The East Carolinian, October 1, 1981






On The
Inside
Computing
For The
Humanities
Page 3
Oct.l, 1847:
Greenville's
Lawyers Duel
Page 5
Pirates Meet
Blue Devils
Saturday
Page 8
i
She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 12
Thursday, October 1, 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
10 Panes
Cuts Take Effect Today
B MIKE HUGHES
s(�ff Wnler
dents at LCI and other colleges and universities
und the nation already know that financial aid pro-
ims have taken on new looks. However, some
students may not know the extent of those changes �
d many of them take effect today.
On August 13. President Reagan signed into law
dgei cuts which affected the six major student aid
ams � Guaranteed Student Loans (GSL), Pell
. National Direct Student Loans (NDSI ). no-
wth programs. Parent loans and Student Social
Security.
se cuts and changes are diverse and will un-
edly affect hundreds o thousands of college
snts nationwide.
The GSI is no longer guaranteed to all students upon
uest. As o todav. students from families with an-
incomes o at least $30,000 have to demonstrate
al need 'he definition o which Congress and
S. Department ot Education have vet to agree
its applying tor the GS1 after August 23. 1981,
were also faced with two new fees � a "loan origina-
tion fee1 of 5 percent of the loan total and an "insurance
fee" ' 1 .5 percent.
. Pell Grants, formerly, Basic Lqual Opportunity
a iffer students130 less annually than one
vear ago In the tall of 1980, students could receive a
maximum of SI,800 per year. President Carter lowered
that to $1,750, and Reagan cut the ceiling to $1,670 an-
nually.
Congress signed no increases in NDSL funding
through 1984. The only major change in these loans to
students under the new law is that the annual interest
rate will climb from four to five percent.
The interest rates will also increase on Parent Loans.
Though current interest rates are tied to interest paid on
U.S. Treasury notes, the interest will increase from 9
percent in 1980 to 14 percent this year.
In the area of no-growth programs, Congress resolv-
ed to increase funding for supplemental education op-
portunity grants, College Work Study programs, state
Student Incentive Grants and Trio programs for the
disadvantaged.
Congress reluctantly decided to let independent
students continue to take out Parent Loans. However,
independent students cannot get more than $2,500 per
year in Parent Loans and Guaranteed Student Loans
combined.
Social Security benefits will be kept intact this year.
Originally, the Reagan administration wanted to stop
those benefits to the 800,000 students who currently
qualify, but a legislative compromise settled the ques-
tion. The amount of benefits will be cut by one-fourth
in the fall of 1982, and no new students will qualify as of
then.
Recruitment
Viet Nam Vet Protests
President
cuts are
aid funds
Ronald Reagan's budget
limiting student financial
By PATRICK O NF1I 1
si.ff Wnlrr
A solitary vigil opposing the
presence of a U.S. Marine Corps
recruiting unit on campus was con-
ducted last week by Glen Maughan,
an ECU education student.
Maughan stood in silence op-
posite the recruiting table in the lob-
by of the Student Supply Store
holding a placard stating. "The
Military Is Looking For A Few
Good Men And Women For Can-
non Fodder Fodder is the am-
munition used in a war cannon.
Maughan, a Viet Nam veteran,
had seen the recruiting table at the
bookstore the previous day and
become upset. "I really couldn't
sleep last night thinking about it
he said the day of the vigil.
"The people who haven't signed
their name on the dotted line yet �
they're the ones 1 want to reach
Maughan explained. "We're sup-
posed to be an institution of higher
learning, yet we condone the
presence of an organization that
trains people to kill
Maughan also commented on
President Reagan's current policy of
heavy military build-up and hard-
line verbal attacks on the Soviet
Union. "They (the American
public) eat it up. They love it
Maughan said "The Department of
Defense spreads paranoia� 'we
need more weapons, we need more
people They push it down our
throats
Student reactions to the vigil were
generally favorable, according to
Maughan Many stopped and of-
fered words of encouragement he
said. Others took copies of his
prepared statement. "People kept
telling me they were with me
Maughan added.
Speaking on his time in Vietnam,
Maughan said, "It was tragic. I
share grief with a lot of people. I
lost friends and 1 know a lot of peo-
See VIGIL, Page 2
Librarian Opposes Censorship
By FRANCEINE PFRRY
f.CV Ne�� Burr�M
Photo By MARIANNE BAINES
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Dr. Robert H. Maier
Vice Chancellor Named
To National Commission
t Ne� Hurrau
Dr. Robert H. Maier, ECU vice
chancellor for academic affairs, has
been appointed to the advisory
council for the blue-ribbon National
Commission on Higher Education
Issues, according Thomas M. Stauf-
fer, staff director of the commis-
sion.
The commission is investigating
means of maintaining quality in
higher education during times of
budget cutbacks, high inflation and
economic uncertainty.
Its advisory council will study the
commission's findings and advise
Sunny, Breezy
This Weekend
Mostly sunny and breezy today
with the high tn the mid 80s. Partly
cloudy with a chance of showers Fri-
day; highs in the upper 70s. Fair
Saturday fad Sunday with highs in
the mid 60s to low 70s.
on the key issues for inclusion in
recommendations.
The commission includes
representatives of eight national
higher education associations and a
number of leading administrators of
colleges and universities.
Members include Robert S. Mac-
Namara, former president of the
World Bank; Derek C. Bok, presi-
dent of Harvard University; Allen
W. Ostar, executive director of the
American Asssociation of State Col-
leges and Universities; Virginia B.
Smith, president of Vassar College;
Edward B. Friske, education editor
of the New York Times; and Ben-
jamin F. Payton, president of
Tuskegee Institute.
The National Commission on
Higher Education Issues is under-
written by a grant from the John D.
and Catherine T. MacArthur Foun-
dation of Chicago.
As vice chancellor for academic
affairs, Maier has administrative
responsibility for all academic
departments as well as related pro-
grams and functions in the College
of Arts and Sciences and all profes-
sional schools except the School of
Medicine.
When an indignant pressure
group snatches a "bad" book from
the shelves of a school or public
library, whose rights are threaten-
ed?
The book's author? The library
users? The intimidated librarian?
According 'o Dr. Gene D. Lanier
of the East Carolina University
library science faclty, everybody's
First Amendment rights to free ex-
pression are violated; all of us are
wronged.
Since becoming chairman of the
North Carolina Library Associa-
tion's Intellectual Freedom Com-
mittee last year, Lanier has been a
tireless defender of the public's right
to free access to published
materials.
In addition to his teaching duties
in the ECU Department of Library
Science, Lanier has spoken to
numerous civic and professional
librarians' organizations, urging
resistance to censorship.
"The Moral Majority and other
'concerned' groups are attempting
to dictate to American society what
they should believe, exclude
anything they find offensive as if it
did not exist, and specify what a
person should read, view and to
what he or she should listen says
Lanier.
"There are clear signs of a move-
ment to dismantle the barrier that
has separated government from per-
sonal morality and religion. This
kind of thinking can be seen in
many forms, such as so-called
'reviews' of school textbooks he
said.
Lanier points out that while most
censorship attemps today seem to
rise from a group's outrage on
moral or religious grounds, censor-
ship for political reasons has occur-
red in other times and other places.
A number of literary masterpieces
� including the novels "Madame
Bovary" and "Brave New World
the scientific works of Galileo, the
published philosophies of Locke,
Rousseau and John Stuart Mill,
even "revised versions" of the Bible
� have offended some individual or
some group and thus been banned.
Censorship persists today, with
the public or school library as the
usual battleground, the subjects
often being such best-sellers as Judy
Blume's "Wifey" or Peter Ben-
chley's "Jaws Lanier said.
"Libraries and the public should
share a common goal � a diverse
marketplace of ideas. If enough
people suport First Amendment
rights, forces who are attempting to
monitor and expurgate library
materials will soon burn themselves
out.
"A book is easier to burn than ex-
plain. Censorship betrays the in-
securities and fears of some of the
fanatical groups who try to ban
books
One of Lanier's chief regrets is
that most intelligent people, even
librarians themselves, avoid con-
frontations with would-be censors,
letting the issue die and the book-
banners win.
"It is distressing to discover that
pornographers, avowed por-
nographers, are the primary
defenders of First Amendment
rights, just as avowed recognized
criminals are the primany defenders
of due process of law Lanier em-
phasized.
"Society has the strange tendency
to evaluate the merits of concepts
and issues and values in terms of
who espouses them. If the only peo-
ple who are really way down con-
cerned and determined to fight for
the First Amendement are the guys
who want to spread the most lurid
of all possible sexual illustrations,
materials, and so forth on every
billboard on every superhighway in
the country, something has been lost
from the argument
Lanier hopes that defending the
library against pressure groups who
would censor its holdings will
become the concern of many, and
that libararians who are threatened
will take steps to resist.
"Most often, a censorship at-
tempt comes out of the blue. It's
precipitated by a given book. It hits
the librarian or the teacher all of a
sudden he said.
"We know of case after case
where librarians are suddenly con-
fronted with a demand that they
remove a book. Or we even find that
the librarian is the last to know that
a book has already been removed,
the action has been taken
Library materials � books,
periodicals, films and recordings �
are acquired for a variety of tastes
and interests, Lanier explained. Ob-
viously everybody is not going to
like every item in any library.
Parents, for instsance, might
worry about their teen-agers' fin-
ding amoral or atheistic points of
view in a book, or obscene
language, or explicit sex. Books
which portray ethnic minority
groups in an unflattering light
distress others.
"It is necessary foi us to have
faith in professional librarians
Lanir said. "They are well trained in
the process of selecting materials for
their libraries and media centers
"We leave medicine and law up to
the professionals. We should follow
suit with the professionally-trained
librarian
"When information is suppress-
ed, people cannot see the whole pic-
ture and solidify their values and
principles. A free people can best
guard its freedom by the fullest
possible understanding of all
philosophies
As the father of two school-aged
daughters, Lanier supports the no-
tion that children should be free to
read and learn about a variety of
ideas and lifestyles.
"Presuming young people cannot
think for themselves is a cynical in-
dictment of our youth he said.
"We cannot wish away crime,
violence, immorality and other
unacceptable ideas in our society.
They exist and I want my children to
be aware of them and how to deal
with them in evryday life
Ironically, the censors often
defeat their own suppression,
especially when a banning incident
makes headlines, Lanier observed.
"Any publication of a list of
unrecommended titles results in a
list of best-sellers. Ban a book and it
becomes a hit
"That's why the Roman Catholic
Church terminated their listing of
unrecommended titles several years
ago. Educators should teach vouth
HOW to think, not WHAT to
think
Meanwhile, as long as censorship
threatens First Amendment rights to
free expression, no one pressure
group can be assured of the upper
hand, he warns.
"Once a group is successful in
banning a book, other groups start
to line up and it never stops
"The Moral Majority may be
followed by the John Birch Society,
who may be followed by the
American Association of Atheists,
who may be followed by the
American Communist Party. Where
do you draw the line?"
