The East Carolinian, October 20, 1981






�he iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 57 No. 17
Tuesday, October 20, 1981
Greeavilk, Nortfc Carolina
8 Pages
FOOD DAY
Coalition Fights Hunger
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Miff �rilr
More than 40 ECU students,
staff, and faculty members par-
ticipated in a series of educational
events concerning hunger and
malnutrition last week.
The central focus was
"International World Food Day
which was set aside by the Food and
Agricultural Organization of the
United Nations to call attention to
the problems associated with
hunger.
Although World Food Day was
actually on October 16, the ECU
Hunger Coalition sponsored events
throughout the week. These events
included showing films in two local
elementary schools followed by
discussion, circulation of literature
on campus, a legislative letter
writing campaign in Mendenhall
Student Center, and street theatre
presentation.
Many students were surprised
when they saw the skit begin on the
street in front of the Student Supply
Store. "It was a shock effect
noted .left Whisnant. an ECU
Political science major who par-
ticipated in the skit. The presenta-
tion contrasted the daily lives of
typical college students with the
starving millions in the developing
world. "It (skit) might have made
some of them think. Thev stayed
and watched it and many clapped
for us afterwards" said Marybeth
Kozar, an ECU physical therapv
major in the skit. "We shouldn't be
so caught up in trivial things she
added
Whisnant, noting that some
students laughed at the skit, said,
"Laughter is just the other side of
crying; the whole thing went right
by them � it was ignorance
"We had their attention, it was
very well presented said per-
former Wendy Barnwell, an ECU
student from Guyana. "The con-
trast was there. I think a lot of peo-
ple take things for granted. They
aren't aware of what is going on, '
continued Barnwell.
The ECU Hunger Coalition spent
five weeks in preparation for World
Food Day activities. "We were very
satisfied. The programs in the
schools went very well noted
Sister Helen Shondel, an ECU cam-
pus minister and member of the
Hunger Coalition
The Coalition encouraged
students in Mendenhall to take the
time to write a letter to their con-
gressman or senator concerning a
hunger issue. "We provided paper,
pens, envelopes, and even the
stamp said Sister Shondeii. Ovei
80 students wrote letters, she said.
"We're trying to get people's con-
sciousness raised, get them to work
on activities Sister Shondeii said.
"This will help people to become
conscientious in their own lives after
we lead them
Part o your education is to be
well rounded. That's whv we have
so many different required
courses Kozar noted. "If we
SGA Proposes More
Student Involvement
�-
I'h H. t. VHS I'UMUMIN
Members of the ECU Hunger Coalition stage a street theater presentation.
aren't exposed to n (hunger) now,
we'll probably be less likely to listen
to it as adults Asked whv she was
involved with the Hunger Coalition,
Kozar said guess mv conscience
gets at me. Here I am with a nice
place to live, good food, nice clothes
� somehow it's noi fair. How come
I'm not living like thev (the poor)
are
� �
"The world system needs to be
changed Barnwell said. "The rich
have continuously exploited a lot of
peole. Thev must always be in con-
trol all the tune it's self interest.
1 hev must be living comfortably.
It's an historical pattern o' white
supremacy in the rich nations
Recently the Presidential Com-
mission Report on World Hunger
also criticized the United States and
other developed nations of having
placed a very low priority on helping
developing nations.
" The United States is still the best
country noted Barnwell "Here
See COALITION, Page 3
By DIANE ANDERSON
The SGA passed a resolution
yesterday which states there should
be more than one student represen-
tative on the committee to select a
new chancellor.
The proposal was written in view
of the fact that the selection com-
mittee consists of six trustees, five
faculty members, three alumni and
only one student � the SGA presi-
dent � who represents nearly 14,000
members of the campus community
effected by the decision of the com-
mittee.
The proposal will be sent to the
selection committee before the
Tuesday, Oct. 20 open hearing. The
hearing is designed to give all
members of the university com-
munity input on the criterion for
finding a new chancellor. Students
have specifically been alloted the
time between 9:45 and 10:15 a.m. to
speak on this issue.
A memorandum from the selec-
tion committee encouraged written
statements, oral presentations and
group resolutions. Persons wishing
to speak at the hearing should in-
form the executive secretary of their
intentions before the meeting.
A second resolution was passed
by the SGA in which the students
expressed their trust that the selec-
tion committee "will select can-
didates for the chancellorship who
have demonstrated unyielding com-
mitment to excellent academic pro-
grams, extra-curricular oppor-
tunities which promote a broai and
enriching overall experience, and a
proven understanding that places
students' welfare and interests as a
top priority
This resolution will also be
presented to the selection committee
before the hearing.
In other action, SGA Speaker
Gary Williams established a task
force to examine the reasons behind
the restrictions of the Student loan
Fund, specifically the Medical
Emergency Fund. Because ol con
troversy over the way the monies
were being used by the students, the
summmer legislature suspended the
fund.
A bill was also passed bv the
legislature allocating $465 for an
Oktoberfest on October 28, bv the
International Language Organiza-
tion
The newly elected representatives
for Jones Dormitory were announc-
ed. They are Mitchell Haber and
Keith Johnson.
Speaker Gary Williams announc-
ed the committee appointments.
The committee chairpersons are
Linda Bishop for both screenings
and appointments, and planning
and policies, Mitch Davis for stu
dent welfare. Bob Mills on rules and
judicial, and Andy Lewis for ap-
propriations. Jim Mclntyre was ap
pointed parlimentanan, and Russel!
Overman is the representative to the
transit advisory board.
Greenville Boy Fighting For His Life
B GLENN PARKS
staff U nlrr
Two-month-old Donnie Lassiter
underwent a bone marrow
transplant Tuesday and Fridav.
The operation, performed at
Boston Children's Hospital in Mass.
was Donnie's only hope for sur-
vival.
Donnie Lassiter was born in
Greenville at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. Several days after his
birth, Donnie developed serious
skin rashes, red spots on different
areas of his body and ugly sores that
were increasingly growing larger.
Doctors at PCMH suspected Don-
nie of having a rare white blood cell
disease called Actin-Polymerization
Defect. Dr. Tate Holbrook. a
pediatrician at PCMH, kept the in-
fant alive with continuious treat-
ment with antibiotics after diagnos-
ing the disease through studies done
at Massachusetts General.
Young Donnie developed another
complication due to the defect. The
tissue around his rectal area was dv-
ing and a colostomy was performed
because of a possible spread of in-
fection upward toward the in-
testines.
Holbrook also diagnosed patent
ductus arteriousus, a congenital
defect in Donnie's heart. After con-
ferring with the doctors in Boston,
Holbrook decided to transport the
patient to Massachusettes General
for the bone marrow transplant.
However, Holbrook kept the pa-
tient at PCMH for a couple of
weeks because he felt Donnie was
too weak to undergo surgery at thai
point. Donnie has undergone the
surgerv for the heart defect and is
reportedly recuperating well.
Because o the variety of the
disease, doctors Joel Rappeport and
Robbie Parkman, who performed
the hone marrow transplant, are
pathfinding and gaining insight to
treatment of such diseases.
Although several successful bone
marrow transplants have been per-
formed, none have been performed
for Donnie's particular disease. On-
ly two previous cases of actin
polymerization have been diagnos-
ed; the earlier cases occurred before
the advent o the bone marrow
transplant. Since that time, three
centers for bone marrow transplants
have been established. The John
Hopkins Institute m Baltimore, the
lied Hutchinson Cancer Center in
Seattle and the Sloan Kettering
C cuter in New York. Normally bone
marrow transplant patients from
Greenville are sent to Seattle.
However Donnie I assiter is the
youngest patient to undergo such a
transplant and special considera-
tions had to be made.
A bone marrow transplant is a
complex operation. However, it
basically involves complete removal
of the patients blood in the bone
marrow o the hip bones and
replacement with blood cells of a
compatible donor with similar
genetic make-up absent of actin
polymerization. With the surrogate
blood cells, which are immature and
capable of growth, the patient can
fight off infection in a normal
fashion.
Donnie's sister, 5-year-old Don-
nielle, is the donor whose blood will
be placed in Donnie's hip bones.
Massachusetts law requires a court
order, psychological testing and
family counseling for potential bone
marrow transplants from one minor
to another. Although this drawback
caused some stress for Donnie's
parents, Donnie and Dot Lassiter,
they consider it necessary and are
willing to accept the challenges they
have confronted concerning Don-
nie's disease.
Donnie's hospital bills have been
paid by insurance. However, the
family has incurred numerous
related expenses. The family had to
fly commercially to Boston and the
Reagan Speaks At York town
Freedom 'Protected'
YORKTOWN, Va. (UPI) �
President Reagan, looking out over
a wind-swept Revolutionary War
battlefield, said Monday his ad-
ministration is working to protect
the freedoms won 200 years ago in
America's fight for independence.
Standing before a historic and
colorful tableau at the site of the
British surrender at Yorktown 200
vears ago, Reagan drew parallels
between the goals of his administra-
tion and those of America's col-
onists.
"In a masterly execution of a tex-
tbook siege. General Washington
and his grab-bag army defeated the
finest troops King George could
field Reagan said in remarks
prepared for the occasion.
"Today, when people tell some of
what we are trying to do cannot be
done, 1 remember that moment at
Yorktown, when we achieved a
miraculous success without the help
of a massive and centralized govern-
ment
Equating his own efforts to those
who won the right of self-rule from
the British, he added, "Ours was a
philosophical revolution that chang-
ed the very concept of govern-
ment
Within the crowd who heard his
remarks were men in red coats, col-
onial rags and crisp French tunics �
who had been participants in a re-
enactment of the battle that ended
the Revolutionary War on Oct. 19,
1781.
An afternoon re-enactment Mon-
day of the British surrender and a
victory parade, reviewed by Reagan
and Francois Mitterrand, capped a
four-day bicentennial ceremony at-
tended by more than 100,000 peo-
ple.
The event served a dual purpose
by bringing Reagan together with
Mitterrand, whose presence
underscored Franco-American
cooperation at Yorktown.
