The East Carolinian, September 22, 1981






�he iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 9
Greenville.N.C. Tuesday, September 22, 1981
20 Pages
English Department
Chairman Resigning
B DIANE ANDERSON
Dr. W Erwin Hester, chairman
of the department of English at East
Carolina University foi 14 years,
will be leaving his position at the
end of the summer session ol 1982
to become a full-time professor.
"I have served as chairman ol the
ish department since 1968 and
feel that fourteen years is lone
enough foi a person to chair a ma-
jor department Hester said. The
1 nglish department should. I
believe, continue its progress under
adership
Several improvements made
Dr. Hester's leadership in-
clude the development of a jour-
ism minor, a concentration in
writinj and a master's
degree qualifying teachers for two
ears colleges.
Many professional journals have
also been published under Dr.
Hester's direction, including
'Teaching English in the Two-Year
College "Children's Folklore
Newsletter" and the "Tar River
Poetry" magazine.
In his letter of resignation, Hester
expressed that the English depart-
ment "has grown to one of the most
productive at East Carolina, both in
quantity and, more importantly, in
quality. The active enrollment in
our graduate program has at least
tripled. During a time when virtual-
ly, all English departments have ex-
perienced a serious decline in the
number of undergraduate majors,
we have maintained a large and
vigorous program
Dr. Hester also stated that he
would encourage his replacement to
continue work on combining the
broadcasting and journalism minors
into a journalism major.
"The English department has
been working toward the develop-
ment of major communications.
This is currently awaiting final ap-
proval he said. Dr. Hester warn-
ed, however, that the development
of such a program would take time.
Other activities begun during Dr.
Hester's term as chairman include
the East Carolina Folklore Archive,
the Language Arts Conference
which is now in its tenth year, and
the Children's Literary Conference,
now in its fourth year.
Dr. W. Erwin Hester ��
After 14 years as the chairman of the English department at East Carolina, Dr. Hester announced his resignation
Wednesday.
Little Freedom At Liberty Baptist
NCHBURG, V a.
,i i;s k � l hnson, a sweet
I and good-natured student,
a as attracted to a woman he sa on
-us one da . 1 ike any other stu-
ison figured the logical
ould be to ask her for a date.
unlike most students. Ricky
�son needed his dean's permis-
it.
Permission to date is nothing
isual at 1 ibertv Baptist College,
where Johnson was enrolled. I iber-
tv, Baptot is the academic pasture
damentalisl preacher Jerry
Falwell's electronic ministry.
Falwell, who is best known as the
president of the Moral Majo
- students need administration
consent before going on a date,
which must then be spent in a
designated dating area.
-s Johnson discovered, the ad-
ation doesn't always go
. Aitr. students' dating wishes,
ecialb
as in Johnson's case
the two students are not of the same
race.
But such is life at I ibertv Baptist,
which Falwell opened in September,
191 as an academic antidote to
"the dark spiritual condition of the
world He strongly disapproves of
the evolutionary theories and situa-
tional ethics of other colleges, so
I ibertv Baptist promotes higher
education as a hteralist Christian ex-
erase. In its first year, Liberty Bap-
tist's enrollment was 110 students,
who sometimes had to attend classes
held in condemned buildings around
Lynchburg. But this fall, Falwell
welcomes some 3000 students to a
24-building campus on a mountain
outside town.
While the campus isn't Iv
1 eague the buildings are
prefabricated and students sleep
tour to a room - Falwell regards its
construction as "miracle
Besides miracles, the college relies
on tuition and contributions
solicited during Falwell's weekly
televised "Old Time Gospel Hour
It has raised enough money to offer
bachelors degrees in nine fields. It
was accredited last December by the
Southern Association of Colleges
and Schools.
Falwell wants to take it higher.
His goal is "putting the school on
the level of Harvard
Yale, for one, doesn't want it
there. Yale President A. Bartlett
Giamatti raised a national con-
troversy recently when, in his writ-
ten message to Yale freshmen, he
denounced Falwell and the Moral
Majority as "peddlers of coercion"
who are "angry at change, rigid in
the application of slogans (and) ab-
solutist in morality
Moral Majority spokesman Cal
Thomas replied that "Giamatti's
speech was totally false and un-
founded
Yet Liberty Baptist openly and
cheerfully flaunts most of the tenets
of liberal education - free and open
inquiry, skepticism, etc. that
distinguish good colleges from the
mediocre.
"Anytime (faculty members) start
teaching something we don't like
Falwell savs, "we cut the money
off
He also flaunts academic or-
thodoxy in his admissions stan-
dards, which require not only grades
but demonstrably good "moral
character" and an acceptance of
Jesus Christ as the applicant's per-
sonal savior.
"You must be a horn-again
Christian to be admitted to our col-
lege summarizes President Pierre
Guillerman. As part of the admis-
sions process, students must write
autodiographical descriptions of
their conversions.
After being admitted, students
operate in a highly-structured and
restrictive environment. "If a stu-
dent is not from a disciplined
home Ricky Johnson says, "it is a
cultural shock. The rules are clear-
cut, but you don't actually unders-
tand it until you live it
There is, for example, the
elaborate reprimand system.
Students can receive reprimands
for engaging in a wide array of
recreational activities. Marijuana is
strictly forbidden, as is drinking,
dancing and going to movies.
Rock music, which Falwell con-
siders "the devil's anthem is ab-
solutely prohibited. So is country
and western music.
Students can be suspended for
dancing, swearing, reading por-
nography, or visiting the dorm
(including the lobby) of a member
of the opposite sex.
Automatic expulsion occurs it a
student uses drugs, joins a
demonstration or riot, or indulges in
"immoral behavior
But Liberty Baptist students don't
have much of a chance to sin. Dorm
officials inspect their rooms daily,
while a guard oversees the single
road entrance to the campus.
Students must sign out before leav-
ing. They have to be back by 10:30
p.m. on weeknights, and 11:30 p.m.
on Friday and Saturdays.
Once in, Prayer Elders conduct
devotions at curfew times. The
prayer sessions, like twice-weekly
attendence at Falwell's Thomas
Road Baptist Church, are man-
datory.
Faculty members also must
adhere to rigid standards. "No way
�ill we hire a divorced person for
our faculty asserts associate Dean
Glenn Sumrall. Teachers must "set
Christian examples for the
students
They must avoid dancing and
drinking beer, although Guillerman
notes that "we don't go around
looking in refrigerators
All of which makes for a quiet.
well-ordered presence in the com-
munity. Norml town-gown ten-
sions are minimal. Despite some
complaints about students' attempts
See COLLEGE. Page 5
ECU Medical School
Sponsoring Symposium
On Mentally Retarded
B MIKE HUGHES
The diversity of attitudes toward
mental retardation will be the topic
of a -v mposium to be held in Green-
ville on October 1 through the 3.
The symposium, titled "Natural
Abilities and Perceived Worth:
Rights, Values and Retarded Per-
sons iK sponsored by the East
Carolina University School oi
Medicine and the North Carolina
Humanities Committee and will be
held at the Ramada Inn on Green-
Mile Boulevard. The conference
directors are Dr. Loretta Kopelman
and Dr. John Moskop, both on the
faculty at the ECU medical school.
According to Kopelman, the con-
ference will provide a forum for the
discussion of attitudes, policies and
language concerning the mentally
retarded. The symposium's
multidisciplmary faculty will discuss
these issues from a medical perspec-
tive, as well as from those of law,
philosophy, history and religion,
she said
On The Inside
Announcements2
Opinions4
Campus Forum4
Entertainment
Sport!
The symposium is intended for
philosophers, physicians, nurses,
allied health professionals and
others concerned with the care of
the mentally diminished, according
to Kopelman, who is director of the
humanities section for the school of
medicine. However, the conference
is open to the general public.
Each of the speakers is renowned
in his respective field, according to
Kopelman. "1 am very pleased with
the faculty we have slated she
said.
Among the guest speakers will be
Dr. David J. Rothman, who is a
professor of history at the Center
for Policy Research in New York
City. Rothman will deliver a lecture
titled "Who Speaks For The
Retarded?" based on his books on
the history of mental institutions.
Kopelman later added that some
of the distinguished speakers have
agreed to attend this symposium for
less than their usual honoraria. She
attributed this willingness to the uni-
que appeal of the upcoming con-
ference.
Kopelman says she hasn't an
estimate yet as to the number that
will attend, though she figures the
total number of available seats at
between 120 and 150. Advanced
registration continues through
September 24.
Campaigning Begins
In SGA Election
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Major A ttractions
Thursday night drew a crowd of 4,000 fans and netted at profit for the ECU
student union. See page 16.
By DIANE ANDERSON
unum Nr�s Vdilor
Campaigning began last night at
7:30 for the positions that need to be
filled in the SGA legislature. The
orientation meeting with the can-
didates for day student represen-
tative, dorm representative, and
class officers was held at 7 p.m.
Monday to acquaint them with elec-
tion rules and procedures.
The candidates are required to
leave a $10 deposit with the elections
chairperson, Dasha Efird-Little, to
insure that they will clear away all
posters and banners put up during
the campaign. Little made it clear
that if the elections committee had
to remove any banners or posters,
the candidate to whom those articles
belonged would lose his or her $10.
An itemized expense account is
also required by the elections com-
mittee, to be handed in no later than
September 30. Each candidate for
the legislature has a limit of $75 to
spend on his or her campaign, and
candidates for class officers have a
limit of $100.
Many of the slots in the
legislature are still open, and several
candidates are running unopposed.
There are 20 day representative can-
didates running for 25 slots. Out of
26 dorm representative openings,
only 19 are running for the posi-
tions, and 4 dorms, namely Tyler,
Fleming, Slay and Umstead have no
representation at all.
Each dorm will have two
representatives in the legislature.
Since Jones, Aycock and Scott
dorms are the only ones that have
three people running for the posi-
tions, these candidates are the one
who will need to campaign.
The senior class candidates arc
Russell Overman for President.
Dwayne Naylor for Vice President,
and John Greer for Secretary-
Treasurer. All of these candidates
are running unopposed.
There is no one running for
sophomore class or graduate class
vice president.
The elections will be held on Oct.
6. Voters must have an ECU l.D.
card and an Activity card to cast a
ballot.
Ballot boxes will be located at the
student store, the Croatan, Mingcs
Coliseum, Mendenhall Student
Center and Belk building, as well as
in the lobby of each dorm. Students
are required to vote in their par-
ticular precinct for legislators.
However, there will be ballots at
every poll to vote for class officers.
All of the polls will be open from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. except the ones in
Mendenhall, the Croatan, and the
student store, which will remain
open until 7 p.m.
In case of a tie vote the date for a
run-off election is set on October 13.
TUDENT APPRECIATION WEEK
Sponsored by
Downtown Greenville Association
t
1 11'11'liiWHt,1 wfc?'





1HI I M l VROI INJAN
t PTEMBER22. 19S
Announcements
Stc
ONA
The ECU 0
Native 4metnam l
ting their tuV n eel
day Septembe' 8
The rneetr'Q b
5 30
held in the
oom at Rag!
tend
cso
i ��. deni
vt,n. ine j currently
. � �
��- graduate students i "�
students ' e
i hem strv anat m
�� �
. �
��-� aqi
SOCIAL WORK
ents wl �
��- �
� ' �'
n al Work" C
se' ices tot an apt �' and
eduie appo � � �
-�d interview s �' �
ected to nave at leas'
P E MAJORS
Are you interested in educating
tout peers' meeting maiors trom
� schools? or having a great
. The P E Maiors' student
convention will be held October 2
1 a' Western Carolina Univer
�, It is a 9f��' opportunity tor
majors An organuaional
meeting tor ECU maiors will be
heldmMingesSept :3at7 30pm
togettvei 'h tello maiors
om a �op - you ouid like
to present
SIGN LANGUAGE
Are you interested m learning
more about Sign Language and the
deat community at ECU' Then all
you have to do is show up on Sept
27 a' 6 p m m the multi purpose
room at NVendenhall Student
Center That s when the ECU Sign
Language Club will have a cover
d.sh supper, a captioned movie,
elect officers for the 81 82 school
year and nake plans tor an up
coming camping trip You don't
want to miss it
SELF DEFENSE
For the tubt time, the ECU
Department ot intramural
Recreational Services is offering a
Personal Self Defense Class You
can learn to protect yourself dur
mg an attack and prevent miury to
yourself This is not karate, but is
a practical approach to self
defense The class will be on (von
day at 6 30 p m in Memorial
Gym The instructor. Joe Paler
mo, requests that you wear loose,
comfortable clothing Register in
Room 204 Memorial Gym or at the
class Cost tor the eight week ses
sion is $5
PACE
The � Una period loi 'he Protes
, id fcdmmtstcative Creer
. ,mination iPACEi 'S from
tember 14 through October 13
� ma'on .s available M 'he
mi Planning and Placement
Office A sufficient score on PACE
� Government
ATTENDANTS
The Office of Handicapped S�u
dent Services needs applications
trom persons interested m becom
,ng Personal Care Attendant lo
wheelchair students Those with a
background of assisting in
div.duals with the activit.es of dai
ly I,v.ng are desired If interested
apply in 212 Whu hard Building
ILO
There will be a meeting ot the
International Language Organiza
tion on Wednesday. Sept 23 in BC
305 Everybody is welcome to at
tend
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to nave an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brief as possible) typed and
double spaced to The East Carol,
man in care of the news editor
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited
The deadline for announcement
areSpm Friday tor the T uesdsay
paper and 5pm Tuesday tor the
Thrusdasy paper
the space is available to all
campus organizations and depart
ments
BUC
The Buccaneer will have a staff
meeting September 23 at 7 p m in
the Buccaneer Office, located m
the Old South Building, across
from Joyner Library
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test IGMAT) will be of
fered at East Carolina University
on Saturday. October 24. 1981 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to GMAT,
Educarronal Testing Service. Box
966 R Princeton. NJ 08540 Ap
phcalions must bewstmarked no
later than September 21, 1981 Ap
plications may be obtained trom
the ECU Testing Center. Room
105 Speight Building
PLANNINGZONING
The Greenville Planning and
Zonmg Commission has set a
workshop session on September 23
in which the followmq items will
be discussed (A) The newly pro
posed mobile home standards, and
(B) The proposed Land Develop
ment Plan The session will be
held at City Mali at 7 30 p m
HONOR COUNCIL
Appin atl i ,un'
and'or Riup B
be.ng ��� H �
Mendenhall Sti
221
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
CHANGES
General allege .tudent should
contrt. I the-1 adviser!
tober 5 10 a � �

