The East Carolinian, October 15, 1981







� � ft �� � � ft i
I
On The
Inside
Most Wanted
Student In
America?
Page 3
Greenville's
Goldfish
Gobblin'
Page 5
Pirates And
Cajuns Battle
This Weekend
Page 8
lEaat (Earoltman
I
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 57 No. 16
Thursday, October 15, 1981
GreeavUk, North Carolina
10 Pages
Lemish Resigns
Vice Chancellor Moving To Virginia
Vice Chancellor Donald 1 emish: calling it quits
By TOM HALL
Donald L. Lemish, ECU's vice
chancellor for institutional advance-
ment and planning, resigned Tues-
day to become a vice president at
Longwood College in Farmville,
Va.
The vice chancellor's resignation,
which is effective Jan. 5, 1982,
was submitted in a letter to
Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer.
Lemish made the announcement to
his staff at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Lemish will become Longwood's
vice president for institutional ad-
vancement.
"Your resignation has caused me
to re-examine my dedication to
higher education the letter to
Brewer said. Lemish explained
Wednesday that with the
chancellor's resignation, which is ef-
fective June 30, he was not sure if
the university would be committed
to the same ideals.
"I've been accused of not having
purple blood and not sweating
gold Lemish said, referring to the
ECU colors. "I think I gave and my
family gave to the community and
this institution� even financially
"1 am dedicated to ECU and will
continue to be dedicated for the next
three months the vice chancellor
added.
lemish said he was "extremely
excited" about working with
Longwood president Dr. Janet
Greenwood and working for "an in-
stitution with a history and tradition
dating back to 1839
Greenwood, an ECU alumna,
was out of town Wednesday and
was not available for comment.
Lemish will be in charge of
Longwood's public affairs depart-
ment and developing alumni ser-
vices, according to Nancy Shelton,
the college's acting director of in-
stitutional advancement.
"The person developing this area
(institional advancement) must be
creative and energetic Shelton
said. Lemish was chosen because of
his "outstanding record in the in-
stitutional advancement area, his
expertise and his enthusiasm for
coming to an area that is developing
this area she added.
Lemish accepted Longwood's of-
fer Monday, Shelton said. The col-
lege had been searching for a vice
president since July, using the
Thompson and Randall consulting
firm in Arlington, Va. Longwood
first communicated with Lemish at
the end of September, according to
Shelton.
Brewer issued a statement Tues-
da commending Lemish for his
work at ECLr. "Outstanding
development people are in extremely
short supply, and Mr. Lemish
qualifies as one of that select
group Brewer said. "I am confi-
dent that Longwood College will
make great forward strides in
development with Don Lemish
F. Douglas Moore, ECU director
of research development, will be ac-
ting vice chancellor for institutional
See OFFICIALS, Page 2
Denied Change Of Maj
SI ATTLE, Wash. (CPS) � University of
Washington students have to give up a routine and nor-
mal part of student life: they are no longer allowed to
chanae their majors.
Moreover, the 10,000-plus UW students who have yet
declare a major won't be able to choose one.
Then again, many of those students � about 3600 �
may be dropped from the university altogther.
Forcing 3600 students out of the university is just one
oi the contingency plans offered by UW adminstrations
if a precipitous fiscal crisis in the state isn't resolved
soon. UW, while only one of the state colleges and
universities affected by the emergency, is Washington's
largest campus, and the one scheduled to lose the most
amount of monev.
Until UW administrators decide which programs they
have to cancel, they've stopped students from declaring
or switching majors to prevent students from choosing
majors that may be eliminated.
The troubles began last month when state Gov John
Spellman unexpectedly ordered a ten percent budge cut
for all state schools and agencies. The university's share
amounted to $33 million off its two-year operating
budget, which UW President William Gerberding term-
ed a "disaster
Crisis May Cut Programs
The university stands to lose twice as much if a
lawsuit brought against the state by primary and secon-
dary schools succeeds. Combined with the effects of the
Reagan cuts in federal education programs, the fear is
that "you won't even recognize this university says
one campus reporter.
"It's mainly a problem of the economy says admis-
sions Director Tim Washburn, who has announced an
indefinite freeze on applications to the campus until the
crisis passes.
"The state's lumber industry is really hurting
Washburn says, "and thus our tax base is way down.
lhe problem is Washington has no state income tax,
and it isn't likely they're going to establish one at any-
time in the future
"It's just a mess all over groans Information Ser-
vices Manager Louise Hasty, who discounts the gover-
nor's budget-cutting rationale as "a lot of garbage
"(The reduction order) was just a bolt out of the
blue she says.
"Right now we're faced with laying off something
like 260 faculty members alone, not counting other staff
personnel Hasty mourns. "And all those federal aid
cuts are going to come on top of all of this. As far as
federally-assisted research goes, we're simply going to
go down the pipe
Lawyers representing the state's lower-level schools
have sued the governor, claiming the state constitution
guarantees full funding for elementary and high
schools. The state constitution clause doesn't apply to
colleges.
If the suit succeeds � as many think likely � other
state agencies would have to bear more of the cuts. The
University of Washington would then have to cut $60
million from its budget, instead of the current $33
million.
"We're numbed by the whole thing says a reporter
at the campus paper, the Daily.
Student eovernment President Clayton Lewis agrees.
"We already cut out all the fat from our budget, and
there's simplv nothing else left
Lewis savs the $33 million cut will close the universi-
ty's departments of forestry, architecture and urban
design, education, botany, and speech.
Students Want
Public Colleges
College Press Service
Enrollment is down slightly at
private Mars Hill College, and up
slightly at public Gaston College.
It's down six percent at private
Nebraska Wesleyan. It's un six per-
cent at public Kearney State College
nearby.
Situations like those, some
observers believe, could be the start
of something big: a massive student
migration from private colleges,
where average costs this year are
$6,800, to public campuses, where
costs average $3,800.
The migration wasn't supposed to
begin until next fall, when the pool
of potential college students was due
to start drying up. But the new
restrictions on and cuts in federal
student aid programs may have in-
spired more students than expected
to transfer this year.
"I think the first effect (of the aid
cuts) will be an enrollment shift to
public colleges predicts Dallas
Martin of the National Association
of Financial Aid Administrators.
He reasons that the fewer aid
dollars students can get will go far-
ther at less-expensive public schools.
"We should see a major shift
(from private to public) next fall,
but I wouldn't be surprised if you
start to see some minor shiftng this
fall he says.
Preliminary enrollment figures do
show most public colleges growing
as private colleges struggle to keep
student populations stable. A
Chronicle of Higher Education
phone survey discovered all 22
public campuses it contacted had
enrollment jumps. A College Press
Service survey of private colleges
found enrollment down on most of
those campuses.
However, not all administrators
attribute the enrollment swings to
the aid cuts or to a general shifting
of student populations from private
to public campuses.
Nevertheless, most of the private
colleges that have managed to keep
their enrollments steady this fall are
those that guarantee meeting 100
percent of their students' financial
needs.
At Nebraska Wesleyan, where
there is no Financial guarantee,
Registrar Bette Olson "assumes the
decline (in enrollment) will continue
next year though she doesn't yet
have the statistical evidence to show
she'll be losing students to public
colleges.
She says a "Small Commitee"
will meet soon to discuss ways of
stopping the decline, perhaps by
guaranteeing aid.
At Mars Hill College in North
Carolina, Registrar Robert Chap-
man attributes the six percent
decline in enrollment to "problems
with financial aid but says the
private college has no plans to start
giving aid guarantees in the near
future.
Reed College in Oregon doesn't
guarantee aid, but does have a
stable enrollment of 1130 students.
"Students explains Registrar
Gary Conner, "are finding more
creative ways to stay in school
His students are opting for part-
time status, taking half-time jobs,
and even takng more leaves of
absense.
Miller
Student President Quits
Pry or On The Loose This Weekend
Richard Pry or and Cicelv Tvson star in "Bustin' Loose" this weekend in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatt The film will be shown
tonight at 7 p.m. and this Friday and Saturday nights at 5, 7 and 9 p.m.
(the times listed in this Tuesday's edition of The East Carolinian were in-
correct). Admission is by ID and Activity Cards or MSC membership.
1982 Yearbook Staff Appointed
By MIKE HUGHES
Miff Writer
The recently arrested student
government president at the Univer-
sity of North Carolina at
Greensboro has taken a month's
leave from his elected office.
UNC-G President, David Miller,
informed that school's senate on
September 30 that he would take a
leave of absence from his position.
Miller and Darius Davis, another
UNC-G student, were arrested
September 24 by Greensboro police
for credit card fraud.
According to police reports,
Davis, a part time sales clerk at the
Friendly Avenue Sears Service
Center in Greensboro, pocketed a
credit card left at the store by a
customer. The report said that on
September 22, Miller and Davis at-
tempted to buy two sweaters and a
pair of slacks at Sears with the
stolen card.
Police say that when the store
clerk began a routine credit check
on the card, the two men fled from
the store. However, several
employees at the store recognized
Miller and called the police.
On September 24, Miller and
Davis turned themselves in to
police, after being .ontacted by of-
ficers. Following their arrest, the
two men were charged with "false
pretense in relation to credit card
fraud. Both were released without
bond after promising to appear in
District Court on October 1. The
results of that preliminary hearing
are no. known at this time.
If convicted on charges of credit
card fraud, Miller and Davis face
maximum prison sentences of ten
years.
Immediately following his arrest,
Miller declined any statement per-
taining to the case. "I'm not going
to say anything until they
(attorneys) finish their work he
said.
By MIKE DAVIS
SUflWrilcr
The 1981-82 Buccaneer staff has
been selected. Though many of last
year's staff members returned,
several ECU students applied for
vacant positions.
Amy Pickett returns to the Buc-
caneer staff as manager, Lisa Col-
eman as associate editor and Bob
Debnam as business manager.
Also returning are editors Jan
Souders, of sporis; Louise Hall, of
organizations; Mike Davis, of
academics; Linda Briggs, classes
editor and Paul Collins, copy
editor.
Returning assistant classes editor
is Jeff Bowman, and returning art
director is Andy Anderson.
The new additions to the Buc-
caneer staff include Bryan Hester,
assistant sports editor; Cathy Wells
and Anne Fisher as assistant
organizations editors and Patrick
Campbell as assistant academics
editor.
The staff is already at work on the
1981-82 Buccaneer. Pickett has
already sent the final layouts to the
printing company.
According to Pickett, the 1980-81
Buccaneer should be ready for
delivery by the end of the fall
semester. Last year's Buccaneer will
be available for pick up on
December 14. All returning
sophomores, juniors and seniors
can pick up a copy at the Student's
Supply Store by showing a valid
ECU I.D. and activity card.
The only comment Miller has
issued to date was to the school
senate. Explaining his leave of
absence, Miller told the senate:
"Due to the gravity of my present
situation, 1 feel that it is in the best
interest of the student body and
myself that I temporarily
disassociate myself with student
government until my situation has
been rectified
During the president's absence,
SGA Vice President Rusty Weadon
will assume Miller's official respon-
sibilities.
'?





