The East Carolinian, September 17, 1981






2foe 3:aBt (Earnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 8
Thursday, September 17, 1981
Greenville, N .C
14 Pages
Brewer
WVU Passes Over
Chancellor For Post s
run si�ff ,�� ir Reports
West Virginia University has an-
nounced the finalists in its search
for a nev president, and ECU
Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer is not
on the list.
Brewer, who requested a leave
with pay last week, had been one of
nine candidates being considered
before the WVU Presidential Search
and Screening Committee's decision
Tuesday, according to an article in
the Morgantown (W.Va.)
Dominion-Post.
The chancellor, who resigned
from his post amid charges that he
was seeking the WVU presidency,
was not available for comment
Wednesday. Search committee
chairman J. Reginald Dietz also had
no comment yesterday on why
Brewer did not make the final cut.
"If one of the four (selected can-
didates) dropped from considera-
tion, then the committee could still
call on the other five candidates
Dietz told the West Virginia
newspaper. "Following the visits of
these four candidates, the commit-
tee will decide whether to invite
other candidates to the campus
prior to forwarding at least three
names to the Board of Regents
The final candidates are Francis
T. Borkowski, provost of the
University of South Carolina; Gor-
don E. Gee, dean of the WVU law
school; Donald D. Glower. College
of Engineering dean at Ohio State
University; and Thomas M. Stauf-
fer, director of external relations for
the American Council on Educa-
tion.
The Morgantown university's
president resigned to become
chancellor of the University of Kan-
sas, leaving interim president Harry
B. Heflin in his place.
The other candidates who are not
in the final four selected by the com-
mittee are Richard Bond, president
of Northern Colorado University;
WVU Vice President Raymond
Haas; and Durward Long,
chancellor of the University of
Hawaii at Manoa.
Tuition
ECU Cheap When
Compared To Others
By MIKE HUGHES
SUft Writer
In the wake of complaints about
the rising costs of education at East
Carolina University, it may be
enlightening to take a look at several
of the nation's most expensive col-
leges and universities.
According to � survey conducted
by the College Board, a non-profit
organization representing many
U.S. colleges and universities, more
than a dozen East Coast private
schools now cost at least11,000 per
year to attend.
This figure is based on the
estimated total annual cost to a stu-
dent, including tuition and fees,
room and board, books, supplies
and transportation.
Bennington College, a small
liberal arts school in Vermont,
showed the highest 1981-82 costs for
students with an estimated total of
$12,030.
The other 13 schools with total
annual costs of more than $11,000
are: Harvard and Radcliff colleges,
$11,950; Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, $11,845; Yale Univer-
sity, $11,600; Sarah Lawrence Col-
lege, $11,550; Princeton University,
$11,289; the University of Penn-
sylvania, $11,200; Brown Universi-
ty, $11,195; Barnard College,
$11,150; Tufts University, $11,113;
Bard College, $11,063; Dartmouth
College, $11,045; and Brvn Mawr
College, $11,010.
The College Board's financial aid
division, the College Scholarship
Service, has surveyed 1,160 four-
year colleges and universities each
year since 1970.
The survey also reports that the
total expenses for the academic year
1981-82 at the average private col-
lege in the U.S. will be $6,885, com-
pared to an average of $3,873 at
public four-year schools.
According to the survey, tuition
increased an average of 13 percent,
or $430 per year, at private schools
and 16 percent, or $113. at public
colleges and universities.
No Foreign Language A Handicap
B KRISTIN A V&SQUEZ
"ti Unlrr
The bilingual illiteracy of Americans is not only a
problem, but more seriously, a handicap, according to
studies by the President's Commission.
The studies show that this country's language and
research capacity is seriously deteriorating at a time
when an increasingly hazardous international military,
political and economic environment is making un-
precedented demands on America's resources, intellec-
tual capacity and public sensitivity.
In an address last week, Secretary of Education Ter-
rell Bell said thai first on his list of priorities was im-
proving foreign language programs in this country. He
further stated that an advanced Western nation such as
ours should be ashamed of its bilingual illiteracy.
America is hindered by its limitations in foreign
languages, according to Marguerite Perry, former chair-
man of the Department of Foreign Languages and
Literatures.
"We will never make the contributions that we are
capable of making until we realize the importance of
knowing other nations' cultures and languages 4e
said adding that Americans are so accustomed to believ-
ing that English is the universal language, that we have
ignored other languages to too great an extent. Other
nations may become tired of this "obvious arrogance
and will choose to do business with other nations, accor-
ding to Perry.
Perry and the President's Commission claim the
future will belong to those nations that are wise as well
as strong, bringing out the absolute necessity to develop
and maintain a first-class standard to enable Americans
to cope with the changing world.
Languages are also essential for human understan-
ding. Perry said. "The challenge that a foreign language
puts forth is rewarding, and more importantly a tool
that has been used since the beginning of time to
discipline the mind she added. "Long ago everyone
was required to take Latin. This was not only for better
understanding of our own language, but also to be an
enriching process which is invaluable
According to the studies, in 1977 only 8 percent of
U.S. colleges nd universities required a foreign language
for admission (it was 34 percent in 1966) and most
universities did not require students to take a foreign
language in order to graduate. Today these low figures
are a little higher, but not much, i.ie President's Com-
mission has stated that many institutions are reinstating
the language requirements, and the interest in foreign
languages seems to be on the rise. Harvard's enrollment
percentage has increased in the last two vears. The ECU
foreign language department has reported a continuous
increase of students taking a foreign language.