ECU Hosting Charlie Daniels
By TOM HALL
Nrw, t.dil�r
The Charlie Daniels Band will
appear at Minges Coliseum next
month, according to Student
Union Program Director Ken
Hammond.
The concert, which is schedul-
ed for November 20, will last
"for a couple of hours Ham-
mond said. No other musical ar-
tists are scheduled to perform.
The contract for the concert is
now being negotiated, according
to Major Attractions Chairman
Jerry Dilsaver.
"An Evening with Charlie
Daniels" will begin at 9 p.m.
Hammond said 6,000 tickets will
be on sale by the first week of
November.
ECU students will pay $7 for
advance tickets, according to the
program director. Tickets for the
general public will sell for $9, as
will all tickets sold at the gate.
Student tickets will be available
at the Mendenhall Student Center
ticket office. Other tickets will be
sold at Apple Records on Fifth
Street as well as the Record Bar
stores at Pitt Plaza and Carolina
East Mall.
"There's been a lot of student
interest generated about this con-
cert Hammond said. "Tickets
will probably sell briskly; it's ad-
visable to buy early
The decision whether to have
festival or reserved seating has
not been made, according to
Dilsaver.
The Charlie Daniels Band
plays country rock and has such
notable hits as "Long Haired
Country Boy "The South's
Gonna Do It Again" and "The
Devil Went Down To Georgia
Dilsaver took over as Major
Attractions chairman after
Charles Sune resigned October 1.
� �'
����� � MM rim km in
Glen Maughan, a Vietnam veteran, protests military recruitment at the
ECU Student Supply Store. Many students have not even registered for
the draft.
first several nights they stayed in a
room "the size of a broom closet
Holbrook said. They later moved to
the Ronald McDonald house for the
families of hospitalized children
paying approximately $18 a night.
The family also has to pay food ex-
penses and taxi fares from
Massachusetts General to Boston
Children's Hospital. The family is
overcoming other financial battles
but the real battle they face is an
emotional one.
Holbrook wants to set up a
private tax-free fund for children
who need care for cancer and
unusual blood disorders. Any per-
sonal or organizational contributing
can be made by contacting
Holbrook at Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
Registration
Dodgers To
Be Jailed
By MIKE HUGHES
Miff Wnler
Though draft registration in the
United States has become a stan
dard part of a man's eighteenth bir-
thday since its re-implementation in
1980, several men around the coun-
try have neglected to register. Ac-
cording to a U.S. Department of
Justice spokesman, prosecutions
against these non-registrants will
soon begin.
Tom Stewart, speaking for the
Justice Department last month,
estimated that as many as 20 percent
of all young men required by law to
register have not done so. However,
Stewart and John Russell, another
Justice Department spokesman,
both maintain that the exact number
of non-registrants in not yet known.
Stewart did not reveal any specific
information about the prosecutions
other than affirming that the cases
will be conducted, on an individual
basis.
See DODGERS, Page 3
On The Inside
Announcements2
Opinions4
Campus Forum4
Entertainment5
Sports7
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1981
Announcements
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday. October
JO. in tne chapel of St Pauls
Episcopal Church. 406 4th Street
(one block from Garret? Dorm)
The service will be at 5 30 p m
with the Episcopal Chaplain, the
Rev Bill Hadden, celebrating
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Honor
Society will hold a general
meeting Tuesday. October 20, at
5 00 p m in room 312 Mendenhall
Student Center AH members are
urged to attend
VOLLEYBALL
THe PRC Society and Jetferys
Beer and Wine will be sponsoring
a Co Rec Volleyball Tournament
at M.nges Coliseum on October 31
from 12 6pm There iS a ten dollar
entry fee First place. Keg second
place, pony Keg Other prizes win
be awarded Sign up at the PRC
building (Behind McDonalds and
across from Hardees on Cotanche
St i Deadline Oct 20 Teams must
consist of six persons with at least
two females per team
BEAUX ARTS BALL
The seventh annual School of
Art Beaux Arts Ball wiH be held on
Fr.day. October 23 a' 8 00 p m a
PaDa Katz on East Tenth Street
Tickets are S3 00 in advance and
14 00 at the door They are
available in the School of Art
School of Music and Department
Of Drama Offices NOTE Only
those m costume will be admitted
SPAN
There will be a discussion on
historic preservation downtown
rev i tatization community
development, and grantsmanship
in Brewster D 209 at noon on
Wednesday Oct 21 Wat Brow"
and Phil Guy of Tarborc will be
the speakers All interested per
sons are welcome to attend
SNEA
The Student National Education
Association meeting will be held
October 21 Wednesday at 4 00
p m in Speight 201 All education
majors are invited
NCSL
The N C S'uden' Legislature
will meet Tuesday. Oct 20 at 7 00
p.m in room 212 Mendenhall All
members and interested Darties
please attend
INFLUENZA
influenza vaccine is available at
the Student Health Center Tne
cost is $3 for each injection
Students with chronic illnesses
diabetes, asthma, or those who are
on chemotherapy for malignant
diseases ana those having unusual
exposure should come by the Stu
dent Health Center between 8am
and 5pm Monday through Fri
day during October or Novembet
CHEMICAL SOCIETY
On Monday, October 19.
American Chemical Society Stu
dent Affiliate will have a business
meeting at 7 p m in Flanagan 202
It attending, please bring a dish
for a covered dish supper. All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend For further in
formation, call Dawn Williams,
758 8948
FICTION WORKSHOP
We are putting together a small,
very serious, fiction writing
workshop If you already write
well, want to write well enough to
pubhsh ana know how much work
lies between the former and the
latter, give us a call at 7S8 2430 or
756 5112
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA
Wanted Male, musicians,
singers dancers, poets, or
whatever your talent, to par
ticipate m The Student of the Year
Pageant, sponsored by Alpha Kap
pa Aipha Sorority, Inc The
deadline for contestant applica
tions will be October 29 So on
November 17, be prepared for
another AKA Affair Alpha Kap
pa Alpha is also looking forward to
the students presence at their
dance which will be held October
24 from 10 p m til 2 a m , at the
Cultural Center Come iam"
alter the game' We also en
courage more minority students to
participate in SOULS Please '
IVCF
inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship will meet this Wednes
day night at 7 30 hi the Methodist
Student Center Everyone is
welcome
LIBRARY PROGRAM
A successful library program is
one which reaches out to the com
munity it serves A panel of school
and public librarians will explore
ways and means tor doing this in
the October 22 program of the
1981 82 Library Science Lecture
Series
Mr Willie Nelms. Director of
Sheppard Public Library in
Greenville, will address the topic
of public library outreach Project
CHEER, Sheppard's outreach to
daycare centers in Pitt County,
will be discussed by project direc
tor Ms Dorsey Sanderson Ms
Jean Johnson, Media Supervisor
for Wake County Schools, and Ms
Helen Tugwell. media coordinator
at James B Hunt Jr High School
in Wilson, will discuss school
library outreach to teachers,
students, and the general com
munity.
The program will start at 6 30
p m in room 221 of the East Wing
of Joyner Library on the ECU
campus A social hour will follow
the lecture All interested persons
are invited to attend
The lecture series is being spon
sored jointly by the ECU Depart
ment of Library Science, the Pitt
Greenville Media Society, and the
ECU Library Science Alumni
Association CEU credit can be
earned by teachers and librarians
who attend at least 5 of the 6 lee
lures in the series A S5 00 fee will
be charged for those persons wan
ting CEU credit
Additional information on this
lecture and others in the sries can
be obtained by calling the Depart
ment of Library Science at
757 6621
SURFCLUBL
A meeting will be held Wednes
day 7 8 p m in room 221
Mendenhall on the following
dates October 21. 28. November 4.
11. 18. and December 2, 9 All
members are urged to attend
New members welcomed!
ASSISTANTSHIPS
The Institute for Coastal and
Marine Resources is now accep
ting applications for two assistant
ships scheduled to begin in late fall
of 1981
Graduate Assistantships. Office
Coordinator�Field Team Coor
dinator, will coordinate field team
activities, and assist investigators
in data collection and analysis
Background in behavioral or
social sciences preferred
Undergraduate�Graduate
Assistantship, Data Analyst, will
assist investigators in the analysis
of data Must have background
and familiarity with computer
programming and statistics.
Please contact Dr Jeffrey
Johnson or Mr Marcus Hepburn,
Mamie Jenkins building, ICMR at
757 6810 or 757 6220 An equal op
portunity, affirmative action
employer
LAMBDA CHI
Lambda Chi Alpha would like to
congratulate the winners of their
annual field day The sorority win
ner was Alpha Phi The fraternity
division was won by Sigm Nu
SCANDINAVIAN
SEMINAR
Scandinavian Seminar is now
accepting applications tor its
1982 13 academic year abroad in
Denmark, Finland. Norway, or
Sweden This unique learning ex
perience is designed for college
students, graduates, and other
adults who want to study n a Scan
dinavian country, becoming part
of another culture and learning its
language A new one semester
program, only in Denmark, is also
now available
After orientation in Denmark
and a 3 week intensive language
course, generally followed by a
family stay, students are placed
individually at Scandinavian Folk
Schools or other specialized in
stitutions, where they live and
study with Scandinavians of
diverse backgrounds The Folk
Schools are small, residential
educational communities intended
mainly for young adults Both
historically and socially, these
schools have played an important
part in the development of the
Scandinavian countries Midway
through the folk school year, all
the Seminar students and staff
meet in the mountains of Norway
to discuss progress and make
plans for the spring A final ses
sion is held at the end of the year to
evaluate the year's studies and ex
periences
Because the Scandinavian coun
tries are small, open, and accessi
ble, the year provides an unusual
opportunity for the student to ex
plore his or her particular field of
interest by doing an independent
study project On the basis of a
detailed written evaluation of
their work, most college students
receive full or partial academic
credit for their year
The fee, covering tuition, room,
board, and all course connected
travels in Scandinavia, is S5.900
interest free loans are granted on
the basis of need, as are a few par
tial scholarships
For further information, please
write to SCANDINAVIAN
SEMINAR. 100 East 85th Street.
