The East Carolinian, October 22, 1981






On The
Inside
��

In Demand:
Education Majors
Shed Their Burden
Page 3
Equal Time:
Best Chests,
Wet T-Shirts
Page 6
Hurricanes:
Miami Sweeps
Into Ficklen
Page 10
�he lEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.58No. 18
Thursday October 22. 1981
Greenville. N.C.
12 Pages
Suggestions Made
For New Chancellor
B TDM HALL
Nev� r ditor
Friendly. A teacher. A scholar.
An administrator. An eastern North
Carolina native. A political force.
Sensitive to the arts.
These are some of the
characteristics ECU'S next
chancellor should have, according
to the views of 17 people who spoke
to the Chancellor Selection Com-
mittee at an open hearing Tuesdav
morning.
Speaking before a gathering of
approximate!) 50 people, ECU
faculty member Dr. James Batten
asked the committee to "proceed
with caution The chancellor
should he a "teacher, administrator
and scholar simultaneously Bat-
ten said.
Only nine students attended the
hearing at the Willis Building, in-
cluding SGA President Lester Nail,
who serves on the search committee.
Robert Swaim, a student in the
School o Business, said he had
heard many people say they wanted
a chancellor from eastern North
Carolina and had "proven loyalty
to this institution already Swaim
added that the committee's choice
should have political clout, a proven
track record in leaching skills, and
the ability to generate funds and
promote the university.
Charles Schwartz, dean of the
School of Music, said he hoped the
next chancellor would have a record
of "sensitivity toward the visual and
performing arts Sociology and
Anthropology chairman John
Maiola said candidates should have
experience in teaching and research
and a record of community,
regional and national service. The
next chancellor should also have
proven himself in publication, ex-
tramural and academic funding and
development, and a "sensibility of
the relationship between the univer-
sity and the region.
"I would like to see you select a
person who has an eye on the
future said William F. Pritchard,
See FUTRELL, Page 5
I'h H I. K
SGA President Lester Nail and Associate Dean and Director of Student Life Carol
meals of students and faculty at the open hearing for the Chancellor Selection C
n Kulghum listened to
ommittee I'uesday.
I' V I I � HSIS
the com-
Desegregation Plan Causes Turmoil
(CPS) � In Louisiana, long-time compatriots like
rights lawyers and black college presidents are
e ding with each other.
In North Carolina, Ohio and Missouri, among other
states, the two historic allies are barely speaking to each
other.
In Washington, one government department pro-
claims college systems it had condemned as segregated
last vear integrated this year. Another government agen-
cv announces it isn't true.
All the confusion and turmoil are the result of the
Reagan administration's reversal of the traditional ac-
tivist federal role in trying to desegregate colleges and
universities. Since coming to power in January, it has
abruptly approved desegregation plans in eight states.
Washington had rejected some of the same desegrega-
tion plans less than a year ago. And though some civil
rights leaders have been quick to denounce the ad-
ministration's withdrawl from the desegregation
business, some black college officials � who were prime
movers in bringing college segregation to Washington's
attention years ago � say they're content with the new
decisions.
Civil rights lawyer Margaret Ford, for example,
argues the administration's actions mean nothing less
than insuring American colleges "will remain white and
black, and will never become integrated
However Dr. Jesse Stone Jr president of
predominantly-black Southern University in Louisiana,
lauds a recent adminstration approval o a college
desegration plan for the state because it "allows us to
have our cake and eat it, too
Louisiana isn't the only state that, after more than a
decade of bitter litigation, suddenly has a government-
approved desegration plan.
Since January, the U.S. Department oi Education has
at least tentatively okayed integration plans for colleges
in Tennessee, Missouri, West Virginia, Florida, Ohio,
South Carolina and North Carolina, as well as in Loui-
siana.
In the 11 preceding years o the struggle, the govern-
ment had approved desegregation plans in only four
rkai icorgia, Oklahoma and Virginia
The legal battle began in 1970, when the NAACP
I egal Defense Fund (which isn't associated with the Na-
tional Association for the Advancement of Colored
People) sued the government to stop funding colleges
thai discriminated on the basis of race.
The Fund identified college systems in ten states as
discriminatory, but later added nine more state systems
to the original list.
In the ensuing hearings and trials, the accused states
were eventually required to develop detailed plans for
desegregating their colleges. U'nder the agreements, the
states would continue getting federal funds while they
developed the plans, which would have to be approved
by the government.
lew plans were approved, however, largely because
the government was determined to eliminate duplicate
programs at neighboring black and white campuses.
The government theorized that some of those duplicate
programs were id up on :hc black campuses primarily
to keep black students from enrolling at the white cam-
puses.
All that changed with the Reagan administration's
ascension. A week after a June court ruling that
duplicate programs don't "inhibit the disestablishment
of a dual system Secretary of Education Terrel Bell
accepted a desegregation plan for North Carolina that
didn't address the duplication issue.
The plan Bell approved offers fewer new programs,
less aggressive affirmative action hiring plans, and
lower funding than a North Carolina desegregation plan
the government turned down in W1), says Arthur Flem-
ming, chairman of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, a
government agency.
Flemming also called the North Carolina plan "a
serious and disturbing development
N.C. Proposes To
Raise Drinking Age
B MIKE HUGHES
MaH Unltr
Perhaps you're one of the hun-
dreds of ECU students who
migrates downtown each weekend
for a couple of cold brews. Or
maybe you enjoy a glass of wine
w ith dinner from time to time. Well,
unless you are 21 or plan to be in the
near future, you may just have to
change your drinking plans.
Currently before the North
Carolina legislature are two bills
which propose a raise in the state's
drinking age for beer and wine from
18 to 21.
Also before the senators and
representatives is a joint resolution
calling for a study to be made on the
effects of raising the drinking age.
This proposal includes considera-
tion of the drinking laws of other
states.
Seven states� Illinois. Maine,
See BILL, Page 3
Media Board Decides
To Reinstate Foster
If the current bills pass, the N.C. drinking age may be raised to 21 for beer
and wine.
By DIANE ANDERSON
The Media Board Tuesday over-
turned East Carolinian Editor in
Chief Paul Collins' decision to fire a
staff member.
Collins fired Director of Advertis-
ing Chuck Foster Oct. 5 on grounds
of insubordination. In his letter of
dismissal, Collins stated that the ac-
tion was taken "in connection with
the placement of a half-page adver-
tisement in the September 29 issue"
of the paper.
The letter goes on to state, "I
vvarned you twice . . . not to take
any unauthorized action or any ac-
tion out of the ordinary without
first consulting me. I did this in con-
nection with the problems resulting
from the "Student Appreciation'
issue. The second time I spoke with
you, I clearly explained to you
that you would be dismissed from
your position. It is my feeling that
the ad was placed in the newspaper
See COLLINS, Page 5
Speaker Says Loans In Doubt
By PALL COLLINS
Idiior in htef
Should the SGA reinstate its
loan fund?
According to Speaker of the
Legislature Gary Williams, this
may well be one of the most con-
troversial questions the SGA will
face this year.
"There will be controversy
over the emergency medical loan
fund the second-year legislator
said Wednesday in an interview
with The East Carolinian.
The two-part loan fund was
suspended in June by the summer
legislature which consists of the
SGA president vice president and
treasurer. In addition to $100
medical loans, $25 personal loans
were available in the program.
Williams, a senior finance ma-
jor, said the medical loan pro-
gram was the more controversial
of the two since it has traditional-
ly been associated with abortions.
"That's what leaps out at you
he said.
Williams said he felt the pro-
gram "does not have a strong
chance of being reinstated He
did say, however, that he felt the
personal loan fund would be
reinstated if problems with repay-
ment could be worked out.
"It's a program that is needed,
that the students can use. It
serves a good purpose
Williams has appointed a task
force that will study the history
of the loan program and present
its findings to the legislature.
Another major issue that stu-
dent government will have to deal
with this year is the overhaul of
elections rules, according to
Williams. "There have been
changes each of the last three
years, but they didn't foresee all
the eventualities. After last year's
elections I think we've seen just
about every eventuality
The task of revising the
guidelines falls to the Rules and
Judiciary Committee, which is
chaired by Bob Mills. It will hear
reports from the last two elec-
tions chairmen, Dasha Efird Lit-
tle and Al Patrick.
Williams has also suggested
that the committee consult
university attorney Dave Stevens
and members of the political
science department as to what
should and should not be includ-
ed in the rules.
A third major area Williams
said he hopes to improve this year
is appropriations. He said that at
this time there are no guidelines
specifying what groups should be
funded under what conditions.
"We need to get policies down on
paper
According to the speaker, his
ultimate aim for appropriations
is to put the SGA on an annual
basis. "This way groups would
submit their budgets in the spring
and have their funds at the begin-
ning of the fiscal year on July 1
Williams, who was a member
of the appropriations committee
last year, said this year's commit-
tee has decided to set aside about
which will not be spent ap-
propriated until spring semester.
�tBM ft, i,H rUIUNIN
1982-82 Speaker of the SGA Legislature, Gary Williams
T
I





