The East Carolinian, September 24, 1981






She Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 10
Thursday, September 24, 1981
GreeaviUt, North Carotin
10 Pages
Solidarity
Students Attend Meet
By PATRICK O'N Kill
Sl�ff Wnlrr
The newly formed ECU chapter
of the NAACP sent six of their
members to Washington, D.C. last
Saturday to participate in the
Solidarity Day activities.
The Solidarity Day events were
originated by the AFL-CIO as a
means of lobbying support for the
labor movement and, more broadly.
to resist the major cuts in social pro-
grams initiated by the Reagan ad-
ministration.
The budget cuts seemed to be the
central theme as over 300,000 peo-
ple converged at the nation's capital
for the largest demonstation there
since the U.S. involvement in Viet
Nam. Numerous special interest
groups joined the labor supporters
to resist increased military spending
and further social program cuts.
The union members and par-
ticipants held thousands of placards
expressing their feelings: "Money
For Jobs - Not For War "Defend
Civil Rights "ERA - Yes and "
For Jobs And Justice - Solidarity
Forever
Jackie Roue, an ECU student,
called the turnout "a great success.
I'm a student and I'm concerned
about the future for everyone. We
had lots of participation and a great
spirit of unity
Other ECU students attending the
meet included Gracie Wells, Angela
Dickens, Sharon Powell and
Kimberly Page. Wells stated that
she would like to see more student
involvement in the political process.
She mentioned letter writing to Con-
gress as one option. The ECU group
also thanked Lester Nail, SGA
president, and Marvin Braxton,
SGA vice president, for their strong
support of the trip.
Many national leaders were pre-
sent, including National Organiza-
tion of Women president Eleanor
Smeal, Benjamin Hooks of the
NAACP and Coretta Scott King,
widow of Dr. Martin Luther King.
"We have a government of the
rich, by the rich and for the rich
said Douglas Fraser, president of
the United Automobile Workers.
Never before had Washington
seen a gathering of such a diverse
See NAACP, Page 3
Springboks
Team Stirs Controversy
Ph. to By GARY PATTER SOW
Cooling It
Jo-Jo hams it up for the camera on a warm day. Now that fall is here and
cooler temperatures are forecasted for today, Jo-Jo's dogpaddling days
may be limited. See story, page 5.
By SAFARI MATHF.NGE
Maf( WltMt
In the past several days, con-
troversy has been mounting over the
issue of the visiting South African
rugby team in the United States.
Opponents of the visit have stag-
ed demonstrations across the coun-
try in opposition to the visit, claim-
ing that since South Africa pro-
motes apartheid� or racial segrega-
tion� the team should not be allow-
ed to play in this country.
In an exclusive interview with The
East Carolinian, Jean leroux a
white South African expatriate who
is now an American citizen working
with the acquisition department of
the Joyner Library said about the
issue, " 1 don't understand why
Americans should bring politics into
this. Springboks (the name of the
rugby team) is not responsible for
what their government does. Its on-
ly a rugby team
Leroux continued, "In-fact all
these demonstrations have given
them (the team) a bad view of
America, which is really a very good
country. I could understand it if
these people were politicians or Ar-
my generals. The South African
government may be racist, but what
must the Springboks rugby team do
about it?"
There are two black players on
the predominantly white team.
When asked to comment whether
this was a unique feature in South
African sports Leroux said, "Not at
all. Blacks are being included in
sports these days more than ever
before, especially because black
people are stronger and have more
stamina
When asked about apartheid in
South Africa, Leroux said, "I don't
like the way the world defines apar-
theid, in every country and in evrey
society, there is some form of apar-
theid. Even among the black people
themselves� different tribes may
look down upon one another. As far
as I am concerned, the white South
Africans could constitute just
another tribe except they are
white
Segregation is a main feature of
the South African government.
Blacks and whites do not mix in
See SOUTH, Page 3
Many Can Qualify For Food Stamps
B CHADBl FFKIN
slid Wolrr
Approximately one-third of the
population o' Pitt County is eligible
to receive food stamps, according to
Betty Rouse, the supervisor of the
food-stamp unit in Pitt County.
"Anyone can apply for food
stamps Rouse said. "They may
not qualify, but they can still app-
ly
Everyday at the food-stamp of-
fice, a steady flow of people make
their way to the "bank as it's call-
ed, to pick up their monthly allot-
ment of food stamps. Around the
corner in the lobby, a crowd of peo-
ple are usually sitting in the crooked
rows of chairs or lounging against
the walls, waiting to make applica-
tion for stamps.
According to Rouse, around 300
people come in each day to pick up
their stamps, but during the last two
weeks of the month, it slows down
to about 100 people a day. She
stated that last June 3,619 blacks,
932 whites, three Hispanics, three
Asians, and one Indian came in.
"After a person applies for
stamps, we have 30 days in which to
process their application the
supervisor said. "If they don't
qualifv. we write them a letter ex-
plaining why. If thev do qualify, we
determine the amount of stamps
they are to receive and mail them a
card. The person then comes once a
month, shows his, card and iden-
tification at the 'bank' and picks up
the stamps
Rouse also stated that out of
those who apply each month, about
300 cases fail to qualify.
"The number of cases does not
steadily increase she added. "It
usually stays between 4,300 and
4,500 each month In June of
1981, according to Rouse, 4,304
households containing 12,882 peo-
ple received food stamps in Pitt
County. "That's $493,982 wouh of
stamps she said.
Like any other state agency, the
local food stamp unit has its share
of problems. Fraud, though, accor-
ding to Rouse, is not a major one.
"We've had only four fraud cases to
go to court this ear she said.
"The largest one amounted to about
$5,000 She also added that the
unit has only one worker who is in
charge of investigating frauds.
When asked about the effects of
President Reagan's budget cuts, she
said that many of the persons now
eligible for food stamps would no
longer be after October 1. She was
unable to provide figures for Pitt
County alone, but statewide the
predictions are that 12,000
households or 50,000 people will no
longer be able to receive the stamps.
"I'm not sure the new rules will
accomplish what Reagan thinks they
will she said. "There are too
many loopholes. We'll just have to
wait and see
Howard House Renovated
English Faculty Relocated
Campus Security
will move in November
By GREG HIDEOUT
Stiff Wntrr
The East Carolina Security and
Traffic Department is moving to a
larger building on Fifth Street.
"The space is badly needed said
Joseph H. Calder, director of cam-
pus security. "We weren't pushing
for another building, but when they
(the ECU administration) offered it
we were grateful to have it
The department will be moving to
Howard House, which is across
from the Spillman Building. It was
purchased by the administration
from a private family after the death
of the owner, according to Calder.
The acquisition was part of
Chancellor Thomas Brewer's expan-
sion plans for the university.
Howard House is being renovated
to accommodate the security depart-
ment, Calder said, adding that the
changes should be completed by ear-
ly November.
The campus building currently
occupied by the department will be
used by the Department of English
as offices for faculty members, ac-
cording to Dr. Elmer Meyer, vice
chancellor for student life.
This move will make room for ex-
pansion for the computer science
program. The space vacated by the
English department on the second
floor of Austin Building w ill be used
as offices for the computer science
faculty.
As many as seven or eight English
faculty members will have to move
to the present security building after
the campus police transfer to their
new office.
In addition to the move to Fifth
Street,the campus police are also
planning to have a full-time crime
prevention officer. The position has
the support of the university ad-
ministration and many students.
Sgt. Lynne Singleton, who now
handles the job on a part-time basis,
has said that the crime prevention
programs she conducts have im-
proved the rapport between campus
police and students.
Singleton conducts a two-part
program� a slide presentation on
basic crime prevention tips and a
seminar dealing with assault and
rape.
The first crime prevention pro-
grams of the school year are
scheduled to be presented on Mon-
day, Tuesday and Wednesday of the
first four weeks of October.
Ebony Herald Ends
Three- Year Hiatus
Bv DIANE ANDERSON are encouraged, and we have seen
��.Nr��.or positive feedback from the
The Ebony Herald, a minority students
publication founded at ECU in 1975 "We're looking for more diversi-
and discontinued in September of ty he said, and continued that the
1978, circulated its first edition in Herald is interested in having more
three years on Wednesday. feedback and contributions from in-
In regard to the rebirth of the terested students,
tabloid, Edward Nesbitt, associate When asked to comment about
editor of the Herald explained, "A the cartoon on the editorial page,
lot of minority students are concern- Nesbitt said, "It has raised a few
ed about having their own paper to eyebrows. However, the paper is
express their views for students to express themselves,
Since the printing of the first edi- and I would be hypocritical for not
tion this week. Nesbitt stated, "We letting him (Weyler) express
himself
��qg��gi�1 The cartoon contains such
fSm mWr lnClJQ statements as "Death to all com-
Vll I TO? HIOIvKJ mies" and "Nigger Go Home"
�MHHMMMnnaHH written across a large sign saying
N.C.
2 The editor in chief of The Ebony
Announcements Herald, Lamont Byrd is in
Opinions Washington on a co-op program
Campus Forum4 this semester. Other staff members
Style are Safari Mathenge, news editor;
Sports8 John Weyler, features editor and art
Classifieds 10 director; and Donna Wiley, adver-
Fearless Forecast10 tising manager.
Faculty Senate Votes
To Commend Brewer
A familiar college custom returned to ECU Wednesday night. Following
a "panty raid" on the west campus residence halls, some equal rights
proponents called for a "jock raid" on College Hill.
I mm stiff and V irr Rrports
The ECU Faculty Senate com-
mended Dr. Thomas B. Brewer
Tuesday for his work at the univer-
sity but did not vote to ask him to
remain on as chancellor.
The faculty approved a resolution
thanking Brewer "for his many ef-
forts and accomplishments in
fostering qualitative growth at East
Carolina University during the past
three years
The resolution was approved 31
to 17 after four votes. The Faculty
Senate rejected similar resolutions
for a Brewer commendation until
written balloting was conducted.
The proposal was submitted by
Dr. James L. Smith, a philosophy
professor, who asked the Senate to
formally acknowledge Brewer's
resignation. The agenda of the
meeting had to be amended by vote
to submit 'he resolution. The
amendment, which did not pass in
the First three votes, finally passed
17 to 15.
The faculty also requested that
the university's trustees and UNC
President William Friday give the
Senate "the option of nominating
facultv members to serve on the
search committee" if such a com-
mittee is formed.
Ashley Futrcll. chairman of the
university's trustees, said that there
appears to be an organized effort in
support for Brewer. The response
immediately following the resigna-
tion had been 10-to-l against the
chancellor, Futrell added.
Many Community leaders and
businessmen have been supportive
of Brewer in letters to Friday and
Futrell.
The board of trustees will meet
Friday at Mendenhall Student
Center. Among the topics discussed
may be the reconsideration of the
board's stance on the resignation.
Friday has said that he plans to
discuss the plans for the selection of
a new chancellor at the meeting.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPH-MBER24, 1981
t
f
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
I you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible' typed and
double spaced to The East Caroh
nian in care ot the news editor
There is no charge for an
nouncements. but space is often
limited
The deadline tor announcement
are 5pm Friday tor the Tuesdsay
paper and 5pm Tuesday for the
Thrusdasy paper
The space is available to all
campus organuations and depart
ments
ART SHOW
Greenville area entries m the
23rd edition of the Springs Mills
Art Show will be received at the
East Carolina School of Art
Wednesday through Friday, Sept
23 25 from 9 am to 5 pm Entries
picked up In Greenville will be
returned to the pick up point
fotlowng close of the exhibition at
no charge Further information on
the pick up schedule in Greenville
is available from Randolph
Osman at East Carolina at
757 6665
Entries also wili be accepted
Sept 25 through Oct 4 at the Na
tionai Guard Armory m Lan
caster SC where the show will be
on public exhibition Oct 16
through Nov 1
SCHOLARSHIPS
Thirty full �uition scholarships
to a five day direct marketing Co!
legiate institute at Skokie, Illinois
November 30 December , 1�8'
are now available to seniors ma
lOrmq m advertising, marketing
loumalism communications and
similar fields
Successful applicants will get a
practical introduction to basic
direct marketing and direct mail
techniques under the guidance of a
dozen top practitioners m the fas'
growing. $99 bHion direct
marketing industry For example
the principles of direct ma.i sue
t ess. creativity, mailing li�.t,
testing and other subiecfs wilt be
covered at the Institute The cur
nculum goes oevono direct n I
to cover such topics as telephone
marketing, cable TV Qube. space
and braodcasting advertising
A panel of direct marketing e
ecutives selects Institute scholar
ships recipients based on faculty
recommendations, the student s
academic standing interest in
advertising ana marketing, ana
record of extra cumcular school
related activities and employ
ment Scholarships cover all tu
f'On fees, room ana ooarfl
Students are required to pay the
firs' S100 of transportation costs
within the continental U S
Scholarship applicants are
available fror.i professors or the
ccundation 6 East 43rd Street.