"Histroy has shown that this
most fundamental freedom needs
constant nourishment and protec-
tion. To take freedom of expression
for granted is the first step toward
jeopardizing it
t�
�� fey OAV PATTCHSOM
77 take a hamburger and an order of fries to go, please. M
'v





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 1. 1981
Announcements
CHANGE OF MAJOR
& PREREGISTBATION
Change o Major � October 5 1
Preregistration October 1? 16
Only students currently I enroll
ed may preregister
COLLEGIATE 4-H
On Tue�day, October . the ECU
Collegiate 4 H Club will meet at 7
p m in Mendenhall, room IM All
members and interested persons
are urged to attend
CLOTHING
TEXTILES
The Clothing & Tetiles Associa
tion is holding its monthly
meeting on Oct 7 at 5 p.m.
Membership is open to all students
majoring or minormg in C&T We
welcome old members freshmen,
and transfer students to become
81 � members
The feature this month is a
demonstration in makeovers and
hairstyling by a consultant trom
Bel s Come Oin us
PSICHI
Psi Chi the National Honor
Sixiety m Psychology, will meet
Tuesday. October 6 at 7 pm in
Speight I7� Dr Susan McCam
mon will speak on the social and
psychological significance of the
use of birth control by college
aged woman Everyone is invited
�o attend
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
The sorors of the Eta Mu
i hapter of Sigma Gamma Rho
Sorority inc hope that your
school year, thus tar has been a
posit,ve an progressive one
Sioma Gamma Rho will be having
rush on Sunday. October 4. a' 7
p m m Mendenhal! Student
Center room 244 We entenri an in
vitatmn to you to come and learn
about Sigma, and Go With The
Gold
POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum will meet at
8 p m on Thursday October 1, in
Mendenhall 248 The meeting is
open to anyone wishing leedback
on his her poetry listeners in
vteO as well those planning to
read are asked to bring si or eiaht
copies of each poem
SKI SNOWSHOE
CHristmas and Sprin Break
trips will be mde to Snowshoe,
West Virginia tor PHVE creditor
non credit There will be an
organizational meeting on Mon
day, October 1? at S pm in
Mlnges. room 14J A slide presen
tatlon will be shown and informa
tion on ski packages will be
distributed Space is limited for
each trip Reservations will be ac
cepted at this meeting. For addi
tionai information contact Mrs Jo
Saunders at 7S7 �000. Memorial
Gym 705
ALPHA EPSILON
DELTA
AE D pre med 'pre dental honor
society will meet at 7 30 p.m
Tuesdsay. October in Flanagan
307 Dr Boice Daughtery. Oept of
Psychology, will be the guest
speaker AM interested persons
are invited to attend
PROFESSIONAL DRESS
WORKSHOP
Dr Geneva Yadev, Home
Economics, will be presenting a
workshop entitled Professional
Dress for Interviewing and Career
Advancement" on October 6 at 4
p m m the Home Economics
Building. Room 735 Dr Vadav
will discuss appropraite dress tor
both males and females, wMch
will provide more control of pro
fessionai situations - one being
the job interview How dress in
fluences one s perception will also
be discussed This workshop is be
ing sponsored lOintly by the School
of Home Economics and the
Career Planning and Placement
Office All staff, faculty and
students are invited to attend
SCIENCE MAJORS
On Monday, October 5,
American Chemical Society Stu
den Affiliate will meet at 7 p m in
Flanagan 202 All members and in
terested persons �re urged to at
tend
PHI TAU LITTLE
SISTERS
The Phi Kappa Tau Little
Sisters will hold its meeting this
Sunday night, October 4 at 9 30
p.m. This is a mandatory meeting
and everyone is expected to at
tend!
HONOR COUNCIL
Applications for Honor Council
and'or Review Board Member are
being taken in the SGA office m
Mendenhall Student Center. Rm
721
CALVIN KLEIN JEANS
The ECU Biology Club is raffi
ing a pair of men's or women's
Calvin K lein blue jeans donated by
Brody's Tickets can be purchased
for a 75 cent donation trom any
club member On October 7. the
Biology Club will also be selling
tickets at the student store Draw
ing will be on October 17
COME SING!
Take a break from studying and
have some fun
Come Monday night at 7 p m to
Jones Cafeteria to join the new
Residence Hall Chorus The mixed
chorus, open to all interested men
and women students, offers and
opportunity to perform showtunes,
Christmas music, and other
challenging music both on and off
campus. Rehearsals will be Mon
day nights from 7 to 8 p m
Organizer and director of the
new chorus is Dr Charles
Schwarti. Dean of the ECU School
of Music. Piano accompanist is
graduate music student Pat Bos'
No audition is required Just
come Monday night, October 5.
and join the funl
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
Any student that has some m
terest in pursuing some
philosophy outside of the
classroom with other interested
students is cordially invited and
encouraged to attend an organize
tionai meeting of the Philosophy
Club on Tuesday, October 6, at 4
p m in Brewster D 309 You need
not be a philosophy maior or
minor to participate in the ac
tivities of the club If you have any
qeustions or are interested in com
ing. but unable to attend a' this
time, please contact Dr Georgalis
at 757 6171. or come by Brewster
A 335
CO-OP SESSION
All ECU secretaries and office
staff are urged to attend a Co op
awareness session on Thursday.
October 1. from noon to 1 p m
"Bring your own lunch" in 306
Rawl For more information, call
757 6979�6375 today!
HIGH HOLIDAY
Students and faculty are invited
to High Holiday Services at Tern
pie Israel (a reform congregation)
at 1109 W Vernon Ave Kinston
The following is a schedule for
services
Erev Yom Klppur IKol Nidre),
10 7 81, 7 p m
Yom Kippur Day. 10 8 81. 10 am
Morning, 3 30 Afternoon. 4 45
Memorial Service, 5 30 Con
eluding Service
Succot Services. 10 16 81, 8 p m
For further imforma'ion, call
Joan Crane. 7$6 5408 or Marty
Goldfarb, 756 7266
FIELD HOCKEY
There will be a practice Tuesday
at 5 p m for all gins who have su
bmitted their forms for a physical
Practice will be held in the center
ot the track near Harrington
Field For more intormation call
Beth Christian at 757 1771
SEMINAR
1 he ECU Department of
Chemistry will present "Highly
Stereoselective Asymmetric Syn
thesis" by Dr Ernest L E'lei ot
the Department of Chemistry of
the University of North Carolina
at Chapel hhI on Friday. October 1
at 3 p m in Room 70! Flanagan
BuildihJ Refreshments will be
served in 'he Conference Room
toltowinq 'he seminar
P.E. MAJORS
Ail studens who plan to declare
physical education as a major dur
ing chanqe of maior week for the
tall semester should report to
Mmges Coliseum a' 1 p.m on
Wednesday September 30 for a
motor and physical fitness test
Satisfactory performance on this
'es' is required as a prerequisite
tor official admittance to the
pysical education maior program
More detailed information cover
ng the tes' is available by railing
7 57 6447
NAACP CONVENTION
Greenville will be hos'ing the
38th annual NAACP Convention at
the Ramada inn, October 8 11
Anyone interested m attending,
please con'acl Virgime Canton a'
75? 6180
WOMAN'S SOCCER
ECU Woman's Soccer Club
Organizational Meeting at 8 P m ,
Sunday. October 4 at 927 E 14th
Street (behind Beld dorml We
will discuss practice times, game
scheduling and do a little paper
work Any questions, call 758 7170
and ask for Chris
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
CHANGES
General College students should
contact their advisers prior to Oc
tober 5 to arrange tor preregistra
tion
PACE
The filing period tor the Profes
Sional and Administrative Creer
Examination (PACE) is from
September 14 rtlrougrl Oc foOer 13
information is available in the
Career Planning and Placement
Office A sufficient score on PACE
is necessary to qualify for many
entry level Federal Government
positions
KNOWLEDGE
Do you want to know the truth?
The rightly divided Word of God.
the Bible, is the truth (II Tim
7 15) God wants you to know the
truth about life (I Tim. 7.3,41
That is what we teach Come by if
you want to know more, Monday.
October 5. 7 30 pm room 742.
MSC
BIKE RIDERS
Take a ride with the Tar River
Cyclists this weekend' The
regular Saturday morning ride
has been moved to 9 a m because
of the cooler weather A Sunday
ride is scheduled tor 1 30 p m All
will begin a' Elm Street Gym on
Elm Street up the hill from Tenth
For mose who would like to ar
range rides individually, a roster
is available near the information
window at the police station
The club is planning a camping
ridmg trip at Kerr Lake.
November 6 8 interested riders
should contact a member of the
steering committee by October 70.
or attend the steering committee
meeting on October 70 at 7 p m at
the Community Building at Fourth
and Green streets
The Steering committee
members are Tom Marsh. Robin
Curry, George Moye. Carroll Web
ber, and woody Simpson For m
formation call 758-9928
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
Phi Kappa Tau Little Sister
Rush will be at 9 p m until at the
Phi Tau House, 409 Elizabeth St
Come to party, and meet ad the
Phi Taus1 � "A Legend tew All
Times
CLEAN UP
COMMITTEE
The Greenville Beautitication.
Clean Up Litter Control Commit
tee will meet at the Public Works
Building. 1500 Beatty St at 7 30
p.m. on Thursday. October 1
JOB SEARCH
A series of workshops will be
conducted by the Career Planning
and Placement Center in the areas
of interviewing techniques and the
preparation of 'he resume
"Resume Preparation" a' 7 p m
Oct 6 at 3 p m , Oct 7 at 4 p m .
and Oct 8 at II am Each
workshop will last approximately
one hour and will be held in 'he
Bloxton House ladiacent to
Greene Dorm) All seniors are in
vited to attend
COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
The Student Union Coffeehouse
Committee will be sponsoring
auditions for the fall semester Oc
tober 2 and 3 at 9 p m to 11 p m m
Room 15 of Mendenhall Student
Center All interested performers
may sign up in Room 234,
Mendenhall Student Center Ad
mission is free
SCEC
Student Council for Exceptional
Children will hold their first
meeting on October 5. Room 129
Speight at 4 p m We welcome all
to Oin us
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
To all Pre Occupational
Therapy students any other m
terested people Please come lo
the ECU Occupational Therapy
Student Association get together
Tuesday, October 6 at 7 p m mthe
Mendenhall Mul'i Purpose Room
This is a chance tor all people m
'erested in occupational therapy
as a possible rareer to come and
get acquainted with the iunior and
senior students, the ECU O T
faculty and community occupa
tionai therapists A short film will
be presented, as well as a question
and answer session Refreshments
wil' be served If you have any
questions or need further
asistance. please feel Ire. to i all
757 3819 Hope 'o see you there
MODEL UNITED
NATIONSCLUB
On Thursday October 1 a' 4
p m there will be a meeting ot the
Model un.ted Nations Club m
Brewster Building room C 105
Elections will be held at this
meeting, so il s important for all
interested r� yardless of maiOl '
attend
COLLEGE BOWL
Test ou' your knowledge In the
varsity sport of the mmd The Col
lege Bowl competition will be held
October 11 13 m Mendenhall
Teams are forming now Applica
'ions are available m Mendenhall
You mus' nave five players and a
coach
"WOMEN'S MO WOLDS m&0
@2@0m mm�
i
TOES. 0CT. fe"
c
A
the l � i
men
thinj
matt
thai
tant Pi
be n

Mai
Vigil Held At Store
Continued from Page I
pie who are missing arms and legs.