New York. N Y 10028
SURFCLUB
A meeting will be held Wednes
day October 21 at 7 00 8 00 p m .
Room 221 Mendenhall
All members are urged to at
tend New members welcomed I
CHEERING SECTION
The Student Athletic Board is
sponsoring a group cheering sec
tion for the Miami (FL) home foot
ball game on October 24 Anyone
interested in sitting in this section
should bring their activity cards
by the Athletic Director's office
located upstairs in Minges Col
iseum no later than 5pm Friday.
October 16 Only 100 seals are
available, so you'd better hurry
For further information call Pam
Holt at 757 6417 Raise Hell for the
Pirates!
BEAUX ARTS BALL
Start making you costumes tor
the 7th Annual Beaux Arts Ball
This years bizarre event will be
held at Papa Katz on Friday, Oc
tober 23 at 8 00 Tickets are S3 00
m advance, 14 00 at door
WE DARE YOU!
The Omicron Chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda dares any major in
business, business education, and
office administration to become a
member of this national organiza
tion You don't have to walk on hot
coals, sing a solo, or do anything
out of the ordinary to ioin
BUT you do have to be prepared
for one of the most interesting,
activity oriented organizations on
campus Our next meeting is
Wednesday. Oct 21 at 4 p m in
Rawl 341 WE DARE YOU TO
COMEH
CORSO
All Corso members please pick
up your tickets immediatly" We
need to begin selling the t.ckets to
the Faculty Student Party Pick
them up from Jackie in the Social
Work Corrections office
SLAP
Have a sweet tooth? The ECU
Chapter of NSSHA will be having a
bake sale in the Belk Building on
Tuesday, October 20th from 8 On
till 5 00 All proceeds will go
toward our scholarship fund
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Remaining School of Musk
Events tor October Oct 23 24
Opera Scenes. 8 00 AMiiarr
Tell, Boris Godonov, Marriage of
Figaro. Macbeth. Rigoletto, Oct
25, Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Concert 8 15, Memorial Gym
Oct 26 Paul Tardif piano Facul
ty Recital, 8 15 Oct 27 Sigma
Alpha lota Musicale, 6 00 Oct 30
Mark Harrel. trumpe' Gary
Blizzard, trombone Senior
Rectal, 7 30

I
Pizza inn
BUFFET
PIZZA, SALAD, SPAGHETTI, SOUP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
ONA
The Organization of Native
Americans will be meeting tonight
(Oct 20) m CSO office (top floor
back part of Whichard Building)
Everyone is welcome to attend
The meeting will begin at 5 30
p m
BEAT MIAMI!
There will be a Beat Miami Pep
Rally Thursday Oct 72 at 7 p m
on College Hill in front of Tyler
dorm The ECU pep band and
cheerleaders will be there along
with Coach Ed Emory Music will
be provided by the Elbo Room and
free fnsbees and food coupons will
be given away by Burger King Br
ing your blanket and beverages
and celebrate the upset victory
that s going to take place this
Saturday when the Pirates host
'he 13th ranked Miami Hur
r.canes
REBEL
The ECU Literary Magazine
REBEL is looking for an Associate
Ed'tor Prose Editor and Art
Editor Applications can be picked
up in the Publications Building n
the Media board secretary office
Any maior is acceptable
TRAFFICOFFICE
The ECU Traffic Office,
presently located m the old laun
dry building, will close at the end
of the business day on October 27.
1981 and reopen for business on
November 2. 1981 in a new location
at 1001 East Fifth Street, across
from the Spilman Building
Police operations will continue
m the old laundry building until
October 30 A dispatcher will be on
duty at the present location to pro
cess emergency traffic matters
only until October 30 The seventy
two hour period on traffic citations
will be extended to exclude the
period the Traffic Office is not
operational
All pc'ice. traffic and mfor
maiton services will be moved to
1001 East F ifth Street by the end of
the business day on October 30.
1981
AED
Alpha Epsilon Delta pre
medical society will meet on Tues
day. October 20 at 7 30 p m m
Plan 307 Dr Dean Hayek,
Associate Dean of Admissions at
ECU School of Medicine, will be
the guest speaker All interested
persons are invited to attend
MonSun.
Mon. & Tues,
WEDNESDAY
SPAGHETTI DAY
11:30-2:00
6:00-8:30
o

LARGE PORTION
OF SPAGHETTI,
GARLIC BREAD 1.88
BONUS TRIP TO SALAD BAR
RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT HOURS
5:00-6:00 AND AT 10-11 PM
WE HAVE A NEW FORMAT
A NEW MENU AND,
NEW AFFORDABLE PRICES.
TRY THE 5.95 DINNER BUFFET
AT 5:30 PM TO 9:30 PM EVERY
TUESDAY
GIVEUSATRYE.C.U.
YOUR WALLET WILL LIKE US.
CLOSE TO THE ECU CAMPUS
LOCATED IN THE MINGES BUILDING BASEMENT
CORNER OF 3RD& EVANS ST. DOWNTOWN CREENVIL1 E
OPEN LUNCH AND DINNER MONSAT.
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.49
Hwy 264 Bypass, Greenville
H Sun. Testing Equipment
H N.C. Inspection Station
Road Service &
1
& Bucaneer Babes
present the 2nd Annual
MALE BEST CHEST
CONTEST
TUES OCT. 20th
1st � $100.00 & PONY KEG
2nd � $50.00 & FREE PASS
3rd � $25.00 & FREE PASS
Sponsored By:
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Located beside N.C.
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OWND & OPERATED BY REX COREY
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1st ANNUAL
CHAPTER TEN
WET T-SHIRT
CONTEST
TUES, OCT 20,1981
Open to Everyone or Sponsored
Organizations
Contestants can enter up
until Tues. night 1020.
By day
he is
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But When
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JOHN MOORE
"The American Dream"
Judging will be done by 3 surprise guests
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Dodgers To Be Jailed
( ontinued from Page I
Stewart did comment, however, that
neighbors and friends ot the non-registrants
have been (he most common sources, used
hv the Justice Department in seeking the ol
fendei s
Russell sas thai a list ot 108 names oi
non-registrants has been turned in to his of
fice. Now, he sas. the lustice Department
plans to seek them out.
ccording to Russell, letters will be sent to
these young men affording them a second
chance to register without penalty. It the
non-registrants still fail to register after a se-
cond warning, Russell says, their names v.il
be turned over to the FBI for tint her pro-
cessing.
If convicted of failure to registei for the
draft, a young man will face a maximum
penalty of five years in prison and a $10,(XK)
fine.
Beginning with those bom in 1960, all men
must register upon reaching their eighteenth
birthdays. Forms are available at any U.S.
post office.
Coalition Fights
World Hunger
I HI I AS I i AkOl 1MAN
u r M k 20, iwi
(ontinued from Page I
you know you have a
chance to get ahead
in response to the ernes
tion of what can be
done for the poor,
Barnwell said, "They
(students) have to have
information and join
our organization or
some other
The Hunger (Hah
tion is now in its
eleventh year of cam-
pus organizing and will
be planning othei ac-
tivities throughout the
year. I hese include
speaking to groups,
showing films, a
hungei tast on the
1 hut sday before
rhanksgiving, and the
Walk tor Humanity in
the s pi i n i. "All
students are welcome 0
participate said
various tioup
members.
I he fastarolinian
Classifieds
. '� ilMf'U
Published every Tuesdd, �
1.1, dm "t � � �
,� evei . Wednesday hj'
iny It
i �asl arolin ai " � '
� . . A . . !�� � �
University "
opt ated and publisl �
I . '� . , I East C rtrlinrt
Subscription Rle $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ot ECU.
Greenville. N C
POST MA ST I U � �
�� ��
nitti Building ECU G
Telephone ?�) titt 6J67 6J0�
Application to mail a second
class postage rales is pending ai
Greenville North Carolina
ATTIC
SOUTH
No. 6
ROCK
CLUB
TUE.
LIGHTNING WELLS
BLUES BAND
in the Phoenix Room
wed
RCA RECORDING ARTIST
WSIDEWINDER
FOR SALE
� OH K CORNE T utnpel .