N Y . N Y IOC;? 212 689 4977)
AVA
The American Vocational
Assocxiation will have a W.ne ana
Cheese Par'y for their annual
rembership drive Dues for AVA
De collected at the party $6 00
'or state -national dues ana $3 00
for local dues The party will oe
held m the home of Mr Pau1
Waidrop 102 S Warren Street, on
September 29 at 7 30 p m AH IN
DT Home Economics Ed
Business Ed maiors. and any
otner persons interested are
welcome to come For information
or directions, please call 757 6?44
or 7.58 2906
cso
The Center for Student Oppor
'unities (CSOi School of
Medicine, is currently seeking
highly qualified undergraduate
ana graduate students to work
part time as 'u'ors Interested
students with expertise in either
chemistry anatomy physiology
biology, math, physics English or
SLAP are encouraged tc appiv
Other academic areas are also
considered Competitive wage-
Contact Dr Frye. Center for Stu
dent Opportunities, 217 Whichara
Annex, or call for an appointment
at 757 6122.6075 6081
NAACP ELECTIONS
On Thursday. September 25 Ihe
ECU Student Chapter of the
NAACP will hold an election of of
ficers for the 1981 82 term Voting
will take place between 9 a m and
2 p m at tne Student Book Store
'or registered members of the
chapters or other members of
NAACP with proof of member
ship Registration dues will be col
lecteo until 12 00 The candidates
are for President Virginia
Canton, Betty Moore and Gracie
Weils. Vice President Wanda
Henly. Domse Reynolds, and
Katrma Whitaker Secretary,
Jackie Rowe Treasurer Kimber
ly Page
SIGN LANGUAGE
Are you interested m learning
more about Sign L anguaqe and the
deaf community at ECU? Then ail
you nave to do is show up on Sept
27 at 6 p m in the multi purpose
room at Mendenhall Student
Center That s when the ECU Sign
Language Club will have a cover
dish supper a captioned movie
elect officers tor the '81 '82 school
year and make plans tor an up
coming camping trip You don t
want to miss it
ATTFNOANTS
The Oil f nt Handicapped Stu
dent Services needs applications
from persons interested in becom
ing Personal Care Attendants to
wheelchair s'udents Those with a
background of assisting in
dividuals with the activities of dai
ly living are desired if interested
apply in 212 Whichard Building
CORSO
There will bo a Correc
tions Social Work Organization
meetemg on Thursday September
24 at 5 30 p m in Mendenhall Stu
dent Center room 221 All correc
tions and social work maior and
intended maiors are iged to at
tend'
GENERAL COlLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
CHANGES
General Conner stirints snou'ri
lontactthe.r advisers prior to Oc
?oner s to arrange tor preregis'ra
tion
TABLE TENNIS
Register now for Ihe ACU I DAY
STUDENT TAPE TENNIS
lOURNAMFNT to be held Tues
day October 6 at 6 p m at
Menovnhali All full time day
students who wish to oar'u ipate
must registf a' trP Billiards
Center no ia'er than Sunday Oc
toner a
This foi '� � �f . ll determine
the tot ' ' ' dan student con
tenders whr will fare the dorm
Student �. - 'he ACU ' AH
Campus Table Tennis Tourna
mnnt fo he held Thursday.
Novprnhe-i I? Thf. f.rst place
finishers the Ml Cnpus Tour
nampn' . n s -inn women's
divisions uvili represent ECU at
the regi0nai tournament in
Vir-j.rna n libruarv The all
expense paid tt ip tor the delegates
will be sponsored bv MenaenhaH
Student Centpr
Registration forms ana det,vied
information ate available at the
Is Center
HIGH HOLIDAY
Students and I �� re "in ten
to High h � - os at Tern
� � �
,i' I lOi- � � � nsfon
The foiowing is a schedule to
Services
Erev Rosh Hashana 9 26 81 8
p m
� .hana. 9 29 81 IT
a m
Erev Yoi" Kippur (KOI Nidrel
� n- - � i. io i si 10 a m
Morrnq 3 30 Afternoon 4 4S
Memor.ai Service, 5 30 Con
eluding Ser i, ice
Succot Servces '0 i 81.8 p m
For hitt reformation, call
Joan Crane "56 S408 or .iri,
GolcJf-iru 154 M
FIEl D HOCKEY
�� � . .
pta si att nd the n
ber 24
at 7 p m m Tyler Dorm lobby If
you i an not attend call Dana
s ' 7sn 9,24 or Beth Chns
tian at 757 1721
SCEC
i �
"� � ' � M ' .� ICOUfl lor
� � . ' I a Children. Monday.
October 5 at 4 15 p m ,n Sp 129
Please i 0fn and enjoy our ex
citing
PSYCOON THE MALL
Te start the Halloween Season,
the Central Campus Residence
sponsoi ing Alfred Hit
PSYCHO" on the Mall
Monday Sept 28 at 8 n m So.br
mg a blanket and some to ge'
scared th! Meet rha ON THE
MALL'
COFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
The Student U)i ,on Coffeehouse
'� � will tie sponsoring
auditions for the fall semester Oc
'ober 2 and 3 at 9 p m to 11pm. in
Room 15 of Mendenhall Student
Center ah interested performers
may sign up in Room 234.
Mendenhall Student Center Ad
mission is free
� OLLAR 5
OFF. I
II
Buy one meal and
get $1.00 off the
second one.
With this coupon, when you buy
one meal at the regular price, you
can get a second meal of the same
value for a dollar less.
Must be used at time of purchase
Does not include sandwiches,
unlimited salad bar, or specials
Offer good through
end of Month of
ena ut vionTn ot $�g�
Sept. H
JACK S�
I
I
I
ARTS MANAGEMENT
Arts Management will hold a
meeting in the Jenkins Art
Auditorium Monday, September
28 at 6 00 p m Elizabeth Stewart,
Director of the Pitt Greenville
Arts Council will be the guest
speaker.
FRISBEECLUB
The ECU Frisbee Club will be
held this Tuesday evening at 8
p m. in Room 248 Mendenhall if
you wish to learn, play, or com
pete practices will be set ano road
trips planned Memberships are
now being accepted
SOULS
Meetings every Thursday at 7
pm at the Ledonia S Wright
Culture Center
AUDITIONS
Auditions tor THE GLASS
MENAGERIE by Tennessee
Williams will be held September
74 and 25 at 7.30 pm at the
Methodist Student Center, 501
East Fifth Street Stephen B Fin
nan. formerly of ECU'S Drama
and Speech Department will pro
duce and direct in cooperation
with the Wesley Foundation of
Greenville Everyone is welcome
to audition For further intorma
tion. call 757 3546 or 758 2030
COLLEGE BOWL
Test out your knowledge in the
varsity sport ol the mind The Col
lege Bowl competition will be held
October 11 13 m Mendenhall
Teams are forming now Applica
tions are available in Mendenhall
You must have five players and a
coach
PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY
Deadline for 1982 admission to
professional phase is October 14.
1981 All general college and
physical therapy credits must be
completed by end of Spring 1982
Allied Health Professions Admis
sions Test must be taken m
November Application and inter
view appointments are to be made
by September 24, 1981 in depart
mental office (Room 308, Belk
Building. 757 6961 ext 231)
FOREIGN SERVICE
EXAMINATION
Application forms are now
available in the Career Planning
and Placement Office for thp
Foreign Service Examination
Registration forms should be
received by the Educational
Testing Service before October 23
1981
MINORITY GRADUATE
STUDENTS
The Minority Graduate Student
Locater Service is a service of
fered b� the Graduate Record Ex
ammations (GRE) Board for the
benefit of minority students
wishing to pursue graduate stude
Through this free service college
lun.ors. seniors and graduates
who are members of racial and
ethnic minorities may make their
names available to graduate
schools seeking minority ap
piicants For more information
and registration forms, contact
the Career Planning and Place
ment Office
WINTERGUARDE
Once upon a time, there was a
Winter Guarde. Their name was
BLACK RUSSIAN. and
everywhere they went everyone
loved their ideas Find out why
For information, call 752 8443
EC CD.EC.
AEROBICS
The ECU Department of
Intramural Recreational Services
is offering classes in aerobic
movement and exercise The
classes are designed to improve
physical fitness levels, increase
flexibility and firm up that flab
The classes are offered in
Memorial Gym on Monday.
Wednesdays and Tuesdasys.
Thursdsays from 5:15 6:15 p.m
and Tues Thurs 12 1 p m. They
are also offered in Belk, Monday
at 7 p.m White. Monday at 8
p m Greene, Tuesday at 7 p.m
Fleming, Tuesday at 8 p.m Gar
rett, Tuesday at 9 p.m. and Cle
ment, Wednesday at 8 p m Sign
up lor these classes in Room 204
Memorial Gym or at the classes
Cost is S5 00 lor classes that meet 1
time per week and M 00 for classes
that meet twice per week Classes
are held for 8 weeks If you have
questions, please call Sue Stanley
at 757 6064
JOB SEARCH
A series of workshops will be
conducted by the Career Planning
and Placement Center in the areas
of interviewing techniques and the
preparation of the resume
"Resume Preparation" will be
held on Sept 28 at 2 pm , Sept 29
at 3 p m . Sept 30 at 4 p m , and at
2 p m Oct 6 at 3 p.m Oct 7 at 4
p m and Oct. 8 at 11 am Each
workshop will last approximately
one hour and will be held in the
Bloxton House (adjacent to
Greene Dorm) All seniors are in
vited to attend
SELF DEFENSE
For the first time, the ECU
Department of Intramural
Recreational Services is offering a
Personal Self Defense Class You
can learn to protect yourself dur
mg an attack and prevent miury to
yourself This is not karate, but is
a practical approach to self
defense The class will be on Mon
day at 6 30 p m m Memorial
Gym The instructor Joe Paler
mo, requests that you wear loose,
comfortable clothing Register m
Room 204 Memorial Gym or at the
class Cost for the eight week ses
sion is $5
MINORITY
FELLOWSHIPS
The Committee on Institutional
Cooperation has established a
fellowships program designed to
increase the representation of
members of minority groups
among those who hold doctorates
'n the social sciences, humanities,
?tatural sciences, mathematics
and engineering
Funded by grants that total
more than S4 million and from ad
ditional resources of affiliated
universities, the program will pro
vide 25 fellowships in the social
sciences. 10 in the humanities, and
up to 25 in the natural sciences,
mathematics and engineering for
the 1982 83 academic year.
The Committee on Institutional
Cooperation (CIC) is the academic
consortium of the Big Ten untver
sities and the University of
Chicago, all located in the
Midwest Fellowships must be us
ed at one of the CIC universities
Application deadline is January
15, 1982. Anyone desiring detailed
information about the fellowships
program should write to: CIC
Minorities Fellowships Program.
Kirkwood Hall HI, Indiana
University. Bloom,ngton, Indiana
47405
NAACP CONVENTION
Greenville will be hosting the
38th annual NAACP Convention at
the Ramada Inn, October 8 11
Anyone interested in attending,
please contact Virginie Carlton at
757 6180
PPHA
The Preprofessional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will have a
meeting this Thursday.
September 24. 1981 This meeting
will be held at 6 pm at The Afro
American Cultural Center All
members and any other interested
parties are urged to attend
HONOR COUNCIL
Applications for Honor Council
and'or Review Board Member are
being taken m the SGA office in
Mendenhall Student Center, Rm
221
COMEDY
The award winning Ayden
Theatre Workshop will present the
comedy 'You Can't Take It With
You" Thursdasy and Saturday at 8
p m and Sunday at 3 p m . Sept
24. 26. and 27 at the Ayden Griffon
Auditorium Admission is $2.