It (the U.S. involvement) was a
waste of human talent
The Marine Corps recruiters had
little to say about Maughan's ac-
tion. "We don't comment on these
kinds of things they said. "We set
up our table next to the gay group at
Chapel Hill. We respect his right to
protest
PA
Touch
Of
Class"
KATZ
Thurs.
Night
Super College
Night
One Cover Charge �
Free Bev. �
All Night Long
Fri. - Super After
Class Party
Doors open ot 3:00
Rock-N-Roll Afternoon
with your favorite
beveroge only 35.
River
Bluff Rd.
Behind
Pott Putt
Maughan feels the military solu-
tion to conflict is no longer viable in
a nuclear age. "The military pro-
motes the arms race he said. "It's
always been connected. It always
has been
Maughan vowed to return, with
others, if further recruiting by the
military is conducted on the ECU
campus. "Many students support
me and 1 will come back as long as
they do
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
GettingYour Degree?
CONGMTULATIONS!
(got somewhere to go?)
GET HEAPING PORTIONS
ATAPR1CE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
October 1. Thursday SO 15
CHICKEN N DUMPLINGS
2 vegetables
October 2, Friday �Q59
TROUT ALMONDINE. 2 vegetables Z
October 3, Saturday cm-q
CHOPPED SIRLOIN STEAKZ3
2 vegetables
October 4, Sunday Q29
TURKEY & DRESSINGZ
2 vegetables
October 5. Monday tniq
COUNTRY-STYLE STEAKZ"
2 vegetables
October 6. Tuesday SO09
BROILED CALFS LIVER, Z
2 vegetables
October 7. Wednesday � q 09
BAKED SPAGHETTI. 2 vegetables �.
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Can Show the Way
W)
If you're a senior, you'll be job hunting soon�and
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your GPA. This information is fed into the D1A LOG
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N





I 111 I AM .R M N
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s
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Computers, Humanities Bedfellows
computing class in
niish Depart-
ment. Isn't that sort of
thing supposed to be in
math oi something like
that
ccording to Assis-
tant Professor John
V arren, nothing could
be more natural than
'aching about com-
puters while surround-
ed b Shakespeare and
Marlowe
W hile computers
use numbers to run,
the are not limited to
numerical applications,
rhermodynamic forces
supply the push tor
automobiles, but you
don't have drivers-ed in
the physics depart-
ment he comments.
Computing for the
Humanities will be
taught for the first time
during the spring
semester, and Warren
sas that he is looking
forward to the ex-
perience.
"We aren't looking
to get people who arc
going to be profes-
sional programmers or
systems engineers, he
sas. "I'd like to see a
broad spectrum of ma-
jors. There are really
very few professions
that will not feel the im-
pact of the computer in
the very near future
Warren cites jour-
nalism, where video
display terminals have
replaced typewriters on
most newspapers, is
one area where com-
puters have made un-
predicted gains.
"When 1 entered jour-
nalism in the mid-
sixties, computers were
something that fouled
up your light bill; yet,
15 years later, my old
colleagues are running
without a second
thought
"Business is
undergoing what can
only be described as a
revolution as com-
puters remake pro-
cedures and allow un-
precedented planning.
FRI. NITE - OCT. 2
MERCURY RECORDING ARTISTS
THE BRAINS
W arren adds.
"1 ibraries are just
beginning to feel the
pressures that ma well
change the entire way
the do business Com
puters have made possi
ble procedures like fac-
tor analysis that are
turning psychology and
sociology into sciences
instead of arts. Music
and art have at their
disposal a device that
can literally do the im-
possible. The computer
will touch every portion
of our lives tor the bet
ter or for the worse �
and i f y 0 u don't
understand the beast,
you can control it
The course will covei
the history ol com
puters trom their incep-
tion thousands oi years
ago. Warren insists that
Stonehenge is actually a
giant astronomical
computer The course
will also take a
"drivers ed" approach
to computer operation.
"As fai as I'm concern-
ed, the inner workings
are a bunch ol trained
chipmunks carrying in
formation around in
their pouches, he says
What people need to
know is how to put
things in, how to gel
things out and what are
the limitations ol the
machine
1 he syllabus reveals
the breadth ol the sub
jecl matter. One week
is headed "Simulations
and Games Skylab
and Space Invaders"
while another is
"Cryptography �
Codes, Making and
Breaking Warren ad-
mits that the course will
not be deep but savs
that the intent was to
provide a broad over
view of the field.
"Actually, toward the
end ot the semester,
each week will be
covering a subject that
would be appropriate
tor a doen or so doc
toral dissertations he
says
"1 just want to in-
troduce people to the
computer m as non-
stressful an environ
men! as possible War
ren adds, "Despite the
impressfon that movies
and television give,
computers are neither
food nor ev ii. I hev are
just a tool How
they 're a powerful tool
thai can become
erous unless peo
pie and not jusl ex
perts � understand
what is going on
lmels
1 ft
1
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Will
SOUT
No. 6
ROCK
CLUB
ic H; a
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is s pretensions and crank up the rhythm sec
ROLLING STONE
t l.Psi . cceeds in transforming them into
d s,� svnth tones kind of like
, k .i nto one
NtW orm� km
w
lai aiui synihesiei textures trom the newest New
n-l S A ard rock "
I'KtiM vuhkn
LOCATED BEHIND
THE ELB0 ROOM
758-0711
SAT. NITE OCT. 3
OMAR & THE HOWLERS
BOHt I W I'lMH HOI SHIN I'OSI
Kil v vR v HI
IOHN MORIHI S VIII l.t Mill I
IHI WOK MM VI'NIM Ul HMHSHIIM.I I
THURS.
SNUFF
FRI. I SAT.
(NEW)
CHOICE
SUN.
WHEELS
PHI KAPPA TAU
LITTLE SISTER
RUSH
45
TUES. and WED. T�- -
NITE THE OKI FRATERNITY WOULD LIKE TO EXTEND
AN OPEN INVITATION TO ALL INTERESTED LADIES,
ANDENCOURAGEYOU ALL TO ATTEND.
THE PARTIES START AT 8:30
COME BY AND MEET THE PHI TAUS!
iiMiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiii��������t�attiiiiiaiaiiia�ttiiiMiii�itiiiiitiiiiiiittiiiiiiiitMt�llllltl�iitlUlllltllllltllllllllllllllllllltliailltllttlllllllllttlltllllllltlilllllllllllllllllltllllllllillltlltlllttltltillUItlllll'
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav or
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Sun. thru Thurs
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Fn. & Sat
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10 Different Items Under 3.00 Every Day
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Monday and Wed. Beef Tips 2.89
Tues. & Thurs. 8 oz. Chopped Sirloin
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2.09
Monday thru Friday Soup & Sandwich
(Steakburger or
Chicken Sand�No Potato)
1.99


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11 A.M.T02 P.M.
Chef Salad 1.99 4 oi. Chopped Sirloin 1.19 ��
ench F'ies and Toait
Sat & Sun (Oct. 2-4) Buy 8 oz. Ribeye Get Free Salad Bar
Petite Sirloin 2.50
Kids under 12 et Stverburger or child s plate w potato tor �
Sorry, no take-outs on specials.
i

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when it comes to delivering
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Each of these advertised items is required to be re-
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16





A"
(Sir �a0t (Hwcalinmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. �,�w. cm
Jimmy Dupree. �������,
Ric Browning, i�, Charles Chandler, span, ���,
Chris Lichok, bu�mmmm Tom Hall, ,���.
AL 1SON BARTEL. prod, Mtmntr STEVE BACHNER. rmmrjir �rf�v
Steve Moore. ammmmmmmm Karen Wendt, &���
(X-iobcr I, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Moral Maj ority
If Thine Eye Offend Thee
"If thine eye offend thee, cut it
out
The Moral Majority and other
Neo-Conservative Christian groups
have expanded this Biblical saying
to include literature.
If a book offends you, ban it.
Banning books is nothing new�
even the Bible has been censored in
some societies. The works of
Galileo, Rousseau and Locke have
all been banned at one time or
another, in one society or another,
lor one reason or another.
But censorship in our society is
especially disturbing, for we are a
nation that places so much impor-
tance on freedom� of press, of
speech, of ideas. In a Supreme
Court case, Chief Justice of the
United States Holmes wrote that
"the best test of truth is the power
of the thought to get itself accepted
in the competition of the market
Gene D. Lanier of East
Carolina's library science faculty
last year became chairman of the
North Carolina Library Associa-
tion's Intellectual Freedom Com-
mittee. Lanier feels, quite correctly,
that banning a book violates the
First Amendment rights of
everyone.
"The Moral Majority and other
'concerned' groups are attempting
to dictate to American society what
they should believe, exclude
anything they find offensive as if it
did not exist, and specify what a
person should read, view and to
what he or she should listen
Lanier says.
The attitude of the Moral Majori-
ty (sic) is in direct contradiction to
Holmes' theory, which embodies
the American ideal of freedom.
Therefore, according to this
theory, banning any book for any
reason is not just wrong, it is un-
necessary.
The strength of America lies in its
ability to freely examine all manner
of ideas and decide which are valid.
Room And Board $1000Day
A presidential commission has
recommended that the U.S. govern-
ment pay the former hostages of
Iran $12.50 a day for each of their
444 days spent in captivity.
The recommendation also calls
for unlimited, indefinite payments
for medical or psychological care
for the former captives.
Some of the ex-prisoners,
however, aren't satisfied with the
settlement. Their attorney, Brice
Clagett, recommended to the com-
mission that they be paid $1,000 a
day. The attorney says he expects
that some of the ex-hostages will file
suit against the U.S. Court of
Claims.
In World War II and the Korean
War, American prisoners of war
were given $2.50 a day for each day
they were held. During the Vietnam
War, U.S. prisoners were compen-
DOONESBURY
MT SlACXMErEK V$JRB
W0AW'tikJR COLLEAGUES
Oft WE COUNCi OF ECONOMY
. rm H&tr uhhmkabl� clvse.
Mfr�T&SP0NSe TO SK
REAOAHQMiCS
sated $5 a day.
The 51 former hostages of Iran
deserve no more respect or benefits
than those Americans who were
captives before them.
The idea of any of the ex-captives
of Iran receiving $1,000 a day for
their ordeal is disgusting.
Most of us felt sorry for them
when they were hostages and prayed
daily for their safe return. However,
they're back home with their
families now, safe and sound.
They've been wined, dined and
given the red-carpet treatment.
The more America does for these
51 individuals, the more disrespect
she shows for the other Americans
who have been held captive.
Give the ex-hostages the $12.50 a
day they deserve and retire this un-
fortunate incident to the history
books.
by Garry Trudeau
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Students Need Greenville, Too
By KIM ALBIN
Recently a former SGA president was
quoted in this newspaper as having said,
"Every year all the merchants put up signs
saying 4Welcome Back Students What
they're welcoming back is our wallets
Not only was this person quoted, he was
actually applauded for having said such a
snotty, childish thing. His statement was
used seemingly to induce the students of
ECU to view as contemptible the efforts of
local businessmen to attract our
patronage. A boycott of Greenville mer-
chants was then suggested, a boycott which
could express student "dissatisfaction"
with the "shabby treatment afforded ECU
students by Greenville's citizenry
Through research I have found that
many of Greenville's citizens were appalled
to hear their treatment of ECU students
called "shabby" � especially in an issue
of The East Carolinian in which Greenville
merchants bought over ten and one-half
pages of advertising, during a week which
the Downtown Greenville Association has
designated "Student Appreciation Week"
� by a person who would seem to repre-
sent the ideas and convictions of the entire
student population. The business com-
munity of Greenville has every right to
their indignation; they deserve an apology.