THEEASTCAROIINIAN
OCTOBER 15, 1981
Announcements
ASSISTANTSHIPS
the institute tor Coastal and
Marine Resources s now accep
ting applications 'or two assistant
ships scheduled to begin ,n late tall
of 1981
Graduate Assistantships. Office
Coordinator Field Team Coor
fima'or will coordinate field team
activities, and assist investigators
in da'a i.ollettion and analysis
Background in behavioral or
social sciences preferred
lergraduate Graduate
ftssiStantship Data Analyst, will
assist nves'iga'ors in 'he analysis
i lata Must have background
am! familiarity with computer
programming and statistics
c- contact D Jeffrey
Johnson Ol Ml Man. us Hepburn.
, Mi is building KMR at
'J7 6S10 01 "�' �J20 An equal op
� a' rmative action
pmp
PHI BETA LAMBDA
The Omicron Chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda elected officers for
the 1981 82 school year on
September 30 They are as
follows Betsy Steinert Presi
dent. Fielding Miller Vice Presi
dent Heatber Quadlm Recording
Secretary. Kathy Wrenn Cor
responding Secretary Bob
Elmore. Treasurer Anne Tucker
Reporter Janice Irvine.
Historian and nenise Bellinger
Parliamentarian
REBEL
The ECU Literal v Magazine
REBEL is looking tor an Associate
Editor Prose Editor and Art
Editor Applications can be picked
up in the Publications Building n
the Media board secretary oftice
Any maior is acceptable
SLAP
RUSSIAN ANYONE?
i led 01 ' Of Russian
' 5St( ' M i OOld not tit
� the i ours1
rite ��� aoair Sri "q
SAWf at
. so ottered .� be Russian
.�� . . � .
R 2220 �
OOSt tv sky
i- , � v-
ta mnt in
A F I 00 arn �' may be
five or to sat si.
� ��
POETRY FORUM
Poetry ' ,��
I. 13 it 8 p n
It . � � i . -
feedback on i
eir '
� � � j 6 or 8 opies of
�� �
SCEC
Student Council tor Exceptional
Children presents speakeis on
autism' and their related
organiatms Marorie Riddle wll
tie speaking on EARTH and Max
ine Rothrock will present mlorma
tionon TEACH Refreshments will
De served Everyone is nvited to
attend this fantastic program on
Monday Octobei 19th at 4 00 pm
n spe.ght 129
Have a sweet tooth' The ECU
Chapter of NSSHA will be having a
bake sale in the Belk Building on
Tuesday, October 20th from 8 00
(ill 5 00 All proceeds will go
toward our scholarship fund
LAW SOCIETY
ECU Law Society will meet on
Thursday night. October 15 at 7 30
m Room 221. Mendenhall Guest
Speaker will be L mda Boon, Direc
tor of Placement, University of
Richmond Law School Please iom
us Further information call Diane
Jones 7S6 65S
VOLLEYBALL
THe PRC Society and Jeffery's
Beer and Wine will be sponsoring
a Co Rec Volleyball Tournament
at Mmges Coliseum on Octobe' 31
trom12 6pm There is a ten dollar
entry fee First place, keg, second
place pony keg Other prizes will
be awarded Sign up at the PRC
bu'ldmgBehind McDonalds and
across from Hardees on Cotanche
St i Deadline Oct 29 Teams must
( onsist of six persons with at least
two females per team
BANKING AND
FINANCE
The Banking and Finance
Fraternity along with The Real
Estate Fraternity will hold its
monthly meeting Wed Oct 21 at
5 00 in Rm 221 Mendenhall The
speaker will be Mr David
Guilford VP of Mortgage and
Loan, Planters National Bank All
interested persons please attend
Elections of officers will also be
held
GTU
is the
i"
onor
pate
� �
PS
vs 0
d
. ��� er' lomesi
lerest ncj quest
morel To
si have
- above n at leas' i � iass of
nfot mat or
� , . �� � at his �� �
;BA?38i or call Mitch Doub at

. � I! Why
g Gl ml hurs
� at 4 i" m �� Brewstei
SAB
The Student A'hic'ic Boai is
holding its weekW meeting on
Monda, CH tober 19th at 5 30 p m
in Mmges Room 142 143 this is 'he
SSf dav .01, can sgn up to attend
he m ami f I post game
COOkOuf kea party so make
dans to attend New members are
eligible to come to the party along
with a limited number ot nates of
guests but you mus' sign up by
Monday There is no charge tor
members and a very nominal fee
for guests planning to attend for
further information can Pam hoi'
at 757 mi:
SAB
rne Student Athletic Board
urges all rrmf'S and students to
see the football tea Off to 'he a.r
port Fndav October (, The bus
departs fron Belk lorm a' P 45
r
Officials
Praise
L emish
Continued From Page 1
de eiopment after
I emish leaves, Brewer
The East Carolinian
Serving the oamwj crynmumlr
tPKt tm
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday durmg me academic
; year and every Wednesday dvr
i mg the summer
The Eas' Carolinian is the ot
'fioai newspaper of East
Carolina university owned,
operated, and published tor and
! by the students of E ast Carolina j
! University
Subscription Rate �20 yearly
Second class postage pa�d at
Greenville. N C.
The Eiit Carolinian ottices
,re located in the OW Savth
Building on the campus ot ECO.
Greenville, N C
Telephone tj7-J�,�3'J�
Application to mail at second
class postage rates a pen4lt �?
Greenville. NO
HISTORY
All history maiors and minors
are mvited to attend Phi Alpha
Thetas annual cookout Hotdogs
and other refreshments' will be
served1 Tickets can be purchased
for S2 60 from any Phi Alpha Theta
member or m the history dept of
tee H will be held Oct 16 at 4 30
at the picnic area next to
Memorial Gym
Any hisotry maior or minor who
has 12 s h .n history, a g p a of 3 0
in history, and a 2 7 overall is in
vted to become a member of the
Lambda Eta chapter of Phi Alpha,
Theta international Honor Society
n History
SNEA
nr Student National Education
Asscv aOn meeting will be held
October 21 Wednesday at 4 00
p m ,n Speight 201 All education
maiors are invited
CHEMICAL SOCIETY
Or Monday October 19
.nLan Chemical Society SHi
dent Affiliate will tave a business
meeting at 7 p m in Flanagan 202
It attending, please bring a dish
'or a covered dish supper All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend For further m
formation, call Dawn Williams
�'S8 894
COURSES FOR
NON MUSIC MAJORS
Music Appreciation (Muse 2208'
if the music class most often taken
by non music maiors However
the following music classes also
are available tor General Educa
lion Fine Arts credit Muse 2218
Orchestral Music Muse 2238, Con
temporary Music, and Muse 22S8,
History of Jail Music
The following performance
groups accept non music maiors
by permission of the instructor
Concert Band SymphonK Band
University Chorale Man s Glee
Club, Women s Glee Club and
Women's Chorus L irrnted spaces
will be available tor private
lessons in several applied music
areas
AED
Alpha Epsilon Delta pre
medical society will meet on Tues
day. October 20 at 7 30 p m m
Plan 307 Dr Dean Hayek,
Associate Dean of Admissions at
ECU School of Medicine, will be
the guest speaker All interested
persons are invited to attend
CHEERING SECTION
The Student Athletic Board is
sponsoring a group cheering sec
tion tor the Miami IFL) home foot
ball game on October 24 Anyone
interested in sitting in this section
should bring their activity cards
by the Athletic Director's office
located upstairs m Mmges Col
iseum no later than S p m Friday.
October 16 Only 100 seats are
available, so you'd better hurry
For further information call Pam
Holt at 757 6417 Raise Hell tor the
Pirates!
GEOLOGY
The Geology Club would like to
invite all persons to attend Brown
Bag Seminar no 2 on October 16
at 1 p m m Room 301, Graham
Building The topic will be
Geochronology as a Tool tor
Deciphering the Geologic History
of the Appalachians presented
by Dr Paul D Fullager. Prof of
Geology UNC CH A short
meeting ot the Geology Club will
follow the seminar to discuss up
coming events, including a Hallo
ween party Remember bring
your lunch!
POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum will meet
htis Thursday Oct 15, at 8 p m in
Mendenhall 248 Open to anyone
wishing feedback on his or her
poetry Those planning to attend
are asked to bring 6 or 8 copies of
each poem Listeners also
welcome
CORSO
All Corso members please pick
up your tickets immediatly! We
need to begin selling the tickets to
the Faculty Student Party Pick
them up from Jackie m the Social
Work Corrt-i hons office
ALPHA RHO
This is the group who love
Metlo Yellow We cannot wait
until we wine with the best un Fr,
day Alpha Rho is on the g
SURFCLUB
A meeting will be held Wednes
day October 21 at 7 00 8 00 p m
Room 221 Mendenhall
All members are urged to at
tend New members welcomed'
COMPUTERS
The ECU chapter ol ACM
(Association for Computer
Machinery) will meet this Thurs
day at 3 30. October 15. in Room
221 Austin Anyone interested in
any aspect ot computers is invited
to attend Dr Harper ot Co
operative Education will speak on
the demand tor Computer Science
maiors and minors to work thru
the co op program
CORSO
All Corrections and Social Work
maiors and intended maiors are
.nvited to attend the CORSO
meeting Thursday, Or totn t 15
itodal at 5 30 m room 221 ot
Mendenhall Student Center A.
are gomg to plan the big bash
with the faculty Please come'
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK Of
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FBOM IHt
WEEK
�T FURTHER EXPENSE
ills �� Pregnancy Test. Birth
Central. and Prableat
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
832 0535 'Toll Free Numoe'
800 221 3S�i between 9AM
ar0 5PM Weekdays
RAl E IGM WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raieigh N C
HAVE A PROBLEM? NEED INFORMATION?