Perry savs the overall percentage increases in foreign
language enrollment for each fall semester has been a-
follows: 175, 7 percent. 9"7f, 13 percent; I9T7, iR per-
cent; 1978. 11 percent; 1979. 10 percent; 1980. IS per-
cent; and 1981, 8 percent. Perry and Manohta Buck, an
ECU Spanish professor, say that students taking a
foreign language seem to enjoy learning another
language. Although some students take foreign
languages because they need it in order to fulfill their
graduation requirements, the majority of students elect
to take a foreign language. ECU offers many languages,
and has an excellent staff of teachers, the professors
say. adding that students are realizing the importance of
knowing a foreign language and are taking heed to this
fact.
Writing Your Congressman?
Making Point No Problem
Pfc�to Sr JON JORDAN
Write to U.S. Senator and former ECU professor John East if you want
to voice your opinion.
By MIKE HUGHES
Staff Writer
"There ought to be a law
How many times has that line
come up in everyday conversation?
But on the part of the average
American citizen, action seldom
goes beyond that point of mere
statement.
With the diversity of controver-
sial issues and proposals facing
United States legislators today,
there are few, if any, Americans
who are in total agreement with all
the actions of the legislative branch
of the federal government.
Though the average citizen may
feel he or she has no voice in
Washington, D.C one of the most
effective methods of influencing
legislation is by writing one's
senator or representative.
Though it is true that a letter pro-
bably will not inspire any significant
changes in U.S. law, a thoughtful,
well-written letter from a consti-
tuent voter may have a great impact
on a senator's or congresman's
thinking.
Below are five basic rules for
writing a legislator:
�Write clearly and keep the letter
short.
� Identify the issue or legislation that
is of concern.
�Write as soon as possible after the
introduction of the bill.
�Try to make comments as con-
structive as possible (avoid making
oppositions without including possi-
ble alternatives).
�Share any pertinent knowledge and
experience with the legislator.
All U.S. legislators can be written
at the following addresses:
Senators.
The Honorable (Name of Senator)
Senate Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
Representatives:
The Honorable (Name of Represen-
tative)
House Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20515
Sanford Called On To Resign
DURHAM (UPI) � Declaring
that the Duke University faculty has
been "betrayed, abused and grossly
insulted" by attempts to seek a
Richard Nixon Presidential Library,
a Duke faculty member has called
on university President Terry San-
ford to resign.
"A lot of my colleagues share my
view that Mr Sanford no longer is
worthy of the office said Dr.
Peter H. Klopfer, a zoology pro-
fessor and faculty member for 22
On The Inside
Forum
Announcements
Opinions
Campus
Trivia
Blackfoot
Tony Collins
Ramses VI.
Classifieds
.2
.4
.4
. 7
. 7
11
11
14
years.
Klopfer said Tuesday he and
other professors would circulate
petitions either to express "no con-
fidence" in Sanford or to seek his
resignation.
"The feeling that we have been
betrayed, abused and grossly in-
sulted is extremely widespread
Klopfer said. "There is not one
faculty member in 20 that would
dispute that
Sanford declined to comment to
Klopfer's suggestion to resign.
"One becomes accustomed to
anything he said.
The professor's call reflects the
passion generated since Sanford �a
former Democratic governor and
avid Nixon opponent-contacted the
1937 Duke Law School graduate
and suggested Nixon name Duke as
the site for the library housing his
political papers.
Under Duke's plan, the university
would provide land near the campus
for a library, while a private foun-
dation would pay to build it and the
federal government would maintain
it. Several other sites, including the
Los Angeles area, also are in the
running for the library.
Many Duke faculty members
want the treasury of information in
the famed politicians' papers, but
are split over whether a library
would appear to be a memorial to
the president who resigned in
disgrace in 1974 because of the
Watergate scandal.
Recently the council voted
unanimously to recommend that
Duke's trustees oppose any museum
or memorial that would glorify Nix-
on.
"The degree to which this move-
ment (for Sanford's resignation)
goes depends on the degree that
Sanford recognizes the harm that he
has done Klopfer said. "I don't
think he has recognized the degree
to which he has antagonized people
� and I include myself � who
thought highly of him.