Season tickets are available for
$10 00 Call 746 6782 or 524 4250
CAR WASH
Get your car washed before the
game' Tau chapter of Phi Sioma
Pi National Honor Fraternity will
be at the Etna Station on 14th
Streeet and Greenville Boulevard
to take care of your vehicle's
every need Hours are from 9am
to 3pm CHEAP'
THE WAY
Do you want circumstances to
control your life? The only way to
avoid being pulled around by your
envirment is to understand the
principles from the Bible, and
make them your guideline for
behavior You must become condi
honed by the Word of God to
change to a new and better person
(Eph 4 20 24) That is what we do,
stop by and check us out. (Acts
17 11) Thursday. Sept 24. at 11 am
m Poom 212 MSC, and 7 30 pm
Room 242 MSC Also Monday.
Sept 28, at 7 30 pm, in Room 242.
MSC
I
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus commumly
inter 192 S
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ToENTeH �ftLL ISO-1860 o 1S8-HK
PE MAJORS
All studens who plan to declare
physical education as a maior dur
ing change of maior week for the
fall semester should report to
Minges Coliseum at 1 pm on
Wednesday. September 30 for a
motor and physical fitness test.
Satisfactory performance on this
test is required as a prerequisite
lor official admittance to the
pysical education major program
More detailed information cover
ing the test is available by calling
757 6442
SPECIAL SEMINAR
The Committee on Medieval and
Renaissance Studies is pleased to
announce the topic for its Spring
Semester 1982 seminar ASMR
SO00: The Theme of Death. An In
terdlsciplinary Approach to Life in
the Middle Ages and the
Renaissance (Thursday even
ings. 6:309 30) Students in all
programs are invited to consider
pre registering for this exciting
seminar For furtnr information
about the seminar and or about
the Medieval Renaissance Studies
Minor contact program coor
dinator and seminar instructor
Dr McMillan. Austin 315. seminar
director Dr Daugherty. Jenkins
1334. or seminar instructor Dr
Bassman, Brewster A 424
P.E. MAJORS
Are you interested in educating
your peers? meeting maiors from
other schools? or having a great
time? The PE Majors' student
convention will be held October 2
and 3 at Western Carolina Univer
sity It is a great opportunity for
all majors An organiiaional
meeting for ECU maiors will be
held in Minges Sept 23 at 7 30 p m
Get together with fellow majors
and choose a topic you would like
to present
JEWISH STUDENTS
It you would like home hospitali
ty and transportation to temple for
High Holiday services, please call
Jerry at 752 5942, or Dr Resmck at
756 5640
CHESS CLUB
Like to play chess? Greenville
Chess Club has open meetings
every Monday at 7 p m in Com
munity Building 4th and Greene
Street
SIGMA THETA TAU
Sigma Theta Tau will be
meeting Thursday. September 24
at 7 p m m Room 203 of the Nurs
mg Building
PLANT SALE
There will be a plant sale on
9 30 81 in room S 111 of the B iolog y
Building The sale is from 8 30 am
to 12 noon
PACE
Tne filing period for the Profes
sional ana Administrative Creer
Examination (PACE) is from
September 14 through October 13
Information is available in the
Career Planning ano Placement
Office A sufficient score on PACE
is necessary to qualify for man,
entry level Federal Governmem
positions
WANTED:
Representative on
the Media Board.
Pick up applications in Media
Board secretary's office. 8 a.m
p.m. and 2 p.m5 p.m. Monday-
Friday.
.Hardegr
t
Now you can enjoy the Best Eatin' All
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your favorite lunch or dinner fixin's from
10:30 A.M. 'til midnight. Then from midnight
'til 10:30 A.M you can cruise in for your
favorite homemade biscuit breakfast, orange
juice, fresh brewed coffee, crispy fries, or an
ice cold soft drink! So whether it's early eatin
or nocturnal nibblini you can count on
Hardee's to be wade awake with a wide
variety of the Best Eatin' All Around!
2907 East Tenth Street, Greenville
�Hwdees Food Systems. Inc 1981
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111 I AM AKOI INIAN sm'M-MHI K 24, I98J
Abortion Frequent Alternative For Coeds
B DAVID GAEDE
ICPS) hen
Ronald Reagan
nominated Sandra Day
v I v onnoi to till the
vacancy on the U.S.
reme c ourt, initial
position to her
tered around a I "4
e she made while a
state legislate) An
amendment to the bill
in question would have
ined aboi ions at
ona state colleges
universities.
i)'( onnoi oted no,
latei test i tied.
i ise the abortion
amendment didn't have
o wil the tax
vl . H w.f- al
�s days, aboi
'( much of an
campuses
fl ncs have
changed 1 hough most
polls indicate strong
college support tot
abortion tights and the
scanty statistics that are
available suggest an in-
creasing number of un-
married, pregnant col-
lege women are opting
foi abortion, campus
Right to I ife groups
have spread. 1 he issue
today is as intense on
campus as elsewhere in
the society
At Arizona State, foi
example, the issue
sparked a round of pro
and ant i aboi t ion,
demonstrations last
spring, as various
groups tried to force
university and student
government leaders to
take a stand on the
issue.
Ovei the last three
av ademic yeai s, vai ious
California student
groups have sued to
regain student fees that
have paid for abortion
counseling. 1 he most
recent attempt came at
San Diego State, where
doens of students
withheld then student
tees in protest. A state
judge eventually ruled
the use of student fees
tot abortions was per-
missible.
"It's the biggest
social issue we deal
with remarked one
northeastern student
body president at the
A m e r i ca n Student
Association convention
las! summer. "When
anyone questions how
student fees are used,
they want to know
about abortion
A May, N81 na
tional survey by the
Washington Post
found similiar results,
with ten percent in
alterably opposed to
abortion, and the re-
mainder in favor of it
in varying degrees.
Student attitudes
toward abortion seem
to reflect those of the
public at large, accor-
ding to a recent Stan
ford study. "Students
are struggling more and
more with the issue o
abortion, but what they
ultimately do hasn't
changed a lot savs
Dr. John Dorman of
Stanford.
National statistics
South African Expatriate
Savs U.S. Not Free Of Bias
Continued t rom Page 1
es, whites have theii own
kv theii own.
� ��at they (blacks)
; allowed to entei into
tees" I erous said, "but 1
al minded than mosl
emphasiz-
vith the Atricans.
m can government is
chile minority. Black
institute mote than 80
al population have
.
v chei the nov ei nment
was formed the black people did not
know how to govern. White people
had to teach them. Now they are
slowly learning and although it
would sound radical to most white
South Africans, 1 would like to see
both whites and blacks governing
together
I eroux felt that the United States
is faced with a similar racial pro
blems. "The blacks in this country
have opportunities but not as much
as they would like to have 1 eroux
declared. "In South Attica, the
white people built that country, and
1 guess they uist won't let it go
NAACP Meets Solidarity
Continued From Page 1
united around one central
m� i roup of blue-
collar hard fiats could be seen mar-
ching down Constitution Avenue
car � protest signs and a tew
� d Aould be a Com-
munist Party group carrying similar
tor abortions among
college women do not
exist. But spot checks
suggest abortion is a
frequently c h osen
alternative.
A t the Gainsville
Women's Health
Center next to the
University ot Florida,
about 30-50 abortions
pei week are perform-
ed. Most, according to
Naiuv Breeze, an area
counselor, were tot
IS io-24-year-old
single, white women
having their 111 si
pregnancy
H is ev ei . Hi eee
points out that the
centei diaws women
from all ovei north
Florida.
1 heie hav e been
about 2(K) abortions
reported pei yeai since
1977 among Cornell
women, though some
university officials
speculate unrepoi ted
operations might well
the number to 4(XV
I he university made
just abortion iclei
rals m 1971 "I. us firs
veai ot existence.
"I would like to
believe (college women)
ate not getting aboi
tions with the same
kind ot impunity that
they did in 'he past
Dorman savs. " I here
is a greatei concern and
sensitivity that students
go through over abor
lion, but then end deci
sion is still the same
"We do have manv
members on college
campuses savs Dan
Donehey ot Right lo
1 tie's national office in
Washington. Righl to
the college market
I he American 1 ite
1 obby AI 1 doe
last year, 1 I
organized a special
I ite, however does not department to
have "anv programs dinate anti-abortion el
specifically aimed at forts on campu
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Of tCl mOuws
MM �? �
t TUfS TMU�S 'W
(AH lff�
- Utu;
OPTICIANS
A
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
I). I). Garrett, Greenville
NAACP president, said, "This is
the kind ol nnitv from the local level
that will have an impact on our
legislators. 1 he budget cuts are
beginning to hurt people badly. I'm
in the real estate business and 1 see
people being evicted from their
homes every dav because thev can't
pav the rent
&

(
We're at the head of the class
when it comes to delivering
campus needs. Be a high
achiever in value-
shop Kroger Sav-on!
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
available for sale m each Kroger Sav on. except as specifi
cally noted m this ad if we do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable item when available, reflec
ting the same savings or a ramcheck which will entitle you to
purchase the advertised item at the advertised price within 30
days
OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO
MIDNIGHT-Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd.
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16�,





i
QUie iEaat (Earnitman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paui Collins��n,��
Jimmy Duprii. ,����, ���
Chuck Foster, ��� ��� Chari is Chandler, �,em�
Chris Lichok, ���� � Tom Hal i . vm &�
Al.lSON BaRTEL. Prudttcnon Hwhh STEVE BaC'HNER, EmenamaHmi Editor
Steve Moore. oi�mm �w Karen Wendt, &���
3aD5)M sfteosiQ caefe.o
September 24, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Representation
Dorms Apathetic A bout SGA
The Vietnam era gave birth to the
popular expression "What if they
decided to have a war and nobody
came?" For East Carolina the say-
ing more appropriately might be
"What if they decided to have a stu-
dent government and nobody
cared?"
Filing dates for the October 6
SGA elections ended last week, and
the slate of candidates is less than
awe-inspiring. Twenty students
have filed for 25 positions as day
representatives; 19 students have fil-
ed for 26 slots as dorm represen-
tatives. So even as the year begins,
the legislature will be short 12
members.
This, however, is not the extent of
the situation. Four dorms� Tyler,
Fleming, Umstead and Slay� have
no candidates at all. Most of the rest
of the dorms have a bare minimum
of candidates. Only Scott, Jones
and Aycock have more candidates
than positions available.
In the races for class officers,
seven candidates are without op-
position, and no one is running for
either sophomore or graduate vice
DOONESBURY
president.
One result of all this is that 14 of-
fices will go unfilled and that, all in
all, 37 candidates will need only one
vote� perhaps their own� to win.
Not exactly a shining example of
Democracy in action.
What to do? For those who
would still like to run for office
Elections Chairperson Dasha Efird
Little says there is a possibility they
can still run as write-in candidates.
.Anyone interested in pursuing this
alternative should contact Little to
go through the necessary procedure.
For those who of you who are not
interested� in any way, shape or
form� in this or any other SGA
election, be forewarned.
If you don't care now, you'll have
no right to complain later in the
year that the SGA doesn't do
anything, that SGA members are
corrupt or that the SGA is wasting
your money. Tough luck. Now, not
later, is the time to do something.
Remember, each year the SGA
spends more than S100.000 of your
money. So speak now or forever
hold your peace.
by Garry Trudeau
I
(ft)eciler
Bowling Teaches Human Efficiency?
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UMOWOBUl'
By KAREN ALBIN
By far the most degrading experience
that we suffer as college students is not, as
some would tell it, standing in the lines of
drop�add once a semester, nor is it, as
others complains, filling out the forms
necessary to receive financial aid. Going to
the imfirmry can be an humbling penance
for those of us who so malevolently catch
colds and worse from our classmates, but
even this little incident cannot stand up to
the worst eventualitv: having to take P.E.
1000.