t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 22, 1981
Announcements
COMPUTERS
There will be a meeting ot the
ECU chapter c ACM (Association
of Computing Machinery) this
Thursday, Oct 72. at 3:30 in room
721. Austin Paul Baker. � U S
Government personnel officer,
will answer questions on prepar
ing tor a successful interview All
persons interested ere invited to
attend
DON'T MISS IT
Everyone come out to the PRC
Pre game Bash. Friday, October
23 from 3 7 pm The cost is t for
the first 100 people 13 for rest
Unlimited amounts of your
lavorile beverage, free food, door
priies. and good music The direc
lions are follow tenth Street past
Papa Kali and take a right ai
graveyard onto Route 9 Look tor
RAVNEZ sign Then iust follow
the signs i
BEAT MIAMI!
There will be a Beat Miami Pep
Rally Thursday. Oct 72 at 7 p m
on College Hill in front of Tyler
dorm The ECU pep band and
cheerleaders will be there along
with Coach Ed Emory Music will
be provided by the Elbe Room and
free trisbees and lood coupons will
be given away by Burger King Br
ing your blanket and beverages
and celebrate the upset victory
that's going to take place this
Saturday when the Pirates host
the 13th ranked Miami Hur
ricanes
REBEL
The ECU Literary Magazine
REBEL is looking tor an Associate
Editor. Prose Editor and Art
Editor Applications can be picked
up in the Publications Building n
the Media board secretary office
Any major is acceptable
CALLAGHANDATE
CHANGE
The date of the lecture by the
James Callaghan. former prime
mmister of Great Britian, has ben
changed Callaghan was slated to
appear onthe East Carolina
University LEcture Series on Oc
tooer 26. nil His appearance has
been postponed until March 29,
Other personalities appearing
on the series include Buck, minister
Fuller. Congresswoman Shirley
Chisholm. and Syndicated colum
nist James J Kilpatrick Season
tickets lor the lec'ure series are on
sale in the Central Ticket Office
and are priced at $7 SO lor ECU
s'udents. Sll 00 tor faculty and
stall, and $15 00 lor the public For
rpservaiions or additional inlor
mation contact the Central Ticket
Office a' i�1�) 757)4411, Ext 244
CAR WASH
The Sigma Nu pledges will be
having a car wash on Saturday.
October 24 trom 8 12 a m It is
located at the Exon Service Sta
tion by Krogers on Greenville
Boulevard The cost is $2 00 per
car
NAACP
The ECU chapter of the NAACP
will have a membership drive all
day October 26, 27. 28, and 79 in
tront of the Students Supply Store
Please support and join the
NAACP today.
SOULS
SOULS election of Homecoming
Representative will take place on
Thursday October 22 Voting will
be from V 4 at Mendenhall Student
Center and Student Supply Store
To vote you must have I O and
Activity Card
DRAFTING
TECHNIZUES AND
TOOLS
All interested students and
faculty are welcome to attend a
demonstration and lecture by Mr
Mark Hitchcock from KOH NOOR
Rapidograph. INC It is sponsored
by the Dept of Geography and
planning and the Student Supply
Store and will take place on Tues
day. October 77, 1911 in Flanagan
307 at 9 00 a m and in Brewster
B 107 at 3 30 pm
PPHA
The Preprofessional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday, October
22 This meeting will be held at 4
p m at The Afro American
Cultural Center AM members and
any other interested parties are
urged to attend
SKI SNOWSHOE
All persons planning to ski
Snowshoe during Christmas break
should contact Mrs Jo Saunders
at 757 6000. 205 Memorial Gym.
Deposits are due on Tuesday, Oc
tober 27 at 4 00 p m in Memorial
Gym 10 Balance due on Thurs
day. November 19 There is
limited space available
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
The ECU Sign Language Club
will hold its regular bimonthly
covered dish supper and meeting
on Sundav. October 25th at the
Mendenhall Student Center Multi
Purpose Room The supper will
begin a' 4 00 p m with a short
business meeting and captioned
film to follow
The meal and meeting are open
to any interested student, faculty
member, or a member of the com
munity You do net need to know
Sign Language to attend, but
students who are taking sign
language classes or who have
taken them m the past are em
couraged to attend The purpose of
the SLC is to allow sign language
studnets and hearing impaired
students and community
members to socialize and develop
communication skills
We hope to see you there'
BLACK RUSSIAN
il you're still curious about our
winter guarde Come see us on
Halloween at Carolina East Ma"
Performances at 12 30 p.m ano
5 30 p m See you there'
WORSHIP
Sunday mass tor Catholic
students on campus will be held in
the Biology Building lecture hall
at 12 30 beginning November 1
The Newman Community would
like to invite all Catholic students
to come to the Newman mass and
meal on Wednesdays at 5 00 over
at the Newman Center 953 East
Tenth Street
ECU BIOLOGY CLUB
The Biology Club will hold the
drawing lor the Calvin Klein leans
on Monday October 24. 1981 We
regret the delay which was
necessary due to the fact that
several members had not turned
m their tickets on Oct 12 The win
ner will be announced m next
Thursdays paper
Resolution Passed
By Faculty Senate
By TOM HALL
Sf�. f dil�
The ECU Faculty
Senate voted
unanimously Tuesday
to send a resolution to
the Chancellor Selec-
tion Committee that
urges the release of
criteria used in finding
a replacement for
Thomas B. Brewer.
Dr. James L. Smith
of the Department of
Philosophy told the
Senate he had attended
the search committee's
open hearing Tuesday
morning. Dr. Joseph
Boyette, executive
secretary of the com-
mittee, told him the
criteria would not be
made public, Smith
said.
"The primary force
of the motion is to have
the criteria made
public Smith said
after distributing copies
of the resolution to the
Senate. The resolution
requests that the
evaluation criteria be
made part of the job
description.
A new deadline for
applications was also
requested in the resolu-
tion � from December
15 to February 15.
The resolution asks
that the "job descrip-
tion be circulated as
widely as possible in
journals and
newspapers both in this
region and beyond
The Faculty Senate is
also requesting that the
evaluation criteria in-
clude "expertise in
shared faculty gover-
nance, a significant
research record,
demonstrated, teaching
effectiveness, expertise
in extra-mural fund
raising, and significant
regional and communi-
ty service at past places
of residence
SAM
Thursday, October 22, The
Society for the Advancement of
Management will hold a meeting
at 4:00 p m in Rawi 104 A guest
speaker will be on hand Everyone
It invited to attend
CO-OP
The Smithsonian institution in
Washington. OC currently has job
openings for juniors, seniors, and
graduate students with 3 0 GPA's
or above for Spring Semester In
terested students art urged to app
ly at the Co op Office. 313 Rawl to
day Deadline for application is
November 1
SCEC
The SCEC will be hosting two
Halloween parties One will be on
October 2Vth for the EARTH pro
gram and the other on October
30th for the TEACH program.
OMEGA PSI PHI
Those ladies interested in
becomng a Q Pearl, submit a let
ter to the Omega Psi Phi mailbox
m Whichard. 2nd floor, by 5 00
p m. on Oct. 24.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta PHi will hold a
meeting at 4 00 p.m October 22 in
Mendenhall 221 Final details of
the state convention will be
discussed All members are urged
to participate inthe Campus
Cleanup 30 p m at Wright Cir
cle. A free pizza will be given to
the group with the most trash
ILO
lLO's Oktoberfest is Wednes
day. October 28 from 4 30 to 10 30
it will be held in the Mendenhall
Multi Purpose Room The
"Schmutzigs" will provide music
and German food and beverags
will be served
Tickets are available at the Cen
tral Ticket Office, the Foreign
Language Dept BA 431, and from
any ILO member No admission �
limited number of tickets
GAY?
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity will be holding its third
meeting Tuewsday October 27 at
7 30 pm Regular meetings are
held every second and fourth
Tuesday of every month The
meeting wll be held at the
Newman Center 9S3 E 10th street
Everyone interested is welcome!
BIG APPLETRIP
The deadline to sign up for the
New York City trip has been ex
tended until Nov 2 The trip is
scheduled for Nov 25 through
Nov 29
ASSISTANTSHIPS
The institute for Coastal and
Marine Resources is now accep
tmg applications for two assistant
ships scheduled to begin m late fall
of 1981
Graduate Assisfantships. Office
Coordinator-Field Team Coor
dmator, will coordinate field team
activities, and assist investigators
in data collection and analysis
Background m behavioral or
social sciences preferred
Undergraduate�Graduate
Assistantship. Data Analyst, will
assist investigators in the analysis
of data Must have background
and familiarity with computer
programming and statistics
Please contact Or Jeffrey
Johnson or Mr Marcus Hepburn,
Mamie Jenkns building, ICMR at
7S7 4810 or 757 4220 An equal op
portunity. affirmative action
employer
CIRCLE K
Circle K would like to thank
David Hewitt for the helpgull in
formation that he gave us last
week Ruth Taylor will be speak
ing tonight at 4 30 in Mendenhall
Student Center Room 221 Her
tropic for tonight is Blood Mobile
Remember our new theme for this
year "Together for Tommorrow'
See you at 6.X
SCANDINAVIAN
SEMINAR
Scandinavian Seminar is now
accepting applications for its
1982 83 academic year abroad m
Denmark, Finland, Norway, or
Sweden This unique learning ex
perience is designed for college
students, graduates, and other
adults who want to study in a Scan
dinavian country, becoming part
of another culture and learning its
language A new one semester
program, only in Denmark, is also
now available
After orientation in Denmark
and a 3 week intensive language
course, generally followed by a
family stay, students are placed
individually at Scandinavian Folk
Schools or other specialized m
stitutions, where they live and
study with Scandinavians of
diverse backgrounds. The Folk
Schools are small, residential
educational communities intended
mainly for young adults Both
historically and socially, these
schools have played an important
part in the development of the
Scandinavian countries Midway
through the folk school year, all
the Seminar students and staff
meet in the mountains of Norway
to discuss progress and make
plans for the spring A final ses
sion is held at the end of the year to
evaluate the year's studies and ex
periences
Because the Scandinavian coun
tries are small, open, and accessi
ble, the year provides an unusual
opportunity for the student to ex
plore his or her particular field of
interest by doing an independent
study project On the basis of a
detailed written evaluation of
their work, most college students
receive full or partial academic
credit for their year
The fee, covering tuition, room,
board, and all course connected
travels m Scandinavia, is $5,900
Interest free loans are granted on
the basis of need, as are a few par
tial scholarships
For further information, please
write to SCANDINAVIAN
SEMINAR, 100 East 85th Street
New York, N V 10028
OA
Are you addicted to food? Do
you eat when you're not hungry?
Do you go on eating binges lor no
apparent reason? Is your weight
affecting the way you live your
life? If so, come to an overeaters
anonymous meeting every
Thursday night at 7 30 p m at the
First Presbyterian Church
(corner of 14th and Elm streets
ANNOUNCEMENTS
II you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement ias
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Caroii
nian m care of the news editor
There is no charge for an
nouncements but space is often
limited
The deadline tor announcement
are 5 p.m Friday lor the Tuesosay
paper and 5pm Tuesday tor the
Thrusdasy paper
The space is available to all
campus organizations and depaM
ments
BLOOD PRESSURE
The Family Practice Society ot
the ECU School of Medicine will
provide free blood pressure
screening to the public at the
Carolina East Mall in Greenville
This service will be provided on
Saturday, October 24 1981 bet
ween the hours of 10 00 a m and
5 00 p m
The Family Practice Society is a
community service organization
composed of medical students
from the ECU School of Medicine
These students arc more than will
mg to donate their time and skill to
screen for high blood pressure
"the silent killer" Pamphlets
about blood pressure, heart at
tacks, and the prevention of heart
disease will be provided by
American Heart Association
TRAFFICOFFICE
The ECU Tralt.c Office,
presently located m the old laun
dry building, will close a! the end
of the business day on October 27.
1981 and reopen for business on
November 2. 1981 in a new location
at 1001 East Fifth Street across
from the Spilman Building
Police operations will continue
in the old laundry building until
October 30 A dispalcher will be on
duty at the present location to pro
cess emergency traffic matters
only until October 30 The seventy
two hour period on traffic citations
will be extended to exclude the
period the Traffic Office is not
operational
All police, traffic and mtor
maiton services will be moved to
1001 East Fifth Street by the end of
the business day on October 30.
1981
SGA
Anyone interested in filing (or
Honor Council or Appeals Board,
please come by Room 228 in
Mendenhall between 8 00 a m and
5 00 p m
BEAUX ARTS BALL
The seventh annual School of
Art Beaux Arts Ball will be held on
Friday, October 23 at 8 00 p m at
Papa Katz on East Tenth Street
Tickets are $3.00 m advance and
14 00 at the door They are
available in the School of Art,
School of Music and Department
of Drama offices NOTE Only
those m costume will be admitted
The East Carolinian
Sfrxing Ihe campus i OfllJPtultff)
smce �
Published every Tuesday ana
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the ol
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University owned
operated, and published tor ana
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: V20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville, NO
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
Telephone 7S7 4344, 6347, 6309
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
reenville. North Carolina.
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!

IHUNGATE'Sp
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HALLOWEEN
HEADQUARTERS

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HUNGATI'S fANGS
PITT PLAZA STAr
756-0121 CtiOo
ALSO IN RALEIGH, DURHAM A WILMING
ATAPIUCE
A1X AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
October 22. Thursday enrto
CHICKEN PAN PIE, 2 vegetables atW
October 23, Friday or�Q
SALMON PATTY. 2 vegetablesZW
October 24. Saturday .�-� eq
VEAL PARMESAN. 2vegetablesW
October 25. Sunday �� ��� -q
SMOTHERED CHICKENV
2 vegetables
October 26. Monday .nog
MEAT LOAF & SPAGHETTIzv
2 vegetables
October 27, Tuesday tQo4
FRIED CHICKEN. 2 vegetablesZJ"
October 28. Wednesday M M
STUFFED GREEN PEPPERw
2t
TENORS AND BASSES
Any student who enjoys singing
may join the newly formed Rest
dent Hall Chorus on Monday. Oct
24, without auditioning Now
numbering about fitly members,
the mixed chorus still needs more
male voices tenor and bass
It you think you might be in
terested, come Monday night, Oct
24. to Jones Cafeteria and Oin the
tun Rehearsals being at 7 00 p m
and end at 8 00 p m sharp
All students toming in October
are charier members and are not
required to audition Students iOin
mg after October wil be asked to
audition for membership
The Resident Hall Chorus,
directed by Charles F Schwarti.
Dean of the School of Music, will
perform its first program on
December 8
VOLLEYBALL
THe PRC Society and Jeffery's
Beer and Wine will be sponsoring
a Co Rec Volleyball Tournament
at Mmges Coliseum on October 31
trom 12 4pm There is a ten dollar
entry fee First pl.ce, keg. second
place, pony keg Other prizes will
be awarded Sign up at the PRC
building (Behind McDonalds and
across from Hardees on Cotanche
StDeadline Oct 29 Teams must
consist of Six persons with at least
two females per team
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Remaining School of Music
Events tor October - Oct 23 24.
Opera Scenes. 8 00 - William
Tell. Boris Godonov, Marriage of
Figaro. Macbeth, Rigoletto, Oct
25. Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Concert, 8 15, Memorial Gym
Oct 24. Paul Tardif, piano, Facul
ty Recital, 8 15. Oct 27. Sigma
Alpha lota Musicale, 4 00. Oct 30
Mark Harrel trumpet. Gary
BiiZJarO, trombone. Senior
Recital 7 30
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
Wanted Male, musicians,
smgers, dancers, poets, or
whatever your talent, to par
ticipale in The Student of the Year
Pageant, sponsored by Alpha Kap
pa Alpha Sorority, Inc The
deadline for contestant applied
lions will be October 29 So on
November 17. be prepared lor
another AKA Affair1' Alpha Kap
pa Alpha is also looking forward to
Ihe students' presence at their
dance which will be held October
24 trom 10 p m til 2 a m , at the
Cultural Center Come "iam"
after the game1 We also en
courage more minority students to
participate in SOULS Please
JEWISH STUDENTS
There will be a Hillel Post Game
Party on Saturday. October 24. at
7 30 p m Anyone interested and
need a ride or directions, please
call Mike at 758 1153, or Mark at
757 1155 This is open lu all Jewish
students
INCREASED LEARNING
A new program tor Increasng
Learning Efficiency will be of
fered by Or George Weigand
beginning October 24, 1981 There
will be two groups One will meet
on Monday and Wednesday at 1 00
p m ana the other will meet on
Tuesday and Thursday at 1 00
p m in Room 305 Wright Annex
the class is available to all
students Attyendance s volun
tary no formal registration is re
quired
INFLUENZA
influenza vaccine is available at
the Student Health Center The
cost is $3 tor each miection
Students with chronic illnesses,
diabetes, asthma, or those who are
on chemotherapy for malignant
diseases and those having unusual
exposure should come by the Stu
dent Health Center between 8am
and 5 pm Monday through Fn
day dunng October or November
FICTION WORKSHOP
We art putting together a "�"�
very serious, fiction writing
workshop if you already write
well, want to wrile well enough ,0
publish, and know how much work
lies between the former and the
latter, give us a caJl at 7M 2430 or
7S4S112
ATTIC
SOUTH
No. 6
ROCK
CLUB
? ??THURS�
SIDEWINDER
? ??FRI. ASAT.��
SUITERS GOLD
FRI AFTERNOON
DELIGHT WAOT�2SC ADMISSION
?�?SUNDAY�
FABULOUS KNOBS
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention
24 HOUR SERVICE
758HELP
1117 Evans Street
Greenville, NC. 27834
EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. 9th St. 752-2332
'Variety of Fresh & Frozen Seafood
'Lobster Tails 'King Crab Legs
Clams'Crab Meat
'Hard Crabs
WE ALSO SELL CJAHA
USED TIRES 1IU0U
�ntf p
All you can eat
Popcorn
Shrimp
The Marines Are Coming!
Platoon
Leaders
Class
Officers
Candidate
Class
Air Ground Law
Freshman Programs�2-Six Week Summer Sessions
Sophomore Programs�2-Six Week Summer Sessions
Junior Programs�1-10 Week Summer Session
THE PI ATOON LEADERS CLASS PROGRAM (PLC) OFFERS A COMMISSION AS A 2ND LIEUTENANT IN THE U.S. MARINE
CORPS AITER GRADUATION FROM COLLEGE FRESHMEN THROUGH GRADUATES, INCLUDING LAW SCHOOL STUDENTS
ARE ELIGIBLE TO JOIN. HERE ARE A FEW OF THE FEATURES OF THE PLC PROGRAM AVAILABLE TO THOSE WHO CAN
QUALIFY: l. No on campus commitments (Drills, Classes or Meetings)
2. Aviation, Ground and Law options available
3. $100.00 a month, during school months after completion of your first session of training
4. Salary that is competitive with civilian occupations
5. NO commitment incurred until you accept your commission
YOUR MARINE OFFICER SELECTION TEAM IS CAPTAIN JACK MOORE AND SERGEANT LEN SMITH. WE WILL BE ON YOUR
CAMPUS ON OCT. 27, 28 A 29th AT 0900 to 1600 IN THE STUDENT CENTER.
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lilt EAST CAROLINIAN IOBI-R 22. I�HI
It
JUNE
�rINTS
CAN
OlR
Demand For Education Majors Revived
A baby boom, an accumulation
of had press clippings and a rash of
"burnouts" have revived the job
market for what was one that most
pitied of college majors� the
education student.
School district demand for new
teachers is way up in some areas of
the country and in some academic
areas, especially math. The demand
is expected to become national
soon.
The Association for School. Col-
lege and University Staffing predicts
in its 1982 annual report "that in the
next one to three years there will be
a critical shortage of teachers in all
teaching areas
Penn State education placement
officer Dante Scatzi claims ther are
already "dire shortages" of teachers
in the South and Southwest. Scatzi
also expects the shortages to be na-
tionwide by the mid-eighties.
Broward County (Fla.) School
District staff chief Foger Beaumont
had to visit 84 campuses last spring
to fill the teaching vacancies he had.
Los Angeles advertised nationally
and installed two toll-free long
distance telephone lines in an effort
to dig up math teachers last year,
before last year, out-of-state
recruiting was extremely rare.
Indeed, teaching jobs were ex-
treemely rare. As the post-World
War 11 baby boom passed through
school levels, enrollments declined
and left school districts with an
oversupply of teachers. When
vacancies opened, education grads
inundated school districts with ap-
plications. By 1978, there were two
education grads for every teaching
job in the United States, according
to the National Education Assoca-
tion (NL:A).
In response, job-conscious college
students simply stopped enrolling in
education courses. Penn State hand-
ed out 62 percent fewer teaching
degrees last year than in 1972.
Education enrollment at North
Dakota Stale has fallen five percent
a year since 1970.
The national Center for Educa-
tion Statistics (NCES) says that, na-
tionwide, the number ot students
preparing to teach after graduation
fell to 159,(XX) in 1980, down from
284,000 in 1970
At the same time, the U.S. birth
rate is climbing again after a long
period of decline. The first wave of
the new baby boom is expected in
elementary schools in 1985. NCES
researcher Martin Frankel predicts
that by 1995 enrollment may surpass
the record 51.3 million students at
all grade and college levels in 1971.
While there will soon be more
students to teach and fewer grads to
teach them, current teachers are
leaving the field in significant
numbers.
"In the old davs Burnett
recalls, "(teachers) would take time
out, but they would return. Now,
they're just staying away
Campus Security Office To Relocate
ZHOUSE