(�hot By OAKY PATTCKSON
"SOULS On The Mali"
was presented Wednesday afternoon by ECU'S Society Of United Liberal Students. Music,
pomes and tables displaying information about the SOULS organizations were featured.
t
�a �m m J'n�- �? !�� nV6






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1981
Announcements
119 E. 5th
752 8711
PHI ETA SIGMA
Pni Eta Sigma Freshmen Honor
Society will hold an organizational
meeting on Thursday, Sept 17 at 5
p m m room 731 Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Plans tor the coming
year will be made All members
are urged to attend
POETRY FORUM
Fi'St meeting ot the ECU Poetry
Forum will be heio on Thursday
September 17. m room 1� ot
MendenhaH Student Center at 8
p m
Veetmg s open to anyone
wishing feedback on his her
poetry Those planning to attend
are asked to bring at leas' tin
copies of each poem
BOWLING
Sun.iay is Funday at the AASC
Bowling Center Every Sunday
from 5pm unil 7pm you tan
bowl m the �moonligt' With the
lights down low the game takes on
a whole new dimension Also, the
high score each hour wins a FHEE
GAME
From 7p m until 10 p m each
Sunday bowlers get a chance to
win one FREE GAME with every
game bowled in Red Pm Bowi
ing' Each time a reef pm comes up
as the head pin and you make a
strike you win a FREE GAME
Don t forget Sunday is a
special day at Menoenhal!
RECREATIONAL
CLUBS
Organizational meetings for the
formation of several recreational
clubs � be held a' Mendenhdli
Student Cente' on the following
dates
Table Tenn.s Club (Monday.
Sept 21 7pm Table Tenn's
Rooms'
Chess Backgammon Club
i Tuesday bept 3J 7 p m Cot
�eehouse)
Mear's Spaoes Club (Wednesday,
Sect 23 7pm TV Area)
These groups meet on a weekly
pasis so participants can socialize
ano eniOy some friendly competi
tion with others who share their m
terest in a spor' Sgn up today at
�he Venaenhali Billiards Center if
you oo'd like to participate in
any of these ciubs
SOCIAL WORK
S'udents who wish to apply tor a
mjior in sooai work or correi.
'ions should contact the Depart
men! ot Social Work Correctional
Services tor an application and
schedule appointments tor the re
guired interviews (757 6�61 j To be
eligible to apply, the student is e�
pected to have at least a 2 5 QPA
ano ftaw had at least one ourse in
social work or corrections
Deadline for submitting an ap
plication ana having completed
the first interview with one ot the
depar 'mental tacul'y is
September 16 The Department
Cnair will be holding the second in
terviews on September 17 18, 1981
SGA ELECTIONS
For ail students who are con
cemeo about East Carolina
University, here is your chance to
have your voice heard Filing
dates tor SGA dorm and day stu
dent legislators ano class officers
will be Sept 9 Sept 19 Come by
the SGA office in Room 228
Mendenna
SOULS
Meetings every Thursday at 7
pm at the Ledonia S Wright
Culture Center
AUDITIONS
Auditions for THE GLASS
MENAGERIE by Tennessee
Williams will be held September
24 and 25 at 7 30 p m at the
Methodist Student Center 501
East Fifth Street Stephen B Fin
nan formerly of ECU'S Drama
and Speech Department will pro
duce and direct m cooperation
with the Wesley Foundation of
Greenville Everyone is welcome
to audition For further intorma
tion, call 757 356 or 758 2030
CITY COUNCIL
The Greenville City Council will
have a special meeting Thursday.
Sept 17 at 8pm in the Municipal
Building Public comments iII be
heard on an ordnance concerning
the city s participation ,n the
Municipal Power Agencv No 3
purchase of an ownership .nteres'
m several CP'L generating
facilities
NAACP
The ECU Student Chapter is
seeking membership All in-
'eres'ed persons please i ome by
the Student Organization bo'h f.rs'
floor MenoenhaU tor registration
and information. 12 5 until Friday
Regular meeting tonight at 6 30
p m in room 244 MendenhaH
HUNGER COALITION
"Our appropriate response to
world hunger is not concern but
outrage1 The battle aga nst
World hunger is seldom an emo
tiona' issue The ECU Hunuer
Coalition invites ail interested Dec
pie ot join us and help us in try :nc
to bring the ssue of hunger to the
attention of everyone Hjnger
should be an emotional issue an?
we bel eve we can help alleviate if
We meet every Thursday even ng
at 7 30 pm a' he Neyynir, Mouse.
953 E 10th St ,752 4216' World
food Day is Oct 16th The Hunger
Coalition and some nutrition
students will be working on educa
tional proiects tor that day We
need your help'
CATHOLIC SOCIAL
SERVICES
Ca'hohc Social Serv ces ahs a
newof'ice a'27Cic E Fourth St St
Peter s Church Hours are T ues
day. Wednesday and Thursday
from 10 a m to 12 noon The new
telephone number is 7S8 6133
RENT A LANE
Every Saturaa do: icr less at
Mendenhan ECU students and
MendenhaH S'udent Center
members can do; any time each
Saturday between 12 noon and 6
p m tor one hour �or or.i, $3 00 per
lane Use the t,me to improve your
game and have some tu" You
really can t beat the price sc don't
miss it!