REAL Crisis Intervention
24 HOUR SEH
Mv
lMta� w t-n y-
758HELP
HI AI fKl.ils r�'Nlt.M
111 Evans Street
iviiie.N C 27834
BEAUX ARTS BALL
Marl making rou costumes for
the 7th Annual Beau Arts Ball
This ytars buarre event will be
held at Papa ka on Friday Oc
tober 23 at 8 00 Tickets are S3 00
in advance S4 00 at door
SONIC.
Special
Of The
Week
Stop In For
A Special Lunch
7 O
ra(0M�
FIFTY CENTS
ADMISSION
o
FIFTY CENTS
COLD ONES
BEGINNING PIANO
AVAILABLE
Peg rifling Pa no Group classes
-�a. a 'able to non music ma
ung the Spring Semester
Because of limited capacity tor
these classes, it is not often that
inese classes are availavle to the
sic maior These piano
lasses will be taught Mona
no Wednesdays at 12 00 and Mon
lays and Wednesdays at 1 00
Permission to enroll in one oi
these piano classes must be Ob
tamed n advance from Dr
Richard Luch Room 377 ot the
A J Fletcher Music Cen'er
f SONIC SPECIAL
j FOOT LONGCONEY
J Regular French Fries
I Med. Drink
I
I
I
I
I
Good
with Coupon
Oct. 12 18
�1
i
i
l
l
ssTnM 1111
i &
E
( nil
( oi 1 i.
JU!
studeni
crin


.@ �� ��offi �
$1.89
REG. $2.95
Plays the BEST in BEACH and JAMS
TDn�
o
SONIC. .
618 Gr��nvile Blvd. � Only .������������� j
SONIC
For Friday Afternoons' JAM PARTY
Starring the Famous 32 oz.
"BUCKET FOR A BUCK"
from 3:00 till??
saul. No
permanent
successoi will be chosen
until after a new
c h a n ce 11 o i is a p-
pointed.
rhe vice chancellor-
ship was one of the new
i. ip-level administrative
posts created b Brewer
when he came to ECU
in l"v I emish was
a search
thai Brewer
.uied and took over
his present position in
luh 1979.
I emish holds ad-
ministrative respon-
sibility for direction of
alumni relations, in-
stitutional research, the
E I news bureau,
sponsored programs,
the planning office and
the Regional Develop-
ment Institute.
1 ongwood College is
located 65 miles west of
Richmond and has
2TO students.
Sat , Oct. 17
Presents In Concert RCA Recording Artists
Nantucket
with Special Guest Subway
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
Buccaneer MOVIES i-i�3
756 3307 Greenville Square Center
13 579 "SIGNORETAT
THE TOP OF
HER FORM
-Rex Reed, Syndicated Columnist
-f SENT IITIT-RIO n
LOVE
STARTS
pG TOMORROW!
IF LOOKS COULD KILL
msFW:
r
Select group of
Lady
Thomson
ABORTIONS
l ?4 week terminations
Appt's Made 7 Days
CALL TOLL FREE
800 321 0575
iCI Camoutuged Fatifluei And
Shirt. Sleeping Baq
Backpacks Camping Equip-
ment. Steel Toed Shoes. Dishes
And Over 700 Different New And
Used Items Cowboy Boots
ARMYrNAVY
liOi S Evans
Curre undergraduate pre
edicai students may now
�� for several hundred
Air Force scholarspo These
scholarships are to be aware!
ed tn students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
Or at the besl nnino nf their
ophn " -far The scholar
iirov'des lor tuition.
lab trees ana equip
plus a SS30 monthly
irwstioate this
imflor at alternative to the
cost ol medical PS a
�,on Contact
U S A F HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
RECRUITING
SUITE GL I, 1100 NAVAHO DR
RALEIGH. N C 27609
PHONE COLLECTlvly)7SS �I3�.
SAAD'S
SHOE
w9&f 113 Grande Ave
8 Jppi Quality
GET HEAPING PORTIONS
AT A PRICE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
October 15. Thursday �OiS
CHICKEN N DUMPLINGS9&
2 vegetables
October 16, Friday �Qsq
TROUT ALMONDINE. 2 vegetables t
October 17. Saturday �OW
CHOPPED SIRLOIN STEAKV
2 vegetables
October 18, Sunday $029
TURKEY & DRESSING
2 vegetables
October 19. Monday �OA9
COUNTRY-STYLE STEAKt'
2 vegetables
October 20. Tuesday $009
BROILED CALF'S LIVERtw
2 vegetables
October 21, Wednesday iO 09
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THF EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 15, 1981
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Engineering Grads Find Jobs Easily
College Press Service
COLI EGfi STATION, Texas -
James Beall may be the most wanted
student in America.
Beall isn't a heartthrob or a
criminal. Instead he's at or near the
top of his engineering class, which
happens to be at Texas Agricultural
and Military University� widely
recognized as one of the best
engineering schools in the nation
(along vsith Purdue University and
California Technical Institute).
As such, Beall has already been
uined and dined by companies that
want to hire him after graduation.
He expects to be wooed and courted
by dozens of other firms by the time
he graduates later this year. He pro
bably won't be disappointed; na-
tionwide recruiting for engineering
grads is fierce. They are the surest
bets to get good jobs among the en-
tire Class of 1982. Beall, as one of
the top two grade-getters at one of
the top engineering colleges, just
may have the best time of his life
this year.
"1 started interviewing this sum-
mer Beall recalls. "I've had two
plant tours and several job offers
already, one with a petro chemical
plant and another with an aviation
firm
He figures that whatever firm he
eventually chooses will probably
start him at $30,000 a year "or
maybe even a little higher
Beall's expectations aren't out of
line. The average 1982 engineering
graduate will earn $25,000 next
year; Liberal arts graduates will be
scrambling for average starting
salaries of $10,000. Engineering
students were less than 10 percent of
the 1980-1981 graduating class but
got 65 percent of the on-campus job
offers, according to the Campus
Placement Council of Bethlehem,
Pa.
Judith Kaiser, College Placement
Council spokeswoman, says the cur-
rent market is far different from
seven years ago, when a recession in
the wake of the Arab oil embargo
slowed industry demand for
engineers and engineering students
actually Hocked to change their ma-
jors.
"In 1972, we had 3495 engineer-
ing students enrolled recalls Dr.
Robert H. Page, Texas A and M
dean of engineering. "Here we are
nine years later with three times that
number: 11,502
The reasons for the change are
evident, he says. "Technology is
getting more and more complex,
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and it has created a great demand
for quality engineers. The orders are
out to recruit engineering students
Engineering enrollment at Texas
A and M is up 1000 from last year,
and Page expects similar increases in
the next several years.
National engineering enrollment
has skyrocketed from 195,000 in
1972 to over 350,000 in 1980.
"1 would expect it's up another 10
percent for this current year
speculates Dr. W. Edward Lear,
director of the American Society for
Engineering Education.
"The job opportunities are
great Lear ex plains. "The
average four-year engineering stu-
dent will have three or four job of-
fers before graduation, and will
earn an average of $23,000 to
$27,000 the first year
"The favorable job market has
created significant increases in the
total number of students who
choose engineering as a major
understates Iowa State engineerng
Dean David Boyland. "And most
projections indicate the demand will
continue
The boom, ironically enough, has
pitched college engineering schools
into the deepest crisis in their
histories.
"I think everyone is beginning to
see the potential disaster if we don't
do something Lear warns. "Right
now we're dealing with a double-
edged sword
Enrollment jumps have made
over crowded classes common, and
impressive salary temptations from
private industry have made it hard
to hire new professors to take on the
additional class load. Few new
graduates choose to go on for more
schooling when they can get high
salaries. Experienced engineering
professors are leaving academia to
take those higher salaries, too.
"Starting teachers can expect a
salary of around $25,000 a year
Lear says. "That's after three years
of additional schooling, plus the
cost and effort to get their Ph.D.s.
When they can step out of college
with a B.S. degree and get the same
salary in the private sector, they see
that they wouldn't be that far ahead
by continuing their education
Current instructors "can realize
anywhere from a 30-to-100 percent
salary improvement by moving to
corporate jobs Lear grieves.
He estimates there are 1600 to
2000 vacant engineerinng positions
on U.S. college campuses.
Cal Tech's engineering enroll-
ment has doubled in the last seven
years, but dean Roy Gould is fin-
ding it harder and harder to get in-
structors to teach them. "1 suspect
it's going to get harder as we have a
smaller and smaller pool to draw
from
"I'm really concerned about our
future confides Texas A and M's
Page. "Our very best students are
going into industry, students that
ought to continue their education
for the benefit of the country and of
the student. There's an expression
going around that says 'Industry is
just eating its own feedcorn and I
hope something is done to control
the situation
Many schools of engineering are
now self consciously stressing the
values of post-graduate education,
and cooking up incentives to keep
their students in school.
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� 1981 ArtCarved Ctas Rings