The analogy drawn in the offensive
editorial, between the community of
Greenville and a leech, serves only to point
out that the speaker has his chronology
confused. The "parasite as he terms the
city, was here before any of us were and
will probably continue to exist in some
fashion after we have gone. In the mean-
time, we should graciously accept what the
city of Greenville does offer us: a home for
our university, a beautiful downtown
shopping area, two shopping malls, nice
restaurants, an art museum, and most im-
portantly it would seem, recognition of the
city's need for us.
Yes, those merchants know they need
us. They are fully aware of how their
businesses suffer when we are away. They
need us to make money. And profits, as
you business majors should know, is not a
dirty word. We're really lucky that the
merchants have an incentive to stay in
business, for without them we'd have no
town in which to conduct our education.
Of course I'm suggesting that we need
them too.
Only out of recognition of this need and
mutual respect for each other can a healthy
relationship grow and maintain itself
Through the years this has been no pro-
blem, yet now it seems as though some of
us are forgetting our manners.
The Downtown Greenville Association
has certainly done its part in
demonstrating this mutual need and
respect. The attempts made by the DGA to
reciprocate to our patronage include sen-
ding athletic teams to games, buying
uniforms, making donations to various
campus organizations, supporting campus
events, advertising in The East Carolinian,
and sponsoring "Student Appreciation
Week The DGA does not change zoning
laws or determine where students should
park. This is done by area residents
why should we boycott the merchants0
Businesses do not, nor should they, pre-
tend to be in business for the benef
their patrons. They should concentre
making profits. If they care to extend con-
cern to their customers, as the busine
of Greenville do, then we should respond
gratefully and supportively.
Copyright ltl
Campus Forum
Students Do Unto Others And Run
After reading Tuesday's editorial 1
felt that I must respond. I cannot help
but wonder if any of those complainng
about recent actions by Greenville
citizens would like to be in the citizens
shoes. Suppose you owneH a house near
campus. Would you like to hear car
doors slamming at all hours? Woould
you like to go out in the morning an find
your driveway blocked by someone's car
ind not be able to get your car out for
the day? AH these things and more are
what the citizens are complaining about.
They are not down on students�they
are just plain tired of being walked all
over. I agree these are not always caused
by students, but unfortunately, students
are the most visible offenders.
Do not label me as a complaining old
biddy, because I am not. I am an ECU
student, but I also happen to be a home
owner near campus. The complaints are
vald and are unfortunate. All this is be-
ing caused by a limited number of
students, but one student reflects upon
the whole campus. Now the entire stu-
dent body must pay the price. It will take
several years for the students to show the
citizens that they can be good neighbors,
and for the citizens to accept this, but
the rebulding needs to begin now.
Remember, the citizens are permanent
residents of Greenville�the students are
visitors for an extended period. Treat
the citizens the way you would expect to
be treated if you lived here.
ELIZABETH B. WINSTEAD
Senior, accounting
Action Needed
I totally agreed with the article in the
September 22nd issue of The East
Carolinian by Joseph Olinick on the
subject of the Moral Majority. I'm sure
everyone has his own certain opinions
on such a subject. Yet, when it comes to
freedom of speech and the press, there
seems, to me, to be clear cut rights and
wrongs.
As Americans, we can all appreciate
the right of the Moral Majority to ex-
press their opinions on what is good and
bad in literature, movies and other
media, but when it comes to their opi-
nions affecting other people's rights to
judge those materials for themselves,
this, to me, is not right.
What I find so astounding is how
much they have actually affected what 1
can watch on television and listen to on
the radio. I'm a relatively passive per-
son, but to think a few people can con-
trol what I see and hear makes me
furious! Therefore, my question to Mr.
Olinick is, what can we do?
I've been ready to fight against these
people from the first time 1 became
aware of them, but what are we to do?
Boycott stations that don't play what we
want to hear? We do that anyway. If
there is any organization formed against
the Moral Majority, I for one would
very much like to join it, but as of now, I
have never heard of one. If there isn't
one, perhaps we could start one. If
North Carolina is their next target of
"purification then we had better act
fast.
ANN SHIRLEY
Senior, Comp. Sci.
Marvin Disappointed
I was very disappointed with the
editorial in the September 22 edition of
The East Carolinian. It was very inac-
curate and definitely not a true picture
of our relationship with the city mer-
chants and officials.
When Mr. Sherrod made his remarks
in front of the City Council last March,
it was definitely not the words of a wise
leader but instead the quotes of an unin-
formed president. Mr. Sherrod did not
even attend City Council meetings and
when he did finally attend one, his
remarks were reflective of his time spent
there.
I cannot figure out how anybody can
tell the merchants, which consist of
notable ECU supporters, such as the
Minges or Don Edwards from UBE that
they have not done their share in terms
of supporting the ECU students. Even
the newspaper in which you published
Tuesday had over 40 ads purchased by
Greenville merchants. In regards to city
officials, we have been very lucky to be
able to work closely with Mayor
McGlohon and City Council represen-
tatives Clark and Gray. I've seen them at
all of our football games, and they ex-
pressed genuine concern over our zoning
problems and have worked closely with
me to explain these new laws in hopes
that we can work out a relationship that
will be in the best interest of everybody
involved. I did not hear any praise for
their wisdom when they leased a lot of
choice land to the university for only $1.
to alleviate our parking needs.
If you are concerned about the pro
blems in terms of zoning, the culprit is
the Tar River Neighborhood Associa
tion. A group primarily composed o
faculty members who constantly Iobb
at City Council meetings against issues
which primarily affect students. They
have recently campaigned to deny the
purchasing of houses by our Greek
organizations and have been instrumen-
tal in the present parking and zoning
laws.
I encourage you in the future to con
sidcr cases like this before you write ar-
ticles of this kind, besides�what would
happen to The East Carolinian if all the
merchants decided to boycott your
paper?
MARVIN BRAXTON
SGA Vice President
In Search Of Cinderella
To Whom It May Concern:
I am troubled by a dilemma of
Cinderellic similarity. While standing on
the lawn outside Garrett Dorm last Fn
day night 1 was struck on the head by a
wayward pair of womens undershorts.
While it was a lacy delight, I don't feel
they were rightfully mine to keep. I wish
to return them to their true owner(s). If
you have recently lost the above article I
will be conducting try-on sessions this
week and possibly throughout the
semester to determine the best fit. If you
feel they're yours, feel free to call for an
appointment at 758-7634. Thank you.
PATRICK O'NEILL
Junior, Family Relations
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iRelations
THF EAST CAROl 1N1AN
Style
OCTOBER I, 1981 Page 5
To The Death
Lawyers Fought Duel
On This Date in 1847
By CHAD BUFFKIN
MtWriM
Outside the courtroom, H.F.
Harris and E.C. Yellowly were close
friends. In front of a jury, however,
the were constant rivals. Both
young men were lawyers of the local
bar, and both were in love with the
daughter of a wealthy farmer.
Their courtships with the young
lady might have progressed
peacefully, had it not been for a
court case that involved the two at-
torneys. The first speech to the jury
was given by Harris. He severely
criticized Yellowly for the way he
managed the case. Yellowly spoke
to the jury next and even more
severely criticized Harris.
After the court adjourned, Harris
picked a fight with Yellowly.
Friends of the two lawyers quickly
pulled the men apart and prevented
anv serious injury.
After the fight, Harris challenged
Yellowly to a duel, and Yellowly ac-
cepted. At this point, both men were
arrested and put under heavy bond
to keep the peace for one year.
On the day the year was up and
the bond expired, Harris promptly
renewed the challenge and again,
Yellowly accepted.
The two lawyers met on the
Virginia-North Carolina stateline at
the Dismal Swamp Canal. Upon ar-
riving, Yellowly sent a friend, Dr.
W. J. Blow, to see if the fight could
be stopped. Harris acted belligerent
and refused to talk.
Harris' first shot went wild, and
Yellowly fired into the air. Again,
Yellowly tried to reconcile, but Har-
ris wouldn't hear of it. "I came
after blood he responded, "and I
intend to get it
In the second volley, Harris' shot
again went wild. This time Yellow-
ly's shot found it's mark and Harris
fell. The bullet had hit him in the
forehead slightly above his left eye.
As Harris fell, Yellowly said to
his friend, "Go to him for God's
sake; 1 don't want to kill him
However, Harris was beyond help.
Yeh- wly and his friend got into a
carriage and drove off. Harris was
left lying next to the woods with a
red handkerchief over his face.
Shortly after the duel, a warrant
was issued, and Yellowly and his
Money Troubles Plague
True Bargain Hunters
friend were arrested at Deep Creek,
Va. After a hearing before three
magistrates, the two men signed the
necessary papers and were released.
The body of H.F. Harris was
taken to Deep Creek. E.C. Yellowly
and Dr. Blow returned to their
homes in Greenville, N.C.
The date was October 1, 1847.
By JULIE MORGAN
Staff Writer
Money seems to be the major con-
cern of most people today. Until
one leaves home does he come to
realize the true value of money. A
student must soon learn how to sur-
vive on a fixed amount of money
each week. No matter how hard it
may seem to realize the money is no
longer available for the unncccsary
"extras Through careful observa-
tion and a random survey, the
following list of advice sould put a
halt to your growing financial
troubles.
The first step in curbing your
thriftless spending is to learn a com-
mmon vocabulary, the positive
words to listen for include: "free
"over "half-price "coupons
and most importantly
"all-you-can-eat Maybe a better
description of these words would
make more sense for you.
When you hear or see the word
"free" run, don't walk to wherever
the food or activity is being held. It
is senseless not to at least check into
these events. "Over" is a word you
catch hearing at the end of a sen-
tance.This word however can save
the consumer countless amounts of
money if he will only listen for it.
When a friend shouts an invitation
such as "Come on over accrept it.
A person can almost be certain that
this is a cue for free food.
The best way to save when wan-
ting to purchase items is to use
coupons, to buy nothing unless it is
half-price. Patience is the attribute
you need to save. Wait until the
price tag is marked lower. Most of
the time it will come down to at least
retail price, if not cheaper.
The most important phrase to
evert take time out to listen or watch
for is the ever popular
"all-you-can-eat" jingle. At the rate
food cost today, whe you choose to
dine out it is always smarter to pay
one, flat price and get all the food
you can. Certain restaruants have
special time or days set aside to run
these cheaper pries. Take advantage
of them; what have you got to lose,
but a few pounds.
A few other pointers may help the
student save some money. Always
make list of needed items before go-
ing to the grocery store. Try to train
yourself only to buy what is on the
list. By taking cold cash to the store
you will be less likely to buy things
you don't need.
If you are planning on drinking
when going out at night do some
consuming before you go out. It is
less expensive to buy the beverage
and consume it before entering the
night life. Walk to your favorite
spot, rather than drive. This will
save you gas money as sell as make
for a safer trip.