SURF CLUB
There w" '�'� ' ' ' " nq '
niMendenr.al(
portanI �'
an
TREASURE HUNT
D scovery D �
proud to anno
nual Scuba D �
mday October
. . � w �� � ' K " '�
�� �'�
CHESSCLUB
mu" ��
� � . . '
WORSHIP




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AUDITIONS
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7 3C p m �� ma
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COLLEGE BOWL
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P.E. MAJORS
. s Clare
physic a 3ur
. , � week tor the
Should 'eport 'o
,rr a' I p m on
a�� Mai Septembet JC tor a
� ess test
. , � . performance on mis
. d as a prerequisite
� � i sdmittance to 'he
, . � on ma.or program
� . . � ntormation cover
available by calling
THROW
n vou want to throw here s
where to go Intramural Field,
bottom of the h,II 5 p m Tuesday
or meeting at 8 pm. Tuesday.
Mendenrtall room 248 Be There"1
CORSO
There will be a Correc
tions Social Work Organ.zat.on
meeteing on Thursday September
24 at 5 30 p m .n MendenhaH Shj
dent Center room 221 All correc
t.ons and social work maior ano
.ntended maiors are urged to at
tend'
SOULS
BLOCK SHOW
.
SPECIAL SEMINAR
n Medieval and
. � . � s pleased to
. the topic tot is r-
. - . A 5 VR
yjnr - � � Death An in
v i mi
- � � � �

trtis excil
� �� . � nattoi
about me seminar ano or about
. ,sance Stv
iram coor
, and seminar instruct�!
. v � � mar
Daughertv lertfctns
Dr
JEWISH STUDENTS
it you would like home Iw sp la
and transportation t templet i
H gti Holiday se'v1- pleasi
, � ���. $943 or Or Hesn � ��
'5a v.4.
WINTER GUARDE
Once upon a time then was a
vv.nter Guard rheir i . � � �
BL'CK RUSSIAN and
everywheri "� � went every me
iovec fhe.r idea; � vn�
for ntormalior '52 843
E C C D E C
GLENN PHILLIPS
BAND
COMING - WED
SEPTEMBER 23 -
Ladies Free
"If rock & roll guitarists were kamikaze pilots, Glenn Phillips
would be in heaven righl now: he attacks Ins instrument with no
regard lor life o. limb.
�'Dark Lights, his ihird album, crackles with melodies.
momentum and slam-bang good humor TROLL-
ING STONE
Westerxi t
Family
STE8KH0VSS
( B
D
1
fl
q
Great I uncheon Specials
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
411 Day
Specials
MON thru FR I
Soup 8. Sandwich
SI.9?
Delicious 33 item
Salai Bar
ic D�Hei � ��' �'�� ,or
unO' i S3
FRI & SAT
Kidsunc: ,t steerburger or
child s plat, with potato for v�c
MINORITY
FELLOWSHIPS
lei lowships
� � , � �
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Fund! '
, la �'
� �
-
ruttei ' ' '
� �� � � �� �
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AEROBICS
NAACPCONVENTION
. - � ' ��� �
enhon at
Mr 8 11
. �. � attending,
. . . . ,
THE WAY
want t � �'�
� an whe
� �
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. � � ' � ' � '
I
24th. II
m 11 and 7 30 p m ,
��. tudent
The ECU Dec
it � i
�� .
movement and ext
, l : �
. . � � �
,ibiiity and t
Men

from S 156.1
Thurs 12 i P
are also offeree in BelK v
Ml '� V �� �' "
p.n � � '
' '
�� Tuesday at v p m an I
nt Wednesday at 8 i
Memorial Gym or at "��
Cost is SS 00 tor classes mt meet 1
� me per wee anoMOC I
mai - � -a . pei wee isse
l0r S week ' �
questions please a Sue ' � ' �
a' 7S' 6064
OCATED REHIND THE ELBO ROOM
SORRY NO TAKE OUTS ON SPECIALS
h ' -ar
Sav on
Quantity Rights
e Sold To Dea i
H
a ' 1. s
GAY?
PPHA
onal Health
PPHA

, ' � � Center ah
ARTS MANAGEMENT
� will hoid a
jt-nk.ns Art
ia, � -oer
I then �-� � ' '� �
. rP,t1 Greens �
��. � will be "he guest
e intormai�
; c �
FOREIGN SERVICECOMEDY
EXAMINATIONiwai ��� � Ay den
. . present the
rou C- t Tat ' With
ihirday at s
iy at 3 pm bept . .� i 27 at 1
. . . � f the 1Lon is 11
� , � �.� iDle tor
�� 524 4250
PRE MED
. �. ����'�� � �
Delta
Med Pre Dental Society
IC r nrt n Flanagan 307
JacKse.n An.son Chairman ot the
Department of Em.
Med.cne of the ECU SchOO �
Wedicme will o? the guest
speaker All members and in
vrsted persons are urged to �'
tend Also, any
lO.n.ng AED this tall should i
JOB SEARCH
A senes of workshops will be
�lucted by 'he Career Plann.og
rid Placement Center in the ar is
ot interviewing technique' and the
preparation of the resume
Resume Preparation will oe
held on Sept 28 at 2 p.m Sep' 29
aiipm. sept 30 at 4 p and at
2pm Oct 6 at 3 p m , Oct 7 a' 4
p m ano Oct 8 at u a m Each
workshop will last appropriately
. hour and a Cm held in 'he
Bioxton House (adjacent to
Greene Dorm, Al' sen.ors are in
yited '0 a"end
kA

l

We're at the head of the class
when it comes to delivering
campus needs. Be a hlghj
achiever in value
shop Kroger Sav-oni
ADVERTISED TEM POliCY
Each of these advertised items is squired to be read- .
available for sale m each Kroger Saw-on except as spe
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vou your choice of a comparable item when available rt-
t.ng the same savings or a m - entitle yo
purchase the advert.sed item at the advemsed price mthm .
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OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO
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Includes our No. 2 Ribeye Steak, Baked Potato
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REG OR MINT FLUORIDE
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99
DECORATE YOUR ROOM
WITH THIS BEAUTIFUL
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5-Inch
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110 12
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FRESH BAKED IN STORE
FUDGE ICED
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Added Feature
Drawing
coh aooW For FREE Dinners
Register tor FREE ECU Tickets!
P -� i.c�� VOU UO rwl MM 10 t� IKMWI to �in
TVW
ftanKs
BAGGED

No puich��� t�c���iry Vou
A2Oi
PK9
233
COSMETICS A
FRAGRANCES
16�(
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SUGG
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State Budget Cuts Creating College Havoc
(CPS) - George Kish has taught
geography ai the University of
Michigan for 41 ears. Though con-
sidered one of the best, he may soon
be a professoi without a depart-
ment.
Rodger Keller worked as a hor-
ticulturist on the campus. He was
dismissed in June.
Both men are victims ol a budget
crunch that may take years to abate,
kellei was one of si gardeners let
go. Kish, however, isn't being fired.
His department is. The university
wants to eliminate the geography
department after this school year.
Such radical cuts and contrac-
tions have become commonplace at
colleges in at least a doen states
where soured economics, citizen
"tax revolt" measures and budget-
slashing legislators have accidentally
conspired to alter campus life even
more drastically than the Reagan
cuts of the federal education
budget.
In Oregon, for example, state
budget cuts may force the end of the
athletic programs at Oregon and
Oregon State. The University of Il-
linois must soon close its clinical
medicine program.
A surprise state budget cut
"could affect accreditation of some
programs" at the University of
Mississippi, the university
chancellor frets. All but two state
schools in Texas are without
building funds. Missouri, moreover,
has imposed an indefinite freeze on
the stale's entire education budget.
These .ate-level crises � which
have gone almost unnoticed while
attention focused on the Reagan
federal budget � have had both
ridiculous and sublime effects.
Iowa State, for instance, won't be
in this year's New York Times
"Guide to Colleges" because
"budgetary reasons" kept ad-
ministrators from distributing the
Times' questionaire to students.
Massachusetts educators, reeling
from the budget cuts in the wake oi
last November's "Proposition 2 I 2
" tax revolt, are busily closing down
Boston State College and consider-
ing closing two other community
colleges to balance the budget
It's an absurd case of education
following the dollar around instead
of vice versa grouses Roger Chin-
ness of the Massachusetts Board of
Regents for Public Education.
"Some institutions are having to
delay opening of college
In California, the effects of the
first tax-revolt measure � 1978's
Proposition 13 � were supposed to
hit colleges fully this year. But
Morgan Odell, head of the Associa-
tion of Independent Colleges and
Universities, says astute use of the
state's pre-13 budget surplus has
forestalled sever cutbacks in campus
services for at least another year.
"It's mainly a matter of waiting
until next fall to find out how bad
things really are Odell savs.
noting that state educators must
now figure out how to cope with the
effects of the Reagan cuts as well as
the Proposition 13 cuts.
"We're all singing a dismal Greek
chorus to the same tune laments
Frank Duddy, Jr president of the
Association of Independent Ceil
leges and Universities of Ohio. Dud
dy says declining state revenues have
exacerbated a chronic college
budget deficiencv
Yet nowhere in America have the
demons of inflation, unemployment
and miserly legislatures more brutal-
ly hamstrung colleges than in
Michigan, where missing tax
revenues from the depressed auto
industry have led to substantial
budget slashes at ail state school.
Campuses have tried to make up
tor lost state funding by raising
average public college costs to
$3350.
"It's getting difficult for more
and more families to pay for col-
lege says Kalamazoo College's ad-
missions director David Boros,
whose school is the state's most ex-
pensive. "But we have no choice but
to raise tuition
"Currently, the only way many
students can come to college is
through substantial aid programs
says Albion College Vice President
James Hatcher.
"But as federal aid is reduced, the
See MSU, Page 9
CBS Claims Friday Was Not Cause For Report
C H AIM I Hill
(I PI) � The producer
of CBS' "Sunday Mor-
ning" sas he was nol
pressured into airing a
second repori on the
University ol North
(. arolina's desegi ega-
tion settlement with the
federal government
1 he follow up aired
Sunday, �a tin-
cedented in the
month lustorv of
"Sundav Morning
executive
Shad Nor-
Bui he said
from I NC
William Fri-
James Hunt
and othei state leaders
had nothing to do with
"li was not a icsult
-
eld
tests
President
das. Go
of any pressure because
all of those letters
(from North Carolina
leaders) I've heard
about have not arriv-
ed Northshield said.
"We did this because
we thought it was the
right thing to do
Friday said "an
enormous groundswell
of indignation" caused
CBS to broadcast por-
tions of an interview
with him that were not
shown in the original
repori on Sept. 13.
"I thought that the
choices they made
(from) the hour's tap-
ing answered some of
the questions that
ought to be answered
Friday said. "I'm going
to speak with Charles
(Kuralt, the host of the
show) as soon as I can
get up with him and
thank him
Kuralt is a graduate
of UNC and a member
of the school's Jour-
nalism Hall of Fame.
Gov. James B. Hunt
Jr who sent a
telegram of protest to
CBS after the original
report, said in a state-
ment he appreciated the
"fuller picture" of the
progress UNC has
made in desegregation
of its 16-campus
system.
"It's unfortunate
this wasn't done last
week, so the first show
could have been more
accurate and fair
Hunt said.
Earlier this year,
UNC ended a 12-year
desegregation battle
with the federal govern-
ment when a consent
decree was filed in U.S.
District Court in
Raleigh outlining a
plan to increase
desegregation of the
system.
The decree, reached
after negotiations with
lawyers for UNC and
the U.S. Department of
Education, sets goals
for increasing the
number of black
students at the 11
predominantly white
campuses and white
students at the five
black campuses.
There are no
penalties for failing to
meet those goals.
The original CBS
story, presented by
reporter Ed Rabel,
hinted the UNC agree-
ment could damage na-
tional desegregation ef-
forts.
Friday, Hunt and
other officials were
outraged because the
story included the old
news films that includ-
ed former Alabama
Gov . George C.
Wallace attempting to
block court-ordered
desegregation in that
state.
In its follow-up, CBS
made no admission of
error in an introduct
ion written by North-
shield and read by
Kuralt.
"This is a com-
plicated question and
there's more to be said
about it than there was
last week Kuralt said.
He also pointed out the
UNC agreement re-
quires the system to
make annual progress
reports to a federal
judge, a fact that went
unreported in the
original story.
Northshield said he
decided to do the
follow-up because he
and Rabel have been
extremely interested in
university deseg-
regation for years.
The Sunday piece "is
unique in our history.
That's why it was so
important to me to
have it done on our
terms, not have it look
like it was a press
stunt he said.
Hinckley Complains To Post
SH INGTON
( rp) - John W . Hin-
tklev Ir , accused of
kill President
Reagan, wrote to a
report complain
about being deputed as
a drifter and elaborate
on his interest in actress
Jodie Foster, the
ashington Post sas.
'�you and the other
Journalists make it
sound like I was some
kind ol a hobo or
something Hinckley
was quoted Sunday as
writing in the un-
solicited letter, dated
to a Post
T may have done
some drifting in the fall
of SO. but in the years
prior to this, I was not
roaming around the
country the letter
read.
"Now that I'm in
Maryland, she (Miss
Foster) and I are much
closer, in more ways
than one Hinckley
wrote. It was signed,
"Yours truly, John
Hinckley Jr
Hinckley has pleaded
innocent to charges he
tried to kill Reagan,
White House press
secretary James Brady
and two lawmen out-
side a Washington
hotel. He is being held
without bond at Fort
Meade, Md.
The Post said neither
Hinckley's defense
lawyer nor government
officials involved in the
case would discuss the
letter.
Trying to verify the
letter's authenticity, the
newspaper said it sent a
reply to the Fort Meade
return address. It asked
Hinckley to initial and
send back a photostat
of the original letter.
On Friday, the
newspaper received the
photocopy initialed
"JWH "
along with a note dated
Sept. 14 that said: "My
lawyers are trying to
hold the press coverage
to a minimum and
therefore will have
nothing to do with
reporters
The note said Hin-
ckley was sending along
a "portion of a legal
paper as proof that I
am me Included was
what appeared to be
part of a court paper
filed in the case, the
newspaper said.
Sepi
repoi tei
"My
coun
itrv
recent cross-
ventures were
�sary because New
Haven was so tar
away the letter con-
tinue i "1 would have
traveled to Budapest to
find Jodie Foster
Federal prosecutors
believe Hinckley, a
2 6 - v e a r - o 1 d college
dropout and son of a
wealthy Colorado
oilman, may have been
motivated on the day of
the attempt on
Reagan's life bv an in-
fatuation tor Miss
I oster.
Miss Foster, a stu-
dem at "i ale University
in New Haven, t onn
plaved the role of a
young prostitute in the
movie "Taxi a story
about a spurned suitor
who stalked a political
candidate.
Hinckley was taken
into custody im-
mediately after the
March 30 shooting that
wounded Reagan and
three others. I n -
vestigators found an
unmailed letter to Miss
Foster in his
Washington hotel
room.
"Jodie, I would
abandon the idea of
getting Reagan in a se-
cond if 1 could only win
your heart the letter
read. It asked her for
"the chance with this
historical deed to gain
your respect and love
In his letter to the
Post, Hinckley asked
that he not be called a
"drifter" in future
news accounts, the
newspaper said.
MONTUES. Available for
private parties � Papa Katz
will cater any party or func-
tion. We also have a mobile
D.J. for public use.
WED. � "ORIGINAL
LADIES' LOCKOUT" -
8.30-10:00- LADIES' ON-
LY � GENTS IN AFTER
10:00.
THURS. - "SUPER
COLLEGE NIGHT"
Sponsored by the Sig
Ep's � Doors open at
8:30 � One cover at door
� free beverage all night
long.
FR, "SPECIALS
DAY" � with a pig
pickin' once a month
starting Sept. 11 from 3
until closing � 45C for
your favorite beverage �
no -5ver all day.
SAT. "A NIGHT TO
REMEMBER" After a
meal on the town � come
enjoy your favorite dance
music � hors d'oeurves
'til 11:00 �ladies free all
night.
SUN. � "KOPY KAT" �
Ladies' Lockout till 10:00
� gents in at 11:00 with
no cover all night long.
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
All members will oe entitled to 3 guests
per evening Nea� dress and proper 'd�n
tification will be required o all members
and guests
�bring application & dues to the door and
receive your membership card that night
,��� MEMBERSHIP ���i
Introductory
Membership-$1.00
for month of Sept.
AJ 7UE
7-
F� STAGES 10CHSCOGKJ!
Cm) YORAU.vVUo &TTE.V3P
dokH PTWSiuKexauswe
Co-SPoi�ce$DWHBo �
A REVEAIJNG COMEDY ABOUT REACHING THE TOP
BY WAY OF THE BOTTOM
River Bluff Rd.
Behind Putt Putt
758-7912
"A Touch
Of Class"
I
"DVAM (TNTF-AT. I
RYAN O'NEAL
JACK WARDEN MARIANGELA MELATO RICHARD KIEL
"SO FINE"
ALOBELLBERGMAN PRODUCTION
MUSIC BY ENNIO MORRICONE PRODUCED BY MIKE LOBELL
WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY ANDREW BERGMAN
Ffom Warn B J A"er Communication Company
SMNATUtl
L
OPENS SEPTEMBER SSth AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU!