Have you ever read the catalog descrip-
tion of P.E. 1000? (Or PHYE 1000, as the
PHYE instructors call it.) It declares that
PHYE 1000 is "an investigation of effi-
ciency of human performance through the
study of variables related to total fitness,
physical fitness, diet, weight control,
degenerative diseases, physiological effects
of exercise, and the significance of motor
skills development" Huh? Gee Whiz, did 1
learn all of that in bowling class? Did I
demonstrate knowledge of those
"variables" when I passed a swimming
test, or when 1 so unwillingly participated
in the final "exercises"? If I did, I was cer-
tainly unaware of it. All I was aware of
was that I was wearing a swimsuit and a
pair of shorts in a room full of strangers,
feigning interest (sometimes) in activities
that I had no desire to participate in, much
less excel in.
Though two years have gone by, I still
have not overcome the bitterness with
which I completed and passed (Thank
God!) PHYE 1000. Apparently I am not
alone, for I heard some other students
discussing the course recently in the same
tone of voice which I still use to refer to
PHYE 1000. (When I have to refer to it at
all.) And I still have not discovered the
Campus
Spectrum
reason why all of us must waste one
precious hour of our college lives taking a
course in physical education when we all
had to take it in high school and had plenty
of opportunity to dislike the subject then.
Even those students (if there are any)
who liked taking P.E. must sympathize
with those of us who feel that a university
is not the place to learn whether or not one
can touch one's toes or do a chin-up from
a bar. Nor should a university be a place
where one should have to demonstrate
one's physical fitness in front of a mob of
strangers, male and female, all strangely
clad. While this was especially embarassing
to the less-competent men in the class, they
didn't seem to complain, but some of their
faces turned red when they fell off the bar
while chinning-up or when they saw the
girl from their ECON class looking at their
skinny legs. Yes, everyone went along with
the procedure, no one daring to suggest
that such wholesome exercise could be so
painful for even a few. I, however, was ex-
tremely displeased at having to disrobe to a
bathing suit or shorts in front of the entire
section and then having to engage in such
torture, and it certainly isn't because I
have hang-ups about my body. Part of mv
displeasure did stem from having to look
at everyone else, though. A sea of red faces
can make even the boldest among us feel
uncomfortable.
Since I have already endured P.E. and
have nothing further to say on the subject,
1 can only hope that some sympathetic
faculty member will see this column and
perhaps look into the ways in which PHYE
can be avoided by future students A- an
alternative to the course (such as a comic-
book reading laboratory or even a serious
reading laboratory, a skills in getting-over
body-hang-ups laboratory, or a fundamen-
tals in financial aid forms laboratory)
would be grand, and unquestionably of
more value to the students of ECU.
(Kim Albin is a senior Fnglish major from
Green River, Wyoming.)
Student Opinions Solicited
In addition to the "Campus Forum"
section of the Opinion page, The East
Carolinian features various students and
faculty members as guest columnists in the
"Campus Spectrum The staff of the
newspaper is proud to provide this in-
novative effort to better serve our readers
and allow another outlet for opinions.
The "Spectrum" is restricted in content
only with regard to rules of grammar and
decency. Persons submitting columns must
be willing to accept "byline" credit for
their efforts, as no entries from "ghos:
writers" will be published.
Persons interested in participating or
desiring further information may contact
Jimmy DuPree, managing editor of The
East Carolinian, at "57-6366, 6367 or 63CW
or by visiting the newspaper office on the
second floor of th� Publications building.
� Campus Forum
Letter To Friday Shows Support For Chancellor Brewer
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following let-
ter was sent to Dr. William C. Friday,
president of the University of North
Carolina system, by the current presi-
dent of the ECU Alumni Association
and several past presidents.
Several individuals have made com-
ments recently in the newspaper and on
television criticizing Dr. Thomas Brewer
and questioning his loyalty and commit-
ment to East Carolina University. Some
have suggested that Dr. Brewer was not
happy here in Greenville and that for
some time now he has been actively seek-
ing a similar position elsewhere. Others
have charged that Dr. Brewer made
wholesale changes in key personnel on
campus too quickly and that the univer-
sity has suffered as a result.
We feel compelled to respond to some
of these statements and to refute them
with the facts contained in this letter.
More importantly, we feel it appropriate
to recognize many of the outstanding
contributions he has made to the univer-
sity.
As presidents of the East Carolina
University Alumni Association during
his tenure as chancellor, we have each
had an opportunity to work closely with
Dr. Brewer and to observe first hand
positive changes he has made on cam-
pus. We are firmly convinced that East
Carolina University is a better university
today as a result of Chancellor Brewer's
efforts.
Dr. Brewer's dedication to quality and
his pursuit of excellence in all areas was
obvious to members of the search com-
mittee who reviewed hundreds of ap-
plicants before selecting him as best
qualified to guide our university in these
difficult times. It should not have supris-
ed anyone that Dr. Brewer was being
seriously considered for the presidency
of West Virginia University. The interest
shown in Dr. Brewer earlier by the
University of Louisville in their search
for a new chancellor had already
demonstrated that others nationwide
recognized the chancellor's fine talents
and outstanding administrative abilities.
Alumni and friends of the university
should have been proud that we had a
chancellor who is held in such high
esteem by others. Just as it is dificult to
keep a successful football coach, or an
outstanding employee, alumni and
friends of the university should
recognize that it should be equally dif-
ficult to keep an outstanding university
chancellor or administrator. In our
view, Dr. Brewer is just that � and
outstanding university chancellor.
In the area of alumni development,
our progress under Dr. Brewer has been
phenomenal. Donors to the alumni an-
nual fund have increased dramatically
from only 1,647 donors to 6,347 donors
in just three years. Alumni gift support
has likewise increased from $55,247 to
$438,274 during the same period. In
fact, participation in alumni giving at
East Carolina University now ranks
above twenty percent which places our
campus in the top ten percent of all state
colleges and universitites in the nation.
In support of our belief that Dr.
Brewer's record in this area speaks for
itself, we need only note that the Council
for the Advancement and Support of
Education (CASE) and the U.S. Steel
Foundation now has recognized the
university's efforts in alumni fund rais-
ing with two consecutive Alumni Giving
Incentive Awards.
In various ways other progress can be
shown. The Planning Commission in-
itiated by Chancellor Brewer has involv-
ed the entire campus, as well as large
numbers of alumni and friends of the
university, in establishing goals and ob-
jectives for the university or the next ten
years. Over 900 individuals have par-
ticipated in the planning process as
members of task forces, subcommittees
and the commission itself. The commis-
sion has given the university a sense of
direction which it has badly needed for
some time now and the commission will
continue to function in the coming years
to insure planned development.
No one can deny that East Carolina
University already had an outstanding
faculty and staff even before Dr.
Thomas Brewer arrived, but new faculty
and staff recruited by Dr. Thomas
Brewer have added greatly to the quality
already present on campus. Moreover,
with them, new faculty and staff
brought new experiences and fresh ideas
from other colleges and universities
across the land and an enthusiasm that
has revitalized and breathed new life in-
to the university.
A vocal minority has charged that Dr.
Brewer has not fully supported the
university's efforts to develop and main-
tain an NCAA Division 1-A program of
athletics. It appears that this criticism is
based in part upon a lack of information
on the part of Dr. Brewer's critics since
the chancellor has been instrumental in
upgrading our football and basketball
schedules and in securing conference af-
filiation for our university . It was Dr.
Brewer who traveled to New Orleans
with then Director of Athletics Bill Cain
to assist us in obtaining needed games in
football and basketball; it was Dr.
Brewer who personally contacted
presidents of all the schools being en-
couraged to join with East Carolina in
developing a new conference in basket-
ball and non-revenue sports.
When Chancellor Brewer arrived on
our campus it was necessary for him to
make some very difficult decisions in the
area of athletics with respect to budget
and fiscal planning. These same deci-
sions are having to be made daily at
other great universities throughout the
nation. In spite of limited financial
resources and the problems resulting
from the implementation of Title IX, we
would submit that Dr. Brewer has done
an outstanding job in helping East
Carolina University to maintain fine
athletic programs. One should
remember that it was Dr. Brewer who
brought Dr. Kenneth Karr to the campus
and it was Dr. Karr who has been so suc-
cessful in scheduling football games with
universities of national prominence such
as the University of Missouri, the
University of Miama (Florida), West
Virginia University and Florida State
University. We also should not forget
that i� was under Dr. Brewer's ad-
ministration that our women's athletic
teams have enjoyed such great success,
i.e. gaining a top twenty national rank-
ing in basketball and a number three na-
tional ranking in soft ball. It is difficult
to argue that we have not made substan-
tial progress in the area of athletics as
well as academics under Dr. Thomas
Brewer.
Finally, it should be noted that both
the chancellor and his wife have been
very active in our community and have
done much to improve "Town-Gown"
relations in our region. As chairman of
the Economic Development Committee
of the Pitt-Greenville Chamber of Com-
merce, Dr. Brewer has been instrumen-
tal in the efforts of our county and
region to attract new business and in-
dustry to our state. Additionally, by his
personal example in such projects as the
Pitt County United Way, Chancellor
Brewer and his wife have done much to
show alumni and friends of the universi-
ty that we must all be good citizens in
our communities as well as loyal sup-
porters of our university if our region of
the state is to grow and prosper.
In Dr. Thomas Brewer East Carolina
University found an individual who was
not afraid to make hard decisions that
are necessary in these difficult,
economic times. It also found a man
whose dedication to quality gained
respect for the university in this state
and across the nation which it has not
previously enjoyed. With his resignation
the university has sustained a great loss.
It would be sad for someone not to
recognize the outstanding contributions
this fine man made to the university
while he was here.
PHILLIP R. DIXON
President, Alumni Association
DANIEL THOMAS HANNON, III
JERRY W. POWELL
MAX R. JOYNER
Past Presidents
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, III
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 24, 1981 Page J
Emerald Waters
Student Praises Costa Rica Program
By WILLIAM JONES
sufl � run
H illian Jones Has a part of the
Cost Mean .Study Program. The
following are his feelings about
( osta Rica and how other students
can get involved in the program.
WW till 1NG:
"She said I can't go back to
America soon
it's no dog-gone cold its gonna
Snow until June
Yeah, they're freezing up in Buf-
falo
Stuck m their cars, and I'm lyin'
here
'Neath he sun and the stars
-Jimmy Buffet!
The Costa Rican sunrise, like its
sunsets, comes up like a rainbow of
pastel, chasing the stars. The breee
beenis o pick up from off the
Pacific, bunging with it again the
siren song of the waves.
Over the emerald water, coffee
colored pelicans glide in delta for-
mation, four or five at a time.
Along the length of a wave thev'll
follow its peak, using the updrafl 10
held hold them aloft as thev look for
food.
The parrots in the palm tree on
the other side oi the tent are waking
up too. Their yellow beaks rat-a-tat
a tireless chatter�such a contrast
with the stately pelican. They must
hate getting up early to sound so
uch Bu . everything is up with
the sun oi earlier in the tropical
lowlands. Within two hours the heat
will be all most full upon us.
So you take a long drink, devour
a huge chuunk of fresh cut pineap-
ple, grab your surfboard and head
for the waves. Or take your mask
and snorkel and relish the color
spectacle underwater. Or start walk-
ing which ever way suits you fancy,
looking for shells, chasing iguanas,
laughing at the monkeys.
You've forgotten (again) that
you're still an ECU student, still
taking a full load of classes. Yester-
day's anthropology exam sure
reminded you of that. And don't
forget there's a biology test next
"you fd better finish your
reading assignment.
Right.
� William Jones
week, so you'd better finish your
reading assignment.
Right.
But for now. just soak up the sun
and enjoy. And wonder how your
friends back in Greenville are enjoy-
ing the snow and freezing rain that
fell last night.
It's hard. Greenville seems like a
million miles away.
ECU is fortunate in a number of
ways to have the program for study
in Costa Rica. The program is open
to all students not on academic pro-
bation. It is, basically, a semester of
ECU courses, Spanish, and
geography, field studies and a varie-
ty of others, taught in a foreign
country. The cost is comarable to a
semester on campus. (This writer ac-
tually spent less that he would have
been able to here.)
The Costa Rica Program is also
unique among college foreign study
programs in its location. It is held in
cooperation with the Universidad
Nacional, in Heredia. Costa Rica
(the country just north of Panama)
is the only stable democracy without
a military in Central America.
The field studies sourse, the only
required course in the program cur-
riculum, consists of half day, full
day, and weekend field trips. Areas
to be visited include the Caribbean
coast (partially by train), the Pacific
coasts (via the program van), and
several volcanos, museums, a coffee
farm, and other places reflecting
parts of Costa Ricn culture.