By living by these standard sug-
gestions, a student may save a large
amount of money. Be open to
advertisement but know what is ge-
nuine and what is fake. So if you
want to know what the true value of
money is, "Come on over and read
my article
Romeo Missed His Lines In Summer
BCHADBLFFKIN
sufiwrtm
Summer school at East Carolina
is generally the time set aside for
giving the buildings on campus their
annual checkups.
Thev get their windows washed,
their walls painted and occasionally
thev get repaired or remodeled.
If by some chance the latter is
necesary, the maintenance crew is
called in. Armed with power saws,
jack hammers, crow bars and other
tools of the trade, these skilled
craftsmen are experts at knocking
out walls, sealing doors and creating
bedlam while classes are being con-
ductd just down the hall.
The heavy-duty project for the
crew this summer apparently was
Austin Building. From the close of
spring semester to the start of sum-
mer school, they managed to
renovate half of the ground floor.
1 thought I knew my way around
Austin, but a brief incident the first
day of summer school changed my
mind. Arriving at my first class, I
casually pushed open the door and
walked in.
A girl was sitting up front, puff-
ing thoughtfully on a cigarette. "Hi
there I said. "Is this
Shakespeare's Tragedies?"
"It most certainly is not she
replied curtlyThis is the women's
restroom
I managed to choke up a few
apologetic words, and quickly slip-
ped out the door.
When 1 finally found my class,
the group was well into reading and
discussing Romeo and Juliet. It was
almost like a shouting contest bet-
ween our group and the work crew
down the hall.
I think they were putting in a sun
roof that day. When the hammering
and sawing got too loud our pro-
fessor calmly paused and mopped
the perspiration from his chin and
his forehead until we could hear
ourselves think again.
The next 45 minutes or so of class
went something like this:
"Oh, Romeo, Romeo! wherefore
art thou . .
About that time a voice from
down the hall said, "I'm down here
on the floor, Mac. The darn ladder
broke again
Romeo: "It is my lady! It is my
love
"It's me boss. Whatcha want
done with this keg o'nails?"
Romeo: "But, soft! what light
through yonder window breaks. It is
the east, and Juliet is the
"Darndest sawhorse I ever seen,
Mac. One of her legs keeps falling
off
As the class period drew to a
close, the professor started to wrap
up the day's lecture.
"Well class he conclud-
edwhat do you think of Act II?"
"I think these two by fours
oughta' hold it together till tomor-
row boss. Let's go home
And so we did.
Buildings Remembered
-�
Hope For Lost Students
Was Jenkins Fine Arts Center constructed on quick sand?
By ANNE HENRY
Staff Writer
With ECU being the third largest
campus in the state, it is easy to
understand how many people get
frequently lost. It would be more
difficult for us to find our way if the
buildings we pass had no names, in-
stead being referred to as the
English Building, the Nursing
Building, etc.
But thanks to those people who
made the state of North Carolina
and East Carolina University what it
is today, each building has its own
identity, helping us find our way.
Founded in 1909 as a women's
college, three of the original
buildings of East Carolina College
still stand. Jarvis Hall was the first
building on campus, built in 1909.
The dorm was originally named for
Thomas J. Jarvis, a founding father
of the university and a Govenor of
North Carolina from 1879 until 1884.
The Student Financial Aid Office
was originally the Cafeteria
Building and was built in 1909. The
Jenkins Alumni Building was built
the next year and was at that time
used as an infirmary. It was named
after Mamie E. Jenkins, an original
faculty member.
Brewster Building was originally-
sighted for a football field. The
building was constructed in 1970 and
named for L.F. Brewster.
What is known now as Memorial
Gym was dedicated to John C.
Christenbury (a head coach from
1940-1943) and to other students and
staff who lost their lives during
World War II. Although dedicated,
the gym was never officially named
the Christenbury Memorial Gym.
The Victory Bell, located near the
gym, was originally used on the USS
Broome. It was cast in 1855 in
Philadelphia and was a gift from the
Naval Department. It is dedicated to
the students in service during and
since World War II. It is now rung
at ECU victories.
The Chancellor's home was pur-
chased in 1949 and was built by
Haywood Dail in the 1920's. Presi-
dent Messick, for whom the new
Drama Building is to be dedicated,
was the first president of the Univer-
sity to occupy the home.
Ficklen Stadium was named for
Greenville Business Leader James S.
Ficklen and was dedicated in 1963.
The stadium can hold 36,000 people
and is considered to have one of the
best lighting systems in the state.
The original building of Joyner
Library was built in 1954 and named
for James Y. Joyner, Superinten-
dent of Instruction from 1902-1918.
Another building has been added to
seat 1,800 students and hold 800,000
volumes.
m
STUNT MAN
Free Flick Tells Vivid
Tale With Peter O'Toole
This Thursday night at 7 p.m. on-
ly and this Friday and Saturday
nights at 5, 7:30 and 10 p.m the
Student Union Films Comittee will
present Richard Rush's frenetic film
The Stunt Man. The film will be
shown in Mendenhall's Hendrix
Theatre.
Admission is by ID and activity
card for students and MSC member
ship for faculty and staff members
on campus.
This innovative, energetic master-
niece of pure moviemaking places
director Richard Rush in the class of
cinematic virtuosos. A movie within
a movie, a suspenseful mystery, an
offbeat romance, no formula ap-
plies to The Stunt Man which
weaves innumberable and dazzling
stunts and impressive performances
into a complex story about paranoia
and illusion versus reality. Five time
Oscar nominee Peter O Toole
(Lawrence of Arabia) brilliantly
portrays a satanic movie director
who, in his mania, adopts a fugitive
from the law (Steve Railsback,
Helter Skelter) to stand in for a
stunt man killed on the set of his
World War I epic. An intense,
cynical Railsback literally throws
himself into the role as well as into
the arms of beautiful heroine Bar-
bara Hershey, but it is the
dangerously engaging relationship
with O'Toole that fuels his
paranoia. (Is his director setting him
up for the ultimate stunt: a death
trap?) Frenetically paced and tautly
edited for continuous thrills, clever-
ly written and scored, The Stunt
Man is a challenging puzzle of
cinematic delights for the
discriminating eye.
"The Stunt Man is a virtuoso
piece of moviemaking: a sustained
feat of giddiness that is at the same
time intense. Rush isn't afraid to
hook you and to keep hooking you.
He is a kinetic-action director to the
bone; there's a furious aliveness in
this picture. Peter O'Toole's Eli
Cross may be as definitive a
caricature of a visionary movie
director as John Barrymore's Oscar
Jaffe in Twentieth Century.
Remarkable as O'Toole has often
been in gentle roles (Goodbye, Mr.
Chips), it's great to see him playing
a hellion. As Steve Railsback plays
Cameron-Lucky, the role suggests
James Dean's crushed loners.
Railsback manages to suggest a
pure, lacerated sensibility. Sam,
dumpling screenwriter, may be the
best role Allen Goorwitz has had.
His byplay and timing are impec-
cably deceptive. Most of the picture
was shot around the Hotel Del Cor-
onado near San Diego. If there was
such a thing as a master piece of a
location, the Hotel Del Coronado as
it is used in The Stunt Man would be
it. Moviemaking is a seedbed of
paranoia. Peter O'Toole has put the
paranoia in Eli Cross, and there's
truth in this great caricature
� Pauline Kael, New Yorker
"I may be the most original
American movie of the year. It's
funny, fast, literate and audacious.
It has won unanimous raves from
critics. Rush's film is uncommonly
ambitious; it's a wickedly comic,
breathlessly paced story. The Stunt
Man is at once an exercise in pop
Pirandello, a satire of filmmakers,
and a touching moral tale about the
perils of paranoia. Rush keeps the
audience in a state of almost
hallucinatory suspense, constantly
pulling the rug out from under us as
he shifts from melodrama to
tragedy to farce. It's a sensory,
mind-twisting trip that leaves one
happily sated. O'Toole, looking
beautifully raved, gives his most en-
See FILM, Page 7
The Stunt Man, this weekends Free Flick will appear on
Thursday at 7 p.m. and Friday and Saturday at 5, 7:30 and 10
p.m.





ff
t r
THE EASTC AROLIANJQg�gbJg�l
Marsha Mason and Kristy McNichol Star
44
When
A Must For Simon
Two ECU co-eds at Be!k
enoving good weather. The conversion to co-ed seems to have been a success.
Co-Eds A re Pleased
By KATHY WEYLER
Imagine, if you can,
what might well have
become of the struggl-
ing divorcee and her
perky daughter in The
Goodbye Girl if
Richard Dreyfuss
hadn't come into their
lives. This done, you
will have a pretty good
idea of the scenario of
prolific Neil Simon's
latest movie, Only
When I Laugh, now
playing at the Buc-
caneer in Greenville.
Only When I Laugh
is something of a
departure from what
we have come to expect
from Neil Simon �
witty, warm comedies
with a slight aura of im-
possibility about them.
The wit is there, the
warmth is there (the
screenplay is by Neil
Simon, after all!) but
there is also a great deal
lover, and, most impor-
tant, her teen-age
daughter Polly (Kristy
McNichol).
The actress, Georgia
Hines, portrayed by
none other than Mar-
sha Mason (Mrs. Neil
Simon), is a most un-
Simonlike character.
She's not buddly-cute
� in fact, in her most
memorable scenes in
the film she is a
physical wreck. Her
character is probably
one of the most realistic
Simon has given us
lately. Basically im-
mature, Georgia strug-
gles admirably with
life's difficulties
through most of the
film, but cannot,
ultimately, come to
grips with her success.
There arc no easy
answers for Georgia.
Yet hers is a story of
growth, for she realizes
at the film's end just
what she is. In fact, she
says to her more
mature daughter,
"When I grow up, I
want to be just like
you
Despite this bit of
realism, much of the
old Simon remains. Ex-
cept for Georgia, the
film's characters are
painfully simplistic.
Jimmy, the homosex-
ual actor, does very lit-
tle except whine about
being out of work.
Toby spends at least
ninety-five percent of
the film preserving her
good looks. David uses
people. We don't see a5
many sides of Polly as
we might, but her main
concern seems to be her
relationship with her
mother. (Is this normal
for a seventeen-year-
old?) Also the dialogue
is obviously that �
dialogue. Even with
Georgia, we can almost
see the quotation marks
around the sentences.
Visually, Only When
I Laugh is pleasant.
Director Glenn Jordan
gives us a good, basic
film but with almost no
original, creative direc-
tion or photography �
like nearly everything
else that has come out
of Hollywood lately.
Describing Only
When I Laugh as en-
joyable is not accurate.
After all, the movie is
not unlike a
psychological study of
an alcoholic. But it is
an interesting film, and
a moving one. Simon
fans won't want to miss
this, as it may be an in-
dication of the beginn-
ing of a new Simon
style.
B JOSEPH C. OLIN1CK
Staff N rtWf
In an innovative move last year, ECU's hous-
ing office decided lo convert Belk Dormitory and
Jarvis Dormitory into co-ed dormitories and this
vear, the conversion has taken place. In some
students' opinions, the conversion is an experi-
ment by the housing office to see how feasible co-
ed living is. In any case, some results and conclu-
sions have been arrived at by the students who are
living in Belk and Jarvis.