CSO
The Center for Student Oppor
(unities 'CSO School of
Medicine, is currently seek.nq
highly qualified undergraduate
and graduate students 'o work
part time as tutors interested
students with expertise in either
chemistry, anatomy, physiology,
biology, math, physics. English or
SLAP are encouraged to apply
Other academic areas are also
considered Compel ve wage-
Contact Dr Frye. Center tor Stu
dent Opportunities. 217 Wh,chard
Annex, or can or an appointment
at 757 6122.6075 6081
SIGMA GAMMA RHO
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority,
Inc will be having a party,
September 18, 1981 from 10 p m.
until at the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center Come on. Party
with Sigma Gamma Rho
P.E. MAJORS
Ail studens who plan to declare
physical education as a major dur
mg change of maior week for the
fall semester should report to
Mmges Coliseum at 1 p m. on
Wednesday. September 30 for a
motor and physical fitness test
Satisfactory performance on this
test is required as a prerequisite
for official admittance to the
pysical education maior program
More detailed information cover
ing the test is available by calling
7S7 6442
SPECIAL SEMINAR
The Committee on Medieval and
Renaissance Studies is pleased to
announce the topic for its Spring
Semester 1982 seminar ASMR
5000 The Theme of Death An In
terdisc ipimary Approach to Life m
the Middle Ages and the
Renaissance (Thursday even
-gs, 6 30 9 30! Students in all
programs are invited to consider
pre registering for this exciting
seminar For further information
about the seminar and or about
'he Medieval Renaissance Studies
Minor contact program coor
dinator and seminar instructor
Dr McMillan. Austin 315 seminar
d.rec'or Dr Daugherty Jenkins
1334 or seminar instructor Dr
Bassman Brewster A 424
GMAT
res' .GMAT wvill be offered on
three Saturday mornings (October
24, 1981 and January 23. and
March 20. 1982) and on Wednesday
evenina (June 23. 1982) The
Wednesday evening test in June is
�he only test scheduled tor the
summer
The GMAT is a test designed 'o
provide one pred'Ctor of academic
performance m graduate manage
menl school Scores are currently
used by abou' 710 qraduate schools
of management in the United
States ano abroad
GMAT registration materials
are avaiable locally from the
Testing Center in Speight 105 or by
a' 'ng to GMAT. Educational
Test ng Service Bos 966.
Prmcefon NJ 08541
The GMAT fee tor candidates
registered at pubhehed domestic
test centers is J27
JEWISH STUDENTS
You art cordially invited to ECU
Hitlers tint get together On
Thursday, Sept 17, at 6 30, come
and participate in a free hot dog
supper. This will be held at the
synagogue, 1430 E 14th street We
will gladly provide transportation
Don't hesitate to call. For rides or
more information, call Jerry at
752 5942, or Dr Resmck at
756 6640
COLLEGE BOWL
Test out your knowledge in the
varsity sport of the mindThe Col
lege Bowl competition will be held
October 11 13 in MendenhaH.
Teams are forming now Applica
fions art available in MendenhaH
You must have five players and a
coach
BILLIARDS LEAGUE
Interested in joining a billiards
league! All billiard players, men
and women, who are interested in
forming a league to meet weekly.
may sign up at the MendenhaH
Billiards Center. An organize
tional meeting will be held Toes
day. September 15 at 7 00 pm in
the Billiards Center.
League scores will be handicap
ped so persons with various levels
of ability can compete equally
Trophies will be awarded in
several divisions.
PILGRIMAGE
A gathering of young adults will
engage in a pilgrimage in New
York City led by Brother Roger
from Taize, France. The theme
will be "Suffering and Hope
Anyone interested must register
by September 30 Details are
vailable from campus ministers or
by calling 758 2030
PRE PHYSICAL
THERAPY
Deadline for 1983 admission to
professional phase is October 14.
1981 AH general college and
physical therapy credits must be
completed by end of Spring 1982
Allied Health Professions Admis
sions Test must be taken in
November. Application and inter
view appointments are to be made
by September 24, 1981 m depart
mental office (Room 308. Belk
Building, 757 4961 ext 231).
GAY?
Or love someone who is? We're
forming a Gay Support Group in
Greenville and we need your in
put For all those interested in
helping out, there will be a short
meeting at 5 p m , Sept 22 in the
Newman House on 10th St For
directions or more information
call 752 4216
FOREIGN SERVICE
EXAMINATION
Application forms art now
available in the Career Planning
and Placement Office for the
Foreign Service Examination
Registration forms should be
received by the Educational
Testing Service before October 23.
mi. v
P.E. MAJORS
Are you interested in educating
your peers? meeting malors from
other schools? or having a great
time? The P E Majors' student
convention will be held October 2
and 3 at Western Carolina Univer
sity. It is a great opportunity tor
all majors An orgamzaionai
meeting for ECU majors will be
held m Mmges Sept 23 at 7 30 pm
Get together with fellow maiors
and choose a topic you would like
to present
PACE
The filing period for the Profes
sional and Administrative Creer
Examination (PACE) is from
September 14 through October 13
Information is available in the
Career Planning and Placement
Office A sufficient score on PACE
is necessary to qualify for many
entry level Federal Government
positions
OF .
GREENVILLE
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
SPECIAL
12 PRICE
INTRODUCTORY OFFER
Applications are now
being accepted.