This coming spring some new
field trips are under consideration.
These include a jaunt to the Canal
Zone in Panama, and a camping
trip to Chirripo, the highest moun-
tain in Costa Rica. Both the Pacific
and the Atlantic Oceans can be seen
from Chirripo's peak.
Along with the tremendous visual
impact of tropical beach, rain and
cloud forests, and volcano, somes
an even stronger cultural realiza-
tion. This can be very meaningful
learning experience for anyone, but
especially for young adults seeing
another country for the first time.
See STUDENT, Page 7
Drop Add at the Universidad Nacional in Heredia
Freshman Disasters Leave Student Puzzled
By JULIE MORGAN
Muff Wrllrr
Throughout the country most col-
lege freshmen are going through an
adjustment stage. Independence and
responsibility were larger tasks than
what we imagined. Reflecting back
on my first month here at ECL now
sends me giggling in one of the most
quiet corners of the library.
The first trip to the fifth floor
seemed to progress ever so innocent-
ly. I unlocked the door to my new
room as if I had inhabited it since
birth.My parents followed me look-
ing very puzzled. After listening to
my mothers suggestions as to the
decor of the room, my father
ordered us back down to finish
unloading the car.
Walking gingerly behind my
parents. 1 slammed the door to the
room shut. Suddenley there came a
loud crash from my room. Had I set
the TV far enough back on the
desk? 1 rushed back to find the tran-
som above the door laying on the in-
side of m room. My parents were
in total disbelief. As if I was no
dumb enough, 1 could of had brain
damage or worse if it had fallen out
the other way. Destiny or a warn-
ing0
During the next week my room-
mate and I began to settle in. Our
first errand was to go and rent a
refrigerator. Dry cereal was beginn-
ing to lodge in my throat.
Our first walk across campus to
the Student Store seemed to take
forever. We were clearlv out of
shape. I had heard that you had to
pay and sign a contract there to ob-
tain a refrigerator. My roomate and
I searched all over the area for the
table; however we could not locate
it. We dcided to walk back to the
truck set up near our end of cam-
pus.
We trudged all the way back to
find out news we had not an-
ticipated. Through their laughter,
the senior boys told us that the con-
tract table was sitting beside a large
bush next to the Student Store.
Much to our embarrassment and
anger we walked to the store once
again.
Upon closing the financial deal at
the well hidden table we began to
crawl back. The boys gave us out
refrigerator, and yelled sarcastical-
ly, "It's been a pleasure doing
business with you What could
possible happen next?
Soon I learned the quickest routes
to my classes. The routine of school
began to set in. No one would ever
know I was a freshman now.
One day during my third week
here a friend called, and asked if I
would help her with her Library
Science. This came as a compliment
to me, and I was more than happy
to agree with her request. We decid-
ed to meet in front of Joyner.
Her assignment seemed easy
enough, so we started immediately.
We had to locate a book first. We
narrowed our search down to one
wing. Wings? In my high school the
library was one room on the only
floor.
The East wing seemed somewhat
chilly, but my major impression was
that it seemed to be the quietest end
of the library. However, soon mv
friend and I remedied that. We were
on the third floor where there were
hundreds of large books. We walk-
ed down one aisle, and thought we
spotted the book. I lunged for the
book which seemed a lot smaller in
appearence. When 1 pulled it off the
shelf it came tumbling down on top
of me. 1 mean the book was as big as
me.
Soon 1 heard my friend bellow
with laughter. Many people came to
see what had hapened, including the
loibranan on that end. She told us
to quiet down or leave.
We were no vet finished with the
assignment, hut 1 chose the latter
suggestion given by the librarian.
My tnend was furious with m deci-
sion, but my reputation meant more
to me. Somehow ! thought this
episode was planned
My fourth week has gone fairly
smoothly. I know now thought that
that is no indication of how the rest
of the year is going to go. The calls
home every day have stopped;
well as the letters. The question ol
going home is no longer spoken as
often, but most of all 1 have come to
realize that all freshmen fo through
these unthinkable situations at one
time or anotherBut Lord, why so
many?
Trivia Quiz
fi&
Test Your Observations
B KAREN WENDT
The following is a trivia quiz with
a new twist: a test to check out your
powers of observation. Listed are
twenty questions concerning dif-
ferent landmarks and buildings with
which almost every student is
familar. But answering the ques-
tions may be more difficult than you
think. Ciive it a try.
1. How many staircases are there
Fame, a modern day musical will be appearing at Hendrix Theater at 5,
7:30 and 10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights. The film is sponsored
by the Student Union Films Committee.
in Austin?
2. Who is the fountain at Wright
circle dedicated to?
3. Who is respnsible for the con-
struction of the garden area near
Mendenhall?
4. How many floors are there in
Brewster A-wing?
5. How many cash registers are
there on the first floor of the Stu-
dent Supply Store?
6. What kind of bushes grow on
the west side of Memorial Gym?
7. Is there an elevator in the Old
Library Building?
8. When you open the doors in
the library do they come towards
you or move away from you?
9. What is the first name of the
Speight that Speight Psychology
building is named after?
lO.Does the Chancellors home
have a garage?
11. How many people does Hen-
drix Theatre seat?
12.How many holes are there to
be punched out on an activity card?
13.How many gates are there in
Ficklen Stadium?
14.What is the name of the am-
phitheatre that is located behind
Fletcher Dorm?
15.Where are the General College
offices located?
16.What color is the new carpet in
the Student Health Center?
17.How many cashiers windows
are there in the cashiers office?
18.How many cars do the Cam-
pus Police have?
19.How many tennis courts are
located on College Hill?
20.The Main area of campus is
wrapped partially by main four
streets. What are their names?
See QUESTIONS, Page 6
Jo-Jo and her master David Stokes have a few practice runs in the Tar River. P AI" PMItKM,s
Jo-Jo� Is She Dog Or Ham ?
By GARY PATTERSON
Staff Witat
Out across the murky depths of
the Tar, it came, slowly swimming
against the current. A blue spot
followed by a long black shape. Was
it a beaver? Perhaps a slain kidnap
victim, still wearing her sable coat.
Could it be the Pitt-Ness-
Monster???
My imagination was shattered by
the shouts of a young man nearby;
"Come on Jo-Jo, Come on The
riddle was solved as Jo-Jo, a black
Labrador retriever emerged from
the Tar River with a blue frisbee in
her mouth. She was wagging her
tail, ready for her owner David
Stokes to send the frisbee sailing
back over the river again.
On her next trip ashore I pulled
out my camera and immediately Jo-
Jo was a Ham. "She loves to act up
around cameras David exclaimed
as Jo-Jo refused to relinquish the
frisbee to DavidAfter being in the
spotlight for a moment, she walked
straight to David as if to say; "I'm
ready
David who has owned Jo-Jo for
the entire eight years of her life lives
in Washington N.C. where he works
for Culligam Corperation. He
graduated from ECU in 1980. It's
almost a ritual for David to come up
to Greenville on the weekends, bring
Jo-Jo, and see some old friends.
This time David took Jo-Jo to the
town common, also along for the
trip were two lovely, leggy friends of
David's, lazily waxing their Volvo.
"1 really hate to bring her here
said David. "Every time she comes
out of the Tar River I want to give
her a Typhoid shot. I'm serious, this
place is nasty. I'd much rather take
her to the ocean. She loves to bite at
the waves. And whenever Jo-Jo sees
a sand crab or mussel, she'll dig un-
til it's hers, bitting the crab then
spitting it back out onto the sand
Jo-Jo has quite a reputation
around ECU as a sort of the
"Terror or Wright fountain
"When I was a student David ex-
plained, "the fountain was a
favorite place to study, and Jo-Jo
favorite watering hole "She
would follow me to class, then off
to the fountain to wait for my
return. Whenever Jo-Jo came up to
the circle you'd see twenty people
scrambling to get out of the way,
before she made that first splash!
She loves campus life. You could
say she gets all a dog could ever ask
for; a place to cool off, attention
and plenty to eat
"That" David said, "I'd like to
cut out, between my mom and just
people in general, Jo-Jo is fifteen
pounds overweight
t
I '





Bill Blue And Pegasus Enj oyed By Reviewer
By AL AGATE
SI�fT Writer
It was a good
weekend for rock and
roll at the local clubs.
At JJ$, Bill Blue and
his blues-rock-bebop
ensemble played to
packed houses, while
just down the road at
the Attic, Pegasus, a
refreshingly mature
and professional
group, convincingly
resussitated the dying
art form of heavy metal
music. The only pro-
blem this weekend,
perhaps, was for the
music fan trying to
catch two different acts
playing at two different
places at precisely the
same time. But, let it be
known, it can be done
and I'm the living pro-
of.
First of all, no one
should have missed Bill
Blue. They're the kind
of band one thinks of
when one uses the word
"musicians The band
is made up of eight
men, some very young,
some not-so-young,
who share at least one
thing in common: they
can play. You can go
up; and down the coast
looking for a band
lighter that these guys
you won't find one.
Throughout the night
they dropped tempo,
sped it up. and switch-
ed muical genres-often
within a single song-
each time not only ;o
perfection, but with the
kind of slf-assured ease
that belies the expertise
such musicianship re-
quires.
Their range was
literally as wide as the
pop music spectrum.
One song was un-
mistakably new wave.
They even did a heavy
metal medley. They did
jazz, r h y t h y m and
blues and old-time rock
and roll. And what's
more they accomplish-
ed this all with an
underlying style that
made these genres their
own-a southern funk
quality that even this
yankee couldn't
mistake.
The lead singer. Bill
Blue himself, was man
to watch. Walking on
��'�) l!1,V
ARMY-NAVY STORE
to the stage as if he
were walking into his
living room, sporting a
big black mustache that
made him look like a
guest star bad guy in a
TV western, Bill Blue
radiated self-
confidence, subtle
humor and a sincere
absence of pretention.
His voice was more
than capable to cover
the range of his band's
versatilityand con-
sidering his band, this
is high praise indeed.
Watrching him per-
form one got the im-
pression of a man
who's been doing this
for years and getting
better all the time, of a
man whose profes-
sional standard is giv-
ing all each time out.
The night 1 saw
them, the management
had trouble persuading
the crowd to leave at
closing time. Even after
two encores were
played, the crowd was
still revved up and
stamping its feet. I sup-
pose this bodes well for
the possibility of Bill
Blue returning to our
area. Needless to say,
unless you just don't
like music, when they
return you won't want
to miss them.
1 would have liked to
have been able to take
the purveyors of heavy
metal in this region to
the Attic this weekend
to see the Pagasus
show, just to show
them that there are ac-
tually is a heavy metal
band that doesn't rely
on every archaic rock
and roll cliche, to show
them that the silly
things that they do and
that Pegasus doesn't
are not only
unecessary, but
transparent devices to
hide the lack of talent
beneath the cloak of
outdated tradition.
Surely there are some
nice things one can say
about what Pegasus ac-
tually did onstage, and
I'll get around to them,
but I was more impress-
ed by the things that
this band tastefully did
not do. I'll explain.
Most heavy metal
bands go onstage and
play at incredibly loud
levels designed to
deafen an audience
before the audience
realizes the band can't
play. Pegasus got up
there, and they were
loud, yes, loud
enough to stir excite-
ment, loud enought to
get the adrenalin going-
-but sensible. Unlike so
many bands Pegasus
did not rely on macho
posings, did not look
into the front row to
guage their own
cuteness, did not rely
on long solo jams
designed to showcase-
and ultimately,
entertain-a single ego.
Nothing was overdone.
When at one point they
broke into a jam, the
whole band jammed,
not a single individual,
and it was driving. Five
minute songs were not
stretched to ten, nor
were they ended in long
mock dramatic style as
if they were sym-
phonies.
It is the common
desire with amateurish
bands, when in doubt
or just craving affec-
tion, to shout into the
michrophone
p e r i o d i c a 1y in a
Wolfman Jack-Kiss
type voice "How ya
feelin' our there?" the
rock and roll equivalent
of "Was I all right?"
Mercifully, Pegasus did
not do that, and at one
point when I thought
they would, they were
actually using the au:
dience reaction quite
deftly as part of a song.