o
FREE SOAP-WASH HOUSE-FREE SOAP
"The Place to
Wash'r .
Editor's Sole: This story marks
the beginning of a regular series of
information from the ECU police
blotter.
By GREG HIDEOUT
M�ff Wnlcr
The campus security office,
presently located in the old laundry
Duildmg, will close at 4 p.m. Oc-
tober 2 according to Director of
Security Joseph H. Calder. It will
reopen November 2 at its new loca-
tion� 1001 E. Fifth St across
from the Spilman Building.
Police operations will continue at
the old location until October 30. A
dispatcher will be on duty for
emergency matters only until that
date. A 72-hour grace period will be
in effect for those people receiving
traffic violations during the time the
security department is closed.
The move will be made to give the
department more space, according
to Calder.
The security director hopes the
printing of the following "police
blotter" will be helpful to the victim
as well as the potential victim. These
listings date from October 12 to Oc-
tober 19 and include the reports of
dorm residents.
October 12. 9 a.m.� James E.
Coutlaris of 105 Aycock reports his
motorcyie has been vandalized. 3
p.m.� David White of 271 Aycock
reports the theft of food items from
his room. 6:20 p.m.� Patrick
Daniels reports that his bicycle is
missing from the front of Clement
Dorm.
No crimes in the residence hall
areas were reported on October 13
and 14.
October 15. 3 p.m.� Janet R.
Horn of 516 Clement reports the
theft of her wallet from her room.
3:15 p.m.� Glenda A. Futreii of
1021 Clement reports the larceny of
$200 from her room. 3:30 p.m.�
Gail M. Niemeyer of 613 Clement
reports that a necklace and ring are
missing from her room. 8 p.m.�
James E. Bender of 462 Jones
reports the larceny of his wallet in a
stairwell of that dorm. 10:40 p.m.�
An assault is reported by a female
White Dorm resident.
October 16. Kristen Anderson of
232 Umstead reports the theft of a
bicycle.
October I 12:30 p.m.� Glenn
Dunlap of 272 Aycock reports the
larceny of two hubcaps from his
vehicle. 7:45 p.m.� The resident
advisor of Jones Residence Hall
reports the vandaliation of a candy
machine.
October IS. 1 a.m.� John
Waiston Jr. and Johnny William-
son, both of 133 Slay, report the
breaking and entering and theft of
articles from their room.
October 19. 10:15 a.m.� Michael
B. Lloyd reports the theft from his
vehicle in the Mendenhall parking
lot.
According to one campus security
investigator, an average of one bicy-
cle is stolen on campus each day.
so?
WASH I
O
c
11
D
O
I
z

I

o
11
The 4JyL
WASH
HOUSE
Across from Hot Dog City
112 blocks from Belk Dorm
sOAI :
O


i
I
I
O
c
v�
� Color TV
�Pinball
� Attendant on Duty
�Lots of Washers & Dryers
Also �
COUPON
Free soap for every wash.
Offer Expires Oct. 31, 1981
O

-a
I

dVOS 33ai-3SrtOH HSVM-dVOS 33di-3SfiOHI
TTTTTIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH
Slave, S.O.S. And Gralinger To Appear
B KAREN WENDT
sulr rdi
The Student Union Major Attrac-
tions committee has announced
that they will be presenting a triple
feature hand performance featuring
Slave, the S.O.S. Band and Gra-
inger. The Concert will be held at 8
p.m. at Minges Coliseum on
November 7, two weeks before the
arrival of the Charlie Daniels Band.
Tickets tor the concert will be $7
for students in advance and $8 for
the public at the door. Tickets will
be on sale at the ECU Central Ticket
Office and at the following commer-
cial outlets: Fleetway Cleaners,
Flamingo Records, WQDW Radio
in Kmston, WRSU Radio in Rocky
Mount, WSEC Radio in
Williamston, WP1C Radio in Tar-
boro, the SCLC office and Lee's
Barber shop in Washington, N.C.
Recently named Major Attrac-
tions Chairperson Jerry Dilsaver
said the the concert will have a
specialized audience and said that he
and Student Union Chariman Ron
Maxwell were describing the concert
as "a mixture of rhythym and blues
and disco . . . sort of
Though Dilsaver did not predict a
sell-out, but did say that he expects
the concert to do very well, saving
that the crowd should be about
4,000 to 5,000 people.
Dilsaver, who has been the Major
Attractions Chairperson only since
October I, has now negotiated two
successful contracts, both scheduled
for the month of November.
"An Evening with Charlie
Daniels will begin at 9 p.m. on
November 20 at Minges Coliseum.
Tickets for this concert will also be
S in advance, but the tickets at the
door and for the general public will
be S9.
rattt
Weekdays
11:30-11:00
Frl 4 Sat
11:30-12:00
300 E. 10th St.
758 6121
The Best Pizza in Town! (Honest)
Fast Service!
Game
Machines
Drive Up
Window For
To Go Orders
Bill May Raise Drinking Age
(Ontinued From Page 1
Massachusetts,
Michigan, New Hamp-
shire. New Jersev and
Tennessee� have rais-
ed their legal drinking
ages in the past ten
years
Senate Bill 664 pro-
poses simply that in all
laws concerning
alcohol � drinking,
possessing, selling and
buying� the number
18 be replaced by 21.
decide the question of
adopting the law.
In the state House of
Representatiges,
however. Bill 963 calls
for a vote within the
The bill also recomends house to raise the age to
a referendum be held in 21. Thus, if ratified,
November 1982 to this bill would effec-
tively eliminate the
referendum, taking the
matter out of the hands
of the public.
The proposed study
will presumably have a
great influence on the
way the state legislators
vote.
Tuesday's edition of The East Carolinian
reported that Donnie I assiier's medical bills have
been paid by insurance. Dr Talc Holbrook said
that most of the infant's hospital bills were
covered. However, their expenses such as food
and transportation to Boston are not covered by
insurance. The Eiast Carolinian regrets the error
PIZZA & SPAGHETTI BUFFET
Mon. & Thurs 5 30 8 00
Mon thru Fri 11 30 2 0C
Wed. - All you can eat Spaghetti 5 3043 00 $2.69
Thurs- Lasagna�One Reg. Price�Second One
$2.79
$2.69
$1.00
iiiiiiiiiiiiiii II i mix

o o
X
DAILY
SPECIALS
Famous
Salad Bar
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
Presents "
IN CONCERT
One Night Only
Legendary Singer, Songwriter
and Entertainer
LEON RUSSELL
and BAND
WESTERN SIZZLIN'
MONDAY -
CHOPPED STEAK
1.99
THURSDAY -
STEAK SANDWICH
n.69
TUESDAY -
BEEF TIPS
H.99
WEDNESDAY -
CUBED STEAK.
i��
FRIDAY -
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
3.79
Free
Tea
with
ECU ID.
SATURDAY -
BARBEQUE RIBS
2.99
SUNDAY -
STEAK ON A STICK
n.99
All Meals are
complete Including
Baked Potato or
French Fries &
Texas Toast
TakaOut Sarvica
neiK.iothSt.
rso-jm
244 �ypa��-7J4 0040
jurs 11 a.m. 10 p.m.
MonThurs
10a.m11 p.m. FriSun.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd
ADVANCE TICKETS $8.00 PER PERSON
ADVANCE TICKET LOCATIONS:
Apple Records Western Pleasure Carolina Opry House
(HANK WILSON IS BACK!)





JMje lEaat (Earaltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, ertcii)
Jimmy DuPREE, vfa0�i�aww
Chuck Foster, mm,m�m, Charles Chandler. v�, &��
Chris Lichok. �.�,�� ��-�� ToM Hall ��'��'�
Alison Bartel. mm itar Steve Bachner. i ���,� e��
Steve Moore, cmm mm�, Karen Wendt, s�, ��
-aB@fdjBpa5,5
October 22. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Drinking Age
57 I ttempts To Raise Legal Limit
At what age does a person
become an adult?
It's an age-old question, but in
the 1960s the argument was that if
an 18-year-old had the duty of a
citizen to fight and die for his coun-
try he should also have the rights
that go with citizenship.
Foremost among these was the
right to vote. An amendment to the
Constitution lowered the voting age
from 21 to 18 for federal elections.
Most states added similar provi-
sions.
No less important to many young
people, however, was the "right" to
consume alcohol. Laws in this area
were also changed and the drinking
age was lowered in many states
Today in North Carolina the
minimum age for the consumption
of beer and wine is 18 � 21 for
distilled alcohol. There is, however,
a bill before the general assembly
that, if passed, would raise the
drinking age to 21 for all forms of
alcohol.
If our senators and represen-
tatives pass this bill they will in ef-
fect be saying that 18-year-olds are
not adults. They will be redefining
adulthood.
DOONESBURY
So it would seem that the ques-
tion at hand is whether or not so-
meone is an adult when he reaches
his 18th birthday. The answer is
probably no.
Does this mean 18-year-olds
should not be allowed to drink?
We cannot answer this question
� no one can. We can say,
however, that the only route to
adulthood is experience � ex-
perience in the duties, obligations,
pains and joys of being an adult.
Raising the drinking age will only
serve to delay experience which in
turn delays adulthood.
Consider This . . .
Despite, or perhaps because of,
the loss of veteran slugger Reggie
Jackson, the New York Yankees
now hold a 2-0 advantage in the
1981 World Series. Injury has kept
the touted "Mr. October" out of
the fall classic, but reserves Lou
Pinella and Oscar Gamble have pro-
vided more than enough punch for
the Yanks to sweep the first two
eames in "The House That Ruth
Built
by Garry Trudeau