Sttre last (Earoluuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
PAUl COI l INS, ��(-h,et
JlMMY DuPRIiE, Manaeii EM
Chuck Foster. ,w� � � Charles Chandler. wmm
Chris Lichok, ���� hm� Tom Hai l- Mr" �"
Alison Bartel, i Steve Bachner. &r�
Stevf Moore. a - KARFN Wendt- ��
September 22, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Greenville
City Must Respect Students
The leech is a parasite that latches
onto its victims with one of its
suckers, makes a wound with three
tiny jaws and draws blood out
through another sucker. When full,
the leech drops off the victim � its
body distended with enough blood
to last for months at a time.
In much the same way, Greenville
uses the students of East Carolina
� taking, taking, taking � but
never giving.
"Every year all the merchants put
up signs saying 'Welcome Back
Students " former SGA President
Charlie Sherrod once said. "What
they're welcoming back is our
wallets
Sherrod hit the nail on the head.
Greenville is glad to have students
spend money in the town's stores,
bars and theatres, but that is as far
as the hospitality goes.
Sherrod spoke these words last
March just after the City Council
rezoned an entire neighborhood
near West Fifth Street � in
disregard of all applicable
guidelines � simply to keep Kappa
Delta sorority from buying a house
in the area. The residents did not
want to live near "any wild ECU
students
This, however, is not the only
such example of the shabby treat-
ment afforded ECU students by
Greenville's citizenry.
An ordinance recently went into
effect that will keep students from
parking for more than two hours in
neighborhoods close to campus.
Students who must be on campus
DOONESBURY
flBDMNS ms poucjes
50 yOJ CAN Mi. APPf&6
TV
for periods longer than this will be
unable to park in these areas.
Of even greater potential harm to
students, though, are the city's new
zoning laws designed to exclude
students from living in the
neighborhoods between campus and
First Street. The laws do not
specifically exclude students; they
just toughen the restrictions on
"multi-family dwellings" � a code
word for student residences.
Greenville, like most parasites,
does not kill its victims, however,
for that would be tantamount to
committing suicide. The city needs
the university and its students to
survive. According to a study con-
ducted by the Department of
Geography and Planning, students
spent more than $28 million in
Greenville during 1980.
Greenville has dubbed this
"Student Appreciation Week and
students should not let such an op-
portunity to voice their dissatisfac-
tion pass by. Students could easily
make their dissatisfaction known by
boycotting Greenville merchants for
an entire day, this Saturday for in-
stance. After all, who put Greenville
on the map?
Consider This
In 1962 Leo Jenkins, Chancellor
Brewer's predecessor, was a can-
didate for the presidency of the
University of South Carolina. And
everyone knows how this hurt his
job performance; he only served 15
more years at East Carolina.
by Garry Trudaau
M30OOMAU
mttecur tun
PKxsoece tt.it
Home Video Replaces Movie Palaces
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
They knocked down another movie
palace in my town recently; dismantled the
grand marquee, all winking, colored, elec-
tric lights; ripped out the red velour seats;
pulled up the carpets over which three
generations of celluloid addicts trod, pop-
corn and candy in hand, their eyes glued to
the giant silver screen. It wasn't the first
old movie theatre to fall prey to changing
social customs and economic imperatives;
it won't be the last.
The lucky old dream palaces, the ones
that aren't torn down, are twinned, trebled
and quadrupled � diced into tiny boxes,
sound seeping through the thin partitions
separating Cinema 1 from Cinema 43, the
screens criminally small, seats set at wierd
angles in what used to be sumptuous
balconies. They're not much, but at least
they're working theatres, not parking lots
or condos.
I mourn the passing of the old movie
theatres � the Paramounts and Foxes ane
Lowes of motion picture past � because I
savor the experienc. of going out, ensconc-
ing myself in impossibly ornate buildings
and passing the evening with hundreds of
other people. Movies are a shared ex-
perience, and there is a community,
however fragile and fleeting, among
moviegoers. We share the same waking
dreams.
That's all changing, of course. Movies,
which once provided a cheap night out for
middle class and working people, now cost
$4 and $5 ahead, as Hollywood cranks out
fewer films, .with ever-inflating budgets.
The grand old theatres, what's left of
them, sit in decaying neighborhoods,
where fear of crimes committed by people
who can't get out keeps away those who
have left.
So, instead of nurturing the community
of the past, we entertain a future filled
with individually-owned techno-toys;
video discs and cassettes; seven-foot televi-
sion screens; cable TV with hundreds of
channels; dishes for receiving direct
satellite-to-home trasmissions We'll have
private media rooms and home entertain-
ment centers, the experts tell us, that are
safe, familiar and comfortable. Our homes
will increasingly become places where we
play, and � with the use of home com-
puters and keyboards linked to TV screens
� work.
Like a lot of new technological applica-
tions, the home entertainment center is be-
ing promoted by gushing futurists (and
manufacturer) as a vast improvement
over the bad old days when people actually
had to move from one place to another.
Personally, I'm not so sanguine. I'll miss
the sociability of going out to the movies,
the surrealistic architecture of the old
buildings, the silver screens big enough to
drive a Mack truck into, and disappear.
What's so great about staying home with a
batch of clever � and expensive, you may
be sure � electronic toys, anyway?
And what's so great about working at
home? Oh. I've heard the arguments for it.
Instead of driving to the job and wasting
all that energy, the arguments go. we can
work safely and ecologically at home
Heck, we can labor in our ratty underwear,
if we want to, with a half-eaten sandwich
and a drink at our terminals. Like all pro-
gress, it's happening because it's good for
us.
Sounds great, but again, it's the social
aspect that's missing from this
technocratic vision of utopia-around-the-
corner. What happens to the friendships
most people make at work by coming into
contact with living, breaching human be-
ings? What about the political power that
people who actually see one another everv
day acquire when they organize? Who is
going to land (or be assigned) the bulk oi
the stay-at-home jobs? Women? Will the
kids be there, too? Call me a mossback
conservative, if you like, but the persona!
and political implications of the new
technologies are, to my mind, far from
liberating.
So. as another baroque movie palace is
reduced to rubble or abruptly mutated into
a four-plex, our lives, too, are scheduled t
be remade. Me, I prefer the floating
dream-community of the old theatres and
the gritty but sociable reality of the
workplace to the shiny, sterile, solitary
future being designed for us.
rrACCs
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Moral Majority
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I
By JOSEPH C. OLINICK
Recently the Moral Majority announced
that it is going to begin and focus an anti-
pornography campaign in North Carolina.
The campaign will seek to ban certain
books and television programs.
In short, the Moral Majority wants to
restrict the freedom of Americans. There
are only five million people in the Moral
Majority's coalition, yet they believe that
they have the right to dictate what 220
million other Americans see on television,
read in books, hear on records and do in
general. There is no danger in allowing
members of the Moral Majority to be
heard like any other Americans. However,
there is a danger in allowing the Moral Ma-
jority to make moral decisions for the en-
tire population.
In essence, the Moral Majority wants to
r Campus Forum
Should Dr. Brewer Remain?
As an ECU Professor Emeritus of
History, my heart has been saddened by
recent events both on and off the cam-
pous which have led Chancellor Thomas
Brewer to submit his resignation.
Having been closely associated with
the university in one capacity or another
for the past 31 years, I have grown to
love her dearly. When she celebrates, I
celebrate � when she hurts, I hurt. She
is hurting now and so am I as are many
trustees, alumni, faculty, ad-
ministrators, staff, students and friends.
Hence, through this open letter it is
my wish not to cast blame or point the
finger of accusation (I have friends and
colleagues on both sides) but rather to
suggest a workable solution to the im-
mediate problem.
When the board of trustees meets this
week with Chancellor Brewer and Presi-
dent William C. Friday to take action on
the resignation, I pray all will "clear the
air" and through their open-
mindedness, fairness, compassion,
tolerance, forgiveness and understan-
ding, one for the other, the resignation
will NOT be accepted. Thus, let bygones
be bygones so the university can con-
tinue its pursuit of excellence under the
leadership of Chancellor Brewer and the
board of trustees.
The alternative, as we all know, is the
long agonizing search for some other
qualified person to serve as chancellor
while the university virtually stands still
under an interim chancellor and fac-
tionalism and other "power plays" take
place.
Chancellor Brewer deserves our sup-
port and all of us should labor along
with him as he strives for excellence in
student life, institutional planning,
athletics, fund-raising, administrative
organization and academic quality.
Let's accept the leadership we have
and continue to progress toward our
motto "To serve
Dr. Richard C. Todd
Professor Emeritus of History
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
end the traditional separation of church
and state. To end that separation could be
disastrous. In the past, when the Puritan
Church was interwoven with the govern-
ment, terrible things occurred. For in-
stance, many people were hung because the
Puritans, in a fit of religious zeal, used
their power in the government to have peo-
ple that they thought were witches con-
demned and hanged. At the present time,
Iran is in turmoil partially bescause it is a
country in which the religion is the base of
the government. In any case, the tradition
of separating church and government is a
good one. The Moral Majority, however,
does not seem to think so.
Why should the Moral Majority be
taken seriously? By their own standards,
they are hypocrites. Their Bible states that
only God may determine what is good and
what is bad and that man is not to judge.
Yet, the Moral Majority has made itself
the judge of our society, determining what
is good and what is bad.
The Moral Majority does have a lot of
power and influence. Its members support
lobbyists that put pressure on government
officials and executives of television net-
works. Also, its members flood major
television networks, the FCC and state and
federal officials with hundreds of
thousands of letters, protesting the group's
various targets. Furthermore, Moral Ma-
jority members put pressure on advertisers
that sponsor controversial programs by
recommending boycotts of their products.
As a result of the Moral Majority's ac-
tions, "Charlie's Angels" and "Soap" will
not be seen on television this fall. Now the
Moral Majority is trying to get "Dallas"
off the air. Actually, the Moral Majority
opposes all of the top twenty programs ex-
cept "Little House on the Prarie and
even some episodes of that program do not
meet the Moral Majority's standards.
Libraries are also one of the Moral Ma-
jority's targets. Works like Catcher in the
Rye, To Kill a Mockingbird, Diary of
Anne Frank and many others have been
removed from some public libraries by dif-
ferent chapters of the Moral Majority.
More importantly, books by some of
America's greatest writers, like Ernest
Hemingway and William Faulkner, have
been removed from public libraries. In
1981, such incidents have increased by MX)
percent.
The victories that the Moral Majority
has achieved are only the beginning of its
drive to force its morals on Americans, but
Americans can and must withstand these
self-appointed censors who want to stop
television from meeting the needs of the
people and who want to repress the great
literature of America.
To conquer and subdue the Moral Ma
jority, it will take courage, commitment,
and conviction, but for the sake of thi
country� and for the sake of freedom-
Americans must fight to preserve and rr�
tect their freedom from the Moral Majori-
ty and groups like it.
(Joseph C. Olinck, a sophomore from
Durham, is enrolled in ECU'S General
College.)
Opinions
Solicited
In addition to the "Campus
Forum" section of the Opinion
page. The East Carolinian will soon
begin to feature various faculty
members and students as guest col-
umnists. The staff of the newspaper
is proud to announce this innovative
effort to better serve our readers
and provide another outlet for opi-
nions.
The column will be restricted in
content only with regard to rules of
grammar and decency. Persons sub-
mitting columns must be willing to
accept "byline" credit for their ef-
forts, as no entrys from "ghost
writers" will be published.
Persons interested in participating
or desiring further information may
contact Jimmy DuPree, ��ghq
editor of The East Carolinian, at
757-6366,6367 or 6309 or by visiting
the newspaper office on the second
floor of the Publications Building
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hnian will soon
rarious faculty
ts as guest col-
the newspaper
this innovative
ft our readers
outlet for opi-
e restricted in
rd to rules of
Persons sub-
it be willing to
lit for their ef-
from "ghost
ihshed.
in participating
iformation may
'xtt. managing
Carolinian, at
or by visiting
on the second
Ltions Building.
Nationwide College Enrollments
Hit AH-Time High This Year
B TOM HAH
Despite predictions
that college enrollment
vsould drop dramatical-
ly in the early eighties,
there may be about
10,000 more students
enrolled nationwide
this year than during
the 1980-1981 academic
sear, according to the
U.S. Department of
Education,
The department's an-
nual survey predicted
that college enrollment
would surpass the all-
time high set last year
with an increase to
12,135,000 students cur-
rently enrolled.
ECU has broken a
record of its own with
13,264 students enroll-
ed, according to univer-
sity registrar J. Gilbert
Moore. There are 99
more students at ECU
this year, not including
the University
(Evening) College.
The Education
Department's survey
also predicted that the
college population
"appears to be
reaching its peak
The moderate
forecast contrasts with
the department's
predictions of six years
ago, when most
observers said college
enrollment would
plunge during this
decade and that the
bottom would drop out
of the college industry.
"The original predic-
tions were patterned
upon the availability of
higher educations
'natural' clientele �
the 18- to 24- year
olds said Lee Eiden
of the Department of
Education, explaining
the fault in the studies.
Enrollment in that
age group has declined
but the gap has been
filled with older, part-
time students, Eiden
said.
fWffPJfV Each ot lhese advertised items is required to be readily available tor sale at or
(fflrtT�lTOf� below the advertised price in each A4P Store eicept as specifically noted I
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT SEPT. 26 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS.
Highway 264 By-Pass Greenville Square
Shopping Center Greenville, N. C.
College Restrictive
C ontinued from Page 1
at proselytizing the unconverted, the
students have made a generally
favorable impression in 1 ynchburg.
"They're good kids says a local
reporter, who declined to be iden-
tified by name. "They act subdued
and docile because everyone's wat-
ching 'Jerry's kids and they're
afraid to be themselves
Usually, students must either ac-
cept administration decisions, or
leave school. Ricky Johnson, for
one. was philosophical about his
administratively-broken date.
" There is an informal rule against
interracial dating he observers,
"because parents complain about
it Johnson himself complained
about the ban to Don Norman, a co-
pastor ot Thomas Road Baptist
Church.
"He wouldn't give permission
Johnson recalls, "although he said
we could be seen together. I
respected him for his understan-
ding
Rules or no rules, Johnson re-
mained determined to follow his
heart. He figured out a way to court
the woman and stay in school at the
same time:
4T bought her an engagement ring
that afternoon he remembers.
They've lived happily ever after.
Ricky Johnson later graduated from
Liberty Baptist, and today Mr. and
Mrs. Johnson still attend services at
Thomas Road Church.
The East Carolinian
needs staff writers.
Call 757-6309,
757-6376
or 757-6377 today!
t
'am
Weekdays
11:30-11:00
Frl. & Sat.
11:30-12:00
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town! (Honest)
Fast Service!
Game
Machines
Big
Screen TV
Drive Up
Window For
To Go Orders
PIZZA & SPAGHETTI BUFFET
AAon. & Thurs. 5:30-8:00S"2
AAon. thru Fri. 11:30-2:00$2.69
Wed. - All you can eat Spaghetti -5:30-8:00 $2.69
Thurs - Lasagna - One Reg. Price.Second One
$1.00
COUPON �
pfcrxa
41ut
BIG SAVINGS
ATYOUR
HOMETOWN
PIZZA HUT
SO00 Off Any Large Pizza
Q With Tills Coupon
$O00 Off Any Medium Pizza
(L With This Coupon
�4 00 Off Any Small Pizza
v I With This Coupon
2 LOCATIONS IN
2601E.10THST. 752-4445
305 GREENVILLE BLVD. 756-4320
OFFER EXPIRES September 27,1981
8PIECE BUCKET DELICIOUS
Fried Chicken
7 witl
each
only
2
99
with supermarket prices
3�
A&P QUALITY
HEAVY WESTERN
GRAIN FED BEEF
Cut Free Into
Sirloin Tip Roast,
Sirloin Tip Steaks,
Sirloin Tips Mjr ��.
Whole Boneless
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
TWO DOORS FROM
COX FLORIST
1)1 W 4th S'
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
758-0204
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
jv SAADS
fef SHOE
Mg REPAIR
t.