Stye East Eat0lInfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. smcmtf
Jimmy DuPREE, tmmgimtmum
Ric Browning, d�� oj AdM Charles Chandler. sporuEduor
Chris Lichok. swmmo Tom Hall, mmemm
Alison Bartel. nuiiitfin mihiuui Steve Bachner. Enitnammem Eduor
Steve Mcxre, cv�w. .�,�,�� Karen Wendt. a, mm
October 15, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Representation
Student Membership Leaves Void
What will be the most important
decision to be made at East
Carolina in the next year?
The selection of a new chancellor
� right?
And everybody knows that this is
a decision that should be shared
equally by members of the universi-
ty community: faculty, alumni,
trustees and students � right?
Wrong.
A selection committee consisting
of six trustees, five faculty
members, three alumni and one stu-
dent has been named.
The students' only representative
in the selection process is SGA
President Lester Nail. While we feel
that Mr. Nail is well qualified to
serve on the committee, we still
believe that students deserve more
of a voice in the selection.
DOONESBURY
There are almost 14,000 students
at ECU, yet we have only one
representative on the committee. On
the other hand, slightly less than
1,000 faculty members are given
five slots, and half the membership
of the board of trustees will take
part in the search.
There are those who argue that
students are not qualified to make
such a vital decision. But really,
who is more qualified to judge what
this university needs from its
chancellor? After all, the school is
here primarily for students.
Students deserve more represen-
tation in the selection of a new
chancellor. The search committee
should should see to this by naming
one or perhaps two more students to
its ranks.
by Garry Trudeau
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THi �AST CAftOUNlAN
Nuclear Experts Cloud The Issue
By ART BUCHWALD
I pride myself on having a very open
mind on things, such as nuclear energy, as
long as they don't build a plant near my
home.
So when I saw the Diablo Canyon
demonstration in California last month I
watched them with the calm impartiality
which I reserve for all things that don't af-
fect me personally.
On one side were scruffy, unshaven, un-
shod protestors. On the other side, were
well-dressed state troopers, and clean,
good-looking spokesmen for the power
company. The dispute, as I understood it,
was the scruffy unbathed people claimed
the people in the white hats didn't know
what they were doing. They had built a
billion-dollar nuclear plant on the San An-
dreas fault, which everyone says is going to
cause an earthquake in California sooner
or later.
My wife, who doesn't know the first
thing about nuclear energy, asked me one
evening as we watched the scruffies being
hauled off in sheriff's vans, "Why would
they build a nuclear plant next to an earth-
quake center?"
"Because it obviously makes sense. The
people who construct those plants know
what they're doing. If you've been listen-
ing to the nice, clean-cut men in white
shirts, ties, and dark suits, you would
know that the power company has done
exhaustive tests, and the nuclear plant can
withstand any earthquake shock known to
man. Besides, we have a Nuclear
Regulatory Commission that has the last
word on whether a plant is safe or not.
They would never have given their okay to
open one, if there was the slightest ques-
tion that building a nuke plant next to an
earthquake fault could hurt the environ-
ment
"Then why are the people in the scruffy
clothes willing to be arrested to close down
the plant?" she asked.
"Because they have an unrealistic fear
of nuclear power. They don't understand it
and, therefore, they're against it. Many of
them are students who enjoy getting in-
volved in civil disobedience, but they're
willing to go to jail for their beliefs
"Whose side are you on?"
"I'm afraid I have to be on the side of
those wearng the ties and coats. After all
they've been dealing with nuclear power all
their lives and they should know if it's safe
or not
"A few years ago you would have been
on the side of the unwashed
"I guess age does that to you. At some
point in time you have to say that just
because a person needs a shave doesn't
make him right - and just because a per-
son has short hair and dresses properly
doesn't make him wrong
"That's a stupid reason for taking one
side over the other
"There is more to it than that. The peo-
ple who build nuclear plants are scientists,
trained in our finest technical institutions.
They work with computers and consult
with famous experts who have an answer
for every problem. The engineers and
designers take extraordinary steps to see
that not one bolt is put in wrong. If the
say a nuclear plant can survive an earth
quake, I have to accept their word for it.
"This is not to say 1 am unsympathetic
with the poor souls who are willing to go to
jail because they lack faith in our great
scientific establishment. But in this case, 1
believe they're making a mountain oul of a
molehill. I would bet my All Savers Bank
Account that they are wrong
Well, you can imagine my surprise when
a week later, the evening news announced
that the Diablo Canyon nuclear reactor
could not go into service because someone
had gotten the drawings all mixed up. and
the wrong pipes had been installed in the
wrong sections of the plant.
It meant that every pipe had to be
sonally inspected and replaced if it was
discovered that it didn't belong there.
A man in a nice white shirt, tie and blue
suit from the power company exlained it
wasn't a very serious mistake and could
have happened to anybody.
Another well-dressed man from the
Nuclear Regulatory Commission said he
was appalled at the sloppy engineering and
was ordering an imu ediate investigation.
They didn't put on any scruffy people
for comment. I wish they had, because I
wanted to find out where to send them my
All Saver's Bank Account.
(c) 1981, Los Angeles Times Syndicates
'Apathy Drug' Grows In Power
By KIM ALBIN
Once upon a time, in an era called the
'60's, there was a free country with hun-
dreds of college campuses where healthy,
concerned young adults protested ques-
tionable acts of government and became
involved in protecting the rights of
everyone.
r Campus Forum
Election Request Prompts Threats
4
The Polish Solidarity Union's 900
delegates, at the second half of their first
national convention in Gdansk, issued a
call for free elections and democracy.
Because they stood up for free elec-
tions and democracy, Poland's delegates
were subjected to ruthless threats by the
Soviet Union and Poland's Communist
government.
Despite Poland's efforts, the Soviets
are determined to stop progress by those
striving for freedom. Historically, the
Soviets have not hesitated to use military
force to stop the spread of freedom �
witness their invasions of Hungary in
W56, Czechoslavakia in 1968 and
Afganistan in 1981.
A coalition of college students
disagree with the Soviet's manhandling
of Poland and are making statements
supporting Poland's right to freedom.
Maintaining that people everywhere
have a birthright to freedom, the
students are circulating a petition ex-
pressing "complete support for the peo-
ple of Poland in their struggle to retain
their inalienable rights This nation-
wide campaign is critical because it sends
a powerful message to the world:
America's youth are firmly behind the
Polish people in their fight against Com-
munist oppression.
Human rights are not a discretionary
privilege granted by the government.
They are a necessary demand of all free
people. With our support, Poland will
be free.
JACK ABRAMOFF
National Chairman,
College Republicans
Goodwill Mission
The dancing and singing performance
of the Chinese Youth Goodwill Mission
from Taiwan, the Republic of China, at
Minges Coliseum on Oct. 7 provided a
delightful as well as educational ex-
perience, and the interaction between
the Chinese college students and the au-
dience afterwards was certainly evidence
of a successful exchange of goodwill bet-
ween the people of the two countries. I
would like to publicly express my per-
sonal gratitude to the administration
and the Student Government Associa-
tion of East Carolina University, and the
Ministry of Education in China for mak-
ing such an opportunity possible for
those of us who live in Greenville. Many
who were at Minges on Oct. 7 also felt
this was a wondeful event, many others
who could not make it that evening have
told me that they wish they could have
been there. In order to enhance the
chances for such a group to visit us
again, I urge all of you who are in sup-
port of this event to write letters to the
following two people who are in charge
of such programs in the Republic of
China, expressing our appreciation for
their successful mission and urging them
to consider sending a similar group to us
annually or biannually.
Mr. H.S. Chu
Minister of Education
Taipei, Taiwan
Republic of China
Mr. C.C. Pan
Director of China Youth Corps
Taipei, Taiwan
Republic of China
KATHY C.W. CHAN
Asst. Librarian
Prison Letters
I'm an inmate here in North Carolina,
and I was wondering if you could put my
name and address in the school paper, in
the hopes someone will see it and decide
to correspond with me. Thank you for
your time and trouble.
REGGIE L. PARKER
P.O. Box 58
McCain, NC 28361
Then a good fairy, worried about the
harmful effects of this involvement on the
students, tried to ease their consciences by
introducing them to a wonderful
substances which, when smoked, would
enlighten them to the virtues of apathy.
The substance whas called marijuana, and
its use among the students became
widespread.
Soon even the government noticed the
change in the nation's young people, and
although the government could not con-
done the use of the drug, it did send
policemen around to tell junior high school
students what marijuana looked like, what
to call it and which type of folk would
most likely sell marijuana.
Everyone paid a great deal of attention
to the users of the drug, and before long
the nation's teenagers began to smoke
marijuana too. Campus political activity
died out, and the government breathed a
sigh of relief.
Ten or 11 years passed. Everyone forgot
what those healthy, concerned college
students of the '60's wer" protesting, and
the campuses were peaceful as never
before. And the students of the new era,
the '80's, lived apathetically ever after.
A Fairy Tale? Yes, but it's not one that 1
want to be telling to my children. At least,
I hope iat someone can think of a better
ending.
It's been years since those college
students jumped on the marijuana band-
wagon and though we've managed to erase
from our memories the reasons they had
for jumping on, there are still those among
us who persist in believing that awful pro-
paganda: that marijuana smoking doesn't
hurt them, that it makes them happier,
more able to cope with the pressure of be-
ing faced with the future. In this way, our
nation's pot smokers justify joining the
ranks, and inoculate themselves from
realization of the terrible injustice that has
been perpetrated against them: they've
been robbed of their sensibility; their
minds have been violated by that rapacious
substance and by whomever it was that
perpetuated the lie in the first place. The
good fairy, it seems, must have been ter-
ribly powerful.
And the good fairy's Apathy Drug is still
growing in power. Back in the old days, 1
am told, most marijuana users were pretty
discreet about their habit. Now, however,
they can waltz up and ask me if I "Wanna
get stoned" quicker than I can say, in my
most recalcitrant tone. "No, I don't smoke
it, get away from me, you lethargic
Pothead, you They don't have to feel
defensive about breaking the law, dulling
their own senses, hazing their memories
under the auspices of creating them. It's
those of us who choose to retain our
energies, our memories, who would be
made to feel defensive, if indeed these slug-
gish souls could have their way and con-
vince us of anything.
Marijuana smoking, as well as the
lassitude it creates, is a danger to our socie-
ty. Those of us who have smoked pot and
rejected it can attest to its lymphatic in-
fluence on the minds of its uers. It creates
an illusory image in those minds of security
and well-being, and I believe it also slows
down the creative processes, not as pot-
smokers would have it said, heightens
them.
The saddest part of the tale, and the
most incredulous, is that marijuana use
continues even though our generation has
grown up with marijuana and is old
enough now to know better. This fact
makes pot smoking seem truly repugnant,
people are jumping on the bandwagon
even though they've been told that it's
broken down, that it's not going
anywhere. Repugnant, and a teensy bit
frigntening.
1 have faith, however, in the next
generation. They seem light years ahead of
our generation in thinking up their own ex-
citing new fads, like New Wave music and
high-energy dancing. Who knows, maybe
they'll even rid our campuses of Toga
parites and goldfish swallowing, at last!
An important thing to remember,
though, is that we don't have to wait for
them, we can begin to reject the Apathy
Drug right now. We can change the ending
of the tale to a happy one, before the good
fairy catches us.
Fi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
OCTOBER 15,1981 Page 5
Bizarre Behavior Observed At ECU
Assigned Deviance
Part Of Classwork
Full Moon Brings
Goldfish Munchers
B KXRFWNFMM
�,�le iliioi
" rhat's a piranha, don't eat
that
"He ain't go! no goldfish
"Oh my Cod. look at that
they're really eating them
The above, plus a wide variety ol
grimaces, cringes, smiles and cheers
were vastly evident at 1 uesdav
nights Chi Omega Elbo Room
Fourth Annual Goldfish eating con-
test. The contest, which is a fun-
draisei for the C hi-O's, has been
held for the last four years, and if
past years were like Tuesday night.
they made a lot of money.
A record was broken in the com-
petition. The past record was a total
of 36 live goldfish. However Tues-
day night at least the top three
cntestants broke the record consum-
ing totaK of 45 and 43 goldfish.
The contest was well organized
and ran as follows. In the first heal
the munchers had twenty seconds to
catch and consume as many goldfish
as the could. The winners of these
heats then went on to the thirty se-
cond semi-final rounds and the two
winners of the semi-finals then
squared off in the forty-five second
finals. In the end, David Hawkins, a
third time entrant in the competition
won out, after consuming a total of
45 goldfish in the three heats.
He won over second place Robert
Scarbourgh (43) and third place
Scott Cobb (45).
In the beginning there were 350
goldfish to be consumed (and there
were a few left over). A total of 16
entrants were scheduled for the
competition, but one entrant. Matt
McDonald, failed to come to the
stage when called and was dis-
qualified. Some of the other en-
trants in the contest were Steve
Chase, Dave Lockett. Chip Nolan,
Robert Morse. Jeff Merritt, Terry
Roberson, Jim Siemicki, Scott
Brush, James Maye, Mitch
Hamlett, and David Brown.
The leftover goldfish, according
to reports, will either be adopted by
'It Chi-O's. given up for adoption
or eaten at a fish fry for the Elbo
Room employees.
It was an intriguing contest, rem-
niscent of past college days of
Fraternity initiations, only these
young men were competing for
prizes of SI00. 550 and $25. Several
of them claimed that they had prac-
ticed for the event. And Hawkins of
course had experience from his two
past entries (where he placed fourth
and second).
Reasons for entering the contest
were mixed. One entrant was very
straight forward about his
See GOLDFISH. Page 6
Two participants in the Goldfish Eating contest
By JOSEPH OLINICK
sun Mki
If you have: run into members of
the opposite sex in the bathroom of
your sex, witnessed "Ring Around
the Rosie" in the Croatan, heard
Christmas Carols in the halls, had a
trash can thrown down at you from
the top floor of Brewster, had your
bike stolen or been kidnapped you
might have been the victim of one of
ECU's sociology classes.
On Friday, October 2cd, a pro-
fessor of Sociology 2110 gave her
class an assignment: go out and per-
form a deviant act. Then, the pro-
fessor sent her class out onto the
ECU campus to perform their asign-
ment. Consequently some odd oc-
curances took place.
Telling of his experiences in the
deviance experiment one student
said, "The teacher gave us our
assignment, and it was to leave class
for 20 minutes and indulge in a de-
viant act. She explained that the act
should not be illegal, and if we did
anything to get in trouble, it would
be our responsibility. In other
words, she was telling us to use
some sense
Our group began by going in the
men's bathroom in the Croatan, ac-
companied by the female members
of the group. There was already
another group of girls in the Men's
bathroom. They weren't from our
group though. So our group decided
to go into the women's bathroom,
which had slight success. There was
a blind woman sitting in the
bathroom reading a braille book.
When she heard the voices of the
male members of the group, she
became obviously embarasscd.
Since this was not as successful as
we thought it would be, our group
sought to perform a more obvious
deviant act. This act involved play-
ing 'Ring Around the Rosie' in the
dining area of the Croatan.
Everyone gave us obvious looks ol
intrigue. We also heard plenty of
laughs. After this act, we went back
to class, and discussd the exercise.
"The other groups did such
things as roll the classroom with
toilet paper. They put toilet paper
all around the teacher. One group
even took an idle studier for a fif-
teen minute elevator ride. In other
words, they kidnapped the person.
Someone supposedly shut the power
off in Memorial. They just saw the
main power breaker and pulled it.
Also one group shut off all the en-
trances of Brewster, and campus
police were required to open them
Another student involved in the
deviance experiment said "Our
group was one of the duller groups.
See CLASSWORK, Page t
Pool 'Queen' Beats Male
Stereotypes And Counterparts
B DONNA l)Al
The king of poo ma have to
make room foi a queen on his
throne a- East arolina's own Bon-
Mexandet shoots foi the na-
tional collegiate pool championship.
The talented female sharpshooter
currently ranks number two na-
tionally among women pool players,
and plans irn to the competi-
tion next summer to vie for the
championship title.
What prompt- a female correc-
� to begin playing one of
I male stereotyped games?
says she learned to play
because "1 didn't have
� else to do The twenty-
no;
the mo
Bonnie
simph
anv
two year old junior began playing
pool basically just to "kill time"
after moving to Greenville to attend
school. Now she thrives on the feel
of the slender pole, agile beneath
her fingers, and the thrill of victory -
especially opposing players who are
dubious of her ability by virtue of
her sex.
Although Bonnie's rise to the top
was rapid, those moments of victory
required hours of hard preparation.
It took the East Carolinian pool
shark eight months, practicing three
to four hours daily, to reach the
point were she won the majority of
the games she played. However, her
rise to expertise was coupled with a
few minor setbacks. Although at-
titudes concerning women's roles in
society are becomming more liberal,
Bonnie did have a problem with ac-
ceptance of her role as a woman
pool player. "A lot of men don't
think women should be around pool
rooms said Bonnie. At one pool
room that she encountered, "they
will not let a woman play on their
tables Without insinuating that
the male ego is fragile, another pro-
blem she encountered was the disap-
pointment (to put it mildly) of her
male opponents when she beat them
at a game. "A man loves to see me
beat his buddy she said. " but if
you beat him, he doesn't laugh
Once she was even told by a tavern
owner to "Stay away from his bar
and pool tables" because she beat
his friend at a game of pool.
How does "racking them up"
and shooting for the corner pocket
relate to the duties of a corrections
major? Bonnie said that she might
take a couple of vears and play pro-
fessionally, but until then her pool
playing prowess may bridge the bar-
riers between herself and her clients.
"1 can talk to the guys while 1 beat
them. Or maybe I'll let them win
one in exchange for good
behavior For now, pool is a
"good hobby" for Bonnie, but
finishing college has top priority.
Take a cue from Bonnie: Never
underestimate the ability of a
woman with a $200.00 custom made
cue stick in hand, and a gleam of
"8" balls in her eyes. Y6u might
just wind up defeaed in a side
pocket somewhere wih the blurr of
speeding balls in your eyes and
stains of "God Save The Queen" on
your lips.
Bonnie Alexander lines up a shot
Diet Dilemmas
Freshman Bemoans Weight
Problems And Frat Ridicule
Richard Pry or Busts Loose In Weekend Free Flick
The Free Flick for this weekend, "Stir Crazy starring Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder, has been
withdrawn due to a booking conflict beyond the control of the Student Union Films Committee. Runn-
ing in its place is Prvor's most recent film, "Bustin' Loose co-starring Cicely Tyson. The film will be
shown tonight at 7 p.m. only, and this Friday and Saturday nights at 5, 7 and 9 p.m. (the times listed in
Tuesday's edition of The East Carolinian were incorrect). "Bustin' Loose" sports Pryor as a salty, off-
color burglar-on-parole, with Cicely Tyson pfcyiag a devoted teacher of eight emotionally disturbed
children whose private Philadelphia school has lost its funding and must close. Pryor is conned into
drivine the school's dilapidated bus and its load of kids cross-country to Tyson's home in Washington.
Bus breakdowns, a nymphomaniacal girl, a pyromaniacal boy and a confrontation with the Ku Klux
Klan provide Prvor the stage on which to display his comic genius.
By JULIE MORGAN
M�!f W ri�r
The word diet never really held
any significant meaning for me.
However, during my teenage years
mv mother did repeat the word quite
often. You see, 1 was what you
might call a little on the chunky
side. Now I was not busting our of
all my clothes mind you, but I did
enjoy a few mosre chips than most
people.
Whenever my mother started a
new fad diet she would bribe me or
challenge me to join her. New war-
drobes, hard cash, or even the threat
of being grounded, never stoped me
from having a cup of popcorn at the
end of the first week of my diet. My
theory was lose two; gain one.
Weight watchers was my mother's
favorite group of calorie couters.
She used to pick me up from school
and would have to wait in the lobby
while she "weighed in Soon she
convicned my to bcome a member.
By this time my mother had joined
and re-joined so many times she
could have opened her own office.
You might say that WW just never
stuck to my bones.
1 think my biggest weakness was
eggs. However my mother came
through for me once again. She told
me about this new diet called "The
Skier's Diet The directions were
to eat a boiled egg three times a day,
and drink lots of water. The diet
guarenteed you to lose ten pounds in
two weeks.
Well 1 have to say this was the
first diet that I ever stuck strictly to.
At the end of two weeks 1 was
unhappily suprised, though. I had
only lost five pounds. Figuring out
the reason for only half weight loss
took a long time, but 1 did come to a
reasonable conclusion. Sure, you
could lose ten pounds in two weeks
on this diet, but only if you are ski-
ing everday at the same time.
When I got my warning slip to get
a physical before I entered E.C.U I
got sick. I hate to go to the doctor's
for a physical. But this time the doc-
tor succeeded in making my day.
After my examination Dr. Glenn sat
me down for a discerntation. He
relayed to me quite frankly, "Julie,
it is not that you are chubby; the
fact is, you are a "big-boned" girl
Now was that supposed to make me
feel better? I thought that was a
doctor's job. His honesty did make
a little impact on me, but apparently
not enough. I dove into a pizza
when 1 got back home.
All I ever heard this summer was,
"You better lose weight now
because God knows you won't in
college College was said to be a
junk-food eater's paradise. After
being here a month, 1 think I'm in-
clined to agree. The night that
would soon change my whole way
of life was to soon come to pass.
My friends and I attended one of
the little sister "Rush" parties a few
weeks ago. The night was moving
along pleasantly, until around ten
o'clock. Suddenly one of the
"Frat" brothers came over to chat
with me. Boy, was I surprised. The
conversation seemed to glide
without pauses. The young man.
without any gumption what-so-ever,
conclude his chat by asking me if 1
wanted to be his "big sister Then
he said he was only kidding.
I about had a heart attack. The
nerve of that guy! 1 was totally em-
barassed.
That weekend, though, 1 got to
thinking about that remark. What
he said was true. This time 1 was go-
ing to start a diet, and stick to it.
Nor a fad diet, but just cutting
back. I go to an exercise class every
night, and the days are going a lot
better.
If I ever sec that "Frat" brother
again I'll probably thank him. He
said what it took. However, he
doesn't have what it takes to make
the "big" time!