At Belk. the situation is rather unique, for only
two floors in one wing of the three-winged
building are occupied by women. Thus, the
women are grossly outnumbered by the men and
at first, the women were concerned that problems
might occur because of the large population of
men in Belk. Now, however, the women seem to
be gradually learning to trust and feel comfor-
table with their male neighbors.
In tact, the women in Belk seem to have a very
positive attitude about living in Belk. They tend
to feel that the men protect them, and the men do
protect the women of Belk. For example, in the
recent "pantv raid the men of Belk prevented
the large grirup of wild raidersfrom entering Belk
and going up to the women's floors. Also, the
men tend to screen out and keep out any people
that have no business in Belk.
In general, the women of Belk tend to feel that
the men of their dorm act mature and follow the
rules. More important, the female residents of
Belk seem to have a very positive altitude about
co-ed living at Belk.
The male residents of Belk seem to have a very
positive attitude about co-ed living, also. They
just like seeing the women in and about the
building as they go about their daily living and
they seem to be glad that the women are making
an effort to get involved in house council and that
the women are interested in cleaning up and
decorating the appearance of Belk. In general, the
men tend to feel that the women enhance and im-
prove life at Belk, and they do not endorse such
things as "panty raids" or anything that would be
detrimental to the women of Belk.
At Jarvis, the attitudes of the residens are like
those of Belk's residents. The men tend to have a
very positive attitude about co-ed living, and so
do the women. In fact, co-ed living at Jarvis
seems to have fostered many "brother-sister"
relationships between men and women. That is,
co-ed living has generated many close friendships
between men and women.
Recently, the residents of Jarvis had a spaghetti
dinner and it definitely showed the positive spirit
that exists in Jarvis. A lot of men showed up and
put their talents and energies together and in a
group effort, they cooked the entire dinner.
Naturally, there were a lot of hungry women to
join the men in eating their creation. Truly it was
a pleasant evening, and that shows the positive at-
titude that the residents of Jarvis have about co-
ed living.
One of the things that should be emphasized
about Jarvis is its security system. At Jarvis, all
doors except the main entrance door are locked at
8 p.m. Around 1 a.m. the main entrance door is
locked; however, it en be opened by any of Jar-
vis's residents with his or her key. This system is
new on the ECU campus and may be put into ef-
fect in other dorms. In Jarvis, it has bveen very
effective in keeping "undesirable" people out of
the dormitory.
Despite all of the good results of the co-ed con-
version, there is one problem. In order to make
Belk and Jarvis co-ed dormitories, some male and
female students were forced out of their rooms.
Student that could not retain their previous
rooms remain upset. However, given time, such
feelings will dissipate.
Overall, the conversion of Belk and Jarvis into
co-ed dormitories has produced positive effects.
Most of the people living in the two dormitories
feel comfortable in and like the co-ed environ-
ment, and feeling comfortable in and liking one's
environment can make college life easier and
pleasant.
of seriousness.
Loosely based on one
of his earlier plays
("The Gingerbread
Lady"), Simon's Only
When I Laugh is the
stroy of a struggling,
rehabilitated alcoholic
actress and her rela-
tionships with the
Significant Others in
her life � Jimmy
(James Coco), a gay,
out-of-work actor,
Toby (Joan Jackett), a
neurotic, aging beauty,
David (David Dukes),
her former live-in
.UiHEUTi
MonFri. 2-6
Discount on beverages
with College I.D.
Serving Breakfast
24 Hrs. A Day
Located corner of
10th & Charles Blvd.
DRUM LESSONS
for
beginners
Rock - Pop
Reasonable
rates.
Geep
Johnson
757-3210
RESEARCH
PAPERS
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Send $1.00 (refundable) for your up-to-date,
340 page, mail order catalog.
We also provide research � all fields.
Thesis and dissertation assistance available.
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 Idaho Ave 206F
Los Angeles, Calif. 90026
(213) 477-8226 or 4774227
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
46th
Anniversary
Sale
Check your lucky number to see
if your discount will be
2-20-30�c
on all regular price merchandise
in the store. This applies to
men's, women's and children's fashions.
Look for the Yellow Card
for this
Important Event!
(Does not include any merchandise already on sale.)
3rd Annual Fall
Proudly Presents the
EMBERS3rAhh1sfc� Party
Make it a complete teach
weekend "
BEACH PfrYP� '��.
OCTOBER J ,3
Cash artdther valuable
prizes to winners.
"�'n
-v
��� ���
lawn tUnlry
Jj
Srlng your blank
No Sottloi or OIom Allowed
The
F
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October 4,1
CoNCorf
Festival thai
THI BfACM.
4,
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Is
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held
Adm. y
$10.00 adv.
$12.00 gate
Adv. tickets at
(on the,
HOLIDAY
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fnn Jordan
lood, ba�u
almost no
itive dirc
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ome out
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 1. 1981
But
film, and
Simon
i r�e an
teginn-
-non
ry
Film
By A Variety Of Critics
Continued From Page 5
joyable performance in years, and
Railsback, quivering with frighten-
ed, confused intensity, is his perfect
foil. Lawrence B. Marcus' witty
screenplay is that rare thing: a script
you can savor and remember
� David Ansen, Newsweek
"The Stunt Man is a labor of
love. Peter O'Toole's pyrotechnics
as a megalomaniacal director pro-
vided charm and coherence to the
Roings-on
� Andrew Sarris, Village Voice
"The Stunt Man is the year's
most clever film, an exhilarating
piece of flimflam that turns out to
be a genuine thriller. The film's
gomaniacal director, Eli Cross, is
played to flamboyant perfection by
Peter O'Toole. Steve Railsback
begins to think that Eli Cross is
planning to kill him, and at that
point, The Stunt Man turns into a
heart-stopping thriller, featuring
some of the most spectacular stunts
ever placed on film. Movies that
regularly trick audiences can be
frustrating, but The Stunt Man is so
obviously in love with the fun and
excitement of movies that we go
along, waiting to be fooled. With
simple bravura filmmaking and an
appealing cast of characters, The
Stunt Man is one of the year's most
daring films
� Gene Siskel, Chicago Tribune
"Cars That Eat People"
Is Sunday Feature Film
Red Cross
ola Monies will be a future feature presentation by the Cinema Society.
Lola Montes is one
of the four remaining
films in the fall pro-
gram sponsored by the
Cinema Society of
Greenville. The next
feature, to be shown
Sunday, Oct. 4 at 7
p.m. will be Cars That
Eat People, an eerie
and gripping film by
well-known director
Peter Weir, who has
produced such thrillers
as Picnic At Hanging
Rock and The Last
Wave. Persons wishing
to join the Society may
do so on Sunday night,
or may contact Glen
Brewster or Karen
Blansfield in the
English Department,
Austin Building.
Memberships for the
remainder of the series
is $8. All movies are
shown in Hendrix
C�� C.iflt njlUy, f tf1'iqut �
runt Vt i rO Sfttt?) O.sru
Ana c.if 'oo Different N� Ana
i C 0 � u o Bool
Theatre. Coffee and
refreshments will be
available on Sunday
evening at 6:30, before
the show.
� esnoi tftOM9snoif 4so. . etnotj ijsom . asnou, qtOM
ARMY-NAVY
STORE stAr
SAAD'S
SHOE
REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
7 S 1228
Quality
Repair

o
irty
French Assistant Enjoys Work
B KRISTIN A YASQUEZ
�Miff Wrifcr
ECl
Foreign language Department has
aquired the best way to teach a student the correct
pronunciation of the French language: a teacher's
and her name is Catherine Bayou. She
n in the United States for a little over a
month, and she says that she really likes helping
udents. "They do very well and 1 enjoy it
( atherine comes from a well-educated family.
Her mother teaches English and her father
ches 1 aim. Greek and French. Both teach in
h school.
i atherine explains that school life in France
fers from out own. In France a child starts
at the age oi five. Elementary school lasts
until the child is eleven. Then comes high school.
This includes ages twelve to eighteen. Upon enter-
ing high school, a student is obliged to study a
foreign language. The second year of high school,
the student must then pick up still another foreign
language to study for three years. Catherine states
that most students choose English as their first
foreign language and Spanish as their second.
Students in France are required to take French,
Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Civic Construction,
Sports and Philosophy along with the pre-
mentioned foreign language requirements.
College education is provided free of charge to
those who wish to attend. Many do not go to col-
lege and they get jobs. Catherine says that only a
minority of French students carry their education
to the college level. She finds that students here
are more attentive than they are in France, the
reason being that we have to pay a good deal of
In
money for our education.
Politics is very different in France also.
France, there are twelve political parties, whereas
we have only two. This wide variety of parties has
caused some problems . During the strike in
Poland, the members of the party in France also
refused to work unless certain conditions were
met.
Catherine finds that in comparison with French
colleges, American university courses are
somewhat superficial. "In France, when we study
literature, we read works and discuss the writers'
philosophies. Here you read his biography and
that's it. There is not as much depth
Catherine will return to France in June, and she
is glad that she is able to have this experience. She
is enjoying learning about how Americans live,
and she looks forward to learning more.
w
3
e
(ft
W
e
o
c
t
o
"The Place to
Wash
.
!
The
WASHT
HOUSE
111 E. 10th St. (Across from Krispy Kreme)
514 E. 14th St. (Across from Hot Dog City)
o

3
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a
Also �
�Color TV �Attendant on Duty
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
OCTOBER , 1981
Page 8
Emotions Expected To
Play Big Role Saturday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports rdii.it
Two things are sure about this
Saturday's ECU-Duke football
game, says Pirate head coach Ed
Emory. "We've got to win and they
will be keyed up
The Pirates, 2-2, are at a crucial
turning point in their season, star-
ting a three-game road trip before
returning home to Ficklen Stadium
tor an October 24 meeting with
15th-ranked Miami (Fla.).
The Blue Devils should definitely
be "keyed up as an aftermath of
ECU's 35-10 win over Duke in the
1980 season opener. "Our people
certainly haven't let them forget
that one Emory said. He then
pointed to three other factors that
he felt should help the Blue Devils
get mentally prepared for Satur-
day's game: the club's come-from-
behind win over Virginia last week,
the fact that the ECU contest is the
team's 1981 home opener and the
fact that an expanded Wallace
Wade Stadium will be dedicated
Saturday.
As a result, Emory says the
Pirates are working hard to offset
Wilson Says
Duke Must
Throw Well
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
Vv(M jtii Spirl dilor
Duke coach Red Wilson doesn't
hesitate one bit when asked what his
Blue Devils must do to win against
the Pirates of East Carolina this
Saturday afternoon. "We have to
do what we do best, and that's
throw the dadburn football
W hich is something the Blue
Devils did well against the Virginia
Cavaliers last week as sophmore
Ron Sally, filling in for injured Ben
Bennett, completed 18 out of 26
passes for 336 yards in the 29-24
Blue Devil victory� their first of
the season.
However, in a 17-3 loss to South
Carolina the week before Sally com-
pleted just seven passes in 27 at-
tempts and threw three intercep-
tions.
"Ron Sally will be our starter.
I'm sure Wilsons says. "Ben
(Bennett) is 95 percent healthy right
now. He's improving very rapidly,
and he should be close to 100 per-
cent Saturday Bennett injured his
shoulder in the Blue Devils' season-
opening loss to Ohio State in Col-
umbus.