��'
'�
' v.
'yMf 113 Grande Ave
Qa 758m8
' JP V. Quality
Repair
COPY CENTER
Copies 4.25$
100OR MORE
5C1 TO W
CASE PRICESON
BEER & WINE
Wfcolatait A Retail ice Sales
lib � lb bass
Keg & ice Delivery � 1 Hours
Visa and Maslercharge
Greenville - 7JM772
Chapel Mill - ��7-�7tl
ATTIC
South t
No. 6
Rock
Nightclub
TUES.W 22nd
POINTER
SISTERS
VIDEOTAPED
LIVE
AT THE ATTIC
ON 7 FT TV
IN PHOENIX ROOM
ALSO SHOWING
LEROUX&
CAROLYNIMAS
FREE ADM
DAIL Y SPECIALS
MONDAY - $�! OO
CHOPPED STEAK � �TT
TUESDAY - $1 QQ
BEEF TIPS 7y
WEDNESDAY - SI QQ
CUBED STEAK � �OT
THURSDAY - SI AO
STEAK SANDWICH � �QT
FRIDAY - SO TO
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE � T
SATURDAY - SO QO
BARBEQUE RIBS X.TT
SUNDAY - SI QO
STEAK ON A STICK � �TT
All Meals are Complete
Including Baked Potato or
French Fries & Texas Toast
and
Free Tea ���� m.
Famous Salad Bar
Take Out Service � W03 E. 10th St. � 7SS-2712
264 By-Pass � 7S4-0040 � Hours 11 a.mIO p.m. � MonThurs.
10a.rn11 p.m. FriSun.
A&P QUALITY
3 or 5 lb.
Roll Pkg
Fresh
Ground Beef
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Full-Cut
Round Steak
PURE VEGETABLE
eat Groc�
Crisco Shortening
3 a 179
Savings
FROZEN
Ann Page Dinners
69G
Meat Loaf
Salisbury Steak
Chicken 11 OZ
Turkey pkg-
IN QUARTERS
Blue Bonnet
Margarine
b pkgs. WW
BUTTERMILK OR HOMESTYLC
Ann Page Biscuits
4 790
cans � ir
FROZEN
Ann Page Pizzas
� Hamburger
� Pepperoni
� Sausage 12 oz.
� Cheese pkg.
99c
Coca Cola Tab
Mello Sprite
Yello2Litre$l9
Plastic Bottle
Each
FAST ACTION
Tide Detergent
66
49 oz.
box
ASSORTED
Northern Tissue
rEFARf
FRESH WITH QUALITY
U.S. 1 EASTERN ALL PURPOSE
White -
Potatoes
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
Dole
Bananas
n.c. grown red or golden
I Delicious Apples
3
lbs. .
only 0
GREAT FOR KIDS
Sunmaid Raisins
Mini
Pack
14
V202.
boxes
1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22. 1981
DGA Helps Keep Downtown
"ALIVE"
The Downtown Greenville Association was
founded in 1975. It has grown from a charter
group of about 75 members in their initial year to
a 1981 enrollment of 109 members, 54 retail firms
� 55 business firms.
The significant reason for the creation of the
DGA was to keep downtown Greenville from
following the dilemma of other cities � empty
stores. At 'he inception of the DGA, the city of
Greenville had 8 empty stores or tombstones.
Since that time, there have been no more than 7
empty stores and right now there are just three.
When comparing this with other cities in North
Carolina this is excellent.
The DGA not only wants filled buildings, but it
also wants parking places for the customers, so
they can patronize these businesses. In 1978, DGA
and City Hall fought over the use of parking
meters and the DGA won the battle for the
elimination of over 200 parking meters.
The DGA also helps preserve two parking lots
downtown, both near the night life oi Greenville.
This type of work is not easy, usually taking a few
years to complete. Such committee activity in-
cludes research, leg work, and liason activity. The
success they have experienced came only as a
result of the interest and cooperation given by city
of Greenville officials.
As always the main interest of the DGA is trade
promotion and in 1980 the trade promotion com-
mittee sponsored a total of fourteen sales and
fourteen mall events. They conduct surveys,
distribute banners, and coordinate promotions
with an average participation of 36 businesses.
Promotions range from George Washington Bir-
thday Sales to Beat the Clock Sales. These have
met with great acceptance over the past few years.
The DGA has many new goals to attain in the
future. They are working towards a new look at
Christmas time with the ordering of new decora-
tions.
They feel that the Humber House property and
the park and parking areas of Evans and Sixth and
Fifth Streets could be designated a "square" and
appropriately named the "Robert Lee Humber
Square
Working hard in joint sponsorship with the
Chamber of Commerce to establish and oeprate a
Farmers Market in the downtown area is a big
project this year. This project has already met
with heated discussions from city and county
residents.
Long range goals include establishing a
playground for the children and a gazebo-type
bandstand for concerts. This will hopefully be
located on the Town Commons.
The DGA is committed to the improvement of
the city of Greenville, and to many this is a never
ending battle, especially in the new age of realiza-
tion in the United States. Hopefully, with the help
of Greenville residents and ECU students, the
DGA will accomplish their goals.
204 E. 5th
WE LOVE
YOU ECU
Valuable Coupon
$100
� OFF ANY NON-
SALE PRERECORDED ALBUM
OR TAPE IN THE STORE!
GOOD WITH COUPON
� EXPIRES SEPT. 26th, 1981 �
GO PIRA TESH
COME WANDER
DOWN TO OLD
GREENVILLE TOWN
FROM ECU WEST
ON FIFTH STREET
COLLEGE SHOP
R.L.HODGES
APPLE RECORDS
SH00TIE FOX
FREDDIES
BOOK BARN
BEDDINGFIELD DRUG
GLOBE HARDWARE
PDGH'S TIRE & SERVICE
STATION
C0IASCHB STREET
UNIVERSITT BOOK EX
ART & CAMERA SHOP
FRAMING SHOP & GALLERY
THE BICYCLE POST
WEST SIDE
EVANS STREET
BIGGS DRUG
WCLW
THE MUSHROOM
BL0DNT-HARVEI
HERRING'S MEN'S WEAR
THE WIG SHOP
CURRY COPY CENTER
LAUTARES JEWELRY
BISSETTE'S
BRODY'S
MARIE'S
MARATHON RESTAURANT
FOURTH STREET
CERTAIN THINGS
RIGGAN SHOE REPAIR
THE STORK'S NEST
COX FLORAL SERVICE
EAST SIDE
fiWS STREET
V.A.MERRITT & SOBS
MINGES BUILDING
CCFFMAN'S
CENTRAL NEWS
COIN & RING MAN
HOUSE OF HATS
ROBINSON'S JEWELRY
D.A.KELLY'S
JEANS GLORY
SMITH ELECTRIC
CAROLINA TRADING
C. HEBER FORBES
CATO'S
LORD'S JEWELRY
STEINBECK'S
GIANT DISCOUNT
TAFF OFFICE EQUIP
SOUTH 01
pjOMBfli ave"�
TAFT FURNITURE
WHITE'S STORE
'WESTERN AUTO SUPPLY
TYSON'S FURNITURE
RENFREW PRINTERS
COZART'S AUTO SUPPLY
DIENER'S BAKERY
KENS FURNITURE
HOLLOWELL'S BKB6
WTT NINTH STREET
MORGAN'S PRINTING
EDWARD'S AUTO SUPPLY
JARVIS STREET
OVERTON'S SUPER MARKET
BANKS
BANK OF NORTH CAROLINA
Cotanche Street
FIRST STATE BANK
Minges Building-E-ans
SAVING & LOANS FIRST FEDERAL
Evans Mall
INSURANCE HOOKER-BUCHANAN
South Evans Street
BRANCH BANK & TRUST
Green & Third Streets
PLANTER'S BANK & TRUST
Washington -Third Streets
NORTH CAROLINA NATIONAL BANK
First & Greene Streets
WACHOVIA BANK k TRUST
Washington 4 Fourth Sts
HOME FEDERAL
South Evans Street
TADLOCK AGENCY
Evans Mall
NORTH STATE
Washington & Second Streets
H.A.WHITE 4 S0S3
Home Federal Building-Evans Street
GOODSON-FLANAGAN Evans Mall
MILADY BEAUTY SHOPPE
Third Street
HAIR STYLING
TRAVEL AGENCY QUIXOTE TRAVELS - Cotanche Street
SHIRLEY'S CUT & STYLE
Minges Building - Evans Mall
A BIG WELCOME FROM THE
Downtown Greenville
Association, Inc.
f
k i
f-Jff � .
� K
To Show
Our
Appreciation
117 East 5th Street
Downtown Greenville
Students
Sale Wednesday, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday
September 23rd through 26th
9:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
I goto
the
BOOK BARN
for my
school
supplies
11

OFF
��
t
vs
V
?.v
v
i
V

k�
CALENDARS TOTE BAGS
PAPERBACK BOOKS
kWRITE-ON BOARDS CANDLES
A
�,���.��m �





returns
.
Wachovia
Bank&Tn





Twenty-eight returns
n an investment.
Wachovia
Bank&Tmst





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1981
Harvard Gas Inj ures 26
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (UPI) � A
chlorine leak in a Harvard Universi-
ty athletic building overcame at least
26 people today and forced the
evacuation of the building a block
away from heavily congested Har-
vard Square.
The injured included firemen,
students and other personnel who
worked in the indoor athletic facility
- which houses a huge swimming
pool and is used for intramural
sports activities.
A spokesman for the Harvard
News Office said 24 students and
other personnel were treated in
either the Stillman Infirmary on
campus or Cambridge City
Hospital. At least two firefighters
were hospitalized.
A university spokeswoman said
none of those injured was in critical
condition
Cambridge Fire Chief Daniel
Reagan said two tanks of toxic
chlorine gas located in the basement
and used to chlorinate the pool were
shut off. But he cautioned reporters
not to come close to the brick struc-
ture surrounded by dormitories.
Several firemen, students and
other personnel were taken to the
university infirmary and then to
hospitals with burns on their skin,
ears, neck and face.
"We're trying to dissipate the gas
with water and ventilation
Reagan said. The chlorine leak,
discovered at 9:45 a.m forced
evacuation of the university swimm-
ing team which was practicing in the
affected building's pool.
"This is not an emergency
Reagan said, "but it is a potentially
dangerous situation
He explained that since chlorine
gas rises it had pervaded the four-
story structure.
The smell was so powerful that it
was easily detectable on the streets
in the area, up to a block away from
the athletic building.
Dozens of firemen dressed in
special gear to protect all areas of
their body from exposure rushed in
and out of the building.
A police spokesman said all
available equipment was sent to the
Harvard Square area to assist with
traffic control and possible evacua-
tions.
A spokeswoman for Mt. Auburn
Hospital said one Cambridge
firefighter was brought in for treat-
ment as a result of the gas leak. He
was identified as Robert Blake, 25,
and was reported in stable condi-
tion.
M
Get the bugs out
If your bicycle is in less than peak riding condition,
come to us. Our professionals are specially trained to handle
all aspects of bicycle servicing - from a simple tune-up to
major repairs And we use only quality authorized parts.
No matter what condition your bicycle is in, we'll help
you get the bugs out.
BICYCLE POST
530 Cotanche St Greenville, N. C.
Phone: 757 3616 Store Hours: 9:30-5:30 MonFri. 9:00-4:00 Sat.
r�
(Of
middle
tirmeh;
Thosi
responsj
most ri
adoptee
state's II
I acin
S30 mi
Ma �
depann
tenu
iireiy
nur
Americi
the Dei
nuei
The
class
forced
severe
periled

der I
cIik:
phased
teacher:
5r

When you know bicycles, you want Raleigh.