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13, 1981
Classwork Included Students' Deviant Behavior
Continued From Page 5
We went through the halls of
Brewster singing Christmas Carols.
It was the day of Econ exams and
there were a lot of teachers lecturing
with the door open. Most of them
stuck their head our the door then
slammed it.
"1 don't think it's the best way of
teaching sociology. A lot of teachers
got mad at us. The hardest part of
being deviant is the conscience. It
was hard to sit back and say 'lets be
deviant Although it definitely
made my day most interesting. I had
never thought that I would be doing
such in college. I never had anyone
tell me to be deviant.
"1 must say that I did not think it
was very nice of one of the groups to
till the elevator up with desks
because there was a man in a
wheelchair and he couldn't get
down to the lower levels of Brewster
because the elevator was filled with
desks.
"Really it (the deviance experi-
ment) was on the verge of being out
of control.
"One group kidnapped the
teacher and she seemed to like it.
Also they rolled the room and the
teacher with toilet paper. Someone
in another group dumped a big
metal trash can full of trash on top
of one of the sculptures in front of
the music building. The trash can
sat on top of the sculpture for six
days. Finally, the teacher asked that
whoever put it there take it down. In
another incident, someone dropped
a trash can from the third floor of
Brewster. It was totaled
Another student said of ther
group activities, "Our group ran
through Memorial Gym, looking
for something deviant to do. We
ripped down some posters, and
unscrewed light bulb. Then we
found some mail cubby holes and
rearranged all of the mail that was
in them. We wanted something bet-
ter to do and were running out of
time. We saw some bicycles so we
decided to steal one. We left a note
saying why we took the bicycle.
Then we took the bicycle up the
third floor of Brewster and showed
it to our teacher. Then we put it
back. Originally we were going to
put soap in the water fountains, but
we though it might be illegal. So we
didn't do it.
"We really enjoyed it. We were
professional deviants.
One group dumped a trash can
full of paper on a teacher's desk
while he was lecturing and one
groups started pulling desks out of
Foreign Student
Describes Life
the classroom while a teacher as
lecturing in it "
Bonita Ratcliff, a graduate stu-
dent in the Sociology department
made the assignment and com-
mented saying, "To me the exercise
was very successful. The students
understand what deviance was bet-
ter than they could from a book. J
would rather have the students go
out and perform a deviant act that
was legal rather than go out and
murder somebody.
"The students did a little bit more
than I expected. I'm glad 1 didn't
give them an hour. I haven't heard
anything trom my department head
I did get one complaint about the
desks
"I think it was very successful.
I he Campus police could not
confirm or deny the acts. Police
Chiel Francis Eddings said "I can't
tell you offhand (about the incidents
that took place). 1 would have to go
through the records. We have lots of
reports of vandalism
I he head o( the sociology depart
meni could not be reached for com-
ment
Goldfish Feasting
Reactions Mixed
Continued From Page S
reasonsA hundred bucks I
really need the money
Hawkins had a simpler goal. "To
win he said before he joined his
cheering friends.
One of the keys in the competi-
tions seemed to be the ability to
catch the fish quickly. The eating
did not seem to be anv problem at
all.
Judges for the event were Dean
Carroll, Lisa Ward, Robbie Smith
and Leslie Wilmoth. The emcee was
Pi Kappa Phi's David Martin.
It is unknown how the ASPCA
feels about the event but judging
from the reactions of some of the
observers it was not totally approv-
ed of.
"Look at all those poor little
fishes, waiting to die
"I couldn't stand to drink that
scummy water
"I've heard that they swim
around in your stomach for a few
minutes until the acid kills them. I
wonder what that feels like?"
Most of the spectators left with a
feeling of disbelief. I can't believe
that guy at 45 goldfish. Forty-five
goldfish. How could they do that?
It's disgusting
But the participants obviously
didn't find it disgusting. Or at least
they didn't show it. Not a single
contestant used the trash cans con-
vieniently placed behind them. And
the audience was glad of it.
Especially when Martin told the
crowd that he advised everyone to
stay clear of Hawkins if he went to
the men's room.
Probably good advice.
By KRISHNA VASQUEZ
Staff Wriler
"Beirut is the Paris of the Middle
East says Mike Wallace. Unfor-
tunately, this is not true today of
Beirut; it is the setting of a war, and
one has been going on for six years.
It is a religious war that could last
throughout this century.
For many though, six years ago
Beirut was a peaceful home. One of
these many is Raja Atallah, a junior
majoring in Management and
Marketing here at ECU.
Raju has been here in the United
States for two years. Most of his
family have left Lebanon to seek
refuge from the war. Raja's parents,
who, in Lebanon owned an in-
surance company, are now residing
in Saudi Arabia. His sister is in
France, and his brother along with
his family is in California. Raja's
father occasionally goes back to
Beirut to check on the family's
home.
Life has given Raja a hard time,
but one wouldn't know it by speak-
ing with him. He is easy-going and
seems very eager to learn about new
things, places, concepts, and
cultures. He doesn't seem to mind
telling people of the hardships
which his family has encountered.
He even laughs when he says that an
average length telephone call with
his parents costs about $40.
One can see that Raja misses his
family's and friends presence im-
mensely. When he speaks of them
his voice is filled with vitality. He
does, however, get to visit with his
brother once in a while. During the
summer and school breaks he
travels.
Having studied French since he
began school, Raja has decided that
English will help him much more in
the business world. Asked if
Lebonese is difficult to learn, Raja
explains, "Lebonese is very difficult
because there are two languages; the
written and the spoken. 1 still make
mistakes when writing
Raja claims that he loves it here in
the U.S but would rather be back
in Lebanon with his family and
friends. He doesn't speak of going
back there to live, but maybe when
the war is over
Classifieds
FOR SALE
ALLIGATORS FOR sale at
bargain prices� your nod
Lacoste headquarters� Gordon
Fulp located at Greenville Coun
try Club 7S4-0SO4.
LIKE NEW: Fender guitar wifh
handsheli case and all ac-
cessories JI65 TS4 1805
I9M MGB. qood condition. Call
Renee at 7S� IS4I
YORK CORNET (trumpet) ex
cellent condition w mouthpiece
case and mute. Asking (200 call
'SI �7M
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE WANTED
S7Smonrh plus one hall utilities
Near campus on E. Tenth St. Call
7S 7�7d.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted 2
bdrm townhouse approx. S blocks
from main campus. Rent S7S mo.
utilities one third. Contact
7 58 6U7 Available now
ROOMMATE WANTED to share
Tar River Estates apt. 5 blocks
from campus. 2 bedrooms. 3
baths. $130 month one half
utilities. �0 deposit Call Scon
7S7 ims around noon or late at
night
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share apt at Eastbrook sns plus
utilities. Call 752 4443
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom duples ntar
Riverbiutf Rd 1120 deposit
i)?0 month plus one half utilities.
Call 75 2317
PERSONAL
WHO IS me ugliest man on cam
pus?
TYPING for students, professors
etc Kempie Dunn. 101 E Wright
Rd Greenville. NC 27(34 Call
752713 alter 1 p.m.
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy at
7S7 37J4
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen years experience as ad
mmistrative secretary wants to do
typing at home Reasonable rates.
Call 7 54 340
LOOK GOOD on paper Protes
sional typing. AMCAS, secon
danes, resume, research papers,
etc WRITE RIGHT. Tia-tMo.
WE SPEAK TuralxanAPA. PRC.
etc.) Highest quality typing, all
styte manuals WRITE RIGHT
757-�4
MARVIN tell us more about the
kink.
TYPING. THESIS, manuscripts.
reports all types and quantities
profesional quality reasonable
rates Call 754 J7U
LOST. ORANGEGREEN striped
beaded chokder necklace, along
E. It St. Thursday morning
September 24. Contact Janice or
Renate at 757 4451 or come by
School of Musk office Reward.
MOLLY: the Elbos not such a bad
place after all, huh
HELP NEEDED with term
papers Good pay included Cat
7SJ4Jt47
LOST PINK sunglasses in front of
Jenkins Art Building Sat. the toth
Sentimental value. Reward. Con
tact Jill. Jenkins room 213 or call
754 500
WANTED: assorted articles of
SM parphernalia Call Wm.
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
Coming
Next
Week
EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. 9th St. 752-2332
'Variety of Fresh & Frozen Seafood
'Lobster Tails 'King Crab Legs
' 'Clams 'Crab Meat
'Hard Crabs
WE ALSO SELL S-fl00
USED TIRES 1U00
and p
A
R
I
Is tl
jr hi
facelift
This
C a
Home
fer
dei
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residen
fror
Int'
the
a
the-
Road
'Proudly 4Wi"6
81
UJCTrUS
V, DUBN& OCID6ER
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YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE
Only 5' From 8-9 P.M.
35 From 9-10 P.M.
FREEMUNCHIES
THIS COMING
TUESDAY, OCT. 20th
TO TT?0LL MUSIC
av
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Soft
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Record Bar
CAROLINA EAST MALL
PITTPLA4ZA
J
Vali
N.
t
1