condition v� mouthpiece
casa and mute Ask.nq 1200 call
'S8 6'84
ft it F erej ��
Has dS pound capacit
ioad and weighs 7(- pounds Lit
and dinot' racks m
eluded Excellent condition l�s
ihan or. eai old
rtt A 00 BLAUPAUNKT qraphu
tq Amp 80 � Si� Great loi
�- a i- -f sj
�F ladies goit ciubs qood
i Can
FOR RENT
AiSTEO
R O O v V i
S'S -non'h
block"
campus k s
third C on ta c
�S8 c 14 � A . a ti'i no
VI JO month plus one hall utilities
e 2317
FOR RENT larqe furnished
room m piivate home Quiet
neighborhood ii?0 month
utilities included Securitv
deposit Special deal it gone on
weekends 'i6 �83S ikeep trying'
ROOMMATES WANTED to share
expenses tor large house sn
blocks trom campus See Dennis
Rm 125 Jenkins Art Bid before S
E !4th Alter S
NEEOED iMMEOI�TELY
Roommate to share 2 be oom
ap! Dt Rent i!20plus
hi . � ies Serious student
M Cindy at 52 4406
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
ta; Rivei Estates apt s blocks
t lampus 2 bedrooms T
bail" sO month one hail
utilities S90 deposit Call Scott
'vvft around noon or iae at
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
.nareapt atEastbrook SIlSpius
utilities Call ?S2 4443
f-i MAt E ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom dupus near
R i v er bluf I Rd SWO depos
PERSONAL
SG KM Students professors
9 E. Wricjhf
Re G een. iu nc
p m
SHAMPOO HAIRCUT and style
ISI2 00 value) The Lite Force
7S2 5048
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy a'
"7 3734
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen years experience as ad
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typing at home Reasonable rates
Call 756 1660
LOOK GOOD on paper Profes
sionai typing AMCAS. secon
daries resume research papers
etc WRITE RIGHT 7 56 �946
WE SPEAK Turabian lAPA PRC
et Highest quality typing, all
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HERMAN LIVESi Take it from
me Victoria
TYPING THESIS manuscripts
reports all types and quantities
profesional quality reasonable
rates Call 756 374t
LOST PINK sunglasses in front ot
Jenkins Art Building Sat the 10th
Sentimental value Reward Con
tact Jill Jenkins room 213 or call
7 51 5060
ARROW RECONDITIONING
straightened refletched renock
ed Call 752 5132
HEY GUYS we thnuqht lileguar
ding on Sunday afternoon was
really boring but thanks to your
I meter nude swim at Minges
Pool we ve decided that STREAK
ING is alive and well at E CU the
shocked lifeguards'
WHO IS the ugliest man on cam
pus'
FREE EXERCISE classes Mon
day and Wednesday attpm The
Life Force 752 5048
WANTED FEMALE resident
counselor Must complete training
and internship in short term client
systems Payment in kind (room,
utilities local phone) Call the
TO JANE HATHAWAY Hope to
day is filled with lots ot happiness
and love Happy Big 1 �� In honor
ot this special day we have
donated your carpet squares to
Clement Dorm in your name
We love ya' Eighth floor Clement
the surfer s woman retired
cheerleader Queen ot Hoots, the
new dopette and Padduigton s
Mamma Let s have a happy
ABORTIONS UP TO
AttiSOF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 14
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
S'lS 00 Pregnancy Test Birth
Conne1 and
P r egnanc v
Problem
Counseling I l
v vs eek 3a vs
� . (MEN
- . � N
)an St
iSPOBTSWOBUl
WELCOME
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID ID.
$1.00
104 E. REOBANKS RD.
756-6000
Real Crises Center 758 HELP one So 'ire one up'
rMONRAMlTl
I UNLIMITED (
i Get Your Sweaters & Shins
Readv for the Fail.
Co-Ed Outlet
I Located next to P!itt Theatre
Mon. Sat. 10 9 Call 335 2424
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you slnoe 1974
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all agM at a reasonable ooet
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
Pan 7Bl-CSgQ fa maletth
� :i
ji.MI
&S5S
CAMPUS ORGANIZATION
REGISTRATION
.�
wPilot.The
pensyou
hove fq hold
ontowith �
Iwohandsfi
Rodney Dcngettieia
Get your claws off my
Pilot pen See I don t
� ic respect'
October 28. 1981

k
ety foi �� . '�
� � �
itureof Easl
.
m "PLEASE wm
k r YOUR "I
SWEETIE" 1
HOMECOMING I
MUMS
$500
only
OnSaleOct 26th Nov 5th
Student Supply Store
Sponsored by Fletcher Dorm
Veranda Room
Ramada Inn
TueSat.
"Odyssey"
Happy Hour MonSat.
6:30-7:00
Free Hors d'oeuvres
264 South
Greenville
1
. � � ner be
. �� e 3ircvs
1 � 31 1 tine pi
rti r ��' fnougri cort)on i
horges on4v 79 'or it
Peopt ge isonitorKi
� ,�� tsmypei - � - ' -Ke0u
A �� - , : IRQ; . n It writes wlp ctecrr so
��� nnc �-�: cottot helps ��
rrtfrom going SQUISH sc peop'e
rait f Ol " 89 "Sr
. " - a" pet
-
PILOf
fine point marker pens
People take to a Pnot - I " 6 � owp
CAS
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
Of H
401 S.EVANS ST.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH)
OPEN 9:30-5:30 MON -SAT.
PHONE 752-3866
PMENNMiONM v-OPfiES
ccmo
DISCOVER THE CHOCOLATE MINT FLAVOR OF IRISH MOCHA MINT.
ifl1. lJMnirJ
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
� -





QJiie �ast darnlfnf an
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. cmamf
Jimmy DuPree, MM���or
Ric Browning. nKMrMMH� Chari es Chandler, spon emo,
Chris Lichok. ���, ��.�,� Tom Hall , s,ws �,���
Alison Bartel, nionrr-rfir-Bi- Steve Bachner. Emtmmmm ��(��
Steve Moore. g Jim ft- � Karen Wfndt, sw ����
October 20. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Circus Time
Legislature Up To Old Antics L
Most observers would much
agree: last year's SGA Legislature
was a three-ring circus.
legislators were constantly runn-
ing around, whispering to one
another during debate, breaking
their own rules and generally doing
anything but paying attention to
what was going on on the floor.
Everyone hoped that this year
would be better, that this year's
legislators would bring some sense
of purpose to their job. But if Mon-
day's meeting is any indication this
year's SGA may be as erratic as its
predecessor.
The legislature was faced with
what seemed to be a simple task:
decide whether or not to allocate
$465 to the International Language
Organization for its Oktoberfest.
Logically, the SGA should have
voted the bill down. According to
the legislature's own guidelines, all
appropriations bills are supposed to
be submitted at least one week prior
DOONESBURY
to their consideration and should
first be examined by the Appropria-
tions Committee. Neither of these
procedures was followed.
What's more, Dean Rudy Alex-
ander pointed out that the
Oktoberfest as currently scheduled
violates state law since no liquor
may be sold on state property and
the ILO is planning to sell tickets to
the event.
Finally, the ILO's constitution
has not even been approved by the
legislature.
Despite all thi- there was not one
vote against the bill. What there was
plenty of, however, was extracur-
ricular activitv during the debate.
Shades of SGA Legislature 1980-81.
The legislature is supposed to be a
calm, deliberative body that debates
each bill upon its merits and then
makes a decision.
No one would ever have guessed
that, though, following yesterday's
performance.
by Garry Trudaau
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SPMCC
UJHAT IS THIS
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SOCIETY' ItiULPW IT HERE
SIGN OUR HETfnOHCE- GLAPV
hahohg james unrrs help ,
aSM66Ara. 7
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ANYOTHER
7 &RPERS0UT
UELL. A COUPLE
OF FELLAHS HN1
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POINT UXXJN'
FOR A PtfTAlL-
HOHU3N6 YEARS AGO
AGCUAS BEfOREIHEUIAR
THAI7 FR1ENPSOfWURST
r Campus Forum
Library Noises
I am a concerned student that believes
that a bad situation exists on campus
and hope this letter will remedy the
situation. A majority of the students at
any institution of higher education can
pretty well assume that a good quiet
place to study will be at the library. I
have always considered myself part of
that majority until recently.
For the past two weeks I have gone to
the A.J. Fletcher Music Library and
tried to study. I might as well have gone
downtown to Pantana Bobs or have sat
on the 50-yard line during the halftime
program at a football game. 1 believe
when someone left the barnyard door
open all the animals rushed in the music
library.
The entire time I was there Thursday I
might have been able to read two or
three pages in my text but that didn't
even happen. I was too busy telling the
people around me to quiet down. For
one thing, I don't believe this is my
responsibility since the librarian was on
duty not more than 20 feet from where I
sat. I think she was taking the blind-
woman approach to the problem. I'm
sure it is not the responsibility of the stu-
dent who is trying to get a higher educa-
tion to maintain control of the library. If
they are, I will be there to p;ck up my
paycheck on Friday.
This is not the first time that I have
noticed a problem with the decibel level
in the library. But I hope after this letter
it will be the last. It might not be that
loud the entire time the library is open,
but every time 1 try to study there I
might as well have a beer in my hand,
because that is the atmosphere that I
have seen maintained there.
All I ask is that someone maintain
control of the library and keep the noise
level to a minimum. A quiet place to
study can be a hard place to find on such
a large university campus. But the
library should always be a place in which
students can go to find such a place.
FRANK GIBSON
Junior, Business
Investigative Documentaries Popular
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
You remember investigative reporting.
It was all the rage in the wake of
Watergate, when mole-like reporters blink-
ed in stupefaction at suddenly finding
themselves in the public eye. Robert Red-
ford nd Dustin Hoffman played Wood-
ward and Bernstein in a glossy movie, and
enrollments in journalism schools soared.
It looked, for a moment, like the second
golden age of muckraking had dawned.
Well, it didn't. Today investigative
reporting is largely back in the closet in
American media, just another fad in the
commodity culture whose popularity has
peaked. Most media executives tired of the
time and expense it takes to launch first-
rate investigative projects, shied away
from stepping on the toes of the powerful
and made sure that most of the muckrak-
ing that does get done focuses on small-
time crooks rather than the system that
nourishes them. Thus, the show business-
cum-muckraking success of "60 Minutes
It gets a bit depressing when you scour
the mass media for hard-hitting, socially-
conscious reporting. If, however, you peer
into the nooks and crannies, the search can
be rewarding. I was reminded of this
recently, when I took in an all-day con-
ference on investigative reporting that
featured expose artist Jessica Mitford,
media critic Ben Bagdikian and David
Weir, director of the Center for In-
vestigative Reporting (CIR), a non-profit
journalistic venture based in Oakland. The
affair was MC'd by Carl Jenson, who
directs Project Censored, an annual
round-up of supressed stories.
The entire group was top-notch, but it
was Weir, author (with Mark Shapiro) of a
recent, ground-breaking book entitled Cir-
cle of Poison, who grabbed and held my
attention with his anecdotes and analysis
of the low-paying, back-breaking, decided-
ly unglamorous field of investigative
reporting.
Circle of Poison uncovers the
widespread use of lethal pesticides banned
for sale in the U.S. but made here and ex-
ported to Third World countries. Once
aboard, the toxic chemicals are used on
food which is then shipped back to the
U.S. He and Shapiro wrote the book, Weir
explained, "out of a sense of outrage that
we would have one standard for ourselves
and another for people overseas and
because he sees reporting as "a tool to
make a more democratic society Weir's
work, which first appeared in Mother
Jones, alerted foreign officials to the
dangers of imported pesticides, and pro-
mpted legislation here � reforms that
Weir views as limited but valuable.