DO YOU DO SPINE TRMISPIMTS?
n
r Campus Forum
Legislator Disputes 'Assertions'
Hi MOM UHATS
UP BHAV YEAH.
sure i reap
about rr
uhaj?oh.nooh,god
NO. NOT UNCLE HENRY
OH, MOM. TM SO SORRY
ru BE HOME- ON the
NEXT FU6HT HAN6
IN THERE-BYE
I
2DXBR?
RIGHT
HERE. OLD
BoPP
)
EVER HAD
ARZLATTVE
HMOWK
BRIBES7
11
f
I
SME HELL.
SOMETIMES BEFORE
HSFtitSTCUPOF
COFFEE. PON7
YOU KNOW DUKE
This letter is in response to the article
appearing in the Oct. 20, 1981 issue of
The East Carolinian entitled "Circus
Time � Legislature Up To Old Antics
In the article the write- made innuendoes
that the legislative body of the Student
Government Association is composed of
incompetent and loquacious legislators
who engage as he puts it in breaking
their own rules and generally doing
anything but paying attention to what
was going on on the floor As a
legislator who is genuinely concerned
about legislation affecting my consti-
tuents, I'm disturbed when I see or hear
of deceiving assertions such as was
presented in the article.
In the article, the writer presented a
very distorted account concerning an ap-
propriation of $465 to the International
Language Organization for its
Oktoberfest. He continued by bringing
to the reader's attention the fact that the
bill was approved without following the
prescribed protocol of Bill submission at
least one week prior to consideration
and bill examination by the Appropria-
tions Committee. What the writer failed
to convey to his readers was that because
time was a major element in this issue,
the legislature voted to suspend the rules
in order to consider the bill. As was
pointed out in the meeting, if protocol
was followed it would be November
before the ILO would be assured of
financial support and hence able to hold
an "Oktoberfest
Allow me to point out that the con-
cept of suspending the rules is not a type
of crutch designed primarily to aid the
SGA, but instead gives organizations
some leeway if time becomes a major
factor. Although, I don't advocate cons-
tant suspension of the rules, I do feel it is
a device that should and will remain a
working tool of the legislature.
Moreover, the writer deemed himself
an authority on what the legislature
should be by stating "The legislature is
supposed to be a calm, deliberative body
that debates each bill upon its merits and
then makes a decision" and concluding
with "No one would even have guessed
that, though, following yesterday's per-
formance At no time during Mon-
day's session did I see anyone act in a
frensical manner, the legislature did in
fact act as a deliberate body that upon
hearing debate on the ILO Bill, all of
which might be added was affirmative,
and after asking several questions of the
ILO representatives voted to ap-
propriate the requested money.
The writer of the article felt it
necessary to compare this year's
legislature with that of the 1980-81
school year which he described as a
three-ring circus. It should be pointed
out that this year's legislature is marked
by many new faces which is indicative of
new ideas. Furthermore, while there still
remains several representative positions
available, it is the legislators who the
writer of the article stalwartly condemn-
ed that cared enough to take time out of
their schedules to give the students of
this campus a chance to be heard.
ROGER W
CREECH. II
Jarvis Rep.
inhatist.
wwats
happened7
THERtSBEEHA
msc6tm.BAcx
HOME 7DNF OVER
HALF THE COUNTY
COMMISEttNERSIN
OKLAHOMA HA1�
BEES IMPLICATED
MY UNCLE HENRy IS
AMONG THEM ACC0KW6
TO TNE fEDS. HE'S BEEN
TAKING KICKBACKS FROM
SOME LUMBER SiPPUER
FOR THE LAST TEN YEAR
OH, NO GOSH,
THAT'S AMIFUL.
MIKE
kfi POOH.
MOTHER.
I'VE NEVER
HEARD HEP.
SO UPSET
DP PIP OH.SURE
THEY TAKE THOSE GUYS
HIM ALIVE7 ARE REAL
PROS
It
Wealth, Comfort Nothing Shameful
UNCLE NRiS BEEN UVINGBJtTH
MOM AND ME fiX NEARLY 15 YEARS
NOB) THATS WHY THIS UHOUWiS
C&ZSASSUCHA BIG SHOCK
BOOR UNCLE HENRY HSBEPWATION
M Tit CDMBWOy HAS ALWAYS BEES
so IMPORTANT TUHM.fHBS COn-
victed. rriL just kill him
YEAH, IT CAN BE PRETTY HHfWti
I HEMEMBERTfeFIRST VMEOJKENAS
CAuED BEFORE A GKANP JURY UlHEN
HEUASA LOCALSeuERCtm$S0&
'C0L0-y
MAS HE IMP'HE HAD TO
PRETTY FLY ALLTHZUIAV
UPSET7 BACK FROM RX)
By KIM ALBIN
According to an article which appeared
on page one of Tuesday's East Carolinian,
last week the ECU Hunger Coalition spon-
sored "events concerning hunger and
malnutrition The group showed films,
circulated pamphlets, had a legislative let-
ter writing campaign and did a skit in front
of the Students Supply Store. It spent five
weeks preparing for the World Food Day
events and according to a spokesperson,
hoped to "get people's consciousness rais-
ed, get them to work on activities
These actions 1 regard, indubitably, as
noble ones. The altruistic souls who plann-
ed and participated in the events must be
truly concerned with world hunger, as all
of us should be. It seems to me, though,
that some of the statements made by the
participants were vague, accusatory
remarks about the actions of the rest of us,
or rather, our lack of action toward
fighting world hunger.
For instance, one participant was quoted
as having said of the skit: "the whole thing
went right by them - it was ignorance
Was it? I've known about world hunger
since I was just a little girl, when m
mother used to make be eat burned
vegetables and split-pea soup. Not only did
she tell me about hunger, I also got a
chance to experience it every time we had
liver for dinner, since I always gave mine
to the dog. Nosirree, 1 don't think our
reactions were founded in ignorance, but
perhaps in our painful recollections and
awareness of hunger's effects.
It is more likely, however, that conscien-
tious as we all are, we as Americans are
wearied by the prospect of being blamed
for world hunger; we're tired of taking the
rap for yet another problem that we didn't
create. One fellow said: "The rich have
continuously exploited a lot of people.
They must always be in control all the time
it's self-interest. They must be living
comfortably. It's an historical pattern of
Search For Biological Parents Not Necessary
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
A common theme in many daytime and nighttime
dramas the last few years is how an adopted child
becomes interested in who his real parents are and sets
out to find them.
On a 1980 segment of "Lou Grant a young Tribune
reporter becomes infatuated with finding her real mother
and drives across the country to Virginia in order to meet
her � without having any idea of what her "mother's"
reaction will be.
A recent ABC program on "special" people who have
fought losing battles most of their life against diseases or
prejudice, portrayed a middle-aged woman who searched
for many years for her "real" mother. After years of
following up on the slightest evidence, she finally found
her � in Alaska.
The case of the young reporter turned out, in fact, to
be a tragedy because the mother would not even look at
her daughter's face when she nervously stepped into the
house. The woman who found her mother in Alaska was
overjoyed � as was her biographical mother.
But, truthfully, aren't both sides really losers in a bat-
tle that will surely bring back painful memories of the
time when the decision to put the child up for adoption
was made?
To forfeit a child � a living part of the natural parents
� takes a great deal of courage but to meet that "lost"
son or daughter years after the agonizing decision was
made is cruel � to both parties. Questions will be
brought up which will have no answers. Natural parents
begin second-guessing themselves. They already wonder
what happened to their child, and now that they see how
beautiful or talented he or she is, they ponder how each
life would have been if the child had not been given up
for adoption.
Whether natural parents realize it or not, putting a
child they believe they couldn't adaquately care for up
for adoption actually enlightenes the life of men and
women who are unable to bear children. The new parents
actually become adoptees themselves � they now have a
child who they can teach, discipline and love.
People often wonder how anyone can give up a child
that has been a part of them for over nine months. Well,
it certainly takes more guts to admitt that a child cannot
be given the proper home, love and care than to go ahead
and "take a chance" � at the expense of a child who
cannot function without the warmth of a mother's hug
or the playful actions of a proud father.
Adoptive children should not ever respond with hatred
when asked why they were given up in the first place
because the natural parents actually showed more love
than anyone could possibly ever imagine by giving their
child a better chance to live a more rewarding life.
Adopted children should be told they were adopted.
Knowing a man and woman care so much for a child who
has been given up can indeed form a strong bond �
which will never be broken.
The woman who found her real mother in Alaska says
this in better words than I can. "My natural parents gave
me a chance to breathe the air in this world, but my
adopted parents gave me life.
I should know � I am an adopted child. And I never
want to know who my biological parents are because
there is no way they could love me as much as my parents
do now.
But 1 thank them for giving me the opportunity to
come in to this world.
white supremacy in the rich nations.
There, in such a brief testament, this in-
dividual managed to point his finger at the
rich, at those who "control at those who
live comfortably, at white people, and at
the citizens of the rich nations. These are
grounds for almost all of us to take of-
fense, especially those of us who, hard as
we try, just can't find anything wrong with
being wealthy, living comfortably, being
white, living in the greatest nation of the
world. You get what you pay for;
sometimes you get what you happen to be
born with, too. I see no reason to
apologize for it.
Apologize, as one participant did when
she stated: "I guess my conscience gets at
me. Here I am with a nice place to live,
good food, nice clothes - somehow it's not
fair. How come I'm not living the way they
(the poor) are?"
Well, if she's truly undeserving, then
perhaps she should change her lifestyle. I
live the way I do, like most college
students, because my father has been out
there breaking his neck for years and
years; I think his feelings would be hurt if I
couldn't determine where the money came
from.
While it does my heart good to know
that there are concerned individuals out
there who are taking action, I just can't
give them my support without even a clue
as to how their actions help solve or at least
alleviate world hunger. When asked what
could be done for the poor, a person said,
"They (students) have to have information
and join our organization or some other
And The Hunger Coalition is planning
more "activities" which include "speaking
to groups, showing films, a hunger fast on
the Thursday before Thanksgiving, and
the Walk for Humanity in the spring I'd
like to know how this contrived suffering
gets food to the starving, how much food,
for how long.
Fighting world hunger is, as I said, a no-
ble cause. Taking or placing the blame for
it is downright silly and does nothing to
alleviate the problem. The best we can do
as Americans is to continue to produce as
many pizzas, airplanes, widgets and Coca
Colas as we can for as long as we can. As a
productive nation, we can better help the
poor by sending them good-tasting,
healthy foods than by sending our burned
vegetables and leftovers.
C.
( ontirtt
as a
I ostcr
reu
son
the
rein
"insu
fired
tion i
the o
other
have
Shec
didn
that'
the ,
Fu
To
( until
deve
and
sho;
Ma
the i
the c
have
un

ricu!
wh i
and
evper
j
and
Re
I
Legi
I
the
numi
I
?