r
lent head
ibout the
ssful.
id not
Police
1 can'i
(incidents
I
t
Art School Offers
Room Face-Lifts
THE EAS1 CAROL INIAN
OCTOBER 15. 1981
LettKtotfOG About Coll�UTh� Hakp 1aJW
tH DaU? AWIS
By TRACEY
JAKOV1CS
sun Wriiw
Is there a room in
your house that needs a
facelift?
This fall, the East
Carolina School of
Home Economics is of-
fering a free interior
decorating service to
local Greenville
residents.
Undergraduates
from the "Problems in
Interiors" class have
the option of choosing
a project that takes
them into the homes of
local residents to help
them redecorate a
room.
The students deal
with a variety of mat-
ters such as measuring
the rooms, arranging
furniture and putting
together floor plans.
They also work with
lighting, wall cover-
ings, window
treatments and color
coordination. Mrs.
Meyers, their instruc-
tor, says, "This pro-
gram focuses on put-
ting together all design
elements towards main-
taining effective and ef-
ficient space
The students present
their ideas to the resi-
dent in the form of a
colorful, professionally
done swatchboard. If
the resident likes the
students ideas he or she
may hire a professional
interior decorator to
carry out the plans. The
resident pays only for
the cost of the swat-
chboard materials
which usually ranges
form ten to fifteen
dollars.
Mrs. Meyers feels
that this program has
great educational
value. The program
helps her students learn
to deal with people,
work out design deci-
sions and learn to cope
with client needs. "This
program prepares the
students involved for a
professional career.
The program is mental-
ly exhausting, but very
rewarding
The deadline to app-
ly for this program is
October 15. Anyone in-
terested in having a stu-
dent work with one of
their rooms should
telephone 757-6929 and
leave their name and
telephone number.
A�0, iwetOvEP fLrM0fi�D
tooth ftere ?
(Mhaha- i Hoee
HE PO�SvT 66T OTO
Ml U70aJ-SC�JT�:P
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az:a
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STEftKHOUSE
3005 E. 10th St.
Hours:
Sun. thru Thurs.
11 a.m. to? p.m.
Fri.&Sat.
11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Road To Homo
MARTY BEAR

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Also �
�Color TV
�Pinball
IS
D
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�Attendant on Duty
� Lots of Washers & Dryers
COUPON
Free soap for every wash.
Offer Expires Oct. 31,1981
10 Ditterent Items Under 3.00 Every Day
� All Day Specials �
Monday and Wed. Beef Tips 2.39
Tues. & Thurs. 8 oz. Chopped Sirloin
Both of Above Served wBaked Potato
or French Fries and Toast.
2.09
Monday thru Friday Soup & Sandwich
1AA (Steakburgeror
9jfjf Chicken Sand.�No Potato)
Great Luncheon Specials
11 A.M. to 2 P.M.
Chef Salad 1.99 4 oz. Chopped Sirloin 1.19 5S1SSE25S
Fri Sat. & Sun (Oct. 2-4) Buy 8 oi. Ribeye - Get Free Salad Bar
Petite Sirloin 2.50
Kids under 12 eal Stperburger or child's plate vwpotafo for 99'
Sorry, no take outs on specials
o