"Reporters, by themselves, don't
change things Weir cautions. "But 1
believe that if you give people information
with which to make decisions, they will be
better able to make sane ones At the
CIR, Weir went on, "we're trying to make
reporting more preventive. Some jour-
nalists write just to write. We don't
Weir and his colleagues were tipped to
the pesticide story by a clipping from a
Brazilian newspaper reporting the deaths
of 13 children from a pesticide outlawed in
the U.S. but still made here for export.
When the reporters began their research,
corporate spokes-people assured them that
Third World people were glad to have the
pesticide to help them grow desperately-
needed food.
"It turned out not to be true Weir
recalls. "We never found a country where
more than 50 percent of pesticides were us-
ed for local food production. They're used
to grow exotic, expensive exports.
Multinationals are destroying the local
basis for agriculture Weir added, "in
favor of large, plantation-style farms "
This is leading some countries to depend
on the U.S. for all but a few specialized
crops. "If you're looking for the basis ol
imperialism in the late 20th century con-
cludes Weir, "look at food
David Weir and his six full-time col-
leagues at the CIR will do about 25 stories
this year. Most will be for alternative
media outlets (although some will go to the
big boys, such as ABC-TV's "20 20"
where a co-founder of the CIR now
works.) This is consistent with the historic
role of alternative media, which broke
such shattering stories as Upton Sinclair'1-
exposure of the meat-packing industry,
reports of civilian deaths in U.S. bombing
raids on North Vietnam and news of the
My Lai massacre.
Producing such stones anywhere will
not be easy in the anxious, angry eighties.
Weir believes, for a number of reasons.
Among them are lawsuit-happ public
figures, the Reagan administration's at-
tack on the Freedom of Information Act,
IRS Pressure on non-profit foundations
that fund dissident journalists and the
dwindling number of national outlets foi
catalytic muckraeking pieces.
It looks rough. And yet Weir, in a
cautious way, is optimistic. "People like
investigative reporting he says, "they are
not turned off to learning more. That ac-
counts for a lot of the popularity of '60
Minutes And a recent, major survey of
cable-TV showed that the second most
desired item was investigative documen-
taries
Yorktown Marks True Birthday
By TOM HALL
I celebrated the Bicentennial yesterday.
You may be thinking I'm five years too
late. I'm talking about the most important
bicentennial of the American Revolution
� the victory at Yorktown.
The signing of the Declaration of In-
dependence in 1776 theoretically created
this nation, but in actuality it was Corn-
wallis' surrender on Oct. 19, 1781, that
broke the British stronghold on the col-
onies.
As a good Southerner, I've always felt
that the importance of the surrender has
been underplayed. Prevailing opinion has
it that the Revolutionary War was centered
in Philadelphia and Bunker Hill. After the
Civil War, there was a sense that American
history was no longer ours, and our part in
the creation of this country was somehow
less important than the North's.
So, despite the horror tales about how
hard it would be to get to Yorktown this
weekend, I was determined to go and pay
my respects to those who made this nation
possible.
I arrived in Williamsburg at 8:30 a.m. to
catch a shuttle bus to Yorktown. No cars
were allowed anywhere near the battlefield
unless they belonged to VIP's or par-
ticipants in the celebration. When my
grandfather attended the sesquicentennial
in 1931, there was a massive traffic jam
and many people were too late to see Presi-
dent Herbert Hoover. 1 paid my $5 for the
15-mile trip at a parking lot and climbed
aboard the same kind of yellow bus I had
refused to ride in high school.
State police lined the narrow country
road into the town, ready to turn away
anyone who tried to buck the system.
Everyone on the bus seemed bright-eyed
and chipper, even the driver, whose
previous experience had been picking up
children on Monday through Friday. As
we reached the woods outside Yorktown, I
spotted isolated camps and colonial-
garbed families looking tired, hungry and
cold.
The line of buses was long outside the
Yorktown Victory Center, so we asked the
driver to let us out to walk. Then all the
pasengers from Williamsburg had to wait
in line for another bus to take us to the bat-
tlegrounds.
I stepped off the shuttle and walked
right into the British "Call for Parley or
plea for negotiations with the American
troops. Hopping into a trench for a better
photograph, I found myself in the presence
of 20 British soldiers.
The troops looked real. Their costumes
weren't made of felt and their wigs weren't
from Woolworth's Halloween aisle � they
looked as if they had been worn for some
time.
The average costume, as I found out
later, cost $1,000. No detail was left un-
noticed, and the emphasis was on authen-
ticity. The "soldiers who had come from
all over the country to participate in the
military re-enactments, were stationed in
large, white-tented encampments near the
battlefield. The rules had been made
perfectly clear to them � no cigarette
smoking, no drinking out of plastic or
paper cups, no plastic eyeglasses, no
wristwatches and "bedraggled is best
The official tally of marching par-
ticipants was 4,000, although there seemed
to be more. Wives and children came
along, too, all in colonial costume. Only a
time machine could have made me feel
more like I had stepped into the 18th Cen-
tury. The spell was broken but briefly
when a colonist pulled out a camera from
beneath his cloak.
Sometimes illusion reached too far into
reality. Walking across the battleground
after a colonial warfare exhibition, I felt
uncomfortable but couldn't figure out
why. Then 1 noticed that 1 was the onl
person around dressed in modern clothes,
and took a short cut to get away from the
procession. A female park ranger, meeting
me at the fringe of the field, said black
powder was still on the ground. When
stepped on, black powder acts like a
miniature land mine.
There was a lot more to see, and visitors
to the celebration often walked a mile to a
shuttle bus, myself included. At 5 p.m. my
legs had had enough, so I waited in line for
a 45 minutes to catch a bus back to the Vic-
tory Center and a way home. A mob scene
ensued as people tried to find the right bu�
home. The solution was to load everyone
going to a general area and take the
passengers wherever they wanted. One
hour later, after touring the gamut of hotel
parking lots, waiting for Presidents
Reagan and Mitterrand to pass and listen-
ing to bus driver that sounded like Martha
Raye, I found my car.
And it was all worth it. A sense of pride
and accomplishment came with the
fatigue. 1 had honored my heritage.
If you couldn't make it to the Yorktown
Bicentennial, there's still a chance for you
to honor your own Southern heritage. The
400th anniversary of the first attempted
English colonization is coming up. Find
out the name of the ship that brought the
.olonists to Roanoke Island. Here's a hint:
it wasn't the Mayflower.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
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THF FAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
(K TOW R 20, IV8I
PageS
Bogart & Allen
Twin Feature
On Wednesday
Woody Allen, Diane Keaton and Tony Roberts in a scene from "Play It Again, Sam" � playing again Wednesday nighl.
By JOHN WEYLER
Staff W rilrr
This Wednesday night, October
23, the Student Union Films com-
mittee will present an unusual dou-
ble feature, consisting of Casablan-
ca (7 p.m.), the classic Humphrey
Bogart film, and Wooody Allen's
Play It Again, Sam (9 p.m.), which
is in part a parody of and was in-
spired by, Casablanca.
The films will be shown in the
Hendrix Theatre and admission is
by ID and activity cards or 1S(
membership.
Casablanca is a classic Hollywood
movie in the most positive sense of
the term, containing all the conven-
tions of 1940's filmmaking rolled in-
to one captivating film which sports
an all-star cast, romance, adven-
ture, humor, mystery, colorful
characters, exotic locale,
memorable songs, and more.
For those unfortunate few who
have never seen Casablanca, this
1942 Warner Brothers production
revolves around the character ot
Rick Blaine (Bogart), a rugged
American individualist living in
Casablanca in the French Morocco
He is owner and operatoi t Rick's
American Cafe, a meeting place foi
ruffians and refugees from the sui
rounding World VA
Rick stays aloof from inti
and politics: once an idealist, he
became bitter and cynical alter his
lover, llsa 1 und (lngrid Bergman)
deseited him. Oik day llsa walks in-
to Rick's ate with he: husband Vic
tor 1 aslo (Paul Henn id), a famous
freedom fighter. It is during this en
trance that the real action ol
Casablanca begins, bringing Kick
back into the whirlwind of romance,
war and intrigue.
I'lay It Again, Sam, the title ol
which is a paraphrase ol the best
known line from i asablanca ("Play
it uium, Sam" is nevei actually
spoken in the film), is diu
Herbert Ko' 1972 film version ol
Woody Allen's 1969 stage produc-
tion,
-Vlen has the usual Allen trouble
in finding a meaningful (or am
other type) relationship with a
woman. He tmds a spiritual advisor
in the image ol the immortal
Bogart, who materializes to offei
advice and helpful wisecracks.
A Shopping Guide For That Elusive Sanity
By DAVID NORMS
si�ff Wnlrr
I ike many of the familiar features of American life.
grocery stores are pretty much the same all over.
Perhaps the biggest difference between individual stores
Tickets Now A valiable
Tickets for The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee
Williams, being produced and directed locall
h Stephen B. Finnan, are now available
through the Central Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center (757-6611. ext.
266) and the Methodist Student Center
(758-2030). The production opens November
10 and runs through November 15. Fvening
performances are scheduled at 8:15 p.m.
November 10-14; a matinee performance is
scheduled at 2:15 p.m. on Sunday, November
15. General admission price is $3.50; student
tickets are $2.50. A group discount of $2.00
per ticket is available for groups of ten (10) or
more. The Class Menagerie will be performed
at the Methodist Student Center, 501 Fast
Fifth Street in Greenville. For further infor-
mation, contact Steve Finnan at 757-3546.
is in their front doors: some have automatic doors, and
others have doors you have to open yourself.
When I was a kid, 1 really hated having to go along to
the grocery store while my mom was shopping. It was
especially bad after I got too old to ride in the shopping
cart and had to hike all over the store. Somehow,
shelves of produce and canned goods just don't capture
a child's interest.