HH FRI. IT IS FREE
FOR THE LADIES �
Ki
s
LADIES' DON'T FORGET EVERY MONDAY
IS SADIE HAWKINS DAY. TWO FOR ONE.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta PHi will hold a
meeting on Thursday Sept 17
This meeting will be a 6 p m in
MendenhaH 221 Proiects and
state convention ma'iers will be
discussed All members are urged
to attend
HANDICAPPED
FUNDING
The Association for Retarded
C I :� ns p " County and the
Department of Special Education
REAP School of Education of
East Carolina University present
Dr Anne Wolfe, deputy director of
Mental Retardation Services and
N C Department of Human
Resources, and Mr Lowell Harris.
Assistant Director of N C Depart
ment of Public instruction, Excep
tional Children s Division, ad
dressing the topic Expected Im
pac' ot Current Funding Problems
on Services for Handicapped
Citizens on Thursday September
17 1981 ji 1pm at the Willis
Building. First and Reade Streets
Greenville N C
GATEMOUTH
BROWN
Sunday,
Sept. 20th
Doors open 8:30
"GATE has tire! The stamp 'Gaiemouth' left on other Texas musicians such as
Albert Collins, Johnny 'Guitar' Watson, Guitar Slim, Goree Carter, and Larl
Gilliam. and the reverence with which his act is talked about, bears this out.
Fven rexk artists like Frank Zappa, Roy Buchanan, and Elvm Bishop havegnen
'Gate' credit. Why such a gifted singer, multi-instrumentalist, and entertainer
must remain so anonymous on i't; side of the Atlantic while he is acclaimed on
die other remains a mystery to me Cal Green
I img Blues Magaine
WEEKLY SPECIAL
Stop in for o "special lunch"
NOW!
Save on an
Ex-Long Coney
"My favorite guitar players
are Gatesmouth Brown, Johnny
'Guitar' Watson and Guitar
Slim
Frank Zappa
Interview � Guitar Player
For Ticket
Information:
758-0711
"Gatesmouth Brown is the
original Jimi Hendrix
David Bromberg
Interview � Rolling Stones
Magazine
don't start
Here's a chance to get a terrific deal on your next
Sonic Coney. Just take the coupon below to a par
ticipating Sonic drive in and enioy our delicious
Sonic Coney with chili and mustard You can get
onions or relish, too, if you want. And for a little
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coupon into a Sonic soon for a great deal on a deli
cious Sonic Coney.
SONIC SPECIAL
FOOT LONG CONEY
Regular French Fries
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SONIC
Good Sept. 14 � 20
with coupon
$
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SONIC
MX3")CSMC � -�-��, -� s�Bvto





I 111 I ASIAKOI IMN SFPHMBfcR 17, 1981 3
ON I
!�
�,
kris (.underson (second from left) accepts the first place and best in show awards in the annual Rebel
Art Show. With him are (left to right) Roger Via of Jefferies Beer and Wine, Dr. Thomas Brewer,
lorn ttaines of The Attic and Cathy Crisp, 1980-1981 editor.
Rebel Distributed Today
L
It
B TOM HALL
1 he Rebels are com-
i n g .
Id Mtdgett, last
car's art director for
the campus literary and
mi magaine, says
f.(XX) copies have been
printed and can be
picked up at the
Mendenhall Student
Center information
desk or from the
Jenkins School of Art
office.
Midgett says the
magazine is long over-
due in getting to cam-
pus because of mistakes
made bv the printer.
"The first four color
illustrations were up-
side down Midgett
said. The printing on
other pages was out of
line, he added.
Midgett also express-
ed appreciation to Jef-
frey's Beer and Wine
and The Attic for spon-
soring and providing
cash awards for the an-
nual Rebel art show.
The magaine is
available on a
"first-come, first-
served" basis, Midgett
said.
'BARGAINS!
GET YOUR FAVORITES AT BIG; SAVINGS!
Sponsorship Changes
I he ECU chapter of
Beta 1 ambda, an
g a n i z a t i o n for
isiness, industry and
� i n ess education
dents, has moved
from the School of
Business to the Depart-
n t of Business
1 ducation and Office
Iministration.
According to Dr.
mes i W hue. co-
� � n the ECU
11 i o n, the
tch occurred
luse the organiza-
's objectives have
ime more closely
to business
i and office
.i d m i n i s t r a t i o n
.acn's
W hue. who organs
he local chapter in
and served as state
the national
.i ii for 1 1
.
vears, said the club is
still open to all students
in the School of
Business as well as
those in the new spon-
soring department.
There is no scholastic
average needed to join.
White added.
The ECU chapter
sponsors business sym-
posiums, civic ac-
tivities, tours of
businesses and in-
dustries and guest
speakers, according to
White.
Phi Beta Lambda is
sponsored by the Na-
tional Business Educa-
tion Association. Dr.
Frances Daniels aUo
acts as advisor to the
local group. The first
meeting of the semester
will be at 4 p.m. on
September 23 in 130
Rawl.
Full lm� ot
hardbacks, paperbacks
& magazines Local
A out of town
newspapers
Greeting Cards
For All
Occasions!