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MARTY BEAR - This Friday Night From 9 to 11 PM
Tne Cotfehouse � Downstairs In Mendenhall � Admission 75'
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CAROLINA
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Sat
Oct. 17�
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Sun
Oct. 18�
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rieetftzeet
fagS
'�mHtjjjjjt
wmjLw l�- i
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Rise Up In The Night-
Brice Street's debut
on Dolphin Records�
on sale now through
October 21.
5.99 (LP only)
LPfffN
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COMPETITION
(Playing Field is Located Behind
The Allied Health Building on the ECU Campus)
� MCOBDS A TAPIS � �f
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Carolina East MallPitt Plaza
JEANS
Values To $20.00
If Perfect Assorted
Styles & Fabrics
Sizes 5 to 15
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ana
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Greenville,
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Store Hours:
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10-8
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1HI t Sl i AROl INIAN
Sports
' .( I i ;U K
Cajuns Not
Ragin' Yet
This Season
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
iuat Sfnri duo
Suddenly, the Ragin' Cajuns oi
Southwestern 1 ouisiana aren't
ragin' after all.
I ast week the Cajuns were riding
a one game winning streak the
longest streak in the South land
Conference- of one game, that be-
ing d easy 34 11 victory over North
rxas State.
1 he winning streak didn't eon
tinue, however, as the Cajuns fell to
wishbone-oriented Arkanas State
in a defensive stiuggle, 14-3.
Arkansas State dropped a 24-20
sion lo the University of Rich-
mond earlier in the season. 1 ne
Pirates defeated that same Rich-
mond team last Saturday, 17-13
The loss put Southwestern Loui-
siana's record at 1-4 this season,
which is coach Sam Robertson's se-
cond at Lafayette.
1 ast season Southwest Louisiana
posted a 7-4 record, one victory
coming against the Pirates oi Fast
Carolina. 27-21, in Greenville.
Saturday, the Pirates travel to
Lafayette to face the Cajuns.
Southwestern lost its opener to
Southern Missisippi, 33-7, and also
fell the next week to rival
Southeastern I ouisiana in 7-0
defensive struggle.
The Cajuns run a multiple offense
which features tunning back dreg
Davis, a sophomore who was
sidelined last week with a twisted
knee but has rushed 53 times for 284
vards He is the only Southwestern
running hack who has broke the
yard barrier this season. Davis
ran for 162 ards against Northeast
Louisana.
Senior quarterback Curt
aldarera has improved with each
start this season, passing for 402
vards and three scores prior to the
Arkansas State contest. Caldarera is
third in the Southland Conference
in pasing.
Caldarera's favorite receivers this
season have been Greg Hobbs and
Claude Charles, who have eight and
s. catches respectively. Charles has
scored three touchdowns. Tight end
Brent Anderson also has six catches.
Running backs Charles and David
Foret are the leading scorers this
season with 18 points each. Kicker
Oscar Speer has hit on all seven of
his extra-point attempts and three of
five field goals prior to the contest
with Arkansas State.
The Southwest defense is an-
chored by defensive back Cooler
Mansur, who has accounted for 32
tackles so far this season. Defensive
end Andy Martin has chipped in
with 28 tackles.
As a team defensively. Southwest
has been porous, allowing a total o
335 yards per game this season �
146.5 rushing and 190 via the pass
Offensively, Southwest has rush-
ed for an average of 14 vards per
game while passing for 143.
Defensive back Michael Dupre
leads the team m interception with
three.
Southwest has 39 letterman retur-
ning, 20 on offense and 19 on
defense. However, the Cajuns lost
19 letterman. Of the 19. nine were
on defense and 10 were on offense.
The Southland Conference school
lost 14 starters overall.
Southwestern 1 ouisiana leads the
series with Fast Carolina, two
games to one. The second victory
for the Cajuns came last season
when East Carolina lost five
fumbles during a 10-minute span in
the second half to give Southwest a
22! win in Pirate coach Fd
Emory's debut at Ficklen Stadium.
The loss was the first for Fast
Carolina in three years on their
home field.
The series' opener in 1977 was a
tough 9-7 win for Southwest in a
defensive battle. However, in 1978,
the Pirates bounced back to romp
past the Cajuns, 39-9.
EC Cagers
Open Drills
BIt ARLKSHANDLER
S(i�irt Krtnur
Practice begins today (Thursday)
foi the Fast Carolina basketball
team and head coach Dave Odom
savs there is an air of optimism sur-
rounding the new season.
"We're very excited he said "I
feel, personally, from a staff stand-
point that we are probably better
prepared and have a better idea of
our personnel's abilities than we
have been in the other two years
combined
Odom's third season at the Pirate
helm is the team's first in the
Fastern College Athletic Conference
(1 (AC). The Bucs will compete in
the FCAC -South.
After having his teams post 16-11
and 12-14 records the past two
seasons as an independent, Odom
savs he is ready to get into con-
ference play
"The door has been opened for
an NCAA berth he said. "The
league tournament in March will
determine which conference school
will earn the berth
Odom is also encouraged by the
1981-82 Pirate schedule. League
foes Old Dominion, Richmond,
George Mason, James Madison and
William & Mary will play in Minges
Coliseum. Navy is the only ECAC
South school that will not come to
Greenville.
In addition, the Pirates will host
UNC -Charlotte, Ohio University
and UNC-Wilmington. The team
travels to such places as N.C. State
and Duke and will compete in tour-
naments hosted by West Virginia
and Missouri.
duard Charles Watkins (6-3,
junior) heads an impressive list ol
Pirate returnees. The New Orleans,
la. native led the team last season
with a 12.8 average. Other starters
returning include Michael Gibson
(6-8 center-forward) and Mark
McLaurin (6-6 swingman). Point
guard Tony Byles will be back after
starting in 1979-80 and sitting out
last season.
Six other lettermen from last
season return and will be joined by
five newcomers. Odom says,
though, that the team seems to be
very close.
"In my brief informal meetings
with the players, I can sense a feel-
ing of unity within the program tha
I have not felt my first two years. I
hope this is a sign that we have made
good progress in intangible, yet im-
portant, ways
Odom will be aided be a com-
pletely re-aligned staff. David
Pendergraft has been promoted
from part-time to full-time assistant
status. Tom Barrise is also new as
the other full-timer. They replace
George Felton, now with Georgia
Tech, and Eddie Payne, now head
and athletic director at Belmont-
Abbey.
Don Carter is the new graduate
assistant, joining the club after serv-
ing as head coach at Frederick
Military Academy. Herb Krusen, a
former ECU star, is on hand as a
volunteer coach.
The Pirate season begins on Nov.
28, when Ohio University comes to
Minges Coliseum.
Rising To The Occasion
The Pirate defense in last Saturday's victory over Richmond brought back memories
of the "Wild Dogs the nickname of the ECl defense of the 1970s.
Pirates'
Schedule
Tough
Bv IIMM DuPRH
Managing
Although 'he 1 ad P
! a '
fourtl
I r u zz i '
id i- well pn
ot daily woi �
"We'll be
basket
teachii entals
plain- Andi
.ong


t i
with no lin

ed an P
23 7
a Mai :ia Girven K
and 1 a
with ne �
Loraine 1
V
kname

and w
n with
diii
:
I

mer
' TI
"Ou
"Wi
n two
the Mia lboree,
?Id Don
on the
hey lo.
Noveml opener
-
'� I hese gii -
�; s i i n s
"We've playe
know we have to com
easy wins and exp
or 1
(Coliseumi. You ha
best and win
On The Road Again
Emory Says SWL Game Most Vital
BvHARI LS('HAND! EK
sporls fr ditor
"We must win this game. It's the
most important one o the year for
us
ECU head coach Ed Emory left
little doubt at his weekly press con
ference Wednesday how he is ap-
proaching the Pirates' game this
weekend with Southwestern I oui-
siana.
"This game can make our
season Emory said. "A win amid
give us momentum going into two
very tough games. Believe me. we
cannot afford to look past this
one.
The Pirates, 3-3 after a 17-13 win
over Richmond last week, come
back after the game with
Southwestern to host 1 lth-ranked
Miami on Octobet 24 and then
travel to powerful West Virginia the
following week.
Southwestern I ouisiana's Rajun'
Cajuns are 1-4. a most disappoin
ting mark for a team that had high
expectations. I he lone win, though.
came over Noith Texas State bv a
34 14 margin. NTSU lost to now
top-ranked rexas by a mere 24-13 a
week before that.
1 he Cajun defense is what wor-
ries Emory the most Despite losing
to Arkansas State. 14-3, last Satur-
day the Cajuns allowed the nation's
fifth-ranked rushing team only 224
yards on the ground like the
Pirates. Arkansas State runs the
wishbone, lhis, said Emory, gives
I SI an advantage.
"They've had three weeks to get
ready for our wishbone said the
third-year coach. "They had an
open date and then played Arkansas
State. 1 hey did a great job last week
and that concerns us a great deal
Adding to Emory's concern is the
fact that the Pirate offense managed
onlv ten first downs and 201 vards
against Richmond a week ago.
"It's verv. ver disappointing to
know that we ran 68 plavs last week
and onlv averaged 2.9 yards (per
play) Emory claimed, rhe biggest
disappointment o all was that we
had 25 missed assignments We're
stopping ourselves when we do thai
more than they're stopping us
The Pirates obviously do not
want a repeat oi last season, wl
they fumbled three tunes in a
minute period in the thud quartei en
route to a 2" 21 loss to I SI
Encouraging in the win over the
Spiders was the play oi the Bus
defense 11 11 oi the team's points
were set up bv big plays by the
defenders.
"The onlv way we same hack to
Greenville with a win was because oi
the defensive effort displayed in
(Richmond's) City Stadium
Emory said point blank "The
defense played with great, great in-
tensity and with a great deal oi
character. We ceitamlv hope that
will carry over into this week
Emory described the club's thud
win of the year as "the shot in the
arm we needed Still, though.
e were some v i ,s
Both of the Pirates' top two no
guards, Ice Griffin and Matk If
vin, are questionable for S I ay's
gam v : iffin was injured I
weeks ago against Duke and 1 rvin
went down in the first halt I
� eek.
Freshman loin Smith is next in
line at the position I ineba
Ronald Reid has practiced some at
nose guard a- well this week
1 wo defensive Mskks, starter Ha
Stephens and top reserve Steve
Johnson, are also questionable
Johnson had eve suigerv earlier this
week and Stephens has a
ankle
Saturday's game gets undcrwav at
8 JO p.m. EDT. It will be aired
Uvailv bv radio stations WITN-FM
(93.3) and WOOW -Wl (1340)


1





I
HIIASI C AROI INI AN
OCTOBER 15, 1981
le
Rrr
of
iei young
the rigoi s
time
v uIs
.i a
Dei
vil'll
- tn a
ames
. Rilc
- aced
ane.