I Ml SAROUNIAS
KTOBbR22, 1981
r
1
-V.
a
in
e,
a
ed
ed
of
till
ns
he
in-
of
of
H. II
Ren
ul
t. this ;n-
ger at the
xe who
and at
These are
3 take of-
o, hard as
ing with
being
of the
pa for;
ppen to be
n to
It did when
nee gets at
ice to live,
low it's not
�e way they
rvmg, then
lifestyle I
st college
is been out
years and
be hurt if I
oney came
to know
Ividuals out
l just can't
even a clue
vc or at least
asked what
person said,
finformation
me other
Its planning
le "speaking
knger fast on
pgivtng, and
Ispring I'd
fed suffering
much food,
1 said, a no-
ie blame for
s nothing to
it we can do
produce as
tts and Coca
jwe can. As a
Itter help the
ood-tasting,
our burned
Collins Questions Board's Action
Continued From Page 1 ed
as a direct challenge to
my authority
As a result of
I oster's appeal, he was
reinstated by a 7-1 vote
of the Media Board.
Carter Fox, chairper-
son of the board, said
the reason for the
reinstatement was
'insufficient evidence
of insubordination
"He couldn't be
tired on insubordina-
tion as it is outlined in
the operations manual.
There may have been
other things he could
have fired Chuck on
She continued, "he just
didn't call it right,
that's all
Foster telt that the
board came to the right
decision. "1 presented
them my tped letter
that lead up to my deci-
sion and my feelings on
the letter Paul gave me
for my dismissal. I also
presented the opera-
tions manual which
shows where 1 was in
the right he explain-
"The board took it
upon itself to decide
whether or not the fir-
ing was for just cause,
while 1 think the
original intention of the
appeal clause of our
operations manual was
to ensure that proper
procedures are follow-
ed commented
Managing Editor Jim-
my DuPree. "From the
comments of various
board members during
and after the hearing,
I'm not at all convinced
they knew what they
were there for
SGA Vice President
Marvin Braxton, who
represented President
Lester Nail, "was
unhappy with" the
Board's decision.
"1 think when you
are editor in chief of
anything, you should
have full power over
your staff he said.
According to The
East Carolinian's
operations manual
under the duties and
responsibilities of the
senior editor, Collins
"has the authority to
hire and fire any staff
position
"The reason why
they think it was insuf-
ficient evidence is
because they don't
know a damn thing
about newspapers ex-
plained Collins. "If
they did, it would be
clear to them that my
evidence was suffi-
cient
"I gave him what 1
think was a clear and
reasonable order, and
according to our per-
sonnel policy if an
employee fails to carry
out such an order it is
grounds for dismissal
Rudy Alexander,
dean of Mendenhall
Student Center and the
administration's
representative on the
Media Board, stated,
"The board considered
the information provid-
ed by boih parties, and
based on that and sole-
ly on the complaint and
the rebuttal to that, the
board acted on what it
felt was a fair and
honorable way of
handling the situa-
tion
Collins went on to
explain, "One of the
reasons for overturning
my decisin was that I
have never sat down
with all my department
heads and told them
what their specific
responsibilities were.
When 1 was news editor
and 1 wasn't sure about
something, I asked.
"It had never been
done in the past so I
think it is laughable tor
them to use that as one
of their reasons.
"1 feel insulted, like
the board doesn't have
anv trust in me and
doesn't feel that I am
capable of doing my
job. If I can possibly
avoid it, I will never go
to another Media
Board meeting because
it is a humiliating ex-
perience, and 1 know
Amy Pickett, the editor
of the Buccaneer, feels
exactly the same way.
"1 think the Media
Board needs to do some
serious thinking bout
what its purpose should
be Collins conclud-
ed.
Foster resumed his
duties as director of
advertising Wednes-
day, with interim head
Ric Browning returning
to assistant director.
Futrell Says Criteria Designed
To Avoid 'Embarrassment'
"WE'VE
GOT A DATE
NOV. 19th:
"That s when the
American Cancer
Society asks every
smoker in America
to give up cigarettes
for a da Give it a
try You might find
vou can quit forever"
THE GREAT AMERICAN
SMOKECUT
American Cancer Society f
This spact contributed by the puOiisfitr
Continued From Page 1 inequity that must be
resolved In his per-
a School of Education
faculty member. Prit-
chard said a "rift had
developed between lay
and administration"
and the new chancellor
should exhibit
"leadership instead of
drivership
SGA Vice President
Marvin Braxton read a
resolution saying stu-
dent legislature "trusts
the Chancellor Selec-
tion Committee will
select candidates for
the chancellorship who
have demonstrated
unyielding commitment
to excellent academic
programs, extracur-
ricular opportunities
which promote a broad
and enriching overall
experience and a pro-
ven understanding that
places students' welfare
and interests as a top
priority
Reading from the
resolution, SGA
Speaker of the
legislature Gary
Williams asked that "in
the future considera-
tion be made to the
number of students (on
the committee) . . . lack
of representation is an
T9
sonal comments
Williams said it would
be commendable to
consider people for the
position that are
"under our doorstep
but it would be "a
mistake" to restrict the
candidacy to persons
fron North Carolina.
Mitchell Daub, also a
member of the SGA.
said the next chancellor
should be "friendly
and respectful to the
students and faculty
The committee should
select someone who
knows how to work
through the UNC
university system, bring
the university into the
"national limelight"
and will work for ECL
until retirement.
Dr. Patricia Dunn,
an ECU faculty
member, said the com-
mittee should make its
decision "without
regard to geography.
She expressed concern
over the "speed and
urgency" of the selec-
tion process, and added
that the committee's
choice should be so-
meone with an advanc-
ed degree whose priori-
ABORTIONSUPTO
12th WEEK. OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROMM-U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S185 00 Pregnancy Ts�. Birth
Control ind Problem
Pregnancy Counielmq for lur
ther information call I3J-OS35
(Toll Free Number
M0-?21-1S( between I AM
and 5 P M Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�17 West Morgan St
Raletgh. N C
ty is for "scholarship,
academics and educa-
tion
Dr. James Smith of
the Department of
Philosophy questioned
the committee's
witholding of the selec-
tion criteria. Ashley
Futrell, chairman of
the search committee as
well as the Board of
Trustees, said the re-
quirements for selec-
tion were kept private
to avoid any embar-
rassment of applicants
turned down for the
position.
SONIC.
OC
3UC
3BC
ZA
AT BARRE, ltd.
Dancewear Specialty Shop
See us for all
of your Halloween Seeds.
422 ARLINGTON BLVD
GREENVILLE N.C. 27834
(919) 756-6670
yw mw ' ��g
Special
Of The
Week
Stop In For
A Special Lunch
s SONIC SPECIAL
STEAK SANDWICH
FRENCH FRIES
MED. DRINK
$ 1 99 REG. $2.75
FOR I
618 feMnvite Blvd. - Only
OFFER EXPIRES I
OCT. 25th I
same
HELP WHEN YOU NEED IT M08T.
The Fleming Center has been here for women
of ail ages since 1974, offering understanding
and help to anyone faced with an unplanned
pregnancy day or night. Services include:
Free Pregnancy Testing
Weekday & Saturday Abortion Appta.
Evening Birth Control Hour
CALL 781-5550 DAY OR NIGHT
The Fleming Center
We're here when yon need na
V -
Come by or c�H
'y S N. rnDAYiiulul
I nautilus
TODAY and set
up an appointment
tor a tree orhout
1002 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE. N C flfi
! for men and women
Stretching Exercise Classes
M-W-F 10:00& 11:00
T-Th. 5:00 & 6:00
Aerobics and Dancercize Classes
M-W-Th. 3:00-4 00
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
November 1 - S3S
December 17
Features Included: Male A Female
Instructors "Nautilus Machines
(12 of the most sophisticated
exercise machines made)
OLYMPIC BARBELLS
�COED HOURS 'FEMALE HOURS
AND DUMBELLS -SAUNA,
SHOWERS, AND LOCKERS
WHIRLPOOL .WET PLANS
AT NAUTILUS FITNESS ISOUR
SPECIALTY 1002 EVANS STREET,
GREENVILLE-75�-�SB4
Can 1 BelpVou?
Visit our 2 locations, Pitt Plaza &
Evans St. Extension,for everything
you need to make this Halloween
your creepiest ever.
We have a complete selection
of masks,make-up,wigs,fangs,
blood, and other morbid items.
SUNSHINE TOY SEOTCNS
Pitt Plaza 756-1636 1 & 2 Evans St. Ext. 7562629
Let (Elf last (Earnltman
write home for you every
Tues. and Thurs.
Every Tuesday and Thursday you can read the most
informative stories about the news events of the day
at ECU and in Greenville the best sports coverage,
and interesting features about the people, places and
things surrounding youso can your parents. For $25
your parents can get a one year mail subscription to
the East Carolinian.
Serving the campus community since 1925, the East
Carolinian provides valuable insights into student
life at East Carolnia University for your parents.
Twice-weekly, we can tell your family about the
most current campus and local news. Student free
flicks, concerts and sports events are all covered in
the pages of the East Carolinian, as well as state and
local news that affects the lives of ECU students.
Our experienced, award winning news staff can br
ing your parents the news wherever it is happening
in eastern North Carolina, plus the most dynamic
behind the scenes investigative reporting.
Our features section will bring them fascinating and
often humorous human interest stories about the peo-
ple of the university and the surrounding area. It also
covers the cultural events that enrich student life, as
well as presenting interesting slices of area flavor.
Scanning the entire spectrum of ECU'S athletic ac
tivity, our well trained staff of enthusiastic sports
writers will bring your family comprehensive
coverage of ECU'S exciting football schedule, in ad
dition to highlighting the rest of an impressive sports
program.
Our remarkable staff works around the clock to pro-
duce the best possible newspaper, containing the
most essential news, features and sports of interest
not only to you, but to your parents and friends as
well, wherever they may be. The East Carolinian. . .
let us inform them.
Your parents, friends, and relatives can subscribe
to the East Carolinian for one year by sending a
check for $25 to: George Hettich, Circulation Dept
The East Carolinian, Old South Building, East
Carolinia University, Greenville, N.C. 27834.
If you wish, you may subscribe for them by mailing
a check for $25 along with the coupon below to the
East Carolinian, or just drop by the East Carolinian
office.
1
jQUje lEaat darnltntan!
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Name
Telephone (
)
RATK:$20peryear
lEast
Carolinian
i
i





HO IASI XKOl INIAN
Style
Equal Time For
Chest Enthusiasts
H KARr'N WrMl
MvW b�oi
� ake it off was the cry oi
1 uesdav nighi as men and women
competed foi crowds and cash in
vvo foi ms oi best chest contests
1 he fii d to finish was th
i irsi Annual Wei I shin Contest,
hive eirls competed with the crowd
shouting such things as 'No skin,
a in" and " 1 ake ii otl
"You don't expect
do v a ked
that the three hna "
Scwart, Mary Curry i
Stavlev had agreed before
entennj the ould
no, expose themseh
wha
�M nethn tween 1r
me Slayk
( urry, a formet Pu
dinj
B

w as mort
hope
" shr -aid
I me,
she ah
ho
Dream' John Moore, the em - hej enlrance m the
the event But hei 1lc
1 he crowd respon ,
� null-shit, hull '
1 he . rowd �a
re help
� �
mi a
V
el n i a bo I
i
- K
V
I
and
W d did not know was
DaMd tta

B �
d annual Buccaneet Bahi
I
thai she was i
"S T
A
1
41
Homecoming
iMans Being Finished
For November Galas
H. II i II M
B V
-
!(
�oil)
irse
i
rtni and
ild 1
t am
I
Heart and Desire
die am oi I
,eason V
ning, the 1441
.other tor the
hey played
MAuto Damage
Hates Student
alrt
pnoio B. JON JORDAN
scene from last ears Homecoming Parade
K.
i
i
lei
Junioioik i �� "ere
Mai � ol his playei !l
Davidson
n ai lit t

�� 1 I MM l'aje
The Great Santini
Flick Shows Family Conflict
i
Peoi
;
Mini
11
. . oh . The God-

ki Ordinary
(.i
� r The "ate
( onrai A I,
, fiei I I
� ��.ii
I' ice pi 1 ol
. � � fhe
t family
ling and com
en parodies his own
, a richly
ter, alternately
I to his
get 'viun life to
I v ne else
I) ,air firsl starring role, he
ertly sieates a mono, able
iraetei ol great sublet) and
depth
O'Keefe is equally impressive as
Meechum's son, turning 18, who is
his own man and must
� his lather's dominating
Admirably directed s b 1 ewis
ohn( ariino (The Sailor H ho tell
I mm Grace With The Sea), the
(,reai Santini emerges as an infec
(wOI ol mouth helped il
break louse records in New York
( ity), moving film convi
dignity, force, and sensiti
��I ewis lohri arhno's The G
Santini is likel to be the n
live cause celebre ol eai Who,
nowadays, i going to see a big-little
famih drama starring only
low key professionals Rob
Dun all and Blythe Danner, eve
the top ol then screen form? (Are
re enough secret admirers ol
Blythe Dannei to flock to the first
film worthy ol hei tempered
sweetness)
��And who will discovet ilia:
undei a frumpish misnomei like The
i,rem Santini there links a cross bet
ween Death oj a Salesman and ast
of Eden, thai is. another saga ol
coming ol age in America '
"The colonel (Duvall) is still a kid
at heart, and in tins faithful adapta
tion, C onrov's forte ol adolescent
insult humoi is lifted intacl Ben is
played with discreel restraint
Michael O'Keefe, dn affab
mirabh even keeled youi
�� 1 he directoi is a wordsmith and
amastei ol the tw
� 1980 have been more richly
rewarding rhe understatement,
assisted b the brilliant Stan Shaw
as a Porgy like martyi to 60 s
racism, has resulted in a powerful,
non preachN stand foi racial digni
ty and the scenes between the tat hei
and Ins daughtei Mary Anne 11 isa
lane Perskv) evoke the anguish ol a
young female search foi identity
under a sexist tyrant
"The film abounds in mature,
redolent confrontations The Great
santini stakes out his year's peak ol
rich, human drama
1 om Mien, illage � oke
J
Robert Iu�all and his screen son Michael O'Keefe pla a fnendh
game ol one on om in this scene Horn Un (.real Santini I he film is
plavtng this weekend in Mendenhall Studententers Hendrix fheatn