Books, Books
& More
BOOKS
BOTH STORESOPEN ALL DAY
7 DAYS A WEEK
CENTRAL NEWS &
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East Carolina University Greenville, N.C. 27834
Carolina Recording Artists
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For Information on Engagements, Prices, & Availability
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Ax
(Eire iEaat Ear0ltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. �mmcm
Jimmy DuPREE, ummttmmam
Chuck Foster, �nm, ILrir v Charles Chandler, spomEdno,
Chris Lichok, iwm ti m Tom Hall ������-
Alison Bartel. Produce nth mi Steve Bachner. ������,���� ���
Sieve Moore, h nitirfmi.fmt.ur Karen Wendt. sivhtdno.
September 17, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Responsibility
UNC Newspaper Misses The Mark
Espionage. The Spy Who
Loved East Carolina.
Or maybe "You, too, can
learn law and become a major
college football coach in just a
few days Contact EZ
Methods Incorporated in
Greenville
This is the way The Daily Tar
Heel opened an editorial which ap-
peared in the Friday, Sept. 11 edi-
tion of the UNC newspaper.
Granted, the editorial page is the
proper place to voice responsible
opinions. But again, we feel the
need to place the emphasis on
responsible.
The school of journalism at
UNC-Chapel Hill is one of the most
respected in the nation, with many
top network and wire service
reporters to its credit. Wit and sar-
casm are often key elements of
editorials, but it would appear
assininity and childish humor are
admirable qualities to The Daily Tar
HeePs staff. An example of their
"humor" follows.
If you need to go to the pot-
tie vou have to raise your hand
first.
True, this paragraph has been
taken out of context, but it makes
no more sense when read as it was
published. What was running
through the mind of the author
when it was written remains a
mystery.
The Daily Tar Heel's account of
the supposed spy incident is biased,
as any editorial should be.
The setting is the UNC Law
Library, Wednesday after-
noon. A bald-headed man and
his young assistant, two
suspicious-looking chaps in-
deed, were intent on scoping
through the large windows, by
jove!
The two trench-coaters were
identified as East Carolina
coaches. Appalling � you'd
think they wanted to win the
game on Saturday or
something, you'd think it was
the last time the two teams
would meet or something.
"I told him he could stay in
the library as long as he was us-
ing the materials, " the Dean of
the UNC Law School said.
They're free to believe anything
they desire. Editorials are opinions;
the First Amendment will protect
their right to say anything on that
page.
But when the lead news story on
the front page begins: "It's not
enough that they spy on our team.
Now they've stolen our ram it's
difficult understand what they inter-
pret as libel.
Their "judge, jury and execu-
tioner" approach to journalism is
frightening, to say the least. The
basic tenant of "innocent until pro-
ven guilty" seems to have been
abandoned in the haste to embar-
rass East Carolina.
It would be interesting if The Dai-
ly Tar Heel was challenged in court
to defend the objectivity of their
reporter.
True, this is probably a petty mat-
ter to argue. Nonetheless, the im-
plications of this are serious. Every
time a newspaper reporter sits down
to a typewriter (or computer ter-
minal) he must be free of prejudices
and affiliations, unless it is a per-
sonal opinion column or editorial.
The reporter in question obvious-
ly let his affiliations overcome the
paramount need for objectivity.
The UNC-ECU rivalry was many
things to many people. Memories of
Pirate victory and near misses will
undoubtedly be clouded by the
pounding ECU suffered in Kenan
Stadium Saturday.
The temptation is great to end
this editorial the way The Daily Tar
Heel ended their's:
So there.
NaNaNaNa.
aa.
.Naaaaaaaa-
But then, we would be showing
no more maturity than they did.
Inter-Media
Communication
"Is a pair of legs worth $5,900?"
That's the question a WNCT-TV
reporter posed to Buccaneer editor
Amy Pickett Wednesday after
reading The East Carolinian's ac-
count of the decision to change the
cover of the 1981 yearbook.
Her answer was the same as our's
(and most everyone else who has
seen the cover) � an emphatic
YES
DOONESBURY
"U& m ccwifcTO me vmm, 6oo-b& work on why spm-irasT groups.
m wros w k vimm� urns� mt praam mm mema
Kaddafi Leading Libya To Disaster
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
A madman is loose on the Shores of
Tripoli.
This is not the plot of some low-budget
fright film but a reality, for the
"madman" is Libyan leader Muammar
Kaddafi, a man whose reign of terror has
become a threat to world-wide peace.
The United States realized how
dangerous the Libyan strongman is when
two Soviet-built Libyan fighter-bombers
maneuvered for a fight and fired missiles
during a U.S. military exercise three weeks
ago. Fortunately, two U.S. F-14 Tomcats
(planes) blew the the enemy out of the sky.
Kaddafi has steered his country on a col-
lision course with the United States since
he seized power 12 years ago. Libya has
been armed by the Soviet Union, Kaddafi
has poured troops into cental Africa and
allowed the burning of the U.S. Embassy
in Tripoli.
Most of Kaddafi's acts of terror have
been financed by the United States since
Libya is this country's third-largest
overseas oil supplier. One possible solution
to stopping some of Kaddafi's terror cam-
paigns, or at least the financial backing of
these deeds, would be for the United States
to look elsewhere for the bulk of its oil.
but squabbles with other countries have
nullified this idea.