"Ben could have played last
Saturday in an emergency. But Sally
has eaned a chance to be our No. 1
any emotional edge the Devils might
have.
"We're trying to be emotional
ourselves the second-year mentor
said. "We have a lot to get up
about. We know what our
challenges are. We're trying to re-
establish identity and credibility
The Pirates have another reason
to get emotional about playing
Duke, a reason Emory says is not
very well known.
"Not much has been said but this
is the last game scheduled with Duke
Emory said, referring back to the
fact that the team's game earlier this
year with North Carolina was the
last ECU-UNC game slated.
"That's all I read about when we
played that other team up there. 1
just hope this series can go on
Emory admitted, though, that it
would take a lot more than just be-
ing mentally prepared to defeat
Duke on Saturday.
"They're a fine football team
Emory said. "They're basically the
same football team that we played a
year ago, except that they have im-
proved so much
Emory said the big win over Duke
a year ago, in his debut as the Pirate
head man, came at a rough time for
the Blue Devils.
"We played them in the first
game of a new offensive system
he said. "They had a new coor-
dinator (Steve Spurrier) and a new
quarterback (then-freshman Ben
Bennett). They have improved every
game since that time
Though Bennett, the Atlantic
Coast Conference rookie-of-the-
year last season, is listed as a ques-
tionable starter for the game after
having missed two already this
season, Emory says he expects the
sophomore sensation to play.
Whether Bennett or replacement
Ron Sally gets the call at quarter-
back, Emory believes the Pirates
will have their hands full.
"The biggest improvement he
said, "is in their offensive line.
They're big, mobile and aggressive
� especially aggressive in pass pro-
tection.
"Everybody knows how good
their passing game is Emory
claimed. "They have great
receivers. (Cedric) Jones is one of
the best receivers in the country. He
has beaten everybody he's played
against this year. Also, their runn-
ing game is really improved
A rush from the ECU
line and good play from the Buc
secondary will be essential, then, if
the Blue Devils are to be stopped.
"We've been working on the rush
this week Emory said. "We really
haven't had to do that yet this
season
Emory also expressed respect for
the Blue Devil defense.
"On defense there is as much im-
provement as there is anywhere on
their football team. Their
linebackers, (Emmett) Tilley and
(Jimmy) Tyson, are very, very good.
They probably play better together
than any group we've played
against. That includes (Colon)
Abraham and (Sam) Key at State;
and (Darrell) Nicholson and (Lee)
Shaffer at Carolina. That's some
good company
The Pirate offensive attack will be
hampered somewhat by the loss of
halfback Earnest Byner, who in-
jured his knee against Toledo last
Saturday and may be out for the
season.
Saturday's kickoff in Durham is
scheduled for 1:30 p.m.
Yes & No
Duke quarterback Ren Ben-
nett (above, 14) and ECU
halfback Earnest Byner (at
right, 44) have made
headlines recently due to in-
juries. Bennett has gotten
the okay to play in Satur-
day's Pirate-Blue Devil
game, but Byner will have
to sit out with a knee injury.
'm
Wolfpack Steals Bucs' Show
Duke Coach Red Wilson
with offensive coordinator
quarterback. We refuse to endanger
a player's future by playing him
when it isn't absolutely necessary.
Shoulder injuries take time to
heal
Sally, Wilson says, adds a new
dimension to the Duke offense.
"Ron is a good runner� very
strong but not real quick. He has the
ability to knock tacklers o him.
Ben hasn't been as clever as Sally.
Ron's a bigger threat, w here Ben is a
great touch passer. We have two
good quarterbacks now, but we're
not going to alternate Alter-
nating, Wilson says, can destroy a
team's confidence.
Even though Wilson stresses pass-
ing, the Blue Devils have had a
balanced offensive attack in their
first three contests� 103 passes at-
tempted compared to 104 running
plays.
The Blue Devil running attack has
been misleading, Wison says. "We
haven't had glowing statistics with
our running game because in most
of our games so far we've had to
play a catch-up type of ball. We've
caught up real quick with our pass-
(right) looks at action
Steve Spurrier.
mg game; so we tune to do what we
do best�either throw longoi throw
short
Mike Grayson is Duke's leading
rusher, picking up 137 yards on 44
carries. Sally has rushed 18 times,
accounting for 82 yards while
freshman Mike Atkinson has gained
45 yards on 13 attempts. Duke
averages 2.6 yards per rushing at-
tempt.
Wilson said his offense proved
something in last week's win over
Virginia. "(Our offense) showed we
could come back under adversity.
We had to throw, Virginia knew we
had to throw, and we still completed
our passes anyway. That's a very
good sign
The Blue Devil defense must
become more consistent, Wilson
sas. "We had some breakdowns,
but the were errors of commission,
not enors o' omission. Still those
errors have to be corrected. They
played spotty against Virginia but
well against South c arolina.
Against ECU, we'll have to play like
See WILSON. Page 10, Col. 1
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
M�i�ni sport t dilor
East Carolina soccer was in the
limelight at Ficklen Stadium
Wednesday night before a crowd of
500 and even though the spotlight
was on N.C. State's 5-0 win. Pirate
coach Brad Smith wasn't deterred
the least.
"Look, he said this was a great
crowd. None of the people who
came here were disappointed. The
kids had a good time at halftime;
(two 'earns from the Greenville
youth league put on an exhibition)
the fans had a good time, and I
know State had a good time.
"State was a much more skilled
team than us. I don't think our kids
tried too hard� we just couldn't
put the finishing touches on a few
plays. This game was something 1
wanted so badly that 1 may have
pushed the kids too much. That's
my problem
East Carolina's problem was in
the form of State's Francis
Moniedafe. a sophomore from
Yola, Nigeria, who penetrated the
Prate defense for three goals, one
coming on a free kick and another
when he took a pass from the mid-
dle and lofted the ball over goalie
Steve Brown.
The first half was mostly a defen-
sive struggle, filled with good passes
and missed opportunities. The first
score of the match came on a goal
by Prince Afejuku at 24:37 when he
took a pass in from the middle and
pushed a shot by the diving Brown.
In the second half superior ex-
perience enabled State to put the
match away on goals by Moniedafe
and Budhy Barber.
State had a greater number of
shots-on-goal than the Pirates, who
had trouble mounting offensive
drives. Mike Swan, a sophomore
from Hamilton, Bermuda, had the
best scoring chance of any Pirte
when he had a one-on-one oppor-
tunity that State goalie Chris Hud
son snared.
"State's set plays killed us
Smith said. "The first one (score)
was on a scramble in front of the
goal, and another came when our
freshman (goalie Danny Curtis) was
in the game. State just executed pro-
perly. Their skill was the kev. Our
guys hustled well and played well
Smith said his squad was
defensive-minded in the first half.
"We had planned to stay defensive
in the first half, and take it to them
in the second. Our idea was right,
but we should have let the second
half settle into a pattern
Smith said his team's lack ol of-
fense was primarily due to State's
overpowering team play. "We just
can't plav one-on-one against a
team like this
Even with the loss. Smith smiled
and said the night was a success
The Pirates, now 2-5. travel to
Catawba for a Sunday afternoon
match.
Pfwto B JON JORDAN
Action From Wednesdays NCSU-ECU Soccer Match
Reborn LaCock Now A Force On Pirate Line
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
LaCock Puts Block On Toledo Defender
By CHARGES CHANDLER
Sports r dllor
For East Carolina offensive guard
Bud LaCock it was a long time com-
ing, but he has finally begun to ac-
complish the sort of things he
dreamt about when he first walked
on campus four years ago.
LaCock came to the Pirates as a
defensive tackle after a star-studded
career at William Hoggard High.
One year his arrival on campus,
though, LaCock was switched to the
offensive line. For over a year after
that things did not exactly fall in
place for him.
"When I got here 1 had a great
love for defense LaCock said. "I
felt like 1 had a future at defensive
tackle. It got to the point that 1
wasn't progressing, though. I never
really had the mental edge I need-
ed
Soon after LaCock was switched
to the offensive line by then-head
coach Pat Dye, injuries put an end
to his hopes of adjusting to
something entirely new.
"I was lost on offense he said.
"Then 1 got hurt and both of my
knees were in casts for six months.
That really played on my mind. I
was almost afraid to go back out
there
But, alas, Dye left the Pirate pro-
gram and in his place came Ed
Emory. That was when LaCock
began to take the steps that would
lead him to where he is today.
"When the new coaches
got here it was like a
rebirth or something for
me. Coach Emory had a
lot to do with it. When he
got here he told me, 'Bud,
it's time for you to start
playing "
� Bud LaCock
"When the new coaches got
here the 6-4, 25-pound senior
guard said, "it was like a rebirth or
something for me. Coach Emory
had a lot to do with it. When he got
here he told me, 'Bud, it's time for
you to start playing "
LaCock said at that point he
decided to put his all into becoming
the best offensive lineman he could.
Still, he realized knew he would not
start right away. He was happy,
though, to be playing behind Wayne
Inman, who had been named a third
team Ail-American by the
Associated Press in 1979.
"I had no complaints about play-
ing behind Wayne LaCock said.
"In fact, I was really excited about
it. I knew playing behind him would
be a good experience. I knew how
much I could learn from Wayne
What LaCock did not count on
was Inman getting injured. It hap-
pened in a practice session following
the Pirates' second game last
season. Inman went down for the
season, thrusting the inexperienced
LaCock into a starting position.
"I never figured he'd go down
like he did LaCock said. "But I
had tried to have myself prepared
for something like that. 1 was only
semi-experienced but I guess it has
turned out to be a positive thing for
me now
LaCock went on to start the final
nine games of the season last year,
but still went into the 1981 spring
practice as somewhat of an under-
dog. He and highly-touted Miami
(Fla.) transfer Tom Carnes were
battling it out for the right guard
position.
Many observers, and especially
the media, gave Carnes an edge,
which only served to inspire LaCock
that much more.
"I guess all of that affected me in
a positive way LaCock claimed.
"Most people expected Tom to beat
me out, but I told myself 1 wasn't
going to let him If he did 1 would
die trying. 1 knew if 1 played the way
I was capable, I would win the posi
tion
LaCock did indeed win the posi-
tion while the multi-talented Carnes
was switched to tackle.
LaCock has established himself
this season as one of the leaders of a
much-improved offensive line. He
now has his sites set on playing
Duke Saturday in Durham, the
place of his birth.
"Most of my family is still living
in Durham LaCock said. "Most
of them will be at the game Satur-
day. I'd really like to do well in
front of them
LaCock went on to say that the
game with Duke should be a tough
one, that the Blue Devils have
"come of age
He probably did not realize it at
the time, but those same words serve
as a fitting description for what has
happened to Bud LaCock over the
last two years.
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1'k er the
H! FAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBF R I, 1981
UNC Head And Heels Above Others In Stats
(iKFHNSBl)RO,
N.C. (HP1) � North
Carolina and its spec
tacular tailback, Kelvin
Bryant, stand far ahead
of the rest of the Allan
tic oast Conference in
this week's individual
and team statistical
categories.
Bryant leads the
league in rushing, scor-
ing and all-purpose fense and defense,
running and is third in rushing offense and
total offense. Mean-
while, the fifth-ranked
Tar Heels are the
ACC's best in total of-
defense, pass defense
and punting.
