHOP
321 Evans St. Mall
752-3333
CENTRAL BOOK
&NEWS
Geenville Sq. Shopping Ctr.
756-7177
Design Your Own
Sold �eads ofJBovo
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See our wonderful Gold ieads of love Otaplayl
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14K7mtB�orJ $3.57
ALL CHAINS NOW AVAILABLE WITH REMOVABLE CATCH.
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2818 E ,10th St. Greenville
All you can eat
Popcorn
Shrimp
499

come join us
for our -t�
SPEC3KL!
Special prices on
choice items from our
menu-served between
5:00 and 7:30
nmnGKUXs






10
FHEEASTCARCyNlAN a.OBlK
Miami Ranked 19th
( PI Top Twenty
. Penn State
2. Pittsburgh
3. Southern Cal
4. Clemson
5. Georgia
6. Texas
7. Alabama
8. Mississippi St.
9. Nebraska
10. Iowa St.
11. North Carolina
12. Washington St.
13. Oklahoma
14. Michigan
15. Washington
16. Iowa
17. Florida St.
18. Ohio State
19. Miami (Fla.)
20. Arkansas
Following a 31-6 �m
over last Carolina
Saturday, the Miami
(Fla.) Hurricanes mov-
ed into the 19th posi-
tion in tins week's
United Press interna-
tional's Top Twenty
ranking of Division I
college football teams.
Ihe Hurricanes, 4-2,
had been ranked as
high as 11th but fell out
of the poll last week
after a tough 14-10 loss
to Mississippi State, a
club that is ranked
eighth this week
Another team that
has downed the Pirates,
North Carolina, fell
from third to 11th this
week following a 31-13
upset at the hands of
unranked South
Carolina.
Penn State, follow-
ing a victory last week
over West Virginia �
the Pirates' opponent
this Saturday � re-
mains the number one
team in the nation with
a perfect 6-0 mark.
Pittsburgh, Penn
State's arch-rival, is at
number two. Southern
Cal moved into the
number three position
following the defeat ot
North Carolina. Atlan-
tic Coast Conference
member Clemson is
fourth, while defending
national champ
Georgia rounds out the
top five.
Pride
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Leading The Way
ECt offensive lineman Terry long plows the wA�M �"�' � du
The East Carolina-Miami contest at fieklen Stadium Saturday.
Classifieds
SAAD'S
SHOE
REPAIR
-r i
Uvv
113 Grande Ave
758-1228
Quality
Repair
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM U 1
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
II1S 00 Pregnancy Test. Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For tur
ther information call MI-0SJS
(Toll Free Number
tOO 271 ��� between A M
and S P.M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh N C
SPOBTSWORtH
WELCOME BACK,
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104 E. REDBANKS RD.
756-6000
FOR SALE
PIONEER STEREO. SX M0 0
watts per channel Used only six
months Mint condition, will
sacrifice tor �J5 Call 757 3310
WATERBEDS LOWEST prices
in NC and SC on fine wood
waterbvds and accessories Com
plete bds with IS year warranty
for as low as 17 Delivery
available Call David tor more m
formation 7$� 3400
LIKE NEW Fender guitar with
hardshell case and an accessories
75 MOS
SLEEPING AND sem may be
haiardous to your health on a ECU
mattress so why not sleep m com
tort on a twin mattress and box
spring Call 7Si J0
73 TORINO m good condition Call
7j7 nr�
DORM SIZE REFRIGERATOR, 1
year old like new tor sale 470
Call 7S� J3�� after 6pm
MOVING MUST sale year old
Queen sue bedsel m good condi
tion HOC Call 7S� �!
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large furnished
room in private home Quiet
neighborhood �l20month
ut.lilies included Security
deposit Special deal if gone on
weekends 7S-43S tlC�P tr.mgi
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Roommate to share J bedroom
apt on Stanciil Dr Rent iUOpius
one halt utilities Serious student
desired Call Cindy at 752-404
PERSONAL
WHO IS the ugliest man on cam
pus
TYPING tor students professors
etc Kempie Dunn 101? E Wright
Rd Greenville. NC 2734 Call
'52 733 after !p m
PHOTOGRAPHY FOR all acca
sions � portraits, resumes, wed
dins, call now for photos tor
Homecoming Queen contest Call
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues And
Shirts. Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks Camp.nej Equip
men! Steel Tort Shoes Dishes
And Over 700 Oittereot New And
Use Items. Cowboy Boots
ARMY-NAVY
1501 S.Evans
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
Appt's. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1-800 321 0575
75.6452 leave name and number
on answering service
FOUND BEHIND Mendenhall
near Wendy's one religious
necklace May claim at traffic Of
fice
RIDE TEN year old to Creswell
every Friday and Greenville ever
Sunday or Monday 756-4432
WANTED RIDE to and from
Chapel Hill weekend of Oc�
30 Nov 1 Will help with gas! Call
Donna at 750 0462
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy at
757 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen years experience wants
typing to do at home Reasonable
rates Call '56 3460
WANTED FEMALE resident
counselor Must complete training
and internship m short term client
systems Payment m kind (room
utilities local phone) Call the
Real Crises Center 750 HELP
BEAUTIFUL! FREE kittens need
a goodl home Call Susan at
752 5114
ATTENTION LADIES P and 8
Breast Clinic is now offering free
breast examinations Phone
752 437V ask for M V Prencipl
D B or J R Barrett D B a"en
ding breastologists
RICKY B Who said you could not
capture a bun
WINSTEAD THINGS always are
batter wlwi you do it w.th a
friend even showers Rub A Dub
Dub
ED I heard she was big, I heard
she was fat. but you still found the
words � Ratt a tatt tatt.
NIMONAS HOPE you didn't
catch a cold at the Deadskms
game Hope you took a fat girl to
keep you dry
RICK CONFUCIUS say a trip to
the beach doesn't always render a
pot ot gold
TO THE three B's. the second an
nual Royster roast or was it an
Oyster roast was a maior bull It
sure was a good time to put some
lead m your pencil Next time I'll
bring a pencil l� you weren't
there vou snooie you lose
was it in the first place You know
what going around in circles can
do tor you. But let's be honest with
each other It wasn't the going
around m circles that hurt, it was
the mass consumption ot too much
Evan Williams, Canadian Club
and Seagram