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 22. 1981
note
ke
I
jjfeMJjiltfWWir
a "friendly"
The film is
idrix Theatre.
Alumni To
Enjoy Their
40th Reunion
LCAAtJiiG AtoQT CoccrGg Tine HAQ.iA)AH
$h Damp A)oit3
Continued From Page 6
Greenville, South Carolina but. he
got mixed up and landed in North
Carolina. After a few practices, he
decided he liked it here and would
stay.
Back then the players really had a
hard way to go. Most of them were
kind of poor, so as a sort of scholar-
ship, Coach Christenbury went out
into the Greenville area to find
homes for the players to live in since
there were no men's dormitories at
that time. With only twenty-three
players, there were very few-
substitutes, and many players had to
play both offense and defense.
In 1940 the team was just getting
off the ground, but by 1941 they
had the magic touch. "We didn't
have a whole lot of talent recalls
Bill Greene, "but we had heart and
desire Heart and desire became
the team's nickname. They had a
great love for their coach and a
great desire to win for their school.
By 1942, many men had gone into
the service for World War II, and
except for intramurals, there were
no football teams. Official play did
not resume until 1946. To the team's
great sadness. Coach Christenbury
was killed during the war. He was a
leutinant in the U.S. Navy Reserve.
His ship blew up in the San Fran-
cisco harbor while being loaded with
amunition.
Many players of the 1941 team
hope to establish a scholarship in
memory of their beloved coach.
Because of his honesty, his
nickname was Honest John. He in-
stilled in his players not to cheat or
play dirty football. He was a
gentleman, a great leader, and like a
father to the players.
The players, who were like
brothers, plan to meet again for the
first time in forty years on Friday
November 6. With two members
dead, the team hopes to have nine-
teen to twenty players and their
wives arrive from as far away as
Texas for the reunion. Their base
will be the Holiday Inn. There is a
cocktail party planned for Friday
night and a brunch at 10:30 Satur-
day morning. Then the oldest bus
they can find, to symbolize how
they traveled to their away games,
will take them all over to the
stadium where they will sit together.
To finish off the celebration, there
will be an after game dinner.
Mr. William Greene, a retired ad-
miral of the navy, is mainly respon-
sible for this first reunion and the
information in this article. He says
the heart of the team was Coach
Christenbury, and the key to the
winning season was "heart and
desire
Support East Carolina
as:
Mrs.
Moo-Sat. 7-lt
Sw. It-it
Plaza Shell
410 Greenville Blvd.
Phone 756-3023
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
(Foreign & Domestic)
Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
Prices
Road and Wrecker Service A ! 'A
SHELLl
Discounts On Repairs With I.D. wv
& Sigma Nil's
present the 1st Annual
Halloween Mardigras
Male & Female
Costume Contest
Tuesday, Oct. 27 from 9-1
1st prize � $75.00 each
2nd prize � $25.00 each
3rd prize � Consolation prizes
Sponsored By:
Shirley's Cut & Style
Apple Records
Tree House Restaurant
International Foods & Gifts
ACROSS
1 Saute
4 Burden
8 Sp title
11 Region
12 Poker stake
13 Luau fare
14 French article
15 Insane
17 Simpler
19 Man s nick-
name
21 Sick
23 Young boy
24 Aroma
26 Consume
28 Sport
31 Opening
33 Evil
35 Inlet
36 Babylonian
deity
38 Made neat
41 Pronoun
42 Gratuity
44 Paddle
45 Sorrow
47 Woe word
49 Beverage
51 Hint
54 Decay
56 Plunge
58 Meadow
59 Scheduled
62 Yellow ocher
64 State Abbr
65 Youngster
66 Seed coating
68 Leave out
70 Reverence
71 Harp
72 Tiny
DOWN
1 Liberated
2 Scale note
3 Sweet potato
4 Dipper
5 Preposition
6 Devoured
7 Transaction
8 Insect
9 Fish eggs
10 Ventilate
11 Singing voice
16 Three-toed
sloth
18 Witnessed
20 Canine
22 Toiled
25 Tatter
27 Scottish cap
29 Goal
30 Beam
32 In favor of
34 Condensed
moisture
36 Greek letter
37 Be ill
39 Grain
40 Physician
colloq
43 Procession
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
See Answer,
Page 9
46 Cloth
measure
48 Drunkard
50 Passageway
52 Weird
53 Linger
55 River duck
57 Greek letter
59 As written
Mus
60 Ordinance
61 And
63 Base
67 Negative pre-
fix
69 Pronoun
� l2345671910
"12"
14sJ15111718
1920 12123m�
24252627 12629
� :���323334� 35
37 1 MM40 1 �'
4243 IIMi-
I"48 I � 4.50 IB52
mm"55 IB557 156
61 1 Be:63� M
651-6766 '69
70jt72
SUTTEES GOLD
STREAK BAND
Friday Oct. 23
4:00-7:00 p.m.
ATTIC A07r
�come join us"
for our
SBRDO
�PEC3ftL
i
Admission 25$
Beverages 60$,
Special prices on
choice items from our
menu -served between
5:00 and 7:30
Introducing
All New Burrito with
Green Chili and Starting
Friday - The NACHO PLATTER.
Come on out and try our
2 new, delicious entrees.
Always Serving Your
Favorite Beverages!
Shoney's
Located Beside the Ramada Inn
264 By-Pass
CbMfctiHftlrtitCttty
Located 264 By-Pass next to Toyota East
Phone 756-2072
Bausch & Lomb
soft contacts
Includes
() Fitting by eye doctor
() Easy care cold disinfection
() Refund policy
() Wear lenses home same day
NOW LOOKING GOOD COSTS LESS
39
95
includes frame and
plastic lenses over 100
frames to choose from
12
00
ftOMTCMWAM lAUSCHitoaaa
Scratch Resistant
coating for plastic
lenses
00
BIFOCAL
SOFT CONTACT
LENSES
195
00
SOFT CONTACTS
FOR ASTIGMATISM
ALSO
EXTENDED WEAR
SOFT LENSES
ABOVE PRICES DO NOT INCLUOE EXAM FEE
OPIQMCTNC
EYE CARE CENTER
Greenville
22t Greenville Blvd.
Cell:7S6-MM
Comprehensive Eye Exams
include glaucoma test
cataract check
CONVENIENT EVENING
ANO SATURDAY HOURS
Or. Peter W. Hollis
15 ECU DISCOUNT
ON EYEGLASSES
�OTHER DISCOUNTS DO NOT APPLY
mst

r
i





AC
I he ' ;
vKimen in r
backgamm
billiards, table
and table �
determin-
campu
tournan
during I
5 po n s
Mendei
nameni
severe.
held
uni
nation
. nd
shij
Car V
Prom

v �
Cross
Answ
11
SS5U5S
�fc
�S
BUSCH, The official beer of The Charlie Daniels Band.
Vnheusi- �� j ' m M





IHt LASTAROI INIAN
OdOHIR 22, 19X1
I V
ACU-I Tournaments Are Successful
I he top men and
women in the events ol
Kuivgarnmon, bowling,
billiards, table soccer,
and table tennis will be
I mined through
campus level qualifying
tournaments to be held
during Fall Semestei
sponsored b
Mendenhall Student
enter, the tour
naments are some of
xtv.etal hundred being
held at colleges Md
universities around the
nation in the qualifying
round for inter
collegiate champion
ships conducted by the
Association of College
I mons-International
The Al 1 - C a m p u s
winners m each event
will represent ECU in
the Region 5 tourna
ment with the cham
pions from appro
lamateU thirty othet
schools from the states
of Kentucky, South
Carolina, lennessce.
and North Carolina.
Ihe ACU-1 Region 5
Recreation Touina
ment will be held
1'ebruaiv 11,12. and
1?. 1982 at Virginia
Polytechnic Institute.
The all expense paid
trip to the regional
competition foi the
ECU representath es
will be sponsored b
Mendenhall Student
Center.
Qualifying tour-
naments are being con-
ducted in the residence
halls to determine dorm
winners and at
Mendenhall to deter-
mine day-student win-
ners who will par-
ticipate in the All-
Campus MEN'S
Hill IARDS and
i hi i r INN IS
events Ihe WOMEN'S
B I I I IARDS,
BACKGAMMON and
I ABIE SOCCER
events will be held as
single All-Campus
events. Participants
tor the BOWl INC.
Car Vandalism
Prompts Trouble
Continued From Page r�
rything else I knew he would
wan: to bring mv car back home.
V ol all, i knew he would sa
hing to the effect thai he knew
something like this would happen.
vv- hen will I ever listen
Mv roomate and 1 walked over to
the campus security office, and
i the crime. We had to ride
across campus in the police car to
the freshman parking lot. Yes, we
were embarassed.
Ihe policeman said he would
keep an eve out, but wouldn't pro-
mise anything. Ihe tow truck came
the next da tor my car. No telling
now long it will take to fix the car.
Maybe mv Had was right. Or maybe
he has been playing in my game all
mv life.
V
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7th Annual

T
FRiDAY,OCTOBER 23 atRMttKATZ 800untt
LNEMUSC featuring JAZZBAH) KMMBS
15KEGS&BK)B $4.00at1hedoor $3.00inad�nce
Costumes Mandatorv Tickelssoldat Art&uramaUmce
Prizes provided by
ViltaRoma NewDeli Pipeline Newbys RecorrJBar
HeartsDdrtit AateRecords SunstiwieGardtenCenter
Art&Camera TraftcUght Margaux Pipedieams
event will be selected
Iron the
MSC'Intramural-
Recreational Services
sponsored program
held in November.
All undergraduate
participants must be
enrolled at the time of
campus and regional
tournament competi-
tion for a minimum of
twelve (12) credit hours
per semester and must
maintain a minimum of
a 2.0 GPA based on a
4.0 system. Graduate
participants must be
full-time students tak-
ing a minimum of nine
(9) credit hours per
semester. A qualified
participant may register
for any of the events
but every participant
must register at the
Bowling or Billiards
Centers at Mendenhall.
Bowling participants
may register at the In-
tramural Office in
Memorial Gym.
The Men's All-
Campus Billiards Tour-
nament is scheduled for
Monday, November 2
at 6:00 PM in
Mendenhall with the
semi-finals and finals
scheduled for the
following day if time
does not allow comple-
tion on Monday. The
top four day-student
qualifiers from the
tournament on Mon-
day, October 19. and
the three qualifiers
from each dorm will
meet in this double
-elimination toura-
ment.The first and se-
cond place finishers
will participate in the
regionals.
The Women's All-
Campus Billiards Tour-
nament will be held on
Wednesday, October
28 at 6.00PM in the
Billiards Center. The
All-Campus champion
in the women's division
will represent ECU at
the regionals.
Scheduled for Thurs-
day. November 12 is
the All-Campus Table
Tennis Tournament.
Eour day student win-
ners and approximately
eight dorm winners will
compete for the men's
title. One winner will
be chosen in the
women's division on
November 12 and will
attend the regional in
Virginia. The double-
elimination tournments
will get underway at
6:00 PM in the Multi-
purpose Room ar
Mendenhall.
The All-Campus
Bowling Tournament
will begin on Thursday,
October 29 with the
Team Captains'
Meeting at 4:00 PM in
MSC Room 221. The
Mendenhall and
Intramural-
Recreational Services
co-sponsored event will
be a team competition
but the ECU represen-
tatives to go to Virginia
will be decided by the
top five singles scores
overall in both the
men's and women's
divisions.
Table Soccer will be
included in the All-
Campus events after a
very successful initial
tournament last year.
The double-elimination
All-Campus Table Soc-
cer team tournament
will be held Wednes-
day, November 18 at
6:00 PM. The cham
pionship team will
represent ECU at the
regionals and may con-
sist of two men, two
women, or one man
and one woman
Scheduled for Mon-
day, October 26 is the
All-Campus Backgam
mon Tournament to be
held in the Multi
Purpose Room at
Mendenhall at 6 00
PM. The tournament
has met with great sue
cess the past three years
and this year should
prove to be no exeep
tion. The first and se
cond place finishers
will participate in the
regional tace-to-face
tournament
CONTACT LENSES �r
Soft Contacts s8995 Jfc
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with the doctor of your choice.
apDcur�
-EYEGLASSES-
SINGLE VISION
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4495
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Monday and Wed. Beef Tips 2.89
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Monday thru Friday Soup & Sandwich
1.99
Great Luncheon Specials
II A.M. to 2 P.M.
Chef Salad 1.99 4 ox. Chopped Sirloin 1.19 ��� RSiS�5
Fn Sat. & Sun (Oct. 2-4) Buy 8 oz Ribeye � Get Free Salad Bar
Petite Sirloin 2.50
Kids undtr U e� St�erburgr or child plat wpotiio lor ??'
Sorry, no lake ou'i on tpeoali
(Steakburger or
Chicken Sand�No Potato)
Items and Prices
Effective thru
Oct 31 1981
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
(

on
Fall means
football, fun, and
fine savings at the
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Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
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purchase the advertised item at the advertised price within 30
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I