This leaves but one solution: the CIA
must be unleashed.
According to a national news publica-
tion, a plan has been formed by the CIA to
overthrow Kaddafi, but this has a
drawback in that the Libyan leader still has
a firm grip on power within the country.
Most of his support lies among young
Muslim fundamentalists, thus disallowing
the CIA to construct a substantial political
counterforce. This plan is being cautiously
discussed in Washington because the
Reagan Administration vividly remembers
the Kennedy attempt to overthrow Fidel
Castro turned into a fiasco.
The Reagan Administration must recruit
trustworthy agenets who are at odds with
Kaddafi from within Libya. Kaddafi must
be overthrown before he starts an interna-
tional crisis, which he threatened to do last
week by attacking U.S. nuclear sites in
Europe if the U.S. remained "aggressive"
toward Libyan interests.
If Kaddafi carries out his threat, the
final outcome would produce more gore
than any fright film director could ever im-
agine.
(William Yelverton, a senior English ma-
jor, is assistant sports editor of The East
Carolinian.)
r Campus Forum
Cartoon, Column Not Helpful?
by Garry Trudeau
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For the second week in a row, The
East Carolinian has mnaged to print an
editorial cartoon that is in bad taste.
This is in reference to the cartoon in the
Sept. 15 edition concerning both Dr.
Brewer and Coach Ed Emory.
By being managers of the East
Carolina football team, we have worked
with and gotten to know Coach Emory.
We also feel tht we are a part of the team
and should therefore defend our head
coach. In the cartoon, we are faced with
the fact that East Carolina got beat by
Carolina. We all had trouble accepting
this defeat, but the Carolina game is a
single game. The week before Coach
Emory opened the season with an im-
pressive 42-6 victory. But did we see any
cartoon about the victory? No! We
think the cartoonist and maybe even The
East Carolinian has the old attitude that
if the Pirates win it's "We Won" but
when the Pirates lose it's "They lost
This type of editorial criticism only
dwells on the faults of the individual.
The East Carolinian should help the stu-
dent body rally behind the Pirates in
order that we may bounce back from
this single loss and look forward to a vic-
torious season under Coach Emory. We
are also convinced that the newspaper
should apologize to both Coach Emory
and Dr. Brewer.
MIKE MYERS
TODD CREEKMORE
CHARLES JUSTICE
TRACY GIBBS
WARREN BROOKINS
ECU Football Managers
Support Needed
I call this a letter to the students and
football team because I believe this
message needs to be heard by them. We
all can agree that there is no more that
can be or needs to be said concerning the
Carolina game. What needs to be said
concerns student attitude.
I've been a Pirate fan going on seven
years now, having gone here for both
undergraduate and graduate study, and
I have always been upset over the fair-
weather-fun attitude of our student
body. As long as we win, we're happy,
but when we lose, all that can be done is
for many to criticize and denounce our
squad for it's poor performance. Don't
you realize that our support is needed all
the time and not just on a winning note?
If you want to say anything about ACC
schools, just look at what their constant
support for their teams has done for
them.
If we expect to compete with the best
and desire a strong football program, its
not going to come just from whether or
not we get the best recruits or coaches
but from strong student and alumni sup-
port that is needed both physically and
mentally. Mr. Chandler calls us a
laughingstock and claims we're looked
down upon by every football fan in the
state. Well, I'm a football fan here in
this state and I be damned if I look down
on the Pirates. If you cut me, I'll bleed
purple just like a Carolina fan would
bleed blue.
I say it's high time you get off this
pessimistic trip so many of you are on
and show those guys on the foootball
field just where your faith is. They work
hard, those coaches and players do, just
to try and please us every football Satur-
day. Let's knock off these slurring com-
ments and sarcastic notes and pump
some verbal life into a little respect and
appreciation for our Pirate Pride.
I il always stay a Pirate fan and be
proud of the fact that 1 chose ECU just
as so many others did, and I also feel
that our coaches and players arc proud
to be a part of the Pirate football squad.
I salute our team for their hard work
and dedication. I'd just like to say to
you fellows that no matter what the cir-
cumstances, whether winning or losing;
you keep your head high, your pride
firm; you congratulate the winner and
praise the loser, and just when you think
you've given it all, reach back and go
one step farther cause You ECU fans,
like me, who desire that football you
wish to be proud of, think about what I
said. After all, someone in Chapel Hill
stole my ECU: Pirate Country sticker.
He saw a good thing and realized it, then
took it.
RANDY ZIGLAR
Graduate Business
Laughingstock?
I would like to comment on the sports
editorial which appeared in Tuesday's
(Sept. 15) The East Carolinian. 1 can't
believe this kind of article would be writ-
ten after Saturday's game against UNC.
Fans are supposed to support their team
whether they win or lose. True, a 56-0
loss is a terrible one. But I think the
team deserves better than to be called a
"laughingstock
Mr. Chandler seems to think that he
has the right to judge every player on the
team when he said "the Pirates failed
one test of character. . I really don't
think it's his job to decide who has
character and who doesn't. The team
suffered a big blow in that game. 1
believe they are a better team than the
score shows. That was proven in their
game against Western Carolina.