How to
COOMES YOUR head has been
body slammed hope she didn't
leave teeth marks How was
Laurie trom Gay Pans
OGREARY AFTER two weeks
your lavenered will you be mar
ned by Thanksgiving Sounds like
you will splash at Pi Kap lake very
soon
PRINCE AS your personal physi
cian. I suggest a higher intake ot
vitamin Q s Boy did we roar this
weekend
CONGRADULATIONS PHI Tau
�Team A on your U S Putt Putt
AH campus Championship
Strokers include Ricky Bun Bar
reft, Wmstead. Fisherman, and
Kirchman
TO TIGRESS Happy birthday i
want my socks back Sure man
From Skippy
KIRCHMAN YOU may have
bummed out a! Rocktoberfest. but
who wilt remember Chops.
PHARO WHERE or who will you
fly to Be there, be square Looks
like you re back with the boys
RUPERT IS free and ready to get
wild wheels will be picked up this
weekend
HUNTER HOPE you gotover
your stomach type illness this
weekend as you know what goes
down must come up Whowereyou
talking to one one knee m the
bathroom' Mope you had fun
because you sure did pay lor it
TO THE Campus Police Oopt let
me be the first to say that you are
some ot the most ticket happy ban
dits I have ever seen You may
have towed my car but wait till I
qet a hold ot your daughter
Paybacks are AMF
FIELDING HAVE you done it all
with her if you take her to church"
j T HAVE you lost your pep I'
you have holler SQUIIII
JEFF IF she drives a Cadillac
does that make her worth if
JEFF I'LL give it to you, you
always take the underDOG! Rock
n Roll High School
ELIZABETH WANNA go to
lunch' If you can't squeeze me M
for lunch how about Happy Hour
Wed afternoon Drinks are on me
Pick you up after a hard day s
work Signed. Here but not forgot
ten
PA RAT That was sure a
funky ride we hitched on in
Raleigh And whose bright idea
Be A
Hero In
Greenville
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
TWO DOORS FROM
COX FLORIST
in W �th St
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
758-0204
medical studen's may now
, "roe'e for several hundred
A r Force scholarships These
scnoiarsh.ps are to be award
po 'o students accepted .nto
mecucal schools as freshmen
, at the beginning of their
sopf" ft vear The scholar
sh.p provides for tuit'On.
cocks, lab frees and equip
went plus a SS30 monthly
allowance investigate "M
financial alternative to the
high cost of medical educa
on ContaC
U S A F HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
RECRUITING
SUITE GL I, 1100NAVAHODR
RALEIGH, N C 270
PHONE COLLECT (�1�)�S-�13s
m
Thanks to Greenville
F lower Shop it's easy to be a
hero in Greenville Here's
now go to Greenville
Flower Shop and pick up a
Hero Club card With ever,
purchase ot a S2 98 Hero
Bouquet you will 9!
punch on our card After 10
punches, the eleventh Hero
Bouquet is tree Nov.
need a reason Stumped'
Weil Greenville Flower
Shop has a tew suggestions
�"She's your favorite lady "
� She s your dinrwr hostess
�"You have a sick fnend "
"Just for fun
�"It's hei birthday "
"You enjoy fresh flowers
�"Because you love her "
�"She's your secretary
�"It's your anniversary
�"You deserve it
But the eleventh and best
reason may simply be no
reason at an Call or come
by Greenville Flower Shop
today tor Our Hero Club
card
1027 S. Evaas
Corner 2nd & Evaas
758-2774
CAS
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS m
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
ft$ER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
4
401 S.EVANS ST.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH)
OPEN 9:30-5:30 MOrj -SAT
PHONE 752-3866
Plaza Shell
410 GrMfivillt Blvd.
Phona 754-3023
Hrv
Man-Sat. 7-1
Sun. 10-10
TUl$
?fl
SaWdaLj , Oct '
4A0 DAA'CE TJt NGU7 AHAf
JO TUE MOSC Of
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
(Foreign & Domestic)
Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
Prices
"fltW