e 1 ad
rhides X
� (
know
. but
i �f the sum-
comers
l our
here
is a;e hard
�s on
out
who
have or
are par-
ts and
national-
N.C. State
schedule.
tfill be
uthful
� � rard
n opener
e a top
'op
ne explains.
in the past.
ontinue to
i meet our
ledule with
national
Minges
e ! the
ital
mu W � t !
and Ervin
naii
1next in
nlinebacker
c at
� Ct'K
r?er Hal
erve Steve
-testionable.
tervearlier this
as a sore
jnderwav at
M11 be aired
pu.WITN-FM
Lm(1340).
Intramural
Sports-N-Shorts
BY GREG MELTON
Demon Deacs
Down Pirates
ATTIC
THURS
FREE
Rock Nightclub
THURS.
FREE
TO ANYONE WEARING
AN ATTIC T-SHIRT
FRI. & SAT.
wSNOW
IM Depart
Event Crazy
BIGGEST A.A.G. EVER
What has 12 legs, 12 arms, stuffs burritos
down its face and calls itself the slut puppies?
Well, it can only be the winner of the annual
ECU Intramural Anything Goes Competitin-
which was held on Wednesday, October 7 at the
College Hill field. A total of 50 teams par-
ticipated in the affair which is sponsored by our
good friends at Jeffreys Beer & Wine
Distributors. They were even more generous
than in the past as they helped conduct the
event and also gave trophies and T-shirts to the
participants.
In reviewing the action it should be noted
that all of the various events are of a relay type
and are scored on the fastest possible time of
completion. Picture 12 people stuffing eggrolls,
hamburgers, burritos and pizza into their
mouths all at once, attempting to be the first
one to swallow the food and recite a message at
the finish line. Well, no one got sick and all the
�woofers" gave it their all.
Other events included the "Campus Shuffle"
in which contestants attempted to jump rope,
blow 10 bubbles while chewing gum, play hop
scotch and roll beer kegs while retaining their
sanity.
As mentioned earlier, the "Slut Puppies"
finished first and congratulations go to team
members Robin Biel. Andrew Hay, Jerry
Phillips, Joe Rossilgnol, Diane Stetson and Sue
Stieman. The "Georgetown Fighting Cocks"
finished a close second followed by the
"Scuzzmen Worms Such names must surely
suggest the kind of enthusiasm that goes into
entering an activity of this type.
The ECU IM DEPT would like to thank all
of the contestants and a special thanks goes to
Taco Cid, Krispy Kreme, Szechuan Gardens,
Xbram's, Domino's Pizza and Burger King
who donated food for the "International
Eatery" relay. Finally, thanks go to "The Se-
md Chance" and "The Army Navy Store"
who also loaned merchandise for the activity.
The Almost Anything Goes affair is the kind
thing that Intramurals is intended to repre-
sent Everyone involved had a great time and
we encourage all those back next year to get in-
volved and enter a team.
TRACK MEET
Remember that the ECU IM DEPT is spon-
soring a track meet on Thursday. October 15. It
will begin at 3 p.m. and we encourage everyone
to come out and watch as ECU's future Olym-
pians strive to set new records in events ranging
from the Shot Put to the Mile Run.
Wake Forest was in-
deed a demon toward
the Lady Pirates of
East Carolina in a col-
legiate tennis match
Tuesday afternoon at
Riverbirch.
The Demon Deacons
shut out the Pirates,
9-0.
In singles competi-
tion, Tay Andesle
defeated Katherine
Tolson, 6-1, 6-0; Kiss
Hite defeated Debbie
Christine, 6-0, 6-1;
Karen Akers lost to
Alice Rhoton, 6-1, 6-1;
Amy Barnett defeated
Janet Russell, 6-2, 6-1,
Tracey Eubank was
defeated by Katie
Carter, 6-1, 6-2 and
Kim Harrison lost to
Carrie Short, 6-1, 6-2.
The team of Andesle-
Carter was defeated by
Tolson-Christine, 6-1,
6-1 in double's com-
petition. Also, the team
of Hite-Rhoton
defeated Russell-Akers,
6-3, 6-3 while Barnett
and Short defeated
Harrison and Kim
McMahon, 6-2, 6-2.
"The match with
Wake Forest was quite
an experience said
coach Caroline Brown.
"We're looking for-
ward to our next match
(against the Duke Rac-
quet Club October 25).
We've already beat
them once, 8-1.
The Lady Pirates are
now 2-3.
East Carolina and
Pembroke State battled
to a double-overtime tie
1-1 in collegiate soccer
action Wednesday
afternoon at Pem-
broke.
The two teams battl-
ed to a scoreless First
half time before tally-
ing one goal each in the
second period. ECU's
Billy Merwin scored on
a penalty kick while
Pembroke's Gonzalo
Suarez added his goal
on a breakaway.
For the Pirates,
freshman goalie Danny
Curtis had six saves,
and Pembroke's Eric
Burks tallied 16. The
Pirates had 28 shots
compared to only eight
by Pembroke.
The next match for
East Carolina is at the
University of Rich-
mond this Saturday
afternoon.
tin
CWjuMti
EVCRY THURS. 4 HI N&Wr-S
PRIVATE CUJB
m
mmm
Iv-
"The
Family
Steak

House
Famous
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WESTERN SIZZLIN'
MONDAY -
CHOPPED STEAK
n.99
TUESDAY -
BEEF TIPS.
THURSDAY -
STEAK SANDWICH
n.69
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WEDNESDAY -
CUBED STEAK
FRIDAY -
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
3.79
n.89
Free
Tea
with
ECU ID
SATURDAY -
BARBEQUE RIBS
2.99
SNOW
SUN.
PEGASUS PLUS
(FINAL ATTIC APPEARANCE)
SUNDAY, OCT. 18th AT JJ's
ROCK N' ROLL REVIVAL
with GREG ALLINSON
FEA TURING
EARLY BEATLES AND STONES:
FREE ADMISSION AND
ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT
9-11
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OCATEO B6MIND THE EL BO ROOV
DON'T LET THE NAME OF OUR
RESTAURANT FOOL YOU WE
ALSO SERVE FANTASTIC
LUNCH AND DINNER VlTTLES
SUCH AS BAR-B-Q BEEF RIBS,
FRESH COUNTRY STYLE FRIED
CHICKEN, STEAKS AND MUCH,
MUCH MORE.
BUY ANY MEAT
BISCUIT-GET
ADDED
EGG OR CHEESE
FREE
6 A.M6 P.M. Only Monday
Oct 12-Friday 16
No Coupon Required.
SATURDAY OCT. 17th
14k Gold Sale
OFF
established
retail
prices
Manufacturer's Sale
It's like the legendary Ah Boba's
treasures have come to J D
Dawson Co And all that glitters is
14 Karat plumb gold See
thousands of pieces displayed on
plush, black velvet dazzling
chains, bracelets pendants
charms, earrings pins - truly fine
imported jewelry for men and
women All the popular
styles and many unique origmol
designs from gold artisans
abroad Sale prices range from
1 99 to 1.500 00
Don't Miss It!
ONE DAY ONLY
(FREE)
Bottle of Jewelry Cleaner for First
100 People Saturday Morning
(FREE)
SURPRISE
PACKAGES
2.5CL
Values to 25.00
14K
PUFFED
HEART
5.99
UK
FILLIGREE
INITIALS
8.95
with 15"
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ea.
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EARRINGS
17.95
MATCHING CHARM
$
6.99
14 K Serpentine
Chain
7" Bracelet 7.99
15" Necklace 13.99
18" Necklace 15.99
SUNDAY -
STEAK ON A STICK
n.99
All Meals are
complete Including
Baked Potato or
French Fries
Texas Toast
ALL
STAR
MERCHANDISE
FINAL
Take Out Service
W3E !��� SI
rse-2u
2M Bypass -7U 0040
Hours II a.mIt p.m.
Mm Thvn.
10 a m. II p.m. FriSwi.
D. DAWSON CO
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville Location Only
NO PHONE OR MAIL ORDERS NO LAYAWAYS
SALE HOURS 9:30 A.M. till 7:00
1
master charge
j 'Ml X'l-B�H� ; MM)
VISA

Fri. Oct. 10th We Will Be Closing Early At 4 30 P.M.
To Prepare For Our Largest Jewelry Sale Only.






10
THi F.ASTCAROI 1NIAN
CK TOBlR IS. I'M I
Fearless Football Forecast
CHARLES CHANDLERWILLIAM YELVERTONCHUCK FOSTER( HR1SHOI IOMANJIMMY DuPREE
(54-17-1)(50-21-1)(49-22-1)(46-25-1)(45-26-1)
ECU AT SOUTHWESTERN 1 OUISIANAECU 24-13ECU 28-0ECU 21-101 CU 23 7Southwest 28-21
UNC AT N.C STATEUNCUNCUNCUM (
CLEMSON AT DUKEClemsonClemsonClemsonClemsonC lernson
MARYLAND AT WAKE FORESTMarylandMarylandMarylandMarylandWake f-orest
VA. TECH AT WEST VIRGINIAWest Va.West VirginiaWest VirginiaWest VirginiaW est Virginia
MISSOURI AT IOWA STATEMissouriMissouriMissouriMissouriMissouri
IOWA AT MICHIGANMichiganMichiganMichiganMichiganMichigan
TEXAS A & M AT BAYLORTexas A&MTexas A&MBaylorBaylorIexas A & M
SMU AT HOUSTONSMUSMUSMUSMUHouston
TEXAS AT ARKANSASTexasTexasTexasTexasArkan
MIAMI (Fla.) AT MISSISSIPPI ST.MiamiMississippi StateMiamiMiamiMiami
FIOR1DA STATE AT PITTSBURGHPittsburghFlorida StatePittsburghFlorida StateHonda State
North Carolina Rips Pirates
B CHRIS
HOLLOMAN
suit Wntrr
The University of
North Carolina
destroyed any hopes of
an East Carolina upset
Tuesday night in
Chapel Hill by soundly
defeating the Pirates,
15-0, 15-11 and 15-2.
The match was very
different from the first
meeting in Greenville
which went down to the
wire. The loss left the
Lady Pirates with a 1-4
record against A1AW
Division I competition.
After the match head
coach Lvnn Davison
was highly disap-
pointed with the per-
formance of her Pirte
team.
"I really have a lot of
trouble finding
anything positive about
the match Davidson
said. "They say that
you learn from your
mistakes, and if that is
so then we should be
very knowledgeable bv
now.
"One of the pro-
blems we had during
the match was that the
team had trouble
receiving the serve
she explained. "We
never really had a
chance to use our of-
fense.
"I was just vei disa-
pointed in the loss
continued Davidson.
"One o our trainers
asked me how 1 fell
after the match and I
told her thai I fell
about the same wav
coach (Ed) Emorv fell
after the football game
with Carolina.
"We played poorlv
but the Carolina
coaches knew we had a
beter team than we
displayed she aid.
"Their coaching stafl
fell that we just didn't
play verv well
The Pirates now
must regroup to face a
very tough Ap- earlier in the season, so seeding in the
palachian State team we need to bounce back t Chapel
on Friday in Minges and win this one she Hill
Coliseum. I he Moun- said. "We reallv need
taincers defeated the to beat Appalachian
Pirates earlier in the verv badly because this
season at Boone. is an AI AW Division I
"We lost a pretty game and our record
tough match to Sl will determine our
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all agBe at a reasonable oost
The Fleming Center we're here when
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I
DON'T MISS IT!
SEMI-ANNUAL
31VS
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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21
WATCH FOR OUR AD IN
TUESDAY'S EDITION OF
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BLDG.
OWNED AND OPERATED BY
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Items anft Pi �
Effe ' ��
Oct 17 1981
Copyigbt 1981
Kroge' Sa on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None So'd To Dealers

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Fall means
football, fun, and
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ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 15, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 15, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.154
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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