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 22. IV8I
Angry Hurricanes To Invade Ficklen
Very Serious' Miami
Trying To Bounce Back
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Spotl Miloc
Following a frustrating loss to
Mississippi State last week the
Miami (Fla.) Hurricanes are anxious
to take to the field against East
Carolina this Saturday.
Not only did Miami lose to
Mississippi State, but the club also
fell out of the national polls as a
result. As a result, the team would
like to show its worth in Greenville.
Hurricane head coach Howard
Schnellenberger says his team has
had a week of superb practices
following the loss to now ninth-
ranked MSU. He added that the
team would definitely not be look-
ing past ECU toward top-ranked
Penn State, the 'Canes opponent
next weekend.
"The loss certainly puts a lot
more emphasis on this week's game
for us Schnellenberger said. "We
really want to get back into the win
column. 1 think our team is taking
the East Carolina game very, very
seriously. They realize another loss
would be a disaster for us
Miami stands 3-2 but still holds
hopes of going to a major bowl
game. And why not? The Hur-
ricanes are two penalties away from
a perfect 5-0 mark. A penalty
nullified a late touchdown in a 14-7
loss to Texas, last week's top-
ranked team. In the loss to
Mississippi State, the 'Canes had a
TD called back with six seconds re-
maining. It would have been a
game-winner.
Schnellenberger refuses to blame
the two calls on the losses, though,
saying his team could have played
better in both contests.
"The penalties are certainly very
frustrating he said. "But we
didn't play as well as we can in
either game. We didn't have to get
ourselves into those situations
Schnellenberger said his team had
looked forward to last week's con-
test, but that the club could not let
that disappointment of the loss
hamper its goals.
"Mississippi State was a very big
game and we treated it that way. We
all knew that if we won we would be
in one situation and that if we lost
we'd be in another. Well, we're in
the other now and we have to make
the very best of it. East Carolina
and Penn State are our immediate
problems. We can really set 'he
stage for the rest of the season if we
win these two. But East Carolina is
the big one. It's the next one
Miami faced a worse situation
when it hosted ECU in the famed
Orange Bowl last season. The club
was coming off three consecutive
losses to Notre Dame, Mississippi
State and Penn State.
The Pirates gave the 'Canes all
they wanted in that one, finally fall-
ing 23-10.
Schnellenberger says that while
his team is improved over a year
ago, he feels the Bucs are also a
much better squad.
"They're definitely a much-
improved team said the former
Balitmore Colt head coach. "Most
of their youngsters are back. They
ran and passed for a lot oi yardage
in our game last year. East Carolina
runs the wishbone and we have cer-
tainly had experience with that now.
Hopefully, if will carry over into
this game and help us get into the
win column
Getting into the win column is im-
portant for Schnellenberger. The
third-year coach says he would like
to make Miami "the Southern Cal
of the East Winning, then, and
building are necessities.
"1 feel very strongly that Miami
has that potential Schnellenberger
said. "The campus sits in a very
nice, tropical climate like Southern
Cal. There is a traditional schedule
that plays the best inter-sectional
opponents. That's attractive to both
football players and coaches.
"The schedule is definitely good
enough to fall into that (Southern
Cal's) category he continued.
"We've made steady improvement
since I've been here. We need to
continue to do so if these goals are
to be met
Emory Says Pirates Are
Excited, Not Intimidated
Lester The Molester
Miami All-American defensive tackle Lester Williams will
lead his Hurricane teammates into Ficklen Stadium Saturday
to take on ECU. Williams, a 6-3, 278-pounder, was named
to several preseason A-A squads and will go head-to-head
with Pirate star Tootle Rabbins this week. The matchup
could prove to be a key to the Pirates1 hopes of pulling off an
upset.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
SpoeU Milor
Everyone knows that hurricanes
are given names. One is headed
Greenville's way this Saturday, and
East Carolina head football coach
Ed Emory says he hopes its named
"Hurricane Upset
Emory's Pirates take on the
Miami (Fla.) Hurricanes in Ficklen
Stadium on Saturday, with kickoff
set for 1:30 p.m. The 'Canes have
been ranked in the nation's top
twenty all season but fell from the
elite group following a narrow 14-10
loss to ninth-ranked Mississippi
State last week. Emory would lce
nothing more than to tack another
loss on Miami's 3-2 record, though
he realizes the difficulty of the task.
"That's got to be the worst thing
that could happen as far as we're
concerned Emory said of Miami's
loss to MSU. "It's going to take
everything the Pirates can muster to
play with them
Emory does not feel, though, that
his team will be awed but what he
considers to be one of the nation's
top ten teams.
"1 believe our team has been in-
itiated in playing top ten teams he
said. "We won't have to worry
about their adjustment to Miami.
We won't be intimidated
The second-year Pirate coach,
whose team is 4-3 following a 35-31
win over Southwestern Louisiana
last week, said that it is vital that the
Bucs perform well despite being in a
big underdog's role. Though he said
that the club is not in a "must-win"
situation, Emory did point out what
a victory over the heavily-favored
Hurricanes could mean to the Pirate
program.
"If we did win it would be a big
help in fund-raising, recruiting and
attitude. It will help us to be
recognized as an up-and-coming
program that plays a national
schedule. I think a win Saturday
would add much to our student
body's enthusiasm about their team
also. It would certainly help to make
up for some of our disappoint-
ments
Emory is impressed with the
Miami defense, which is led by All-
American tackle Lester Williams
and A A candidate at defensive
back Fred Marion.
"Miami definitely has the best
defense of any team we've faced this
year, including North Carolina
Emory said. "They are much more
physical and much more mobile
than North Carolina. It is the
toughest defene we've faced since
I've been at East Carolina and one
of the toughest I have ever seen on
the college level
Emory said he was stunned when
he first caught a glance of the Hur-
ricane defense on a game film.
"I thought they'd made a mistake
when 1 saw some of their film. I
thought they'd sent me some Miami
Dolphin footage. They do have five
or six people on defense who will
play professional football
Emory is also wary of the Miami
offense, which is led by quarterback
Jim Kelly, another Ail-American.
Kelly and the Hurricanes rank 12th
nationally in passing offense. The
junior star has completed 68 of 124
attempts for 1,049 yardv
"Kelly is one of the premier
quarterbacks in the nation Emory
said. "He's a three-year starter with
senior running backs behind him
and great receivers to throw to.
One of those senior backs is
Smokey Roan, who set a school
record with a 249-yard performance
against ECU a year ago. This
season, though. Roan has had a
rough time of it, totalling only 135
yards in the team's first five games.
As for his Pirates, Emory says the
club must avoid the turnovers that
have caused problems in the past.
He added, though, that the club
should have no problems playing
with emotion.
"We are excited he said. "This
is what you dream and work for �
the chance to play one of the top
teams in the country in your own
yard. If our guys are not excited
now, thev never will be
Robbins Will Have His Hands
Full With Miami A-A Williams
Hurricane Watch
ECU hosts powerful Miami Saturday. Among the Hur-
ricanes to keep an eye out for are quarterback Jim Kelly
(above) and running back Smokey Roan (46, below). Kelly,
an AII-America candidate, has been likened to Joe Namath
and has passed for over 1,000 yards in the team's first five
games. Roan, shown here trying to avoid ECU's Glenn Mor-
ris (53), rushed for a school-record 249 yards against the
Pirates last year.
This weekend's East Carolina-
Miami matchup is one that Pirate
fans have long waited for. The game
certainly presents those fans with a
chance to see one of the nation's
best teams. There are also some in-
dividuals and some matchups that
will be worth watching.
First and foremost among the
matchups is the one that will pit the
Hurricanes' All-American defensive
tackle Lester Williams against
ECU's A-A candidate, offensive
guard Tootie Robbins.
Williams was a 1981 pre-season
A-A pick by a pair of magazines,
Playboy and Street and Smiih 's. His
best performance thus far this
season was in the team's 12-7 win
over Houston. In that contest,
Williams was credited with 17
tackles, three sacks and a fumble
recovery.
Williams is a player that pro
scouts drool over. Robbins, though,
has his share of followers as well.
Among them is Miami coach
Howard Schnellenberger.
"We think Robbins is an excep-
tional offensive lineman said the
third-year Hurricane coach. "He's
as fine a lineman as we've played
this year, and we've played people
like Texas, Florida, Houston and
Mississippi State. This should be
another of those classic matchups
While Robbins has his followers,
he also has his critics. The oppor-
tunity is there for him to either aid
or silence those critics on Saturday.
Saturday's game must be a
welcome challenge for Miami runn-
ing back Smokey Roan, who
romped for 249 yards against ECU a
year ago in the Orange Bowl.
Roan has fallen on hard times this
year, though, having gained only
135 yards in the 'Canes first five
games. The Miami team as a whole
is having problem moving the ball
on the ground, as is evident by the
fact that Roan's total leads the
Charles
Chandler
team.
I think Smokey's stats are partly
due to the fact that our offensive
line is just not getting the job
done Schnellenberger said. "I'm
sure he's looking forward to havng
a big game
Miami assistant sports informa-
tion director Karl Schmitt has been
in Greenville this week and says that
the Hurricanes are loaded with pro
prospects.
Schmitt says that professional
scouts say that approximately a
dozen on the Hurricane squad have
good chances of being drafted.
Among them, other than Williams,
are quarterback Jim Kelly, offensive
lineman John Canei, defensive back
Fred Marion (who Schmitt says
scouts like the most) and middle
guard Tony Chickillo.
No one can say that the Hur-
ricanes have a patsy schedule. In
fact, Miami can boast of one of the
nation's two or three toughest 1981
schedules.
The club has already beaten one
of the top Southeastern Conference
teams, Florida (21-20), and one of
the Southwestern Conference
powers, Houston (12-7).
The Hurricanes' two losses came
against the nation's current eighth-
and ninth-ranked clubs, Texas and
Mississippi State. Penalties cost
Miami wins in both contests, as win-
ning touchdowns were called back
in both games.
The two losses came by a combin-
ed total of 11 points (14-7 to Texas
and 14-10 to MSU). Where would
Miami be ranked if those penalties
had not been called and was 5-0?
ECU head coach Ed Emory's opi-
nion on that was a simple: "Why,
QBCariton Nelson leads the ECU offense against a power-
ful Miami defense
they'd be number one
The remainder of the Miami
schedule includes dates with
number-one ranked Penn State next
week, Florida State, Virginia Tech,
N.C. State and Notre Dame.
A closer look at Miami's 14-10
loss to Mississippi State last week
causes one to believe that it was just
a case of bad luck.
There was a big misfortune that
coupled with the fact that the team
had a TD called back due to a mo-
tion penalty with 47 seconds remain-
ing in the game to hurt the Hur-
ricanes' cause. With ten minutes left
quarterback Jim Kelly had a pass
deflected and intercepted in the end
zone on a first-and-goal situation.
In
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I

FHl I AST I AROl IMAN
(X TOM R22. 1981
11
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Intramural
Sports-N-Shorts
BY GREG MELTON
Animals Win
Tuesday night drew close to the most exciting
Hag football season ever in the ECU IM Dept.
The "Animals" ousted the "Jones Enforcers" by
a score of 28-26 to win the men's All-Campus
Championship. The women's championship was
won by the "Heartbreakers" over the Tn-Sigs,
40-0, to finish the season undefeated.
The men's contest was full of excitement. On
the opening kick-off the Animals drove steadily
downfield, climaxing a 50-yard drive with a
touchdown pass of 26 yards from Bruce Bright to
Steve Underkapler. The conversion made the
s.ore 8-0.
The "Enforcers" fought back with Anthony
Martin hitting Preston Starks on a critical fourth
down play to keep their drive alive. The Enforcers
capitalized when Martin hit Ricardo Burke on a
30-vard scoring pass making the score 8-6.
The Enfoicers opened the second half by scor-
ing two quick touchdowns on runs of six yards by
Kenneth Colemen and a Martin pass to Irving
Bellamy. Things appeared lost for the Animals as
the Enforcers opened a 26-14 lead.
Here the character of the Animals stood out as
they battled back. With quarterback Bright
scrambling through a fierce Enforcer pass rush,
the Animals fought back with a touchdown, mak-
ing the score 26-20. Now the stage was set for the
final act. Bright connected on pass plays to the
Sawyer twins (Larry and Gary) to move the ball
to the six-yard line. On the final play of the game
as the clock ran out. Bright lobbed a pass high in-
to the corner of the endone. Again, it was
Underkapler who made a leaping catch over two
defensive backs. After the dust had settled the
score stood at 26 all.
Still, the heroics were not over. On the crucial
extra-point Bright rifled a pass into the center of
the endzone. The ball was bobbled between two
Animals receivers before Ouane Kellum finally
made the grab. It was finally over and the
Animals stood alone as the ECU IM Flag Foot-
ball Champions.
In the women's championship, the
"Heartbreakers" had little trouble disposing of
the Sigma girls by a score of 40-0. It was a total
team effort as it has been all year for the cham-
pions, who finished their season at nine wins and
no losses. Yvonne "Flea" Wiliams wa the prin-
cipal heroine as she scored 20 points to lead the
victory. Tammy Parham and Stacey Weitzel each
scored a touchdown for the winners.
PIRA TES
in the pros
H Ml MUM. I.F.AIHKS
I hr Tup 15
Golfers' Delight
Retired East Carolina professor Dr. George C. Martin, Jr.
(right) turns over a washtub full of 1,000 golf balls to Pirate
golf coach Bob Helmick. Martin, a former ECU geology
professor, collects golf balls for a hobby and over the past 15
years has gathered over 60,000. Some 16,000 of those are
currently in his basement. Martin donated the balls, worth
approximately $500, to the Pirate golf team in the name of
his late daughter, Karen Lynn. (Photo By John Stallings)
Pirates Travel To
Duke For Tourney
A.C. Runs With Best
New England Patriot halfback Anthony Col-
lins, a former East Carolina standout, is the 13th
leading rusher in the National Football League
after seven weeks of play.
Collins has rushed for 460 yards, nine less than
the number twelve man, Chuck Muncie of San
Diego. The ex-Pirate is the fifth leading rusher in
the American Football Conference. Houston's
Earl Campbell tops both lists.
Collins' stats are the third best in the NFL
among rookie rushers. Only George Rogers of
New Orleans (746 yards) and Joe Delaney of Kan-
sas City (567 yards) can top Collins' total.
Collins 13th rating on the NFL list puts him
ahead of two of the league's more established
stars. Behind the former Pirate are Chicago's
Walter Payton, who has tallied 430 yards, and
Franco Harris of Pittsburgh, who has managed
402.
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First Lady Pirate Season
Ticket Sales Reflect Success
By THOMAS BRAME
Slafl knltr
"The Iron Duke In-
vitational is the best
tournament we're in
this season proclaims
Pirate golf coach Bob
Helmick. He also
predicts that his team
will be among the top
five in this 21-team
field.
Leading contenders
for the tournament
crow n w ill be defending
champs Wake Forest,
hometown favorite
Duke, local rival NCSU
and national powers
Kentucky and Georgia
Southern.
After last year's
seventh-place finish,
the Pirates are looking
forward to the
challenging for team
honors. East Carolina
is lead by Don Gaffner
(senior) and Don
Sweeting (sophomore),
whom Helmick predicts
should finish in the top
10 in individual honors.
Rounding out the
Pirate participants are
Chris Czaja
(freshman), Dan
Lawruk (sophomore),
Jerry Lee (senior) and
Mike Move (junior).
Two-time Ail-
American Jody Mudd
of Georgia is odds on
favorite to capture the
individual champion-
ship. As a Walker Cup
member, Mudd
presents himself as one
of the best amateur
golfers in America.
With the tough com-
petition, last year's
champ Tim Mit-
tlehauser of Duke will
be pressed to defend his
title.
The golfing gets
underway Thursday
morning and last until
Saturday, Oct. 22-24.
For the first time in
Lady Pirate basketball
history, fans will have
the opportunity to buy
season tickets, accor-
ding to Associate
Sports Information
Director John Stall-
ings.
Season tickets will be
sold by a group of
volunteers going
around the Greenville
area, and fans will be
able to save $15 on the
cost of all game tickets
together.
East Carolina will be
one of a select number
of universities selling
season tickets to
women's basketball.
The decision to sell the
tickets reflects the
team's outstanding
1980-81 season and the
encouraging attendance
in Minges Coliseum.
Head basketball
coach Cathy Andruzzi
is pleased with the deci-
sion and thinks it will
form a basis for com-
munity support outside
ECU.
The Pirates offer an
attractive home
schedule this season
which includes the
Lady Pirate Classic, the
East Carolina-Duke
Double-Headers, the
University of Virginia,
the University of North
Carolina, always
powerful South
Carolina and archrival
North Carolina State.
"The schedule is pro-
bably the most attrac-
tive in lady Pirate
history Stallings said.
Also announced was
the Lady Pirate
Alumuni game to be
played the weekend of
the East Tennessee ings says some big
State football contest name are expected.
� Homecoming. Stall-
Purple Defeats Gold
The Purple squad in the men's compeli
outgunned the Gold tion and 11 for the
team in intrasquad women,
swimming at Minges Big winners included
Natatorium Wednes- freshman diver Scott
day night. 109-90. Eagle and Doug
There were 13 events Nieman.
Karate Club Successful
The East Carolina
University Karate
Club, under the direc-
tion of Bill McDonald,
traveled down to Atlan-
ta this past weekend to
participate in one of the
largest Karate tour-
naments on the Eastern
Seaboard.
Five ECU Karate
club members placed
high in the competi-
tion.
The eveni look place
at the Georgia Tech
Coliseum.
ECU vs. MIAMI GO PIRATES!
SHOP OVERTON'S FOR YOUR
FAVORITE BEVERAGES�KEGS
AVAILABLE TOO! ALL AT
EVERYDAY LOW, LOW PRICES.
2 BLOCKS FROM CAMPUS.
Home of Greenville's Best Meats
Prices Effective Thursday through Saturday
PIRATE COUPON-5 DISCOUNT ON
Any Food Order Regardless of Size
Present this coupon and show
your ECU ID to cashier.
Offer Expires October 31st, 1981
! Amt. Purchased.
i
HEAVY WESTERN BEEF
SIRLOIN
STEAKS -
f M
$009
ib. A
FRESH WHOLE
FRYERS
lb
44
HEAVY WESTERN
T-BONE
STEAKS
$219
NEW DANISH COOKED SLICED
HAM
MORRELL
FRANKS
12 oz.
99
DELTAOR GENERIC
PAPER TOWELS
gt.
roll
38c
CAMPBELL'S
TOMATO
SOUP
22c
Stock up
No limit
VQMp&ib
sovr
Limit 2 of choice
with $7.SO food order.
BORDEN
AMERICAN
CHEESE
HUNT'S
KETCHUP
78e
24 OZ.
MORRELL FRESH PORK
SAUSAGE
lb.
roll
99
LOOSE
SNOW WHITE
MUSHROOMS
$�39
GENERIC
POTATO
CHIPS
c .
bog
98
FLORIDA PINK
CUP THIS COUPON
COCA COLA
plus
deposit
16 oz
carton
of 8
With this coupon and $7.50 food order excluding specials. Without coupon si 58 plus deposit
Limit one per customer. Expires 10-24-81.
GRAPEFRUIT
40 size Jpf
5$r�
COCA
COLA
2 liter bottle
98�
TENDER
BROCCOLI
large
bunch
1
78
DIXIE
CRYSTALS
SUGAR
CUP THIS COUPON
5 lb.
bag
98e
With this coupon and $7.50 food order excluding specials Without
coupon Sl.Sl. Limit one per customer. Expires 1Q24-81.
:kcjc�
t
A,
mm ���
w� . pjBBJ