COM�fA?iy Fu 357 ?�jTS
PrizlEs! "PRIZES. Ciz(5!fi�j
TiCJUTS OH UlC "Oto ATUevtt Arrrr,
G&&mj� Sou. ftoWtvei -6vrsr
TS4 -Scxio
Road and Wrecker Service
T
SHELL!
Discounts On Repairs With I.D. w "A
J
m Qood company is what you make it
7 So make it special,
with Qeneral(�bods International Coffees.
'J$
v
,w�.
. SAVE5CFAND
MAKE GOOD COMPANY
Ok Frames
CMMr
WmmriuNtfi
3&ft3L, I �K�tM&
MulMitwtl
Stiisse Mocha
JnshMxhaM'nt 6afiViMn
rt
wmvt�m�- Trytuf'W
(���x�l ruuuV
tmimikiwl CJkv
Qafpuccino a
I
SAVE 50ON GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONAL COFFEES j
in me MKtm Genetll foods Corporation �il reimburse you tot The tjc MkM 0�B coupon pt�J'
o, hand nt ,oi, ice ve rt on the sale ot the specified D-oduct and :t upon request you sufim
ev,dence hereo!si�tKto.y to Gener.i foods Corporation Coupon may not be assigned &��
evioen ,er"�'r ,�� n ln� ciK ta� Vcd hee prohibited taxed or istnctec By sa
?oZr,nS sTZ-XlniUS ' � Coupom to. M honored
Soresene 'hoh ou s de agencies BroVe-s or others .ho .re not rtW MnteMn ot our
terchanolse v �eohwi authorized By us to ptesent coupons lor redemption ft, nMjmotfO" e�
mopXeeed and hnrjied coupon mail to Gen.ral foodiCorp P0 Bo� 103 Ki��M: i.�n�
60�n Lim,t-0ne Coupon Pet Purchase This coupon oood only on purchase of p-oduct md.caled
Any other reconstitutes fraud Otter npnes April 30 1982

STUDENTsUPPLYSfORT
WRIGHT BUILDING
t





Title
The East Carolinian, October 27, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 27, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.157
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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