I used to wish that I was grown up so that I wouldn't
have to keep going to the supermarket every Friday. The
trouble is, being grown up (or at least, sort of grown up)
does not exempt one from having to go grocery shopp-
ing. In fact, it's worse, since I have to pay for them
now.
Supermarkets have some of the world's most
elaborate air conditioning, judging by their Arctic
temperatures at this time of year. (It's a good thing, I
suppose, since nobody likes warm lettuce and melted
frozen food.) Besides, the cold temperature gives you a
chance to wear your winter coats in June without collap-
sing from the heat.
After getting to the grocery store and putting on a
jacket, the next thing to do is to find a shopping cart,
preferably one with four wheels.
Next, the obstacle race begins. First, you have to
maneuver the cart past the checkout counters and the
mob of people clustered around them. Many-
passageways near the front of stores are not much wider
than a shopping cart, so navigation can get tricky.
Now the thing to do is to pick an aisle and browse
through it. Some aisles will have puzzling titles like:
"Aisle 7: Pickles, Deodorants, etc others will have
less original headings like "Produce
The produce section is often one of the most un-
predictable areas of a supermarket. Unlike potato chips
and pretzels, vegetables and things are sometimes out of
season when you want them. The quality varies
sometimes, too. You can find really scraggly-looking
lettuce one week and really nice, top-quality lettuce the
next, for example.
The snack food section, by contrast, is pretty consis-
tent. Snacks never go out of season, since pretzels, corn
chips, etc are easily grown in factories. They are put in
nice, clean plastic bags, unlike vegetables which often
lie in a big pile with dirt on them.
The candy section can be located either by its sign, or
the sound of little kids being dragged along behind har-
ried mothers, yelling "I want that "I want that "I
Freddie's Fair
Bad Service Spoils Good Food
Bv KATHY WEYLER
staff Wnlrr
Right in the middle of downtown Greenville, on Fifth
Street, is a restaurant whose very exterior seems to ex-
ude the word "expensive This is Freddie's, located in
the much-renovated Old Hope Fire Department
building, and with its stained glass windows and daily-
changing chalkboard menu (sans prices), it does indeed
appear expensive.
Cuisine
If this was your unfounded impression of Freddie's,
the owner fooled you, too. My dining partner and I ex-
pected sky-high prices on our luncheon visit and were
astonished to find that items on the menu range from
SI .50 to $4.45. Our bill, including two elaborate and ex-
pensive desserts, came to just over $7.00.
Freddie's is a very adult restaurant with an at-
mosphere that is almost sedate. You just wouldn't come
into Freddie's, curl up in a booth (feet on the seat) and
spread out your studying gear.
With its bright flowered tablecloths, plants, track
lighting and classical jazz music, Freddie's is an ex-
cellent place to enjoy a restful lunch or dinner, or just a
glass of wine and good conversation with a friend or
two.
The menu at Freddie's is rather distinctive. Ap-
petizers, largely fresh fruits and vegatables, are offered,
as are soups and salads, with delicious home-made
dressings. The salads are unusually crisp and fresh �
priced from $1.50 to $4.25.
want that at each different kind ol candy. (When i
was a kid. they'd knock a knot on mv head it 1 acted lik
that in public.)
Kids really liven up a trip to the grocery story, rhey
add suspense bv running around all ovei the place, mak-
ing more obstacles in the crowded aisles to hav
dodge around with the cart I hey add pathos when thev
cry and throw tantrums on the floor because their mom
won't buy them a "Klingon Blastei kay Gun"
something like that. Some kids stay pretty quiet, doing
nothing more noisy than trying to taste evei thing in the
store.
The canned food section is kind ol a treasure hunt.
The idea is to reach to the back o each shelf to find the
older (and cheaper) cans. Sometimes, all you gel is old
See SHOPPING. Page 6
Vegetarians will be happy to hear that Freddie's of-
fers meatless meals � Vegetarian Delights � in addi-
tion to salads. Sandwiches consist mostly of a variety of
meats and cheeses on several kinds of bread. They are
served with sprouts and pickle slices. Freddie's deserves
a round of applause for using real, thick-sliced roast
beef instead of the insipid lunch meat variety so often
found in restaurants (especially those "sliced thin, piled
high" fast-food establishments).
If you prefer something other than soup, salad, or a
sandwich, Freddie's also offers an outstanding selection
of entrees and daily specials. Such delights as quiche,
chicken and broccoli crepes, baked trout fillet, beef ber-
naise, chicken potpie and stuffed potatoes are available
for a change of pace from typical downtown fare.
The usual beverages (coffee, tea, etc.) are offered.
Beer and wine are available, though the selection is a bit
slim. Prices are about average. Cream sherry by the
glass is also offered, a rarity except in the best
restaurants.
The menu at Freddie's is a little deceptive regarding
desserts: At the time of our visit, half the selections on
the menu weren't available (as is often the case with
many non-dessert selections as well), and several items
that were available weren't listed. So if you want
dessert, it's best to ask the waiter what is and isn't
available. That is, you can find him.
While Freddie's offers great food and a very con-
genial atmosphere, the service isn't exactly one of their
best features. In fact, on our second visit, the service
was only a little short of deplorable. We waited some
fifteen minutes before anyone came to take our order,
yet several parties seated after us received prompt ser-
vice.
It's too bad that a restaurant that has so much to of-
fer � good food, original cuisine, a pleasant at-
mosphere, full take-out and catering services � is a bit
slow in the service department. If anybody sees Freddie,
tell him to give his waiters a pep talk.
Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm Speaking In February
United States Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm will speak in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix
Theatre on February 4, 1982. Chisholm was the first woman, and the first black to seek the nomination of
a major political party for the Presidency of the United States.







THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 20, 1981
UntiOfrJG AiouT-CocxrfeC- Ths Hp ktoi
Bi Dwip aJois
Shopping: Disorder
Arranged By Aisles
THIS SOfT PfrOK 15.
P(L�TTY SAP
Continued From Page 5
cans with a little dust
and the same price,
though.
At times, they pile up
cans into giant
pyramids at the end of
the aisle, either for a
special display or
because they've run out
of shelves. They always
tempt me, probably
because of all those
Jerry Lewis movies
where they crash shop-
ping carts into them.
A particularly in-
teresting part of many
supermarkets is the
gourmet section. They
offer odd stuff like rat-
tlesnake meat, caviar.
chocolate-covered ants
and so on. One o' these
days, I'm going to try
some of that stuff.
By contrast, the
household goods sec-
tion has always been
one oi the least in-
teresting to me. Mops,
brooms, floor wax and
that kind of thing are
pretty low on my shop-
ping priority list, since
she only housekeeping 1
usually bother with is
washing dishes now
and then.
Did you ever leave
your cart somewhere,
wander down an aisle
to get something, and
then wander back and
get someone else's cart
by mistake? (1 hope
some of you have, or
this is going �o make
me feel really dumb.)
I've done it once or
twice and didn't notice
until 1 looked closely at
the cart and wondered
why I had picked up a
pack of fried grasshop-
pers. At the same mo-
ment, there was
somebody who was
wondering why her
fried grasshoppers had
turned into a bag of
Cheetos.
The last batch of
stuff to buy in the store
is contained in the little
shelves crowded
around the checkout
counter. Reading
material assaults the
eve ("Flying Saucer
Kidnaps 'CHIPS'
Star "Fantastic
Doughnut Diet � Lose
Eight Pounds A Day
"Hidden Heartbreaks
of 'Loveboat' Cast)
in the tabloid
newspaper racks. Into
another shelf is cramm-
ed every possible kind
of candy and crackers.
Sometimes, the lines
at the checkout counter
can be interminably
long. (That's how I'm
so familiar with the
headline style of those
screaming tabloids.)
After reading the
covers of The National
This and The Midnight
That, there are still a
couple of things to do
to pass the time.
One is to add up
what the groceries cost,
but that's not much
fun. Usually, watching
the rich variety of
customers trapped in
the line with you is
more worthwhile.
There is usually a
1OtTRTHE CbLOW?
AMP 5V&A� Of A
&�GOLA(LOfTVfilrtK
�L
woman shopping for
her large family, with a
cart piled precariously
with tons of provisions.
If you get behind her in
line, you'll be there
awhile.
You might see the
host of a spaghetti din-
ner, frantically buying
the last ingredients
before the ravenous
guests arrive.
The ones buying the
six pack oi beer are
p r o b a b 1 v college
students.
The father cooking
for the kids while Mom
is out of town is most
likely buying another
couple of packs of hot
dogs.
Last of all, you meet
the checkout clerk, who
has to put up with a
never-ending parade of
customers, many of
whom are of the ob-
noxious variety. (I
wrote alot about kids
cutting up in the store,
but there are plenty of
adults who are much
worse.)
Being in the checkout
line brings up one thing
about shopping that's
nicer now than when I
was a kid: I can buy all
the candy I want. It's
just too bad that I
don't like candy as
much as I used to.