N
- -�
I
PLANTERS
NATIONAL
BANK
BH in cooperation with Student Ap-
preciation Week, will give a 20 dis-
count to all students upon presenta-
tion of ID card.
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
IDENTIFICATION CARD
ISSUEI
.VOID.
PIRATE. EC.
Rihiic I, Bon999 A
GREENVILLE. N.C 27J34
��z
�-�
x
92435
BIRTH DATE
777777
ID CARD NO
STUDENT SIGNATURE
"Swuuj GwiUn, Sadm rtk Guduut'
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE CAROLINA EAST MALL
Wants to take the
opportunity to thank
the students on
Student Appreciation Week
for allowing us
to service your
banking needs.
Conveniently located
Downtown, Carolina
East Mall & Pitt Plaza
Member F.D.I.C.
t





MSU Cuts Boycotted

Continued from Page 3
middle class family will have an ex-
tremely rough time
Those realities have evoked varied
responses from state colleges. The
most radical remedies have been
adopted at Michigan State, the
state's largest school.
Facing a September shortfall of
$30 million, MSU President Cecil
Mackey first tried to cut every
department and lay off many
tenured faculty members, while en-
tirely eliminating the colleges of
nursing (one of the largest in
America), urban development, and
the Dept. of Urban Planning and
Architecture.
The subsesquent demonstrations,
class boycotts and countless per-
sonal denunciations of the president
forced the university to adopt a less
severe plan, though the three im-
periled departments' budgets were
barely re-funded.
Current plans have several
departments merging and others, in-
cluding bio-physics, slowly being
phased out. At least 100 tenured
teachers mav vet be fired.
"My blood runs Green and White
(MSU's colors) states Tom Hock-
ing, past president of the Council of
Graduate Students. "But now I'm
scared that by the time 1 get my
M.A it may not be worth the paper
it's printed on
At the richer University of
Michigan, conditions aren't much
better. Besides axing the geography
department, the regents cut the ex-
tension service budget by 90 per-
cent, and laid off permanent
employees in a number of pro-
grams.
President Harold Shapiro
christened the cutbacks part of a
"smaller but better" program but
the phrase, he says, was "widely
misunderstood
Geography Chairman John Nys-
tuen, for one, calls it "capricious
"I feel like the babe thrown out
with the bathwater says Margaret
Wilder, a geography grad student.
"I feel a great sadness sighs
teacher Kish, who was nearing
retirement. "One would like to
think the work that one started gets
carried on. That's part of the
academic world. And to think that
by the stroke of the pen
"WE'VE
GOT A DATE
NOV. 19 th:
"That's when the
American Cancer
Society asks every
smoker in America
to give up cigarettes
for a day. Give it a
try. You might find
you can quit forever"
THE GREAT AMERICAN
SMOKEOUT
American Cancer Society
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
JO SPARROW
MIKE ROBINSON
TMi ipacc contributed by me pubtitfKt
s
II
J
NUMBERS
A
WAY OF
LIFE
FOR
SUM
when only the linest will do
CALENDARS
Give an original gift that's
remembered every day of the year.
CENTRAL NEWS &
CARD SHOP
Ml Evans St. Mall �-W4a
CENTRAL BOOK
&NEWS 754-7177
Greenville Sq. Shopping Ctr.
Full Line
of
Hardbacks,
Paperbacks &
Magazines.
Local
&
Out-of-Town
Newspapers.
Open 7 Days
a Week
1982
Calenders
25
OFF
OFFERING $25 TRADE IN
on a large group of
SEIKO WATCHES
ALL other merchandise with
ECU ID is 15 OFF
We buy gold and diamonds.
YOUR INDEPENDENT JEWELERS
407 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENViLLE, N.C. 27834
m Downtown
" Pitt Plaza
Thinks
Students
are
Special!
Student Appreciation Week
Savings!
Special Group
of
NOW
Polo Shirts
by
Ralph Lauren
Long sleeve and short sleeve.
Jr.
Wool Flannel
Blazers
Navy, grey, wine, and assorted
tweeds. Sizes 5-13.
Calvin Klein Denim
20�A
You asked for it and you got it! a men's store in Greenville that is different. Different in style, different in
merchandise, and different in price. The new Brody's for men at Pitt Plaza is like no other men's store in
North Carolina.
Brody's for men is now open. Come in and experience this different store and find out for yourself. Save on
the many fall fashion specials that Brody's for men will be offering. Register for over $2,000 in free prizes to be
given away.
You can't afford to miss it! Brody's for men at Pitt Plaza, Greenville. Like no other men's store you've ever
seen!
Come in today!
Student Appreciation Week
Savings!
Levis
SHIRTS
Now

Denim and Corduroy
Jeans
Straight Leg & Boot Cut
$1290
Ooff
Reg. $75.00 and $80.00
Now
$3999
Jeans
Latest styles in
sizes 4-16.
Reg. $44.00
Now
$3599
Bass Weejuns
Reg.$58.00
Now
$4290
In 1936 a shoe was created that has
withstood the ultimate test of fashion -
timeleisness. The Bass� Weejun� - the
look and quality that made Bass� famous
Come in and see the origin of the
species and its successors. Bass� shoes for
men.
Come in and
Register
for over $2,000
in free gifts!
'Like no other men's store
Ibvodiit
Pitt Plaza T
for men

!
!





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 22, 1981
Classifieds
FOR SALE FOR RENT
'�� YAMAHA DTI2S, excellent
condition. S3 mpg. great for cam
pus. street and trails. MOO Call
WATER BE OS! Now students can
buy a water bed (Queen or King)
direct from mgt You can sa up
to one half retail Complete beds
with 15 yr warrenty matress. 5 yr
warrenty thermostat heater, liner.
frame, headboard, pedestal for as
low as IW Queen 1W King. Call
David. Delivery Adv 7M-24M.
1.0 CUBIC FOOT refrigerator, 4
yrs. old, cutting board, $50, call
75J 7J70
AKC REGISTERED Norwegian
Elkhound pups 5150 Ready to go,
call 750 1252
DORM SIZE refrigerator for M0
Like new! Call 750 0755 after �
p m
1�M HONDA 750 Custom new con
dition. iioo miles. 7 5 Mil after 6
p.m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. at
GreeneWay �!2S0monrh rent
plus one half utilities. Call
355711.
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom duplex near cam
pus. Very nice, fully carpeted,
with fireplace. One half rent and
utilities. 752 374, or leave
message at 757 1031.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed,
Oakmont So, Apts. Poof, tennis,
cable, bus service. S7I plus one
third utilities. No smokers.
7M-3W4.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 3 bedroom house on Elm St.
approx. one fourth mile from cam
pus with two other girls, Rent 1125
a month plus one third utilities.
Call 1HJU7.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apartment. 5125
per month plus one-half utilities
Call 7S7 145.
TWO MOBILE HOMES. Com
pletely furnished, both have two
bedrooms and art approximately
three miles from ECU. One rents
for ISO, the other is 175. Phone
7M-WJ between 7 IT
APT. AVAILABLE NOW. Effi
ciency with private bath and en-
try, near ECU. S�0 752-215.
PERSONAL
GO GREEK! The Alpha Xi Deltas
would like to congratulate all the
Greeks on a very successful rush.
We are proud to announce the ad-
dition of 1 new pledges to our
sorority: Kim Allen, Kim Calvert,
Wanda Cole, Cheryl Gresham,
Kim Hastam, Robin Hess, Kelly
Kiernan. Karen Koonce, Pam
Manning, Jennifer Myers, Dee
Nixon, Beth Shaw, Mona Sluder,
Gayle Strum, Jeannie Woolard,
Roberta Watts Congratulations
girls! You're great
"Clip Joint" has moved to 1 If Gar-
rett. Call Marlena at 750-8032.
SPORT FHI, could it be that
TMi COSt Is coming back' Watch
Otlt ladies! IS WEBSTER getting
romantic' JAWS your car ran food
to Charlotte How did the sporting
run Where is Scarr Millar Hilton
HEAD we hear your, a Met
resort tor sporting' COOMCS
come back!
SEX: Now that wo have gotten
your attention- II you're in
tcrestod in coforguard then Oin
our winter guard SLACK RUS
SIAN, second to none Far mmr
information, call 7H-B443.
TYPING tar students, professors,
etc. Kerapie Ounn 1010 E- Wright
Rd. Greenville. NC 27S34 Call
752-0713 altar I p.m.
NOTARY PUBLIC: Convenient
and inexpensive. Call Amy at
7 57-3730.
SEPTEMBER SPCCIAL: (til
value) rS5 shampoo, haircut,
style, unisex. Students and facul-
ty. The Lit Force 752 SOU also.
Free Yoga sessions I
BE A success in your spare time.
Pleasant, profitable work. Your
Independent Shaklee Distributor
will train 752 5040
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
fifteen yeas experience as ad-
ministrative secretary wants to do
typing; at home Reasonable rates
Call 7S4V3AM.
Support
The
Down-
Town
Green-
ville
Merchants
The East Carolinian
Srrvnt i he emmpto community
.tltU.
Pubiisised ovary Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dor
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
tidal newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned.
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University.
Subscnption Rate yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville, NC.
Tk Cast Carolinian offices
mru located kj Baa OM South
Building an the campus of ECU.
Greenville. NX.
Telephone: 7573 4M7,�Mf
Application to mail at second
class postage raters is pending at
Greenville, M.C.
THE MUSHROOM
SBflDCfiGGB?- OrSlle
(Greenville's No. 1 Balloonery)
Beautiful, Big Balloon Bouquets-
Delivered by costumed messenger
Sinoina a song! Call 752-3815
tudent
.
ECU Students: Come in & register
for surprise gifts (with ID)
during student appreciation days.
jost in: Professional face makeup for
Halloween�and more.
Good Things For C�ntt� People
31t Evans St. Mall�Downtown Greenville
Lords
Jewelers
Pulsar watches
Also complete selection of diamond rings,
necklaces, gold chains. Complete selection of
watch bands.
7mm 14Kt. gold add-a-bead
3.50
752-6753
Located on
Downtown Mall
Cox Floral
Service, Inc.
When you think of
Flowers think of Ours
Complete assortment of
fresh flowers.
Select from our florist
refrigerators where
you can see what you buy.
W
117 W. 4th St.
Ph. 758-2183
Member oFTD,
telefloral, AFS
Dial PL 2-2136
300 EVANS ST.
AB3197610
GREENVILLE. N. C.
tmVW
�)ae Jui �)a jJcaui .Lea-ttiv
2500 S Charles St Lb Post Office Box 930
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 27834-0210
Both Have Fountain Service
Both Have Delivery Service (within city limits)
Also Rent and Sell Convalescent
Aids and Equipment
Featuring Quality Prescription Drugs

3
I
I
I
We will pick up your prescription, fill it, and deliver it
back to you.
Hargett's ond Bigg's Drug
Stores
The Key To Good Health

1th e
(Dolleae
Shop
Student Appreciation Week
$5.00offany
purchase over $20.00
Does not apply
to sale merchandise.
Student ID's required
for discount.
I Hargett's - 756-3344
Bigg's-752-2136 j
tiillll�IBtMHMMIHHHII�OWIIHIIMIM�llllltHllllllllllt�IHrilllllllllltllllll(lllll�lllllll(lllll�lllllllllIHllllllllllltT
r"� cl eta
C WEBER "FORBES
PHONE (919) 7523468a P O BOX 7G�419 EVANS STREET � GREENVILLE, N C 77834
Your downtown
headquarters
for a complete selection
of
I
I Hi
NO
s
Offer good thru
Sept. 23-26
222 E. FIFTH ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
919-752-5511
I
skirts
slacks
sweaters accessories
JLlf Q discount on any purchase
with ID by students during
Student Appreciation Days
September 23-26
Located on the Downtown Mall
blazers
blouses
dresses
Noi
.hi
"Tl
Do!
3r

t
� �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22, 1981
11
k"
iiiimmiiiui!
I
Hlillllllilllll
STUDENT
PPRECIATIOW
526 COTAUCHE
hop
st. GRB5NV1UE MC. rreM
MltCONi EM 50mri f l.fc E lens � 179.95
KllKOM FE 50mm f 1.8 E lens - 289.95
UIKOWFM 50mm f 1.8 E lens - 239.95
CAMOUAE-I 50mm f 1.8 lens -tt229.95
CAUOU Sons�shc5t - $129.95
All Other Camera Lens
n our store ZOJCOFF neg price
On The Mall
. Downtown Greenville Association sponsors Student Appreciation H eek
ART MAOOG�
OFF OM ALL AST
S0PR-1ES
-jl. -salbs oc�H oKji-ar?
�sale ends Saturday)
20X
AT FIRST STATE BANK YOU'RE
MORE THAN "JUST A FACE
IN A CROWD"
Standing in line is part of every student's life. Just like
making new friends, going new places, getting used to
your new hometown! At First State Bank you're more
than just a face in a line. . . and we want you to know it.
FIRST STATE BANK HAS A BETTER
WAY OF BANKING. . . JUST FOR YOU
I here are a lot of reasons to choose a bank
hank locations. . special services. . . free checking
and ul i ourse. First State Bank offers all of this to
(.Oil
THERE IS A BETTER WAY OF BANKING
FIRST STATE CLUB.
Better than free hecking!
Ourtub a ounl is a special package of banking services
designed just for you. For one low monthly fee you get
su h services as no minimum balance checking. . . at-
tractive dub checks. . accidental death insurance. . .
special discount coupons (good at local merchants and
theatres) and 24 hour BankAround!
YOU MAY NEVER HAVE TO STAND IN LINE AGAIN!
u. you can handle your banking 24 hours a day. every
iiy u.ith a first State BankAround card. You can use
your card at both BankAround locations in Greenville or
at any BankAround intert hange location in North or
South Carolina All at no charge to you!
PLUS WE HAVE SATURDAY MORNING
BANKING AT OUR WINTERVILLE OFFICE.
No other bank in town offers a better banking bargain or
lower costs. The hometown bank wants you to feel right
at home . friendly service. . . lower costs. . . better
banking
It's worth (hanging banks for.
THE HOMETOWN BANK INVITES YOU TO
ITS DOWNTOWN OFFICE ON THE MALL
TO VISIT YOUR HOMETOWN BANKER.
No matter which banking plan you choose. . . student
checking. or our regular club account. you won't
find a better way of banking!
First State Bank
"THE HOMETOWN BANK" 756-2427
Downtown branch: Corner of Northwest branch: Memorial
3rd and Evans 3 blocks from Drive, across from hospital
campus. complex.
Greenville branch: Memorial
Drive, beside Parkers
Barbecue.
vVinterville office: Main St.
Winterville
Member FDIC.