Clemson is putting
up the best challenge,
with leaders in three in-
dividual and three team
categories.
With 520 yards in
just three games,
Bryant is running for
Heels Down Gritty Pirates
HOI 1 OMV
1HKI
"We tried to get the
other team to make
mistakes and you can
not do that against a
team the calibre ol
I N( 's
Those words prettv
much summed up the
volleyball matchup bet-
ween I nn Da idson's
I ad Pirates and the
I ad Iar Heels of the
I niversit) of North
Carolna on Tuesday
night at Minges Col-
iseum.
It was a match in
which the home team
took a quick 111 lead
in the first set. 1 he
Pirates, playing
without starters 1 ita
I amas and Lexanne
Keeter, lost the lead
and the first set to the
lat Heels by a 15-13
count.
The second set of the
match was close up un-
til the end when UNC
finally took a 15-9 vic-
tory.
In the thud and
deciding game the
smaller Pirates hung
tough and forced
Carolina to score one
point over the limit, as
the Var Heels won a
squeaker. 16-14.
Pirate coach Lynn
Davidson was pleased
with the way the team
hung close but still was
very disappointed in
the outcome.
"We played hard to
a certain extent and
then 1 fell the team
became too cautious
she explained. "I am
very pleased that our
serving has improved. I
think that the thing we
are missing is the con-
fidence that the serve
will be in every time we
stop to the line. 1 am
pleased wih the way we
played considering our
injury situation
Davidson then of-
fered a prediction. "1
know for a fact that we
will beat Carolina dur-
ing this seson she
said. "It will happen.
We have come so close
and when we do beat
the Tar Heels it will
surprise the heck out of
everyone
The loss to North
Carolina droped the
Ladv Pirates record to
2-7; a majority of those
losses coming in last
weekend's N.C. State
Invitational in Raleigh.
The Lady Pirates
next action will be at
the University of South
Carolina Tournament
in Columbia Friday.
Falcons Face Eagles
SUWANEE, Ga.
(UPl) � If he had his
druthers, Leeman Ben-
nett wouldn't have the
Atlanta Falcons play-
ing the Eagles or
anyone else next Mon-
day night.
"I'd prefer to never
play on Monday nights
because it distracts
from the organization
of the week said the
Falcons coach. "We're
giving the players two
days off this week in-
stead of the usual one,
then they won't have
any off next week
because we've got to
get ready to play
another tough game the
following Sunday
But, like it or not,
Bennett has to get the
Falcons, 3-1 after last
Sunday's loss in
Cleveland, ready to
play the unbeaten
Eagles in Philadelphia
this coming Monday
night.
an average of 173.3
yards per game. His on-
ly competition is from
North Carolina State's
Joe Mclntosh at 161.2 '
nobody else is running
at better than 57 yards
a game.
Bryant leads the
ACC, and the nation,
in scoring with 15
touchdowns for 30
points a game. In just
three contests, he
already has a season
mark that only six ACC
players have ever
bested.
Clemson quarter-
back Homer Jordan re-
mains the total offense
leader with an average
of 195.3 yards per
game, followed by
Wake Forest's Gary
Schofield at 189.5. But
in passing efficiency,
look to North Carolina
quarterback Rod
Elkins with a rating of
149.6. Jordan follows
at 138.9.
Jordan's favorite
receiver, Perry Tuttle,
shares the lead in
receiving with Mike
Lewis of Maryland
with an average of 4.3
catches per game.
The best punts come
off the foot of North
Carolina's Jeff Hayes,
who is averaging 48.4
yards per game. The
best returns are by
North Carolina State's
Louie Meadows, who
averages 15.2 yards per
try.
Virginia's Darren
Goode is making an
auspicious start for a
freshman as he leads
the league in kickoff
returns with an average
of 25.5 yards per at-
tempt.
North Carolina's
total offense perfor-
mance ' 505.3 yards per
game is miles ahead of
the 386.2 that No. 2
North Carolina State
has been able to
muster. About 339.7 of
those yards UNC racks
up each contest come
on the ground; North
Carolina State again is
second at 300.2 per
game.
In total defense, the
Tar Heels have permit
ted 216 yards per game
while second-place
Clemson has permitted
241.7. Against the run.
North Carolina has
given up only 99.7
yards a game against
Clemson's 109.
North Carolina also
is best against the pass,
yielding 116.3 yards per
contest. Duke is second
best with an average of
120.3.
Wake Forest and
Duke possess the
league's top two pass
ing attacks, with the
Deacons throwing foi
235 yards a game and
the Blue Devils compil
ing 226.7 per contest
through the air.
North Carolina top
the ACC in seorine
with 53.7 points per
game, while North
Carolina State and
Clemson tie for second
at 23.7.
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Also interested in developing a
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TO MY GQ MAN Alter such a
rouqn week fhouqnt you could
use a srr.i:t � .e brought me
some tiqht sweat pants! Smile
wasn I b'q .nouqh how about a
tncky i iddie Ready' Here goes
What o .a qet when you add two
hoins to one round '? I'll tell
you hen i see ya Love, your
L aundr v I d I
TO THE FOD Look out Durham
cause hi re comes the FOO H we
m ht ii shoot h.s wad! He hates
those Devils like he does those
Hi els But every game he goes to
he breaks thost- seals Give em
m Durham. FOD. and �( we
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10
I lib EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 1. 1981
Fearless Football Forecast
i
ECU AT DUKE (Score)
UNC AT GA. TECH
VIRGINIA AT N.C. STATE
APP. ST. AT WAKE FOREST
PITT AT S. CAROLINA
Cl EMSON AT KENTUCKY
FLORIDA AT LSU
PURDUE AT WISCONSIN
TEXAS A & M AT TEXAS TECH
BAYLOR AT HOUSTON.
MISSOURI AT MISSISSIPPI ST.
FI A. STATE AT OHIO STATE
CHARLES CH AND1ER
(40-8)
ECU 31-28
UNC
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Pittsburgh
Clemson
Florida
Purdue
Texas Tech
Houston
Mississippi St.
Ohio State
WILLIAM YELVERTON
(36-12)
ECU 28-27
UNC
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Pittsburgh
Clemson
Florida
Wisconsin
Texas A & M
Baylor
Mississippi St.
Ohio State
CHRIS HOLLOMAN
(34-14)
ECU 28-?'
UNC
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Pittsburgh
Clemson
Florida
Purdue
Texas Tech
Houston
Mississippi St
Ohio State
CHUCK FOSTER
(33-15)
ECU 31-14
UNC
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Pittsburgh
Clemson
Florida
Purdue
Texas A & M
Houston
Mississippi St.
Ohio State
JIMMY DuPREE
(30-18)
Duke 24-21
UNC
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Pittsburgh
Clemson
Florida
Purdue
Texas Tech
Houston
Mississippi St.
Ohio State
Andruzzi Counting On Youth
ABORTION
B JIMMY DuPREE
Managing t dilor
I he Lady Pirates of
Easl Carolina lost a lot
of talent from the
1 980-8 1 basketball
squad which posted a
23 7 record and as
ranked 17th in the Final
Associated Press
coaches' poll, but head
coach Cathy Andruzzi
has faith in her young
1981-82 unit.
"I think we have the
best freshman class
we've ever had, and our
two transfers will add a
lot of depth where we
need it she says.
"They've really blend-
ed into the program
quickly�that's a credit
to our eterans. They
haven't made the
freshmen and
newcomers feel like
outsiders
Replacing three
departed
starters�Laurie Sikes,
Kathy Riley and Marcia
Girven�and the two
top reserves � Lydia
Rountree and Heidi
Owen� will be no easy
Wilson Praises Pirates
Continued From Page 8
we did in the South Carolina game.
"Forgei comparative scores he
stresses, noting East Carolina's
previous losses to North Carolina
and North Carolina State. "obod
we'll play, lias the overall team speed
hai East Carolina has. And, don't
et, Easl Carolina will be the oil-
's wishbone team we'll see all year.
"1 expect a real tough football
amt I ast Carolina has an outstan-
lotball team, and they're
led with talented individuals.
n time you face a wishbone team,
rig to be problems
"1 aslan tlina is a lot better than
last year because o' hav-
ust to a new system. The
some big, strong people-
ally their running backs� like
i i nesi Bynei and Roy Wiley
While Wilson has to worry about
preparing to pla a wishbone team
like the Pirates, he also has some in-
jury problems. Defensive back
Aaron Stewart, an last Carolina
ia e
�sneci
transfer, is out after breaking both
legs against Virginia.
Starting offensive tackle Robert
Oxendine (knee strain, wide receiver
Glenn Tillery (knee strain), place-
kicker Scott McKinney (thigh mus-
cle pull) and defensive back Brick
Johnstone (ankle sprain) are all on
the casualty list.
Defensive back Dennis I'abron, a
preseason All-ACC pick, was
thought to be on the list with a neck
injury but isn't, which is a big relief
to his coach. "He's okay now, but 1
was worried at one time. When I
saw him Sunda. he had a collar
(brace) around his neck� now that
: ried me
Wilson says the Blue Devils' at-
titude this year is "splendid.
They've worked diligently, all fall.
We'e had two toughies in a row.
and they've played super. We are a
better team now than an) time I've
been here. We were poor in '79,
mediocre in '80
Time will only tell what adjective
Wilson will use in describing his
1981 Blue Devils.
task. But Andruzzi has
confidence in her
recruits.
"All three freshmen
come from good pro-
grams the fourth
year mentor states. "I
hope that the kids that
come here know the
type of program we
run; the type of
discipline we demand.
"We want a kid who
is disciplined on and
off the court. In other
words, 1 want a kid
who comes to college
for an education and
not just to run up and
down the basketball
court.
"I think our three
freshmen and two
transfers fit into this
mold
Center Darlene
Chaney (6-2, 160),
point guard Loraine
Foster (5-7, 140) and
forward Laura Regal
(6-0. 160) will battle the
veterans for starting
roles.
"Chaney was ex-
tremely highly
recruited according
to Andruzzi. "Her high
school team
(Jefferson-Huguenot
Wythe) went
undefeated last year.
We're teaching her the
fundamentals of our
game. She's got great
speed and ability.
"Loraine Foster will
be working at the point
and wing. She has done
a tremendous job; she's
really a hard worker
and has a lot of
moves praised An-
druzzi.
"Laura Regal has a
lot of strength; she'll
make a good power
forward
Junior transfers
Loletha Harrison from
Louisburg College and
Ginger Noce from
Randolph-Macon will
battle for a starting slot
at forward.
"We're doing more
this year than we ever
have Andruzzi says.
"I think last year we
showed the people we
can have a competitive
program with national
recognition
That national
recognition was aided
by a pair of victories
over N.C. State and a
narrow miss against
highly touted Southern
Cal, but the Lady
Pirates will face an
even tougher slate this
season. A pair of games
against State and a
road trip to Old Domi-
nion highlight the
schedule, along with
participation in the
Dial Classic at Mont-
clair State and the
Miami Jamboree in
Florida.
"Our girls just take it
day-by-day accor-
ding to Andruzzi. "We
want to give East
Carolina the best pro-
gram we can.
"We're glad to bring
nationally ranked
teams into Minges Col-
iseum. We know the
people want to see
them, and we want to
play against them
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 1, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 01, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.150
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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