I DLAY IT I
: AGAIN,
j UM"
Vkcdnrsdav N.ghi � Hcndtn Thcairtj
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UNIVERSITY I
I COMMITTEES FOR I
I STUDENT MEMBERS I
A,5i
Adnrx
-�s be r"g trAen tof s'lxte's sH.ng re s&e o
t. tor �- '98' 62 scHool �eor A -un-t' ot Un'ver
�ees and Fjj ie"C'e Comm 'tee
Thesecorwr Meei - ' ' lent �iardtsjif :
)MW TTEES :
A.ji � wwn tees :
Alcohol & Drug EJlk-ox Corrvtte ;
CoTtr-e" e' Internal ovr Stude' Ata"s :
( rr t' Res Jente L'� ;
Committee on Status of M-ncxtties
L1mrr.rtee o Student Heo.lt Se'Mces �
Hondicoroed Student Severs Carnrn ����
Ses.dente S'at.js Appeals omm.t-ee :
Scbolosti Wee.e"d Comm.ttee :
T'ctt Apoea'S Com.t.ee :
Cimie-Vv f k - ��� ee �
Poc '� Senate A Joderv Committee �
�i m is l " - " - ee �
JftfCI : . 1 'TPP ;
� - � � . - ��ectveness :
Course Diojj Appeals Committee :
Continuing Education Commttee
Credits Conw. itfee
Geneioi Goi'eoe CommitTee
5'ude-t Scboiotsn.p e'sowships arxJ financioi Ai.i
Tecxbe- Educator Comm.ttee
tee
� riesC mm rtee
ApplN nt an) -no. be p cKed up ot the toliov�ing locations Otice o' me
. -p Q . rot Student Lte 204 Wh.chard Mendenhall Student
Center Information Desk SGA Otice syVendenhol'Studen'Center, Ctff.ce
f.murni Recreo'ionai Se� es ujemooi G and Residence Hall
: Dnec'ors Offices
� - Jn ,� great � apprec ates "re eHorts .it those s'ude"ts �ho
I tve served m the past and hope �ho� students ��8 continue fhetr �ten�l 5
� onj pottcipa'ion Qursvons one ut membe'sb.p may be d"eted to the :
� �� � ot the vce l'in tor S'udent Lite i7S7 6S :
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European
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Call ahead or come by today
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I
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The Best in
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Try our delicious Souvlakia
Special only $2.55
Now delivering after 5:00
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Phone 752-0326 at 506 Evans st
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Apple Records, s
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YOUR FORTUNE TOLD FREE BY MADAME ZOLA
DRAWING FOR FREE PRIZES
10
PEPSI'S
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 21
8:30 A.M4:00 P.M.
ON THE SIDEWALK BETWEEN RAWL AND WRIGHT BLDG.
RAIN DATE OCT. 22
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE 1
East Carolina University fl
Bu
ByHAKIhs
LAFAVl I l
Carolina pushed
the .500 mart
over a month
Soutrmesrn
night
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not easy for I �
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Sports
()( IOBI-K 20 IMI
Page 7
Bucs Survive Cajun Scare, Win 35-31
B CHARLES CHANDI ER
"sport V diUtr
1 FAYETTE, I a. 1 ast
v arolina pushed its record above
the 500 mark tor the lust time in
over a month with a 35 M win ovei
Southwestern I ouisiana Saturday
ht.
Going to 4-3 on the season was
not eas for the Pirates, though, as
the and the Ragin' t ajuns literati)
exchanged touchdowns and the lead
in a wild second halt I he lead
1 si
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,in " Ingrain : Kfcoh 1 lr- ' irs
t ; j k l)an 12-41 fott I4-t. C haiman 10
Htnn -5 i aldarrra 1 1
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� a.l�ril I II' luimj" ' �
changed a total of ten tunes
The ke to the I CU wm was the
re-emergence of its offense, which
had been stalled for two weeks in a
row I he offense piled up 407 vards
against the Cajuns, 358 coming via
the ground attack
Halfback I eon 1 aw son had his
best night ever, gaming 120yards on
12 cat ties, including a 43 yard
touchdown run in the first halt
rhreeothei Pirate backs quartei
ba. k Carlton Nelson, fullback Rov
Wile and halfback Harold Blue
added a combined total ol 188
I Cl head coach Id Emon was
ecstatic following the win, one thai
he had said would be crucial it the
Pirates were to airv out theii goal
oi finishing with a winning season
"I'm jusl as happv .is hell to gel
out ol here with oui teeth and a
w in aid " 1 hat foui point win
is jusl beautiful to us
He was obviousl) proud ol his of-
fense, which came back time and
tin aftei the Cajuns had stolen
id
"We m he ball the besi we
have all yeai fense I n
claimed "We moved it when we
had to, I asked them to come back
one tune, then twice. Bui the had
to come bad � e times 1 hat's a
real credit to then
rhe Imaies led a) the hall 14-10
but fell behind when I si capitaliz
ed on .i Harold Blue tumble on the
Kl 42 rhe Cajuns scored on their
first second bait possession
fullback David Fore, got one of his
four touchdowns in the game at the
end of that five-play drive, going
over from one yard out to put his
team ahead 17-14.
EC U wasted little time recaptur-
ing the lead, driving 86 yards
following the US1 score to go
ahead. 21-17. Quartei back Carlton
Nelson capped the 12 play drive
with a 30-yard scoring scamper.
Once again the Cajuns answered
the Pirates' challenge. A 26-yard
pass from I si Oilurl Caldarera
to tight end Brenl Anderson
highlighted a 63 vatd drive.
Another one vard run bv Forel near
the end of the third quarter gave the
t ajuns the lead, this time by 24-21.
Aftei the Pirates stalled and had
to punt, Southwestern took over on
its 19-yard line. 1 he 1I defense
held this tune, calling foi a punt
from Cajun 1 an rrussell I he
pendulum ol momentum changed
again when freshman Jimmy
Walden returned the punt 77 vaids
for vet another go ahead score.
Chuck Bushbeck converted the ex-
tra point and it was the Bucs ahead.
28-24
Walden's return appeared to turn
the game around. 1 he Cajuns stall
ed on the ensuing drive and had to
turn the ball back back over to the
Bucs
I SI got it right back, though,
when Carlton Nelson fumbled and
the . 'ajuns recovered at the ECU 12.
Four plays latei I oret scored his
tourth touchdown, this one from
five yards out to give his club a
31-28 lead with 8:53 remaining in
the game.
The Pirate offense responded
again. Taking over on their own 28,
the Bucs drove quickly toward
paydirt. Two runs totalling 27 yards
by fullback Roy Wiley set up a
27-yard touchdown dash by Harold
Blue with 6:43 left in the contest.
The 35-31 Pirate lead appeared to
be a shaky one when Southwestern
took the kickoff and quickly moved
to its own 47-yard-line. The Cajuns'
hopes were dashed when ECU
linebacker Glenn Morris picked off
a C aldarera pass at the 3:35 mark
and returned it to the USL 42. From
there the Pirates ran the clock out.
USE coach Sam Robertson was
disappointed following his team's
fifth loss in six starts, pointing two
kev points that he felt were the
game's determining factors.
"We didn't keep our poise he
said. "They came up with some big
plays that hurt us. I felt the penalty
when we had too many men on the
field and the (Walden) punt return
were the turning points in the
game
The penalty that Robertson spoke
of certainly was a key. It came with
only 29 seconds left in the first half.
ECU kicker Chuck Bushbeck at-
tempted and missed a 47-yard field
goal A flag negated the play,
though, as 12 Cajuns were on the
field at the time of the kick. ECU
started anew with a first down at the
USI 15.
TD Grab
ECU tight end
Norwood Vann
(80) fights off a
Southwestern
Louisiana
defender and
hauls in a TD
pass from
quarterback
Greg Stewart
near the end of
the first half in
the Pirates'35-31
win Saturday
night. The score
was set up by a
Cajun penalty.
(Photo By Chap
Our lev)
The Pirates scored on the first
plav following the flag, quarterback
Greg Stewart hitting tight end Nor-
wood Vann for the six. Bushbcck's
extra point put the final touches on
the 14-10 halftime advantage
ECU is back at home this Satur-
day to face nationally-ranked
Miami (Ha.) The Hurricanes are
3-2, but have lost to a pair of other
ranked clubs, Texas and Mississippi
State.
Rough Road Now Ahead
Saturday Win Crucial
Prioto Bv Chap Gurley
ECU defensive end Hal Stephens (93) leads horde of Pirates tackling USL's David Fore.
Pirates
Are 21st
In Nation

last Carolina ranks 21st in the
: on in rushing offense after seven
veeks of collegiate plav, according
( A statistics realeased Mon-
day.
rhe Pirates, 4-3 on the year, are
raging 241.4 vards per game via
ground attack. The Bucs have
tallied 1.690 vards in 379 carries.
Big F ight Conference powers
Nebra ka and Oklahoma lead the
on, averaging 354.8 and 346.4,
respective!) , North Carolina's third-
ked far Heels are thud in
vmg as well, tallying 318.7 per
I CU's opponent for this coming
weekend. Miami (Ha) also appears
the stat lists, ranking 13th na-
tionally in passing offense with a
24? 6 yards-per-game average
s AKI MHM.clHW I i OSMS
iOnl� lop 25 I mm rr I islfdi
East Carolina's 35-31 win over
Southwestern I ouisiana last Satur-
day was one that the Pirates needed
badly. Even head coach Ed Emory
listed it in the "must win" category
during the preseason.
The victory has the team sitting at
4-3 with another month of football
remaining to be played. Dates with
Miami (Fla.), West Virginia, East
Tennessee State and William &
Mary lie ahead.
The Pirates achieved two big
things with Saturdays victory. One,
the club has already equalled the
wins accumulated by the 1980 Bucs.
who went 4-7. Two, the team has
put itself in relatively good position
to finish with a winning season.
Doing so will not be an easy task,
though, as all four opponents offer
their share of challenges. The fact
that three oi the games will be
plaved in Greenville's Ficklen
Stadium should work to ECU's ad-
vantage.
Charles
Chandler
This week Emory and the Pirates
face the unenviable task o hosting a
powerful Miami team that has lost
two games by a total oi 11 points
and was ranked 13th in last week's
UP1 Top Iwentv poll The two
losses came at the hands o Texas,
14-7, and Mississippi State this past
weekend, 14-10.
The Hurricanes have beaten some
tough opposition as well, winning
over Southeastern C onfetence con-
tender Florida and Houston of the
Southwestern Conference.
The Hurricanes fell to Texas just
one week before the 1 onghorns
humiliated Oklahoma and rose to
the number one position in the na-
,J Cage Practice Starts,
Clubs Want 'Gold'
Fast Carolina's Stacy Weitzel (8) fires a shot over the net in
the I ad Pirates' volleyball match with Appalachian State
this past weekend. looking on in the left hand corner are
ECU's Lexanne Keeter (left) and Miti Davis. Appalachian
staged a big comeback to down the Lady Bucs.
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
taVaaatMM Sports rdilor
As the world of college football
continues on its zany course, basket-
balls can be heard pounding the
Minges Coliseum floor every after-
noon at 3:00.