I





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22. 1981
8 ExcitingColors
maroon, white, gold
navy, royal blue, gray
red,and kellvgreen.
PRINTING $1.00 EXTRA
svURrs
Available in
blue, white, pink
and beige,
list price 17.00.
All Sales Final
Cash only
No Refunds
U.BX r.B.10.95 U.B.E
boded Pullovers1
plain
U.B.EJ1 .with couponh B.�.
T
u
off
ort Shirts
reg. 9.95-16.95
U.B.E)Kwith couponL r f
U.B.EJ
S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Now Thru
Sat. Sept. 26
U.B.EJ r eg.6.95-0.95 XP B�E.
crew Sweatshirts
NECK
V
plain
u.
�wim coo
SHO R rs
r.g. 7.95 -8.93
' U.B.E.

Tennis Shorts
U.B.E.lkwith couponffi BE
Includes
hats, knapsacks,
umbrellas, mugs,
and selected
novelties.
Check out our
Caribou Mountaineering Packs
v
Was)
quelj
ing
COU
aiiioi
needl
t hr
schoj
mon
Buri
mot!
place
rea
I
'
I
f
seliiri
said
bad
som
if
ill
X
X
X
i
i

i





1)11 I ASl C AKOI INIAN SFPTEMBFR 22. IY8I
13
Womb For Rent'
Woman Seeks Money For School
VANCOUVER,
Wash. (UPI) � Jac-
quelyn Burkart is offer-
ing to "rent" her
womb to a childless
couple for $15,000, the
amount of money she
needs to put herself
through nursing
school.
My priority is the
money said Ms.
Burkart, 27, a divorced
mother of two who
placed a newspaper ad
reading: "Healthy
woman wants to carry
pregnancy for infertile
couple
"In essence, I am
selling a baby she
said in a weekend inter-
iew. "But I don't feel
bad about it. I'm doing
someone a service. I
iove kids, but this isn't
my baby, it's someone
else's. I'm just growing
it for them, renting out
for a high fee my
uterus
Ms. Burkart worked
as a pregnancy and
abortion counselor for
five years before
becoming a full-time
nursing student at
Portland State Univer-
sity, across the Colum-
bia River from Van-
couver.
"I just don't have
time to work. I need
money to get through
school she said. "I
have easy pregnancies
and deliveries, so 1
decided it would be a
fairly easy way to make
money
She has a part-time
job as a nurse's aide.
but she said her earn-
ings just cannot pay her
tuition, rent, child care
and other expenses. She
figures the $15,000 she
would earn as a sur-
rogate mother would
last three years.
"What I'd planned
on using it for was just
tuition and extras tak-
ing the kids to a movie
or out to dinner once in
a while she said.
The young woman
said she will be
psychologically
prepared to give up the
child to the couple she
selects.
"I love being preg-
nant, and it's probably
going to be difficult for
me when it comes to
saying goodbye to it
she said. "But when I
know that they love the
baby and will give it a
good home, that will
make me feel better
Ms. Burkart was
married at 17 and
separated from her hus-
band shortly after the
birth of her first child,
Heidi, now 9.
After her divorce,
she decided she wanted
another child so she
performed artificial in-
semination on herself
using sperm donated by
a friend. The result was
Jeffrey, now 2.
Ms. Burkart said she
discussed the idea with
her daughter.
"Heidi is very world-
ly as a child. I have
never sheltered her
she said. "Her first
reaction was, 'Oh,
good. If it's a girl we
can keep it and give
Jeffrey away
Carolinians Approve
Of Pres. Reagan
CHARLOTTE
(UPI) �A poll by a
Charlotte newspaper
indicates 53 percent of
those interviewed in
North and South
Carolina feel President
Reagan has done- a
good to excellent job.
COMPARE OUR PHOTOFINISHING PRICES!

ft

7
r
w
ENTIRE MONTH
OF SEPTEMBER
SETS OF
COLOR
PRINTS
AT
1 LOW PRICE
ofPmans
MEMS WEAR
and
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
ECKERD'S BISSETTE'S
PRICE
5.543.99
8.206.49
9.527.39
14.0810.99
DOUBLE
PRINTS
12 exp. (24 prints)
20 exp. (40 prints)
24 exp. (48 prints)
36 exp. (72 prints)
at time of developing of any color print film sizes 110 - 126 - 135
EISStTTC'S
DISCOUNT CENTER
PRICE
ON THE MALL DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
mm kk me
-ww w w KM w �v u c
Q3rwmi
203 East 5th Street � Greenville, n. C.27934
Aw Ooff on a merchandise
(except sale items) to all ECU
students with Valid ID.
Sizes 3-13
4-14
Featuring such name brands as�
DeLanthe
Jerell
Greenbrook
Act I
Country Miss
Jody
Crazy Horse
Henry Pollack
Molly D
College Town
Peerless
eJe
downtown
Located beside Newby's at 203 E. 5th St.
Offer good thru Sept. 26
s
k
� m.
It has been our objective for some
Twenty-five years to serve both the students
and the faculty with men's clothing design-
ed with a traditional flair. Our expertise is
fit, quality, and service. We attempt to com-
pletely search both the domestic and the
European men's wear markets so that we
can offer to you the best in traditional
fashion at a high quality level. So, whether
you're looking for something unusual in a
Harris-Tweed sport coat, khaki pants or
outerwear directed to practical and func-
tional wear, we think you'll enjoy shopping
in our stores. We want to be your clothing
store.
offtnani
MEN
W
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall





I
I
To Show Our Appreciation
Home of Greenville's Best Meats
P.O. Box 2 � 211 Jarvis St. � Greenville, N.C. 27834 � Phone: 752-5025
Prices effective Thurs. 22nd
thru Sat. 24th
FRESH WHOLE
FRYERS
42 J
Lb.
FRESH
PORK
PICNIC
79 C
FULL CUT WESTERN
ROUND
STEAK
$179
Lb. I
tffMMBIMM
PIRATE COUPON
10 Discount on
ANY FOOD ORDER
Regardless of size.
MINUTE MAID FRESH
ORANGE
JUICE
V2Gal.
Ctn.
98
Receive 10 off your grocery purchase upon presentation off
coupon to cashier. Sorry, no discounts on keg beer.
. Expires Oct. 3
Name
ID Number
Purchase
KINGSTON FROZEN
CHOPPED OR LEAF
SPINACH
5$l00
10-Ox. Pkg.
CLIP THIS COUPON
DIXIE CRYSTALS SUGAR
5-Lb. Bag
98 C
With this coupon and $7.50 food order excluding specials. Without coupon
$1.78. Limit one per customer. Expires 9 26-8
Quantity Rights Reserved
SAV-MOR
MARGARINE
Lb. Pkg.
3$l
CUP THIS COUPON-
COLD POWER
DETERGENT
98
Qt. Box
Wltti this coupon and S7.SO food ordtr excluding specials. Without coupon
"J it,�4. Limit one per customer. Expires 9 26 si
CUP THIS COUPO
WESSON OIL
88
24-Oz. Bottle
With this coupon and
$7 50 food order
excluding specials.
Without coupon
$1.49. Limit one
per customer.
Expires 9-26-81.
KRAFT
MIRACLE
WHIP
$128
Qt. Jar
GRADE "A" PITT COUNTY
LARGE EGGS
Dozen
78
KRAFT REG. $1.59 VALUE I VrfVAV"
GRAPE JELLY COLA
2-Lb. Jar
98
16-Oz. Ctn.
Of 8
1
58
Plus
Deposit
DELTA
PAPER
TOWELS
Gt. Roll
Limit 2 with $7.SO food order.
KRAFT
French, Italian, Catalina
SALAD
DRESSINGS
16-Oz.
DUNCAN HINES
YELLOW ONLY
CAKE
MIX
18-Oz. BOX
Limit 2 with $7.50
food order.
68
WESTERN
BARTLETT
PEARS
Lb.
49
SERVE WITH STEAKS
BAKING
POTATOES
Lb.
29 C
�'�� ' y
YELLOW
ONIONS
3 Lb. Bag
79
-rT"
i i ������
98
GWALTNEY
FRANKS
12-OX. Pkg.
89
GENERIC
POTATO
CHIPS
99
Lb. Bag
COTTONELLE
TOILET
TISSUE
Roll Pkg.
jiffy froz.� All variottos SEALTEST � All Flavors
POT pies ice
CREAM
$188
�-Or Pkg
5$l
13 Gallon'
rt� . �" ��� � �
Da
hor
Ho
he:
bioi
Heii
L
Hin
ed
Hig