Moreover every band
member could sing and
the harmonies came in
handy. The band had a
piano player one could
actually hear, and not
only could he play, but
he was an intregal part
See WEEKEND, Page 7
Buccaneer MOVIES iij
756 3307 Greenville Square Shopping Center
THOSE LIPS
ARE BACK!
FRI SAT. 1 1:30-$2.00 ALL SEATS
Questions Answered
Continued From page 5
Answers
1. Four.
2. Martin L. Wright.
3. Class of 1976.
4. Four.
5. There are four registers but five
aisles.
6. Forsythias.
7. Yes, it's accessable from the lob-
by and a small hallway on the se-
cond floor.
8. When you oen them they come
towards you.
dial
edi

ii
9. Carrie
lO.Yes, a two car garage.
ll.Hendrix seats 800.
12.Thirty.
13.Six.
U.Flanagan-Sylvan Amphitheater.
15.In Brewster, A-wing, first floor.
16.Brown.
17.Five.
18.Four total, two regular and two
Cushmans.
19.Eight.(There are also eight at
Minges.)
20.Fifth Street, Cotanche, Tenth
Street and Reade Street.
I
I
SAAD'S
SHOE
JCfe REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
1a?W 758-1228
Quality
p Repair
WANTED:
Editor for REBEL
and
THE EBONY
HERALD
Pick up applications in Media
Board secretary's office - 8
a.ml p.m. and 2 p.m5 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
5.99 for the LPs and 6.99 for the Tapes
on sale now through September 30
To find out what's
happening on
wall street, call
Wheat First.
PRECIOUS
TIME
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B.E.N.AJAR
Includes:
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Backfired

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1
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Pitt PlazaCarolina East Mall
T





i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 24, 1981
I
C
i
n
ts
i-
')
if
m
ist
or
)S'
or
ict
he
D9
he
g
Handling
hollowing is the second of two installments. Part
one of this study appeared in last Tuesday's edi-
tion of The lastdrolinian. This article original-
ly appeared in the Outlook section of the
September 6, lHI issue of The Washington Post.
I sed by permission. All rights reserved.
B NOEL EPSTEIN
t hiilook Y itiii t llr I hr W axhinijliin Pu�l
tmost anybody you talk to in the university
system vmII admit the need for new policies regar-
ding sc discrimination in the classroom.
Grievance procedures for such complaints in
education are alread) required by federal regula-
tion But that doesn't mean most institutions
have done much, if anything, about it.
In fact, onl a handful of campuses in recent
years - Ohio Stale. Rutgers. Stanford, Yale, the
University of California at Santa Cruz, Brown,
and the University of Washington, among others
have taken such action.
I his has come chief!) in the wake of a widely
noted Yale case. Alexander v. Yale, in which a
student four years ago charged a professor had
unfairly given her a C in a course after she refused
a sexual proposition b him. The federal appeals
court last year held that the student failed to pro-
ve the damage she claimed, and that Yale in an
tse had already established the grievance board
hei uit had sought.
"During its first two years, the board received
tiree signed complaints from students about what
tie thought might be instances of sexual harass-
ment savs Yale Associate Dean Judith Berman
mdenburg. This was in addition to an
specified number of students who came to
cuss incidents but did not sign complaints. Of
signed complaints, Brandenburg adds, "In
t :ase the matter was concluded by a discussion
anged and conducted by a board member bet-
ween the student and the faculty member. The
cases were concluded after two board
bers intervened
V with ethers. Brandenburg stresses the gulf
ten exists between student and faculty
- ceptions ol an episode. "A student may con-
nomeone's remarks or actions terribly
ng or coercive she says. " while the
on the other side may actually considers
Is oi actions as a compliment and not be
e powerful and perhaps unintended ef-
� on the student
hei professor-student sexual cases, as with
ol Rhode Island professor who
id, the consequences for faculty have been
more severe. Prof. John Goheen, ombudsman at
Stanford University, tells of "three or four
cases" reported to the administration since 1978
where sex was solicited from a student by a facul-
ty member. One persistent professor in the
sciences "was reprimanded and given a salary
reduction he says.
San Jose State fired a philosophy professor in a
case in which five students had accused him of
fondling, propositioning and embracing them.
Harvard disciplined a noted government pro-
fessor for advances to a student in his office. The
University of California at Berkeley suspended a
sociologist last year for one academic quarter in a
case in which a dozen students had charged the
professor with sexually harassing them.
In the Berkeley case, the university said that "it
appeared that some of the alleged misconduct was
in itself minor or the circumstances ambiguous
and that "no complainant suffered direct
academic injury from his action Nonetheless, it
found that the suspension was warranted because
of the sociologist's "serious departure from
academic behavior
On the other side, there have been unpleasant
consequences for students who have become in-
volved in sexual charges against a professor.
Most notably at Clark University in Worcester,
Mass after a female anthropologist accused a
male sociologist of sexual harassment, two
woman graduate students gave their own evidence
against the man at a special comittee hearing. The
case took complicated twists and turns, with the
man's supporters, among other things, charging
that he was really being attacked because of his
activist politics. The most recent turn: The
sociologist filed a $23.7 million lawsuit in May
against the woman faculty member, the two
graduate students and two other women who
testified against him at the campus.
Clearly, there is enough here to produce great
caution on all sides o this issue. But. paradox-
ically, this is an instance where caution itself in
some ways becomes a feared consequence � par-
ticularly where it might cause professors or
students to treat the others more formally and
coldly and sour the normal relations essential to
education.
In the Yale case, for example, a male classics
professor who was among those joining the
woman student's suit said that faculty members1
"professional effectiveness in teaching and in
engaging in the pursuit o( knowledge with
students is serioush impaired by the contamina-
tion of student, faculty relationship created by
tolerance of sexual pressures, which . . . generates
an atmosphere of uistrust unconducive to
teaching and learning
His charges were dismissed, and Yale is among
the few campuses with formal policies and a
grievance procedure now to deal confidentially
with such complaints. But his point ts will worth
keeping in mind.
This is especially so for the small number ot
LeSfijtrJG Aeor CoiuGr. 7� "Vp bj
professors who may abuse their authority by sex-
ually propositioning students, for campus of-
ficials who understand their obligation to both
pursue legitimate complaints and head off
misunderstandings, and for women students who
may be pondering whether to file a complaint.
Important as their own circumstances are,
something far broader, potentially affecting large
parts of university life, is at stake
Red
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lOa.mlip.m.FrlSun.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 24. 1981
Page 8
Emory Says Bucs
Must Beat Toledo
He Keeps On Kicking
East Carolina kicking specialist Chuck
Bushbeck (17) is currently being treated
for Hodgkin's Disease, a milignant cancer
of the lymph nodes. Five days a week
Bushbeck travels to New Bern for radia-
tion treatment, and the Villanova transfer
has had some rough days since it began.
This week, though, the senior abandoned
the notion of sitting out the rest of the
year as a redshirt in hopes of playing in
1982. Bushbeck decided, instead, to con-
tinue doing what he loves most � play
football. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Hporta K4Hor
East Carolina football coach Ed
Emory put his feelings about the
Pirates' game this Saturday with
Toledo very simply at his weekly
press conference Wednesday.
"If we can win Saturday night we
might have something going he
said. "There's no question, we're in
a must-win situation
Last Saturday at N.C. State the
Pirates recovered from a
humiliating 56-0 loss to North
Carolina the week before, losing a
hard-fought 31-10 game that was
closer than the final score revealed.
The Bucs battled the tavored
Wolfpack to a 10-10 halftime tie.
The score stayed deadlocked until
late in the third quarter. The Pack
blew things open in the fourth on
two long punt returns � one for a
touchdown � by State's Louie
Meadows.
"We have gone back and
evaluated everything about the State
game Emory said. "We feel like
we should have won the football
game. We played 57 minutes of
good football. It's just that we had
three minutes of breakdowns,
especially with our kicking game
Emory said the punt that resulted
in Meadows' 64-yard touchdown
return was never supposed to have
gone off. The Pirates had a fourth-
and-one situation at their own
29-yard-line with 7:57 remaining in
the game. State led 24-10.
"There was some mis-
communication on the sidelines
Emory explained "I made the deci-
sion to fake the punt. The situation
we'd wanted all night long was
there. We'd been saving it. 1 felt like
that was the right time. We'll never
know now.
"Coach (Wright, offensive coor-
dinator) Anderson was on the phone
and said 'let's go for it with the of-
fensive team Emory continued.
"I said 'no I'm going with the pun-
ting team Well, when 1 was talking
to (Jim, offensive assistant)
Bengala, the kicking coach
overheard me and thought that I'd
changed my mind and wanted to
punt the ball. If I had it to do over
we'd probably just line up and run a
belly off tackle
Emory said t Pirates have put
last week's mistakes and disappoint-
ments aside now and are preparing
for what he expects to be a tough
Toledo team.
"You can tell how tough they are
by looking at the fact that Dunkel
(rating system) picked them as
14-point favorites Emory said.
"Heck, we've played Toledo three
times in the past and lost twice.
They've outscored us 89-24 and our
people are asking who Toledo is
Emory expressed special concern
over the Rockets' offensive attack,
which features quarterback Jim
Kelso and tailback John Walker.
Kelso was instrumental in leading
Toledo to a 40-0 upset of Ball State
last week. The Rockets went into the
game 11-point underdogs. Kelso
passed for 126 yards and two
touchdowns, while rushing for 113
yards and one score.
Walker leads the Rockets, 1-1, in
rushing with 201 yards.
"We probably haven't faced a
team with the speed at the skill posi-
tions like Toledo has Emory said.
"They're one hell of a football
team
The second-year Buc mentor said
he feels the Pirates are ready to take
on the challenge that the Rockets
will present.
"We've grown closer in unity and
as a family over the last two
weeks he said. "I think we have
the right attitude. I've told our kids
that it's a brand new season. We
might be 1-2, but it's not how you
start but how you finish that
counts
Freshman Johnson Is Sure Of Himself, Team
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Mitor
Steve Johnson does not come
across as your average freshman
college football player. Unlike many
first-year players he is full of con-
fidence, both in himself and his
team.
Following a star-studded career at
Brevard High School, the all-state
lineman chose ECU over N.C.
State, North Carolina, Clemson,
South Carolina and Alabama.
Johnson got the first start of his
young collegiate career this past
Saturday against N.C. State, stepp-
ing in for inured Hal Stephens at
defensive tackle. The Pirates played
well, losing 31-10 after battling the
Wolfpack to a 10-10 halftime tie.
The impressive thing about the
performance was that the club was
coming off a humiliating 56-0 loss
to North Carolina. Johnson calls
the loss to the Tar Heels the Pirates'
"turning point The freshman
speaks with confidence in both
himself and his teammates as he
looks ahead to the remainder of the
season.
"We overcame the loss to Chapel
Hill he said. "It's definitely men-
tal for us now. We're going to come
No man alive likes to be em-
harassed When a
prizefighter gets knocked
down, he gets back up. If he's
a good prizefighter he wins.
That's the way I like to think
of this Fast Carolina team.
� Steve Johnson
back strong. Everybody I look at on
this team has their head up. We're
looking forward to playing Toledo
this Saturday and finishing the
season 9-2
The confidence in the Pirate camp
came about as a result of the big loss
to the Tar Heels, Johnson said.
"No man alive likes to be em-
barassed he claimed. "And that's
what happened to us in Chapel Hill.
When a prizefighter gets knocked
down, he gets back up. If he's a
good prizefighter he wins. That's
the way I like to think of this East
Carolina team. We've been knocked
down but 1 believe we will come
back
Johnson said the attitude among
the Pirates was all wrong going into
the matchup with the nationally-
ranked Tar Heels, but added that
such a problem does not exist now.
"We were maybe a little gunshy
going into the Chapel Hill game
h? said. "We went in with the wrong
attitude and came out losers.
"We all got more intense after we
lost so badly he continued.
"Coach Emory handled it just right.
He did not bless us out. He just
wanted us as men to come back and
act like men. He seems to have this
way of getting the best out of
everybody
Johnson said the Pirate team has
drawn closer together each day since
the loss to the Tar Heels, and even
more so this week following the
disappointment at N.C. State.