In mid-October?
Practice makes perfect.
Which, according to assistant
men's basketball coach David
Pendergraft, can lead to " a pot at
the end of the rainbow
And according to lady Pirate
coach Cathy Andruzzi practice can
enable the young talent on her team
to mature. And make her a better
coach.
For the men Pirates, that "pot of
eold'
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Lady Pirates Take Early Lead, Then
Falter In Loss to Appalachian State
Bv Will 1AM YH VERTON
s�iNt�ni Np'�f t I- dll��C
Formei Ne York Yankee cat-
cher Yogi Berra, when asked about
a futile ninth-inning rally in a game
won bv the Yankees said, "It ain't
over 'til it's over
I he I ady Pirates o' Easl
Carolina learned the meaning of this
statement the hard way after a tive-
set collegiate volleyball duel with the
Mountaineers ol Appalachian State
last Frida) afternoon at Minges Col-
iseum
I at c arolina won the first two
games of the match and needed one
more victory to take the match.
Then things changed.
The Mountaineers won the next
three sets to take the match.
"We played the best we ever have
in the first two games said head
coach I ynn Davidson. "Fverything
worked for us. But we lost our com-
posure in the third game and got
very complacent.
"You can never think you have
won a match � even with match
point. You can never let up '
7-16 this season.
"You can't play good every game
of a match Davidson noted. "We
did everything good in the first two
games
Davidson was pleased with the
performance of Lita Lamas, who is
recovering from an injury. "Lita
had some great serves that barely
cleared the net.
"We came to the point where we
llll. I VM VMll I ��- �� � - �
For a while it looked as though felt like we could do anything. We
the Lady Pirates would never let up
as they stormed to take the first two
sets, 15-5 and 15-8, before Ap-
palachian State rallied to take the
next three, 15-5, 15-8 and 15-5.
The loss dropped East Carolina to
expected it to continue to happen,
but it didn't happen that way
The Lady Pirates travel to
Williamsburg for a match with the
Indians of William and Mary Thurs-
day afternoon.
is in the form of a post season
tournament since Fast Carolina is
the newest member of the Eastern
College Athletic Conference
(ECAC). The Pirates will compete
in the ECAC-South, and the winner
of the tournament receives an
automatic bid to the NCAA tourna-
ment.
"It helps knowing there's gold at
the end of the rainbow
Pendergraft savs. "Basketball is a
tournament sport. We'll be able to
maintain our in tensity in late
February, knowing there's a tourna-
ment, unlike last year. We've got
something to look forward to
East Carolina opened practice last
Wednesday, and so far, says
Pendergraft, each session has had
positive results. "The intensity's
there, and the enthusiasm's there
he says. "The upperclassman have
been leaders
Pendergraft, promoted from
part-time to full-time assistant, says
the team's attitude is one of
"wanting. Wanting to see improve-
ment over last year. One of anticipa-
tion
The newcomers� Al Mack,
Charles Green, Bruce Peartree and
David Reichenecker� "all have im-
pressed us with their ability to adapt
to what we're trying to do
Pendergraft says. "(College) is a
whole lot more business-like than
what they've done in the past. We're
proud of them
Although he practiced with the
team last season, Maine transfer
Tom Brown becomes eligible this
fall. Guard Tony Byles, an old
See PENDERGRAFT. p. 8, col. 3
turn Texas, of course, suffered a
humiliation themselves this past
week at the hands of Arkansas.
Mississippi State was picked
before the season by many in the
knowledgeable category as the best
team in the SEC The club has but
one loss, to Missouri, and may just
live up to that billing. MSU ranked
in at number 16 last week and is sure
to move up.
In other words, the Miami Hur-
ricanes have lost � and barely lost
� to two of the very best teams in
the country. Both games were on the
road. The loss to Mississippi State
would not have occurred had the
Hurricanes not had a touchdown
called back. That happened with
just six seconds remaining in the
contest.
The Bucs travel to West Virginia
on October 31 after hosting Miami.
The Mountaineers did a number on
a good Virginia Tech team this past
weekend, winning 27-6. Another
WVU victim was Atlantic Coast
Conference victim Maryland. That
one was played in the Terrapins'
back yard.
West Virginia's only loss in six
games was to Pittsburgh, a club that
will rank in at either number one or
two in this week's poll. The
awesome Panthers won that one,
17-0. Not bad considering that same
Pitt team destroyed llth-ranked
Florida State by a 42-14 margin just
this past Saturday.
Obviously, the rest of the month
of October does not find the Pirates
in anything near a favorite's posi-
tion. On the contrary, the Bucs will
be heaw underdogs in both games.
Should ECU go on to lose both of
those contests they will finish out
with home games against ETSU and
William & Mary, with a winning
season necessitating wins in both
contests. Not easy, but not
anywhere near impossible either.
East Tennesse State has played
some good football and currently
rests in second place in the Southern
Conference. The club is 3-1 in con-
ference play and 4-2 overall.
William & Mary has begun to
play well of late, winning two in a
row after a slow 0-4 start.
So the challenges are simple for
the hopeful Pirates. Two wins in
four games and 6-5 goes down in the
books as the club's 1981 record.
Emory felt before the season
began that a winning record was a
necessity to get the Pirate program
headed back in the right direction.
The team certainly has four (or at
least two) crucial games ahead.
None, though, was as crucial as
last Saturday's win over
Southwestern Louisiana's Ragin'
Cajuns. A loss in that one would
have dampened the team's chances
of a 6-5 campaign, not to mention
what it would have done to morale.
As it is, though, the Pirates stand
in position to have that most impor-
tant winning season. Their play in
the next four weeks can eitter make
or break that opportunity.
t





I rHE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 20, I �W I
Bucs Get A Kick
From Va. Weekend
uisUM Sports rdili'i
Fast Carolina travel-
ed to historic Virginia
last weekend tor two
soccer matches and
made a little history
themselves by winning
both games.
Saturday, the Pirates
defeated the University
of Richmond, 4-2, and
added another victory
the next day by
defeating Virginia
Wesleyan, 2-1.
The wins improved
the Last Carolina
record to 5-7-1.
"We surely
dominated despite the
close scores said
coach Brad Smith.
"The last three to five
games we've outshot
our opponents, but we
just haven't put the ball
in the net That all
changed Saturday,
however.
The contest with the
University oi Rich-
mond saw tour dif-
ferent Pirates � Tom
Lawrence, D w ay ne
Degaetano, Brian Win-
chell and Mark Har-
dy� kick the ball
cleanly into the net.
Degaetano's goal
as unassisted, unlike
the other three which
came from the precise
parsing of Billy Merwin
who set a new school
record for assists in a
match.
Pirate goalie Steve
Brown, back from an
eye injury, recorded
eight saves while Rich-
mond defenders had
seven.
The Pirates con-
tinued their agressive
style of play as they
outshot the Spiders,
15-8.
The loss dropped
Richmond to 1-9 this
season.
"We worked the ball
well, made two mental
mistakes on defense
which cost us two
goals, but we played
better as a team
Smith added.
East Carolina lived
up to their coach's ex-
pectations Sunday as
freshman Mark Hardy
scored an unassisted
goal with eight seconds
left to defeat Virginia
Wesleyan, 2-1.
East Carolna's Kyle
Milko scored the only
goal in the first half,
but Virginia
Wesleyan's Tony Pr-
ingle tied the match
early in the second
period.
For East Carolina
goalie Steve Brown
continued his fine
defensive play as he
stopped 12 Wesleyan
shots. Tom Redden ad-
an
EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. 9th St. 752-2332
PIRA TES
in the pros
A.C. Outshines Earl
former ECU running back Anthony Collins
had another big day for the National Football
! eague's New England Patriots Sunday. In the
process the former Pirate outdueled the man who
is considered the greatest runner in the game to-
day.
Collins rUShed 17 times for 89 yards in the Pats'
38-10 win over Houston. The win pushed New
England's record to 2-5.
Collins1 figures bettered those of Earl Camp-
bell, the two-time defending league rushing cham-
pion. The Oiler star rushed 27 limes � ten more
than Collins � but managed only 86 yards.
Collins , New England's leading rusher, now
has gained 460 yards on the year on 107 carries,
which translates to a 4.3 yards-per-carry average.
He also has 1" pass receptions for 162 yards. The
Penn Van, N.Y. native has tallied four
touchdowns, all four of them coming on rushes.
If Collins continues at his present pace (65.7
yards per game) he would finish the year with
1,051 yards. Nine games remain in the Nil
season.
ded 15 saves for
Virginia Wesleyan.
The Pirates outshot
Wesleyan, 17-16, and
Brian Winchell added
an assist for East
Carolina.
For Virginia
Wesleyan, J.P. Mur-
phy chipped in with an
assist.
Smith says he has
been pleased with the
play of his freshman
and newcomers; citing
that both scores in the
Virginia Wesleyan con-
test were from first-
year players. However,
he stressed the fact that
the Pirates don't have a
set number of starters.
"We really feel like we
play with 16 or 17
players he says.
East Carolina travels
to North Carolina-
Wilmington for a
match Wedcsnday
afternoon.
Pendergraft:
Door Open
Continued from page 7
familiar face, returns to
the team after a year's
absence.
Andruzzi says prac-
tices have been "going
pretty well But she
adds that she has
"three or four players
out with a virus.
! "The girls are work-
ing hard. They're a
very young team, but
they're very attentive
The Lady Pirates.
Andruzzi says, have a
unique attitude so far
. during preseason
drills They're
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waiting she explains.
"They don't know
what to expect. The
veterans used to be the
young kids. They're
waiting for someone to
take a leadership role.
This has become a good
teaching experience
Since the Hast
Carolina men are now a
conference member,
the new affiliation has
become somewhat of a
coaching tool, also,
says Pendergraft.
"There is a tournament
at the end of each
season, which is every
player's dream. We've
always said we're an in-
dependent. Now. we
can say we're in a con-
ference. The doors
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 20, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 20, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.155
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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