bea
Huh
H l
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$10
i
Me
D:
diw
�.�,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 22. 1981 Page 15
Bette Davis
Bio Reveals Big Affair
NEW YORK (UPI) � Bette
Davis' first husband bugged their
home, surprised her in bed with
Howard Hughes and blackmailed
her for $80,000, an unauthorized
biography of the actress says.
In excerpts of Bette: The life of
Bette Davis, appearing next week in
Us magazine, author Charles
Hingham also said Joan Crawford
was a lesbian who wooed Miss Davis
with perfume, flowers and letters.
"Crawford had for years nourish-
ed a secret desire for Bette
Higham writes. "No lovesick male
in those happv, half-forgotten days
when women were still wooed by
men tried harder to seduce a
beautiful woman than Crawford did
in her pursuit of Davis
The legendary actresses starred
together in Whatever Happened to
Baby Jane as sisters and former
child stars who despised each other.
Hingham said Miss Davis spurned
Miss Crawford's advances.
But she fell madly in love with
Hughes; handsome, overwhelming-
ly wealthy and a great flier whose
picture, I fell's Angels, was the
"ultimate in aviation movies
Their romance was disrupted by
her first husband. Ham Nelson,
who rigged a recording system in the
walls of the house they shared and
then eavesdropped from a sound
truck parked on a side steet, the
author claimed.
Nelson "burst into the bedroom"
and caught Hughes and his wife
together, Hingham said.
The author said Hughes paid
$70,000 and Miss Davis paid
$10,000. Then she reportedly bor-
rowed enough money to repay
Hughes his $70,000.
Rolling Stones
Rolling Again
BOSTON (UPI) � The Rolling
Stones, the superstars who have
been trying to get their rock show on
a New England stage for the last
week, may perform in Boston
tonight.
The Boston Herald American to-
day reported the rock group's ad-
vance team met with city officials
Sunday afternoon to work out
details of a concert.
The location of the performance
and information about the price and
availability of tickets were to be an-
nounced sometime today, only
hours before the show, in an effort
to control crowds, the newspaper
said.
Reporters and camera crews for
WBZ-TV and WNAC-TV were ask-
ed to leave a City Hall conference
room Sunday afternoon when they
showed up unexpectedly and walked
into a meeting.
Police Commissioner Joseph Jor-
dan and other public safety officials
were also present at the meeting.
City officials last week rejected a
request for a concert permit from
the Stones, who have been rehears-
ing for their national tour in the tiny
central Massachusetts town of
North Brookfield.
The Johnny Van Zant Band Explodes A t Thursday's Concert
Pictured above (from left to right): lead guitarist Eric Leif-Lundgren,
vocalist Johnny Van Zant and lead guitarist Robbie Gay. The boys
from Jacksonville, Florida shared the spotlight with neighbors
Blackfoot and heavy metal band Def Leppard last Thursday night
before some 4,000 fans in Minges Coliseum. The concert was sponsored
by the Student Union Major Attractions Committee.
Spain 's 'Mi Prima A ngelica' Here Wednesday
B DOUGLAS QUEEN
M�lf Wnltt
This Wednesday evening, September 23, at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre, the Stu-
dent Union Films Committee will present Carlos
Saura's My C ousin Angelica Mi f'rima Angelica).
Following the film, in room 221 of the student center,
Dr. Joseph A. Fernandez of the Department of Foreign
Languages and Literature will lead a short, informal
discussion of fy Cousin Angelica. Refreshments will be
served and any interested students, faculty or staff are
invited to attend.
The Spanish are noted for their gaiety and colorful
festivals imbuing that culture with a potency far more
poigant considering the disasterous Franco years that
have muddled the land of Picasso and Miro.
But Spain has opened up from that dark time under
the relative democratic Juan Carlos. This is evident
from the rather spirited film industry that has at last
been allowed to come to grips with the horror of the
Civil war and the brutal repression of the Republican
cause. Out of this new spirit came a wonderful film in
1974 entitled Cousin Angelica.
Directed by Carlos Saura, Cousin Angelica lightly
skips over the terrible past with an elan that neither
gratuitiously capitalizes on the past nor ignor the rigors
imposed upon the people of Spain on account of it. In
all, Cousin Angelica is a finely poised and balanced
work.
The story concerns a middle-aged businessman, Luis
Vazques, who is unmarried and lives alone in
Barcelona. He is enroute to the south of Spain to lay his
mother's bones in the family crypt, where Luis grew up
and where his Falangist father fought for the
Republican cause.
As Vincent Canby, film reviewer for the New York
Times, said about Cousin Angelica: "It is not simply
about Luis's childhood before and during the civil war.
It's about Luis's recollections of his childhood as he
renews contacts with his family, especially with his
cousin Angelica, the sweet, pigtailed little girl he once
loved and who has grown in to a handsome, rather or-
dinary woman whose disappointments frighten him
An interesting theatrical technique employed by
Saura in his film debunks the conventional flashback by
simply having Luis walk into his memories a grown
man.
For instance, at one point we find Luis weeping while
his mother and father, considerably younger than he is,
console him. This scene does not irk nor call undue at-
tention to itself within the context of the film. This sur-
real approach refreshes the film where traditional
flashbacks seem to isolate the audience in a blur of past
time.
The scenes between Luis and Angelica, played by the
beautiful actress Maj;ia,Qa,CL,Feria(ridei, are. as Canby
says, "both intensely moving and sightly perverse, being
simultaneously a remembrance of not-quite-forgotten
intimacies and a description of where Luis is now, a
contemporary Spaniard whose scars remain raw, if un-
seen. He's a Humbert Humbert with no will to act,
without even a fantasy life
Jose Luis Lopez Vazquez is excellent as Luis, ap-
parently cheerful, self-contained and settled, though
forever disconnected from the kind of family life he
remembers with such mixed feelings.
Spain, though, is the real subject of the film, and at
the time it was reiesed there (1974) Cousin Angelica
caused quite a stir with its reference to the war, Spanish
Catholicism and the possible nobility of at least some
members of Republican cause.
Even if it is difficult for someone not familiar with
the subtleties of Spanish life to get all of these
references, the movie is extraordinarily compelling, an
invitation into a world until recently closed, but whose
vitality has remained undiminished.
Admission to the film is by student ID and activity
card or MSC membership.
Continental Divide
Screwball Comedy Has Class
In the tradition of Tracy and Hepburn, Belushi and Brown "meet cute" in the fortiesish screwball comedy
"Continental Divide The film has been playing since Thursday at Greenville's Buccaneer Theaters.
By JOHN WEYLER
WMWMm
East meets West at the Continental Divide. East is Er-
nie Souchak (John Belushi), a writer for a Chicago
newspaper. West is Nell Porter (Blair Brown), a back-
to-nature "eagle freak
Continental Divide is the movie in which they meet,
Fight, and fall in love. The film, now playing at the Buc-
caneer Theater in Greenville, is one of the classiest pro-
ducts to come from the Hollywood factory in many
years
Almost the best thing about Divide is not what it is,
but what it isn't: another silly slapstick-and-sex epic.
Despite the presence of Belushi, Mr. Adolescent Animal
House Hijinks himself, and the heavy promotion for the
film in college newspapers such as this one, the movie is
not what you'd expect.
Though Divide contains profanity, it isn't over-used
(in other words, "Fuck you isn't constantly offered
as an example of witty repartee). Though there is a lot
of sex in the storyline, there is no more than is normal in
most modern relationships, and there are absolutely no
gratuitous peep-show sex scenes.
Though there is some physical humor, mostly con-
sisting of a roly-poly, backpacked Belushi attempting to
survive in the wilderness, it isn't the main subject mat-
ter. And, best of all. . . CONTINTENTAL DIVIDE
CONTAINS ABSOLUTELY NO CAR CRASHES!
! This well-written, effectively-directed Film bears little
resemblance to Stripes, Caddyshack, Blues Brothers, or
others if that innumerable, infamous ilk. It rather
resembles a romantic comedy made back in the 1930's
or the 40's. In fact, it's more romantic than comedic.
The romance begins when Souchak-Belushi, a
muckraking journalist who has aroused the ire of a cor-
rupt city official, grudgingly decides to literally head for
the hills, to avoid any more attacks by the official's
cronies. While in the Rockies, he's supposed to do a
story on Porter-Brown, an independent-minded or-
nithologist, who lives alone amid the aeries of the eagles
she studies and loves.
He meets her at the end of a sharp stick when she
discovers him asleep in her cabin. He's a big-city boy,
born and bred in the concrete jungle. She's into wide
open spaces and mountain ranges. He's addicted to
nicotine, she's into health food.
He's ugly, dumpy, and non-atheletic; she's healthy,
energetic and good-looking. He thinks she's a frigid
"eagle freak She thinks he's a useless parasitic
newspaperman. He's stuck in her cabin, unable to leave,
while she just wants to be left alone. Under such cir-
cumstances as these, how could anything but true love
occur?
Three cheers to producers Steve Spielberg, Bernie
Brillstein and Bob Larson, writer Lawrence Kasdan
(The Empire Strikes Back, Raiders of the Lost Ark),
and director Michael Apted (Coal Miner's Daughter),
The producers should be praised for gambling on a
film so different from everything else being done today;
Kasdan should be congratulated for a script both witty
and warm.
In Divide both the underbelly of the big city and the
spirit of the untamed wilderness are brought to life on
the screen. The nature photography, especially the
scenes of soaring eagles, is inspiring.
The film's stars should also be honored, both for
their fine performances and Belushi, for having the
courage to tackle a role quite different from those for
which he is best known.
In this screwball romantic comedy, Belushi and
Brown may not be Tracy and Hepburn, maybe not even
Fields and West, but they, and the movie, are good
enough to stand the comparison.