"I know I feel a lot closer to my
teammates he said. "It's more
like I'm playing beside a brother
now, rather than just a teammate
The former all-state performer
was rated highly by head coach Ed
Emory in his first start. Johnson
was his own greatest critic, though,
following the performance against
the Wolfpack.
"1 made quite a few mistakes. But
1 made them at one hundred miles
per hour. The mistakes were mental,
though, and I will fix them
Johnson admitted that he did suf-
fer from a case of nerves prior to the
State game.
"I definitely had butterflies he
said. "But they felt more like bats.
After the first pop of the pads,
though, everything was o.k
Johnson thinks the season should
go that way for him as well, saying
Johnson (73) in pursuit against Western Carolina
that he expects to improve as he
gains experience.
"I know I'm dedicated he said.
"I'm giving it all I've got. As I play
more and more I know I will get bet-
ter. Everybody else on the team is
dedicated also. This team is very
young, but we all want to win �
and nobody wants to win more than
I do
Smith Hoping Program Will Profit
Booters Move To Ficklen Wednesday
ECU'S Brad Winchell (left) and Mark Hardy
team's leading offensive threats
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Assblanl sports Kditor
Wednesday, when East Carolina
soccer coach Brad Smith was asked
what factors would enable his pro-
gram to reach the same status as
Clemson or N. C. State, he smiled
and rubbed his forefinger and
thumb together. Big bucks.
Which is one reason that the
Pirates will be hosting the Wolfpack
under the lights in Ficklen Stadium
next Wednesday night at 7:30; a
landmark event in ECU soccer.
However, that isn't the most impor-
tant reason.
"This match is really important
to our future Smith said standing
outside the Pirate Club, East
Carolina's athletic scholarship
foundation. "For us to be a viable
program, we've got to put ourselves
in a position to bring more crowd
support Ficklen Stadium seats
35,000.
"This is a one-shot deal. We'll
Toledo's Stobart Sees 'Fast-Paced Game'
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
u�l�m Sport Hilor
Toledo Rockets' head coach
Charles Stobart says his team surely
has hit both ends of the spectrum
this season. Game one: a 31-6 loss to
Louisville. Game two: a 40-0 win
against favored Ball State� picked
to win the Mid-American Con-
ference championship this season.
East Carolina hosts Toledo this
Saturday.
"We didn't play badly Stobart
says of the Louisville game. "They
threw two long touchdown passes,
and a pass interference call went
against one of our young defensive
backs. We also had a blocked punt.
Some of our players came close to
playing well. All of them played well
against Ball State
Stobart says he is looking for a
"fast-paced, hard-played game"
against the Pirates. The Rockets'
two main offensive weapons,
quarterback Jim Kelso and running
back John Walker, are playing ad-
mirably, the coach says.
Against Ball State Kelso com-
pleted 9 of 16 passes for 126 yards,
including two touchdowns. He also
rushed for 113 yards and scored
once. Stobart said his sophomore
quarterback could play well every
week like he did against Ball State or
be inconsistent like he was in the
Louisville contest.
Walker is a 4.4 sprinter who has
rushed for 201 yards in t� games.
"He can get better Stv � says.
"He's built in the Archie Griffin
mold, and we hope he'll break out
more
Stobart says he expects some dif-
ficulty in handling the Pirate
wishbone. "It's something we don't
see much of he said. "We saw a
little bit of Bowling Green's last
season, but it's really only the se-
cond or third time we've seen it in
about five years
The Toledo defense has been
tough; allowing 81 yards on the
ground and 141 through the air so
far this season. The unit is anchored
by strong safety Mike Kennedy, an
All-American candidate, defensive
end Darrell Meadows and
linebacker Marlis Russel, whom
Stobart said had an "outstanding"
game against Ball State.
Stobart says his kicking game has
been spotty but his specialty teams
have responded with good coverage.
His kickers are "good but just inex-
perienced
Stobart is optimistic that his team
can turn in a good performance
against the Pirates. "We've played
pretty well against opponents we're
used to seeing. East Carolina has
fine football players. They're good,
skilled players with good size
Stobart says he doesn't pay too
much attention to the preseason
forecasts. The Rockets were picked
to finish eighth this season.
"The most important pick is at
the end of the season he says.
"The key is that certain ball clubs
have certain potential. We were
picked to finish first a year ago, and
we ended up ninth
Asked to compare his program
with others on a national level,
Stobart simply says, "East Carolina
has 95 grants; we have 75. That's a
helluva difference
just have to sec how it goes. If we
can put x number of people in there
(Ficklen) he said in a hopeful
manner, "we'll certainly generate
some revenue
"When I came here five years
ago, we had nothing. I'd walk
around campus looking for
somebody to kick a ball. I'd say,
'Play soccer, and I'll give you a let-
ter Today, we have more skilled
players, and we can do different
things
Smith's budget, excluding his
salary, is $6-7000, about four or five
times as less as national powers
Clemson and North Carolina.
"State has 11 full grants; we have
none. They recruit world-class
players� 1 can recruit maybe one
kid a year
The Pirates were 2-10-0 in Smith's
first two seasons, 3-11-2 in 1978,
6-11-2 in 1979 and a record-tying
7-14-1 last season.
"Our success is a pyramid effect.
We're winning more. We're having
more close games, and our players
feel we're supposed to win these
close matches. Physically, we're
close to most of the teams we play
The night match with the
Wolfpack will not only enable
Greenville residents to become more
familiar with soccer and the Pirate
players but will also give the people
a better opportunity to see soccer;
something hard to do since people
are usually working at the regular
starting time of 4 p.m.
Smith's squad, 2-2 this so far this
season, has a demanding schedule.
Included, other than State, is
nationally-ranked Old Dominion,
Guilford and UNC-Wilmington.
TKe Pirates played undefeated
Campbell Wednesday afternoon.
Smith used Campbell as an exam-
ple of a growing soccer program
that has gained national recogni-
tion. "You don't know how it is
he says, "to walk in front of a cou-
ple of thousand people who are
screaming at you
The Pirates lost a tough 1-0 deci-
sion at the hands of Elon last week.
Smith says his team may have been
looking forward to the N.C. State
match. "I'm not disappointed,
though he said, "We've got a
tremendous group of kids. I don't
think we'll look past anyone
anymore.
"They understand the financial
situation, but they bust their butts
NOTE: Hubert Vogelsinger, the
former North American Soccer
League and Austrian World Cup
player, will conduct a soccer clinic
for youngsters 13-17 the day of the
game. The clinic, sponsored by
Puma, will be held from 5-7 p.m. at
Ficklen Stadium.
The admission price for the N.C.
State-ECU game will be $1 for
adults, which includes observation
of the clinic. Children and East
Carolina students will be admitted
free. Special prizes will be given
away at the match, including a keg
of beer.
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s
THE: EAST CAROUNIAN
SEPTEMBER 24. 1981
V
2
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cek.
ae been
State
f a
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financial
leir but!
the
S� i
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day of the
isored by
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the N.C.
SI for
Nervation
and East
admitted
be gnen
I v a keg
Intramural
Sports-N-Shorts
BY GREG MELTON
Tieermania' Abundant In Clemson
5 . �� for we don't olav them fense by junior quaru
IM Flag Football
Competition Fierce
FLAG FOOTBAl l
The ECU Intramural Flag Football season is
in full swing and competition has been fierce.
There have been several tightly-contested games
a uell as some wide-open affairs. The following
action represents some of the highlights from
around the gridiron.
In the men's division "Jones Maze" opened
with a 62-8 victory over the "Jones M and M's
The "Jones Enforcers" scored a 48-22 win over
the "Jones Cooler Crew" in a game which saw
several long touchdowns. Finally, the
"Tn-Humps" showed their muscle in a convinc-
ing 84-0 victory over the "Scuzzmen Wizards
These teams along with the "Kappa Alpha A"
and "Ruggers" appear to be the class of the
men's division. Still, several other teams could
crack this mystical five before the season's end.
Some spectacular individual performances
ucre noted. Anthony "Too-Quick" Martin and
Stan "See-You-Later" Kearns scored six and
scen touchdowns respectfully in opening-day
n ic tones. Rumor has it that both will appear in a
segment of "Good Morning America" along
with Carolina's Kelvin Bryant.
In the women's division, the question app-
ears to be just who will test the
�Heartbreakers" who have posted opening vic-
tories of 72-0 and 66-0 over teams which wish to
remain anonvmous. This presents a big
challenge to the rest of the girls in the league and
it will be curious to see just who will rise to meet
such a tct. 1BAC apers to be the team with the
creates! chance at the moment.
Ginger Rothermel, Laurie Sykes and Maureen
Buck all have turned inoutstanding perfor-
mances for the "Heartbreakers Other girls
who have made significant contributions to their
teams include Anita Marsh, who scored two
touchdowns in the "Cotton Creamers" win over
"Fabulous Fleming" and Beth Byrd who ran for
three scored n the "While Iron Gndders vic-
tory oer the "White 6-Packers
Congratulations go to all the team and per-
formed and keep up the good work.
ALMOST ANYTHING GOES
Well it's that time of year again when all
craziness breaks loose. That could only mean
one thine. Yes. it's time for the ECU Intramural
"Almost Anvthing Goes Competition This is
a Co-Rec event with three men and three women
on each team. So don't miss the fun and get your
entries now. Signups end October 5th.
Budweiser sponsors this even and will award
"T-SHIRTS" to all participants.
CLEMSON, S.C.
(UP1) Clemson coach
Danny Ford is giving
his football players a
few days off to bask in
the glow of their 13-3
victory over Georgia,
the defending national
champions.
"We didn't have one
hero in that game ' we
had about 25 Ford
said.
"Since we don't play
Ihis Saturday, we're
not making them prac-
tice the first couple
days of the week he
said. "But after that
they can't be heroes
anymore. They have to
get back to work
Clemson, 3-0. broke
was named UPl's
Coach of the Week.
"That's an honor,
but 1 wish our whole
team had been named
instead of me Ford
said. "They did the
work
The game last Satur-
day snapped Georgia's
15-game winning streak
and marked the first
time since 1919 that the
Tigers kept the
Bulldogs, one of their
biggest rivals, from
scoring a touchdown.
Georgia's winning
streak was the longest a
major college team held
this season.
Georgia, hardly
looking like a defen-
into the Top 20 at No. ding national champion
18 in United Press In- with nine turnovers to
ternational's coaches' an aroused Clemson
poll and todav Ford defense, fell
fourth to 16th in the
UPI poll.
A swarming Tiger
secondary picked off
Georgia quarterback
Buck Belue's first five
interceptions of the
season and held
sophomore sensation
Herschel Walker to an
average of less than 4
yards a carry.
Walker, who now
has gained more than
2,000 yards in 14
regular season college
games, needed 28 car-
ries for his HI last
week.
In the first half,
Clemson forced six
turnovers four
fumbles and two in-
terceptions.
"The whole defen-
sive line plaved well
Ford said. "We didn't
capitalize on as many
mistakes as Georgia
made, but our defense
dominated the game up
front and our secon-
dary picked up a lot of
passes
Ford said he is not
bothered by Clemson
sitting below Georgia in
the ratings.
"We try to work our
way up all season '
we're not really con-
cerned about the
polls he said. "It's an
honor to be in it. It's
good recognition for
our outstanding univer-
sity and our outstan-
ding team. They cer-
tainly deserve it
Clemson plays the
Kentucky Wildcats
Oct. 3 at Lexington.
"That'll be the turn-
ing point for us, I
think Ford said.
"How we handle that
game on the road will
tell whether we're a
really good team or a
pretty good team. It'll
be a tough one because
we don't play
every year.
"I hope our guys are
smart enough to know
to leave last week
behind and concentrate
on Kentucky he said.
Clemson, a four-
point underdog against
Georcia. was led on of-
fense by junior quarter-
back Homer Jordan,
who hails from the
Bulldogs' hometown of
Athens, Ga.
"It is an understate-
ment to say we're glad
to have a win over
Georgia Ford said.
ATTIC
SOUTHS
NO. 6
ROCK
CLUB
FRI
SEA-
BOARD
& GUEST
SAT.
THE
STATES
& GUEST

11
Sept. 26th
0 0 till 4
GREENVILLE
SHOPPING
SQUARE
CENTER
5 Continuous Hrs. of Live Music
SuW:RECORDINGARYlST
TRICKS
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10,278 on fito � all sublets
Send $1.00 (refundable) for your up-to-date
340 page, mail order catalog
We also provide research � all fields.