12
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
IX TOBIR22, 1981


Fearless Football Forecast
MIAMI (Fla.) AT ECU
S. CAROLINA AT N. CAROLINA
N.C. STATE AT CLEMSON
DUKE AT MARYLAND
MICHIGAN ST. AT PURDUE
MISSISSIPPI ST. AT AUBURN
WEST VIRGINIA AT PENN STATE
WASHINGTON ST. AT ARIZONA
FLORIDA ST. AT LSU
TEXAS AT SMU
NEBRASKA AT MISSOURI
SOUTHERN CAL AT NOTRE DAME
CHARLES CHANDLERWILLIAM YELVERTONCHUCK FOSTERCHRIS HOLLOMANJIMMY DuPREE (50-33-1)
(61-22-1)(57-26-1)(57-26-1)(53-30-1)
Miami 31-10Miami 24-14Miami 21-14Miami 35-10Miami 35-14
UNCUNCUNCUNCUNC
ClemsonClemsonClemsonClemsonClemson
MarylandMarylandMarylandDukeDuke
PurduePurduePurduePurduePurdue
AuburnMiss. St.Miss. St.Miss. St.Miss. St.
Penn StatePenn StatePenn StatePenn StatePenn i;ate
Washington St.Washington St.ArizonaWashington St.Washington St.
Florida St.Florida St.Florida St.Florida St.Florida St.
TexasTexasSMUTexasSMU
NebraskaNebraskaMissouriNebraskaNebraska
Southern CalNotre DameSouthern CalNotre DameNotre Dame

Bucs Take On William and Mary
�!???
B
v CHRIS
HOI IOMA
stiff v�nlri
The East Carolina
volleyball team will be
back on the road this
weekend after a heart-
breaking loss in five
vets to Appalachian
State in Greenville last
Friday.
The Pirates, current-
Is 6-17, will play at
William and Mary
Thursday and at the
University of Maryland
tournament on Friday
and Saturdav.
The William and
Mary team the Pirates
will be facing is basical-
ly unknown, but head
coach Lynn Davidson
expects a tough match
with the Indians in
Williamsburg.
"I don't know a
whole lot about
William and Mary, but
I do know that they are
typical of the volleyball
programs in Virginia
on the Division I
level Davidson said.
'Most of the Virginia
schools, like Virginia
Tech and the University
of Virginia, are weak
but in a building pro-
cess. Such is the case
with William and
Mary
"The kids were pret-
ty disappointed after
the loss to Appalachian
State, so they are look-
ing forward to starting
the weekend with a
win Davidson said.
"The team is so young
that they just have not
learned how to win yet,
but we are playing
hard. We have had
some good practices
this week, and we are
trying some new things
on offense, so 1 feel like
we will continue to im-
prove
On Friday in College
Park, Md the Pirates
will be facing some of
the top volleyball teams
in the country at the
Maryland Invitational.
Included in the Pirate's
pool will be teams from
Penn State, South
Carolina and Temple.
North Carolina will
also participate in the
two-day event.
"This tournament
probably has the Finest
teams on the East
Coast participating
Davidson explained.
"UNC will be there,
along wih Penn State,
who is one of the top 20
teams in the country.
Temple is another team
that is of top 20 quali-
ty
"Thus, we are going
to a tournament with
strong and experienced
teams, but we are going
to play hard David-
son said. "We hopeful
ly could turn out to b(
in a giant-killer situa
tion. The team is look
ing forward to the mat
ches this weekend
After the two roac
trips, the Pirates wi
return to Greenville tc
face Duke University
on October 27 a
Minges Coliseum.
Tennis Team Young
B THOMAS BRAME
l�ff Writer
Time for ex-
perimentation and a
tool tor preparation" is
how East Carolina ten-
nis coach Caroline
hi own describes this
'all season.
With a good mixture
of youth and ex-
perience, Brown ex-
pects great things form
this balanced squad.
Leadership of the
ECU men, now 1-1,
rests on the shoulders
of captains Barry
Parker and Norman
Bryant. The Lady Bucs
are lead by their cap-
tians, Hanna Adams
and Debbie Christine.
With each squad
consisting of 10
members the Pirate
mentor proclaims,
"Each person must
make a contribution
because tennis is a team
sport
The Lady Pirates,
2-4, entertain Duke's
Racquet Club in Green-
ville October 25.
Campbell travels to
ECU October 22.
With the balance of
the squads and valuable
fall experience, Brown
believes "the ECU ten-
nis program is building
a good foundation for
years to come
WARM-UPS
A Large Selection
of Adidas Warm-Ups
Have Just Arrived!
By Court Casual and Loomtogs.
SHOES
Best Selection of Shoes Ever!
Shipments of Nike, Asami and
Adidas Arriving Daily.
Into Racauetball?
We Have It All, Racquetball
Rackets By EKTELON And LEACH
H.L. HODGES
BOND'S SPORTING
GOODS
210 E. 5th 218 Arlington Blvd.
Downtown Greenville, N.C.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
PIONEER STEREO SX 880, 60
watts per channel Used only six
months Mint condition, will
sacrifice tor $265 Call 757 3210
YORK CORNET (trumpet) e�
cellent condition w mouthpiece,
rase and mute. Asking $200 call
758 4784
A 14 FOOT fiberglass Conn.
Chief" Has a775 pound capacity
load and weighs 75 pounds Life
preservers and canoe racks in-
cluded Excellent condition. Less
than one year old.
BEA 100 BLAUPAUNKT graphic
Fq Amp 40 watts New! Great for
VW'i! $90 758 2254.
SET OF ladies golf clubs; good
condition; price negotiable Call
TC at 758 327?
WATERBEDS LOWEST prices
in NC and SC on fine wood
waferbeds and accessories Com
piete beds with 15 year warranty
for as low as 179. Delivery
available Call David for more in-
formation 758 2408
LIKE NEW Fender guitar with
hardshell case and all accessories.
'54 3805
FOR RENT
175 month plus one half utilities.
Near campus on E Tenth St. Call
758 m�.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted 2
bdrm townhouse approx. 5 blocks
from mam campus Rent J75 mo
utilities one third. Contact
758 4147 Available now
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share apt. at Eastbrook $115 plus
utilities. Call 752 4443.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom duples near
RiverbluH Rd $120 deposit
$l20month plus one half utilities.
Call 758 2317
FOR RENT: Large furnished
room m private home. Quiet
neighborhood. SUO month.
utilities included. Security
deposit Special deal if gone on
weekends. 754-4835 (keep trying).
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Roommate to share 2 bedroom
apt on Stancill Dr. Rent: $120 plus
one half utilities. Serious student
desired Call Cindy at 752 4404
PERSONAL
WHO IS the ugliest man on cam
pus?
TYPING tor students, professors,
etc. Kempie Dunn 1019 E Wright
Rd Greenville. NC 27834 Call
752-4733 after 1 p m.
FREE EXERCISE classes Mon
day and Wednesday at 6 p m The
Life Force 752 5048.
SHAMPOO. HAIRCUT and style
($12.00 value) The Life�Force
752 5048
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy at
757 3714.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen years experience wants
reports all types and quantities
profesional quality reasonable
rates. Call 7M-374t.
ARROW RECONDITIONING:
straightened, refletched. renock
ed Call 752 5132.
WANTED FEMALE resident
counselor Must complete training
and internship in short term client
systems Payment in-kind (room,
utilities, local phone). Call the
Real Crises Center. 758 HELP.
BEAUTIFUL! FREE kittens need
a goodl home. Call Susan at
752 5114
HAPPY ANNIVERSARY Buddy!
typing to do at home Reasonable T,me �ys when we.re havin, ,on.
rates Call 754 3440. Hope me Heeli win s
LOOK GOOD on paper. Proles
sional typing: AMCAS, secon-
daries, resume, research papers,
etc. WRITE RIGHT 754 9944
WE SPEAK Turabian (APA. PRC,
etc.) Highest qualify typing, all
style manuals. WRITE RIGHT
757 9944
TYPING THESIS, manuscripts.
S F ers. BROWN'S is the place to
be Sat after the game. Oysters
are the menu. Come over and
sport and put a little lead in your
pencil Cobb had to go home to
N.J. Mom is taking care of him
now
ROOMMATE
WANTED
ABORTIONS
1 24 week terminations
Appt's. Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
1 800 321-0575
Gl Camouflaged Fatigues And
Shirts Sleeping Bags.
Backpacks Camping Equip
1 ment Steel Toed Shoes Dishes
And Over 700 Different New And
Used Hems Cowboy Boots
ARMY-NAVY
1501 S Evans
Street
buccaneer MOvIs i23
756 3307 Greenville Square Center
STARTS
TOMORROW!
$1.50 TIL 5:30
EVERYDAY
t SAAD'S
J37 SHOE
IV REPAIR
JPP? 113 Grande Ave
ft tTJffc 758-1228
L

l�k
Vp Quality
" Repair
YOU'VE HEARD
ABOUT IT-
NOW YOU CAN SEE IT!
MALCOLM
MCDOWELL
PETER O'TOOLE
tag?
CALIGULA
t VV"
r
TA'
The
wuhis Marathon
Restaurant
Current unoVrgraduaW'pre
medical student may now
compete for several hundred
Air Force scholarships These
scholarships are to be award
ed to students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophmore year The scholar
ship provides for tuition,
books, lab frees end equips
ment, plus a SS30 monthly
allowance investigate this
financial alternative to tfws
high cost of medical edoca
tion Contact
U S A F HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
RECRUITING
SUITE GL t. 11M NAVAHO DR.
RALEIGH. N.C. 27Mt
PHONE COLLECT f�f)'5S-41J
The Best in
Greek food, Pizzas, and Subs.
Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.55
Now delivering
FREE
?hone
Conveniently
Located Across From ECU
at 506 Evans St.
Student Union New York City Trip: The 1981 Student Union Travel Committee's sponsored New York
City Trip will depart from Mendenhall Student Center (West parking lot) at 8:00 PM on Wednesday,
November 25, 1981. Travel will be via 46 passenger buses. After traveling all night, except for
necessary rest stops, the destination of the trip (The Hotel Edison in New York City) will be reached at
approximately 7:00 AM, Thursday, November 26. While in New York City, trip participants will follow
their own schedule of activities. Optional tours will be made available to individuals who wish to par
ticipate. The trip will depart from the Hotel Edison in New York City at 10:00 AM on Sunday,
November 29, for the return trip to Greenville The trip will proceed directly from New York City to
Greenville except for rest stops.
Charges & Payments: The full price of the Student union Travel Committee's sponsored trip to New
York City is as follows:
$110.00 per person in double or twin occupancy room
$100.00 per person in triple occupancy room
$ 90.00 per person in quad occupancy room
The price includes charges for transportation from Greenville to New York City and from New York
City to Greenville and hotel accomodations in New York City. Each trip participant is responsible for
hisher meals, admissions, transportation within New York City, and incidental expenses. All
payments must be made by cash, check, or money order, payable to the Central Ticket Office. The
registration fee of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) must accompany this application. The balance is
payable on or before November 2, 1981. Payments will be acknowledged with receipt with ten (10)
days.

T





Title
The East Carolinian, October 22, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 22, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.156
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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