TH� EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 23.1981 16
Are Professors Trading Grades For Sex?
The following article originally appeared in the
Outlook section of the Sunday, September 6.
1981 issue of The Washington Post. The story
will be run in two installments. See this Thurs-
day's East Carolinian for part two. L sed by per-
mission. All rights reserved.
B NOEL EPSTEIN
Ottllook t'dllor lor Th V� hin�lon Pmi
It is known by appropriately coarse phrases at
more than a few colleges and universities. In
some cases, according to higher education's
Change magazine, it's commonly called "an A
for a lay That's when an instructor offers a
good grade or recommendation or other reward
in return for sexual favors from students. In
other instances, when punishment is threatened,
it often goes by the alliterative "f or fail
It's the kind of thing an Arizona State Univer-
sity student reported in a study at that campus in
May: "One of my professors told me, 'if you'd
be willing to get involved in some extracurricular
activity, it could improve your grade I asked
him what kind of activity he meant. He said to
meet him at his apartment at 8 that night and I'd
find out
It's also often the threat of retaliation inherent
in a professor's propositioning wf fondling or
making other unwanted advances toward a stu-
dent. "Many professors simply don't understand
the effect on the student of w hat they do, that she
is frequently mortified by it but afraid she will
offend the man who controls her grades or
career says Bernice Sandier, director of the
Association of American Colleges' Project on
the Status and Education of Women.
But whatever you call it, explicit or implicit
sexual manipulation of students by faculty or
other staff is becoming an increasingly visible
and vexing issue on the nation's campuses, one
filled with complexity and paradox, at least once
you get past the jokes about faculty fringe
benefits and the student who complained of en-
ding up only getting a D from the lover anyway.
The jokes don't help much with the nasty bits
of evidence emerging from some campuses, the
grievance procedures being instituted, the
charges and countercharges filed, the handful of
professors already disciplined, the fear of
misunderstandings, of malicious accusations, of
wrongly damaged careers, of professors conse- about two percent of the student respondents,
quently staying clear of female students � and of saying they had faced bribes or threats from in-
that, too, shortchanging women in their educa- structors for sexual activities. That may sound
tions. like a mere nuisance to some, just two percent.
Start with bits of evidence. The Arizona State
study, for example, found nine students, or See LAY, Page 17
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lilt I AMAKOI INIAN
SI PlhMBl R22, 1981
17
ome
Continued From Page 16
But if you were to apply that to trie total female
college student population of roughly 5.5
million, you would happen to get 110,000
students.
Mai Rowc, special assistant to the president
ol Mil. has been dealing with the problem for
nine cars there � about 25 MIT student
grievances a year, she reports � and helping
numerous other campuses. She estimates that, in-
deed, "at least two percent of any female student
population will run into some fairly serious pro-
blem of this kind in any given year, and an addi-
tional significant but much smaller group of
men. The male students usually are also concern-
ed with male offenders The Association of
American colleges' Sandier notes that, addi-
tionally, there are "some instances of male
students being propositioned by female pro-
ws
Nanc) Carlson, director of counseling and
careei services at the University of Rhode Island,
says "there are probabl) somewhere between 10
and 100 cases a year" of these types there. A
JO Rhode Island survey actually turned up
ee students who reported being propositioned
themselves in return for grades or test marks and
�w reporting similar propositions made to other
idents at the campus. Two students in recent
years have gone so tar as to take their complaints
the administration.
In one case last year, the faculty member
resigned when we brought it to his attention
says Douglas Rosie, assistant vice president for
a, ademic affairs.
You can find other scattered examinations of
issue with wider-ranging definitions of of-
and thus more o them reported. But
aps the best comment on the extent of the
comes from Jerold Roschwalb of the
il ssociation o State Universities and
� Grant Colleges, whosimpl) states: "There
� this going on than mam people believe
an othei s fantasize
v -osited professor-student sexual rela-
te, h.ne long been common,
,i; the graduate school level. A 1979
merican Psychological Associa-
erapy division members, in fact,
.i quartet oi women respondents
vived their doctorates in the
ng six years had engaged in "intercourse
il stimulation" with their professors.
ces all of that was coerced.
lie also, to be sure, women students
r willing to sleep with professors
� ademic benefits, particularly with
. 's intense competition for the right medical.
;ness or other graduate school. Prof.
1 ivloi at the University of Rochester
reports in his Change magazine article that "to
many students this practice seems to be little
more than an offer of one favor in exchange for
another. As one of them expressed her own at-
titude, 'I've already lost it, once more won't
make any difference � and I'll get an A in Bio
That's not the kind of student achiever you'd
want at your university, of course, and you've
got to worry about any professor who goes along
with selling favoritism for sex, no matter what
lure or "midlife crisis" he may be facing. As
MIT's Rowe aptly states of the overall problem,
"It is most fundamentally an abrogation of the
contract we have to lead, to teach, to inspire, to
foster excellence
The problem for the couple can also come
after the affair breaks off. In one case with
echoes of that one-liner about the student who
got a D anyway, a former Indiana University stu-
dent in speech pathology filed suit several years
ago after her ex-lover professor outright flunked
her. She claimed he acted maliciously, out of
spite. But in March 1979 the federal district court
judge dismissed the case, unconvinced from her
academic work that the instructor had acted im-
properly.
However one feels about voluntary cases,
though, there is no doubt that there's a serious
problem in professorial coercion of sexual
favors, or that until recently there was little out-
cry about it. In part, this was because other
faculty members or administrators who knew of
such cases were hesitant to act.
Jane Levin, a clinical associate at Washington
Univerty's Graduate Institute of Education in St.
Louis, for example, was well aware of the pro-
blem. In the past four years, she says, three
students came into her office "telling me that a
male faculty member either threatened them with
punishment or promised tham a higher grade if
they would have sexual relations with them
But she adds: "Quite frankly, I didn't want to
know the details. If 1 knew who it was and more
about what had gone on, I would have felt com-
pelled to intervene. That would have been very
difficult, and perhaps with negative conse-
quences for my job. 1 do not have tenure Levin
is now part of a group working to sensitize her
campus to the problem.
In large part, though, all the reports suggest,
the invisibility of the problem was � and still is
in most cases � due to the students' fears of em-
barrassment if they reported the episodes, to
their sense of shame or intimidation or self-
doubt, to worries � evidently well founded at
some campuses � that nothing would be done
anyway. Better just to try to avoid the professor,
change courses or even majors or otherwise han-
dle it yourself.
Some young women do indeed handle it, and
rather nicely. The Arizona State student who
reported being propositioned for
"extracurricular activities for example, stated:
"1 told him to go take a flying leap and if he ever
said another word or changed my grade to
something I didn't earn (lower or higher), I'd
report him
"Good for her says the Association of
American Colleges' Sandier. "But unfortunately
many other students fear that they wouldn't even
be believed, that it would be a young student's
word against the respected scholar's, and so they
are just unwilling to report it. Reporting sexual
offenses by your professor � or what the student
takes as such an offense � is a very difficult step
for most students, and certainly one which
nobody should take lightly. That's why specific-
policies and sensitive, confidential grievance pro-
cedures need to be established in this area on all
campuses � for the sake of both sides
You will hear variations on that theme from
almost anybody you talk to who is groping with
this issue: the need for policies and procedures,
incorporated in or added to long-existing student
and faculty grivance processes. It doesn't seem
like much to ask. Grievance procedures for sex
discrimination complaints in education are
already required by federal regulation, under Ti-
tle IX of the 1972 education amendments for
campuses receiving federal aid. But that doesn't
mean most institutions have done much, if
anything, about it.
Thursday: Student brings
in landmark case.
suit against professor
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THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
ECU Upset Bid Foiled
Sports
SEPTEMBER 22, 1981 Page I 8
Fireworks Push Pack Past Pirates
By CHARLES CHANDLER
RALEIGH � N.C. State
freshman tailback Joe Mclntosh is
fast gaining the reputation for being
able to "do it all He did just that
Saturday in leading the Wolfpack to
a 31-10 victory over East Carolina.
Mclntosh not only rushed for 167
yards, including a 40-yard
touchdown run, he also threw for a
crucial go-ahead score in the third
period.
After the fired-up Pirates, coming
off a humiliating 56-0 loss at North
Carolina the week before, battled
the Pack to a 10-10 halftime tie, the
two clubs exchanged fumbles and
punts until the four minute mark of
the third quarter.
At that point the Pirates, who had
just moved from their 19 to their
33-yard line in two plays, fumbled a
snap from center. State's Sam Key
fell on the ball, giving the Wolfpack
just the opportunity it needed.
Mclntosh moved the pigskin to
the 16 with a 17-yard burst up the
middle. Three plays later the Pack
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day 1-5.
faced a fourth-and-inches situation
at the Pirate six. State coach Monte
Kiffin opted to go for a first down
or touchdown rather than have
kicker Todd Auten try a field goal.
State quarterback Tol Avery did
just what was expected, pitch the
ball back to Mclntosh. What the
freshmen sensation did with the ball
surprised everybody in the stadium,
though. He threw a perfect pass to
Avery, who easily danced into the
endzone.
"We had watched the corner
come up the last time we were down
there Kiffin said of the play.
"The corner got fooled on that
play, but the defensive end reacted
well. Joe had to throw a perfect
pass
The suprising pass from Mcln-
tosh was definitely the turning point
in the contest. The fumble that gave
State the opportunity to score also
played a major factor in the
Wolfpack win.
On the play, ECU starting
quarterback Carlton Nelson re-
injured his neck trying to dive after
the loose football. He returned
several series later but was not as ef-
fective as before the injury.
Mclntosh's pass coupled with two
long punt returns by Louie
Meadows in the fourth quarter
made the final score a deceiving
31-10.
Meadows returned one ECU punt
37-yards to the ECU 34-yard line to
set up State's second touchdown of
the second half. Fullback Dwigh:
Sullivan covered the last eight yards
of the six-play drive and put State
up 24-10.
The next Meadows return was
never supposed to happen. A mix-
up on the ECU sidelines resulted in
a Tommy Barnhardt punt to the
State 36, where Meadows took it
and went 64 yards into the endzone.
Todd Auten's extra point put the
nail in the Pirate coffin, giving State
a 31-10 lead with 6:16 left in the
game.
Barnhardt's punt came with the
Pirates facing a fourth-and-one
situation at their own 2. The
freshman kicker was never supposed
Tough To Bring Down
N.C. State freshman running back Joe Mclntosh gave the
ECU defense fits in the Wolf pack's 31-10 vie lory Saturday
night. Here, a number of Pirate defenders try to bring down
the first-year sensation. End Jody Schuz and nose guard Fee
Griffin have their hand on Mclntosh, while linebackers Mike
Grant (49) and Ronald Reid (56) are trying to assist. Trying
to keep Grant out of the play is Slate guard Chuck Long
(63). (Photo By Jon Jordan)
to have gotten the punt off, Pirate
coach Ed Emory said following the
game.
"There was some mis-
communication on the sidelines
Emory explained. "I take full
responsibility for it. We were sup-
posed to have faked the punt
The two Meadows punt returns
certainly turned what was a very
close game for three quarters into
what would appear on the surface to
be a one-sided affair in the end.
"This baTT game was lots closet
than 31-10 said Emory. "Our kids
just don't deserve to be printed up
as 31-10 losers, but that's the way
life is sometimes
The Pirates came out and moved
the ball impressively on their first
possession of the contest, driving to
the State 23 before having to settle
for a Chuck Bushbeck field goal at-
tempt, which was unsuccessful.
The Pirates capitalized on a Clint
Harris interception on their next
drive, though, moving from their
own 38 towards a score. The big
play was a 43-yard pass from Nelson
to tight end Norwood Vann. Roy
Wiley went over from two yards out
on the next play to put the Bucs
ahead, 7-0.
State evened the score on the en-
suing possession. Mclntosh went the
last 40 yards to tie the score at
seven.
On the first drive of the second
quarter, the Wolfpack broke the tie,
getting a 49-yard field goal from
Todd Auten. The Pirates countered
three minutes later, Bushbeck hit-
ting a 37-varder to tie the score at
ten.
The play of Mclntosh over-
shadowed a pair of impressive
backfieldperformances. State
fullback Dwight Sullivan carried
eight times for 82 vards, while ECU
halfback Earnest Byner rushed 11
times for 74 yards.
The Pirates, now 1-2, return
home to Ficklen Stadium this Satur-
day, to take on Toledo. The
Wolfpack. 3-0, hosts Maryland this
weekend.
Mclntosh. Meadows Pace Pack
The play taking place in the above photo happened moments
before N.C. State scored the go-ahead TD in the Packs'
31-10 victory over ECU. A halfback pass from freshman Joe
Mclntosh to quarterback Tol Avery gave State the lead it
never relinquished. (Photo By Gary Patterson)
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Asafcilaal Sports F dilor
RALEIGH� See Joe run. See
Joe catch. See Joe pass. Pass? Sure.
Joe Mclntosh did everything in his
team's 31-10 victory over the Pirates
of East Carolina.
The Lexington, N.C, freshman
not only rushed for 167 yards on 24
carries, including a 40-yard
touchdown run in the first quarter,
but also threw a touchdown pass to
quarterback Tol Avery on a well-
executed flea-flicker.
The play started out as a sweep
right to Mclntosh, but the 5-11, 181-
pound back turned around and
threw a perfect pass to Avery, who
momentarily stopped after the han-
doff, fooling the Pirate defense.
"They (East Carolina) were blitz-
ing at the time Mclntosh said in
describing the scoring pass. "I was
just hoping to throw it in the general
area. The play has been in our game
plan all along. We've run it maybe
10 times in practice
"We ran that same sweep
earlier State Coach Monte Kiffin
said following the game. "Avery
really had to scramble, and Joe real-
ly made a great pass. That was the
turning point. You've got to take
these chances� good teams have to
do things like that
When Mclntosh wasn't passing,
he was on his way to his third
100-yard game of this young
season� something no other State
running back has done after his first
three games. Mclntosh rushed for
131 yards against Richmond and 220
in the Wake Forest eame.
The Wolfpack, down 7-0 in the
first quarter, drove to the East
Carolina 40, where Mclntosh took
the handoff from Avery and was
seemingly stopped by the middle of
the Pirate line. But the agile
freshman kept his balance and
bolted for a 40-yard score.
The aggressive Pirate defense
banged up the impressive freshman,
however. "The yardage was tougher
tonight Mclntosh said. "ECU
was fired up, but our guys didn't
give up. 1 was hurt (badly bruised
thigh) on a screen play, but to be a
good runner, you have to be able to
play with pain
"Joe got banged up Kiffin add-
ed He showed a lot tonight. There
weren't many open holes. But give
the ECU defense credit; they're not
the same bunch of guys I watched
on film. We had to throw the ball
more
� � �
Defensive back Louie Meadows
proved he still had some of his old
high school moves by returning a
punt 64 yards for a touchdown late
in the fourth quarter to seal the
State win. The 5 10, 189-pound
junior was i running back at White
Oak High School.
�'1 thought 1 was going to have a
pretty good return Meadows said,
"but I kept getting blocks. Donnie
1 edrande threw a great one. All the
guvs did. We (defensive backs)
don't get to handle the ball that
much, but returning punts helps our
team a lot.
"ECU has a great punt coverage
team, but great blocking was the
key
Pirate Coach Ed Emory said that
the punt Meadows ran back was
supposed to have been faked. "We
should have gone for the first down,
but there was mis-communication
on the sidelines, which I take the
blame for
"Louie got the defensive game
ball Kiffin added. "He really
deserved it. He's a great athlete
Margin Of State Victory Very Deceiving
Game Much Closer Than 31-10
"Nobody deserves to have this
happen to them after what we've
been through
The words came from a frustrated
ECU football coach Ed Emory
following his team's hard-fought
31-10 loss to N.C. State Saturday
night. He was speaking to a small
gathering of media personnel.
Emory was right on the money
with his statement. The Pirates had
lost just one week earlier by a
humiliating 56-0 margin to North
Carolina. But, in Raleigh the Bucs
were a totally different team.
They played the favored
Wolfpack to a 10-10 halftime tie.
That tie stood until the 1:56 mark of
the third quarter. The score got
worse in the fourth quarter when the
Pirate specialty teams faltered,
allowing State's Louie Meadows to
return one punt for a touchdown
and another one deep into ECU ter-
ritory to set up a score.
"If there was one area I thought
we were sound in Emory said, "it
was the kicking game. We had a
couple of big breakdowns that really
hurt us. We must work on that
area
Indeed, it was a shame that the
Charles
Chandler
kicking game broke down � taking
nothing away from Meadows'
returns � for the Pirates showed
the integrity and character in
Raleigh that they obviously lacked
in Chapel Hill just seven days
before.
Many criticisized the Pirates
heavily following the big loss to the
Tar Heels. This columnist was one
of them. Surely, they needed some
ribbing.
But, alas, good performances
must be complimented. The Bucs
shook off the loss and came to
Raleigh with the plan and the at-
titude to win.
ECU had a good chance of upset-
ting the Wolfpack. Four factors
went a long way in preventing the
Bucs from picking up win number
two.
Two of them are obvious �
Meadows returns and the play of
freshman sensation Joe Mclntosh.
The First-year running back rushed
for 167 yards, including a 40-yard
touchdown run, and threw for the
go-ahead score in the third period.
Factor number three was the in-
jury in the third period to starting
ECU quarterback Carlton Nelson.
The injury seemed to throw the en-
tire Pirate attack off. Who knows
what would have happened if the
Pirates had been able to fight back
with their starting quarterback
healthy?
The injury came on a play that the
Pirates would just as soon forget.
The team had just gotten a ten-yard
run from Earnest Byner and had a
first down on their own 33. A
fumbled snap meant a mass of
bodies, including Nelson's, trying to
recover the loose ball. State got the
fumble and six plays later a
touchdown.
Factor number four goes back to
factor number one � Meadows
returns. The last of those returns, a
64-yard touchdown, should not
have occurred.
The Pirates faced a fourth-and-
one situation at their own 29-yard-
line midway through the fourth
quarter and trailed State, 24-10.
The decision was made on the
ECU sideline to try a fake punt.
Some mis-communication on the
bench, though, prevented the
message from getting to the huddle
on the field.
The rest of the story is well-
known, the Pirates punt and
Meadows takes it all the way.
The final score definitely put a
damper in the Pirates' spirits. The
team fought back and made a most
respectable showing against the
Wolfpack. It's just a shame that the
score could not have reflected the
team's efforts.
Emory, though disheartened by
the end result, is encouraged. In
fact, he had some strong words for
ECU's future opponents.
"This just puts us that much fur-
ther to come back from he said
sternly. "But I will settle for
nothing less than victory from this
team in 1981. And we will get those
victories
If Emory can get the Pirates to
come on the Field the rest of the
season the way they did in Raleigh,
the victories will, indeed, come.
Intercepting
N.C. State defensive back Perry Williams steps in front of
ECU tight end Norwood Vann to intercept a pass from
Pirate quarterback Kevin Ingram late in Saturday's game.
(Photo By Jon Jordan)
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After
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22, 1981
19
Brown Ties Record
s
1
over-
irned
EC I
�d 1 I
itur-
cr
the
hat
OUT
he
i at
We
unication
"he
� game
'He really
al athlete
4:
in front of
pass from
riav Is name.
Kickers' Defense Key To Win
FOOTBALL
The Pirates of East
Carolina, behind the
two-goal performances
of Bill Merwin and
Mark Hardy defeated
Coker College, 4-0, at
Minges Field Sunday.
Goalie Steve Brown
had three saves in
preserving the shutout;
thus tieing an East
Carolina record for six
scoreless matches. The
ECU senior has gien
up only two goals all
season.
The Pirates, now 2-2,
bounced back from a
tough 1-0 loss in the
final minutes to Elon
last week.
"We improved our
mid-field play said
an obviousK pleased
Brad Smith after the
Coker match Smith
was unhappy with his
team's mid-field play in
a 1-0 loss to George
Mason last week. "We
made some changes
there by moving Billy
Merwin to the middle
Trje Pirates took 20
shots, compared to on-
ly four for Coker, as
ECU scored two goals
in the first period and
added two more in the
second.
Merwin and Hardy,
along with Brad Win-
chell had one assist
each for the Pirates.
"We came back very
well Smith said. "We
completely
dominated� it was a
very good win for us.
Brown played well, but
you have to credit our
defense with the
shutout
The win against
C oker came after the
Pirates suffered the
ough defeat to Elon on
a penalty-kick.
Both clubs had II
shots at the goal;
Calloway scoring the
eventual game-winner.
Shields added an assist
for Elon.
"We got beat by a
better team Smith
concluded. "They
played harder than we
did.
"We should have
won that match. Elon
was much improved;
we're much improved.
We fell to execute some
of our runs (plays).
When we failed to do
that, they scored.
"This week is a real
critical week for us.
(The Bucs travel to
Campbell and Guilford
before hosting the
Wolfpack of N.C.
State.) If we get by
these teams, we might
just get our winning
season
The Pirates finished
last season with a 7-14-1
mark; a mark the team
wants to improve bad-
ly. "Last year's record
is deceptive Smith ex-
plains. "We played six
teams that were rated in
the top 20 in the nation
at some point in the
seaon. We also had
five, one-goal losses.
"When taking over
the Pirate program, I
said we would be com-
petitive immediately,
but that it would take
four years to build a
winner. This is my first
class of recruited
seniors
The match with
nationally-ranked State
is important in that the
contest will be the first
night match hosted by
East Carolina. The
match will be played at
Ficklen Stadium on
September 30 (Wed.) at
7:30.
BLACK
RUSSIAN
E.C.CD.E.C. WINTER GUARDE
Spikers Defeat Duke
rlftlM
Staff Wrilrr
The East Carolina voilebyall team
is l-l after.its first action of the
year, splitting a pair of weekend
matches.
The Pirates won a Friday night
encounter against Duke, taking the
match in three straight games bv
scores of 15-12, 15-7 and 15-3. The
team then dropped Saturday's
match with Appalachian State.
After the match with Duke.
Davidson seemed pleased with the
Lady Pirates' performance against
the taller Duke team.
"We played very well considering
it was our first match oi' the
season Davidson said. "Our serv-
ing was very good and we played
with lots of intensity and unity on
the floor. I was really surprised the
way the team played together in the
first game
The two outstanding performers
in the contests were I ita Lamas and
Lexanne Keeter. Dale LaVanta was
impres�nve for ECU defensivelv.
Saturday's match against the
Mountaineers proved to be a dif-
ferent story, however, as the Pirates
fell in four games bv scores of
12-15. 12-15, 16-14, and 6-15.
Besides losing the match the ECU
team lost Lamus during the match
with an ankle sprain. She is expected
to be out of action for four to five
weeks.
Davidson was disappointed in the
outcome of the Appalachian con-
test. She said that both the injury to
Lamus and the play of the Moun-
taineers hurt the Pirates chances for
victory.
"The scores were fairly close but
we didn't play all that well David-
son said following the game. "We
never really established an offensive
pattern. We were making a good
comeback in the third game of the
match but we had the injury to
I amus "
The Lady Pirates will be back in
action this Friday, competing in the
N.C. State Invitational in Raleigh.
Next Tuesday the Bucs return home
to face the a strong North Carolina
team.

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Student tickets for
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(Tuesday).
Students will be able
to pick up tickets for
the game, scheduled for
p.m. in Ficklen
Stadium, through
Thursday. Pick-ups can
be made at the Central
Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student
Center from 8 a.m4
p.m. both days. The
Minges ticket office
will be open Wednes-
day from 8-4 and on
Thursday from 8-6.
The group plan is
available for any
organization that re-
quests it.
I he athletic dep rt-
ment reminds students
that there is a new stu-
dent gate on the
scoreboard (Berkley
Drive) side of the
stadium. It is in addi-
tion to the student en-
trance in the middle-
section of Ficklen's
north side.
Students who may
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can turn to ushers for
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sD
I





20
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 22, 1981
COUPON
COUPON
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Shoes
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Excluded)
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Select Group of Closeout
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 22, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 22, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.148
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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