Thesis and dissertation assistance available
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 Idaho Ave206F
i Angeles,
SP ONSORED BY
Proceeds will be
CIRC LE K
used for service
projects
FREE DRINK with purchase of hot dog,
valid ID and this ad. Limit 1 drink to students.
im.��wimmiiiimiHiiiiiiHiiiiHiniiiiiiiHimiiiiiiiiHiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiimnmnmi"iiiiiiHimnnil
MonFri. 2-6
Discount on beverages
with College I.D.
Ol PQ OFFE
.7?ICTL72:i
Serving Breakfast
24 Hrs. A Day
Located corner of
10th & Charles Blvd.
SPECIAL
2 FOR 1 OFFER!
Buy 1 Steak Biscuit at the regular price
and get 1 Free. This special offer expires
October 3, 1981. Coupon redeemable at
Greenville Bojangles only!
911 S. Memorial Drive 2 blocks off Dickinson Ave.
Open Daily at 6:00 A.M.

EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. 9th St. 752-2332
�Variety of Fresh & Frozen Seafood
�Lobster Tails 'King Crab Legs
Clams Crab Meat
�Hard Crabs
Plaza Shell
410 Greenville Blvd.
Phone 754-3023
Mrs.
Man-Set. 7-lt
Sen. It-it
(S)
WEALSOSELL $4(100
USED TIRES Hi!
an
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK Of
PREGNANCY
ASOBTIOMS FROM 1H�
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
tltS.M PrtWKV T�1. �wm
Control. ��d Ffoolow
Proaaancy Coom�Mim. for
� urther ln�orm�tion call
�370535 (ToM Froe Number
�00 231 75M) between � A AA
and 5 P M Weekday.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�l7We�f Morgan St
Raieiffti. N C
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
(Foreign & Domestic)
Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
Prices
Road and Wrecker Service
.SHELL:
Discounts On Repairs With I .D. w m
come in
Raleigh has the
most complete line
of bicycles in the
industry And that
means there's
one for you
For Racing,
Touring, Com-J
muting, Every-
thing Come in
and see for yourself
BICYCLE POST
530 Cotanche St.
Greenville, N. C.
Phone: 757-3616
Store Hours:
9:30 530 Mon. Fri. 9:00 4:00 Sat.
DINNER
IT UP!
AT WENDY'S FOR
AFTER 4 P.M.
A WENDY'S SINGLE
HAMBURGER, FRIES AND
MEDIUM SOFT DRINK
IS ONLY
When you know bicycles, you want Raleigh.
Popcorn
Shrimp
499
?CHEESE AND TOMATO EXTRA
THIS IS SUCH A
GREAT DEAL
YOU DON'T EVEN NEED
ACOUPON.
OFFER ENDS: Sept. 30,1981
AIN'T NO REASON TO GO ANYPLACE ELSE.
Ml rmKlnUiMlHMMl Iik Ml nW ieMrt
f
' f





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SH�n-MBl-R24. 1981
Fearless Football Forecast
TOLEDO AT ECU (Score)
BOSTON COLLLEGE AT UNC
DUKE AT VIRGINIA
MARYLAND AT N.C. STATE
W AKl FOREST AT VA. TECH
AUBURN AT TENNESSEE
SOUTH CAROLINA AT GEORGIA
OHIO STATE AT STANFORD
FLORIDA AT MISSISSIPPI ST.
MIAMI (FLA.) AT TEXAS
PENN STATE AT NEBRASKA
OKI AHOMA AT SOUTHERN CAL
CHARLES CHANDLER
(31-5)
ECU 28-17
UNC
Duke
N.C. State
Va Tech
Auburn
Georgia
Ohio State
Mississippi St.
Texas
Nebraska
Southern Cal
WILLIAM YELVERTON
(28-8)
ECU 24-21
UNC
Duke
N.C. State
Va. Tech
Auburn
Georgia
Stanford
Mississippi St.
Texas
Nebraska
Southern Cal
CHUCK FOSTER
(28-8)
ECU 28-14
UNC
Virginia
N.C. State
Va. Tech
Auburn
Georgia
Ohio State
Florida
Miami
Nebraska
Oklahoma
CHRIS HOLLOM AN (27-9)JIMMY DuPREE (24-12)
ECU 17-14ECU 27-10
UNCUNC
DukeDuke
N.C. State C. State
Va. TechVa. lech
TennesseeAuburn
GeorgiaGeorgia
Ohio StateOhio State
FloridaFlorida
MiamiMiami
NebraskaNebraska
OklahomaOklahoma
Writers Wanted
The East
Carolinian
Old South Building
757-6366
ECU Soccer: From 3-11 in '78 to high hopes in '81.
Classifieds
THE
FITNESS
CLUB
fear men and women
1001 EVANS STWKCT
ORCCNVILLC. N.C. XT 14
Come by or call
TODAY and set
up an appointment
for a free workout.
FOR SALE
WATERBEDS' No students can
buy a water-bed (Queen or King)
direct from mgt You can save up
to one halt retail Complete beds
with is yr warrenty matress. S yr
warren thermostat heater, liner,
trame. headboard, pedestal tor as
low as i�9 Queen 199 King Call
David Delivery Adv 7S8 3408
4 0 CUBIC FOOT refrigerator. 4
yrs old cutting board. 150 call
752 7178.
AKC REGISTERED Norwegian
Elkhcund pups i'50 Ready to go
call 758 2252
DORM SIZE retrigerator tor S60
Like newt Call 758 8755 after 6
p m
1980 HONDA 750 Custom new con
dition 1100 miles. '56 6888 after 6
p m
1976 YAMAHA DT125. excellent
condition. 83 mpg great tor cam
pus street and trails, V400 Call
758 2323
YARD SALE Clothes, misses sue
10. a few size 12 Sat Sept 26,
7 30 12 30 2508 B East 3rd St in
back yard
ping PONG table, includes net
and paddles 540 Turntable
Thorens Manual 560 Call 758-6093
FOR RENT
TWO MOBILE HOMES Com
pletely furnished, both have two
bedrooms and are approximately
three miles from ECU One rents
for 150, the other is 175 Phone
758 1975 between 7 10
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 3 bedroom house on Elm St
approx one fourth mile from cam
pus with two other girls Rent 5175
a month plus one third utilities.
Call 754 7747
THREE BEDROOM mobile home
lor rent Nice 2 miles past
hospital on semi private lot No
pets, no children Available Oct 1
Call 752 4707
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment. 1125
per month plus one halt utilities
Call 757 1465
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apt 5112 50 per
month plus one half utilities Call
355 6718
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
Two bedroom townhouse, walking
distance to campus S225 per
month plus one third utilities.
Phone 758 6147
WANTED Roommate to share
furnished apt ill5 a month covers
rent and utilities Call 355 6927
MALE ROOMMATE needed Tar
River Est 580 per month one third
utilities 758 6458
PERSONAL
TYPING tor students, professors,
etc Kempie Dunn 1019 E Wright
Rd Greenville, NC 27834 Call
752 6733 after 1 p.m.
LOST AND OR GONE
from the Rawl Building
Takara 10 speed bicycle
return and no questions
Roach Sue Stanko. Julie Long.
Julie Mohan. Ashley Delappt
Babt'Urt Pignani. Elizabeth
Henderson. Kelly Poe. Carolyn
Hughes Lisa lager. Biv Vargas
Susan ToUefson and Shern
Gnmsley We wish all the
sororities a successful year
Clip Joint' has moved to 119 Gar
rett Call Marlena at 758 8832
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive. Call Amy at
7 5 7 3 7 3 4
SEPTEMBER SPECIAL (512
value) 6 85 shampoo haircut,
style, unisex Stutents and tacul
ty The Life Force 752 5048 also.
Free Yoga sessions'
BE A success in your spare time
Pleasant, profitable work Your
Independent Shokiee Distributor
will tram 752 5048
SEX Now that we have gotten
your attention� If you re in
terested in colorguard then Oin
our winter guarde BLACK RUS
S1AN, second to none For more
information, call 752 8443
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen years experience as ad
mmistrative secretary wants to do
typing at home Reasonable rates
Call 756 3660
Student Rates
Features Include:
Male & Female Instructors
Nautilus Machines
1 to 1 Supervision on Nautilus Workouts
�Olympic Barbells �Coed Hours �Dumbells
�Showers, And Lockers �Sauna
�Whirlpool
A T XAI TIL US FiTNESS IS OUR SPECIAL TY
758-9584
WVestcrn Steer,
Family
STEAKK0VSE
BBHBi
TUES and THURS
801. CHOPPED SIRLOIN
$2.09
Both of above served
with baked potato
or FF and toast
Great Luncheon Specials
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
All Day
Delicious 33 item Sif�CiolS
Mar Bar
10 Different items for
under 53 00 every day
3005 E. 10th St.
Hours:
Sun. thru Thurs.
11 a.m. to9 p.m.
Fn &Sat.
11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
CHEF
SALAD
SI.99
4-oz. Chop
Sirloin
$1.19
(with Baked Pot
or FF ana toas1)
MON. and WED
BEEF TIPSS2.89
MON. thru FRI.
Soup & Sandwich
$1.99
(Steerburger or
Chicken Sand � no pot )
Kids under 12 eat steerburger or
child's plate with potato for 99c
SORRY NO TAKE OUTS ON SPECIALS
Taken
a blue
Please
asked
Contact Chris at 752 4379 or
'57 6366
CHI OMEGA sorority will be
holding their annual Parents Day
on September 26.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new
pledges of Chi Omega Lauren
�Mjjt
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Interventio
24 HOUR SERVICE
758HELP
1117 Evans Street
Greenville. N.C. 27834
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
COPY CENTER
Copies 4.25C
100OR MORE
51 TO 99
CASE PRICESON
BEER& WINE
Wholesale & Retail ice Sales
lib & 4 lb bags
Keg A Ice Delivery � 24 Hours
Visa and Mastercharge
Greenville � 752(772
Chapel Hill 967 9791
55
Diamond
Love Buds�
they grow with
your Gold Beads

Diamond Love Buds
Single 18.95
Double 28.97
Triple 39.97
J.D DawsonCo.
2818 E. 10th St.
752-1600
DLB-3
Jewelers � Gemologcst
T HEAPING PORTIONS
AT A PRICE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
Septemlei 24. Hunsd.ti. ft
CHICKEN PAN PIE. 2 vegetable $209
September 25. F nday ,��.
SALMON PATTY. 2 vegetables $209
September 26. Saturdav ,n .
VEAL PARMESAN. 2 vegetables $259
September 27. Sunday
SMOTHERED CHICKEN ZJV
2 vegetables
Septembet 28. Monday crkoo
MEAT LOAF & SPAGHETTI Z29
2 vegetables
September 29. Tuesday �r�io
FRIED CHICKEN. 2 vegetables 'av"
September 30. Wednesday � tna
STUFFED GREEN PEPPER '209
2 vegetables
4Kaapm - Spin
CaroMaaEaal
Moa-Frl LUNCH 1 laa - II
(�tMFrD.SataSaal
(ft�Sat)
-y��xcz7syic7rrn pq"ic3C�3�7�
$1 OFF
All
Sweatpants
2sSsSsSsSsSsSaSsSS2s;
I
r
f�t�rcrcoi 'po.xszzzx�sk�-rerrK:
$5.00 OFF
All Purple
Nylon Jackets
-��y�m�m M����-rs�7�7yy-
GYM
SHORTS
PLAIN
T-SHIRTS
p 3.00
2Pr. 4.00
3Pr. 5.00
1 For 3.00
2 FOR 4.00
3 FOR 5.00
SHOES
y.
1 Pr. For
S�ct Group of CloMouf
Shoe, I Limrrwi Sties
and QwoirHtiM.)
15.00
f 2Pr For 25.00
?VPFor 30.00
PRINTED S ifor 5.00
TH.RTS for 6 00
3FOR 7.00
ONE GROUP OF KNIT SHIRTS $5.00
ECU SUPERSTRIPE HAT J $5.00
H.L. HolVges
BONDS






Title
The East Carolinian, September 24, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 24, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2791
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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