A lot of things obviously went wrong
in Carpel Hill. But one can't blame just
the team members when their own coach
admitted he thought the game was over
before halftime. It's too late to place
blame now, though. What the football
team needs is a little understanding; the
ECU spectators weren't the only ones
who were embarassed.
ECU has nine games left to play this
season. How about a little encourage-
ment, Mr. Chandler? How about saying
something like "Ok, the loss to UNC
was a bad one, but you've still got plenty
of chances to prove what a good team
you are. Play your best against State and
all your other opponents. The fans are
behind you? I think that would sound
better and help the team more than your
closing remarks! "Everyone wants to
know if the Pirates have the heart to
bounce back or if they are indeed, a
laughingstock No one can deal with
an ultimatum like that - if you win,
great! You've got heart. If you lose,
sorry guys, you're a laughingstock. That
attitude stinks. The Pirates have plenty
of heart. 1 think they'll do their best
against State. That's all Mr. Chandler or
anyone else should ask of them.
KATY STONE
Junior, English
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
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! HI A 1 CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1981
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O'Connor A Vote Away From Justiceship
WASHINGTON
(UP1) � Sandra Day
O'Connor � who op-
poses school busing,
favors capital punish-
ment and views abor-
tion as personally
"repugnant - is one
vote and an oath away
from becoming the
Supreme Court's first
woman justice.
The Senate Judiciary
Committee Tuesday
approved Mrs.
O'Connor for confir-
mation, sending Presi-
dent Reagan's nomina-
tion of the 51-year-old
conservative to the full
Senate.
Confirmation seems
certain and a vote is ex-
pected Monday. She is
likely to be sworn in
before Oct. 5, the day
the Supreme Court
reconvenes from its
summer recess.
"I am very pleased
the committee was able
to reach a conclusion
Mrs. O'Connor said
after the vote.
David Gergen, White
House director of com-
munications, said
Reagan was
"delighted" and "is
looking forward to a
strong vote in the
Senate" to confirm her
nomination.
The committee vote
was 17-0 with Sen.
Jeremiah Denton,
RAla voting
"present" instead of
"aye
Denton said he was
unsatisfied that Mrs.
O'Connor's declared
personal opposition to
abortion will be
reflected in her future
judicial decisions.
Mrs. O'Connor was
not forced to answer
how she will decide
court cases because do-
ing so might disqualify
her from acting on
them.
During a three-day
hearing last week, Mr?
O'Connor said she
would not have an
abortion, but could not
condemn those who do.
And she said,
although abortion is
personally
"repugnant" to her,
she could not oppose it
in certain instances,
such as when the life of
the mother is en-
dangered. "For myself,
it (abortion) is simply
offensive she said.
"It is repugnant. It is
something in which I
would not engage
In her testimony,
which touched on a
wide variety of issues,
Mrs. O'Connor also
said she favors capital
punishment as a deter-
rent to crime and per-
sonally opposes busing,
saying it is too disrup-
tive to students.
Chairman Strom
Thurmond, R-S.C,
said his committee's
hearing showed the
Arizona state appeals
court judge has
"integrity, ability and
compassion � all the
qualities a judge
needs
Sen. John East,
R-N.C, said Mrs.
O'Connor's responses
in favor of the death
penalty and preventive
detention and against
compulsory school bus-
ing indicate she will
help turn the Supreme
Court toward more
conservative directions.
Sen. Barry
Goldwater, RAriz
was dismayed by the
commotion the abor-
tion issue stirred at the
confirmation hearing.
"The abortion issue
has nothing to do with
being conservative or
liberal he said. "No
single issue ever should
decide the fitness of a
Supreme Court
justice
The East Carolinian
needs staff writers. Call
757-6309, 757-6376 or
757-6377 today!
Alleged Nazi Aide Prosecuted
WEST PALM
BEACH, Fla. (UPI) -
A University of Ver-
mont historian has
testified Jews in the
a i ea of occupied
Poland where a Fort
1 auderdale hotelkeeper
is accused of aiding the
Nazis during World
V ar 11 "had some inkl-
ing" they were doom-
ed.
Dr. Raul Hilberg was
the first government
witness at a federal
court proceeding aimed
at revoking the U.S
citizenship of Bohdan
Koziy, 58. on the
ground that he lied to
immigration officials
about his past when he
came to this country in
1959
Hilberg's testimony
was videotaped and
played Monday to the
non-jury trial in the
courtroom of U.S.
District Judge James C.
Paine. The government
did not make any im-
mediate link between
Hilberg's disclosures
and the alleged ac-
tivities of Koziy, whom
federal prosecutors said
killed as many as 10
Jews while assisting the
Nazis.
Under questioning
by Justice Department
Prosecutor Kathleen
Coleman, Hilberg said
in most areas of oc-
cupied Europe, Jews
rounded up for
transport by the Nazis
were unaware they were
headed for death
camps. They thought
they were being resettl-
ed and the evacuation
of the ghettoes went
smoothly.
But he said in the
Stanislau area of
Poland where Koziy
lived "the Jews had
some inkling of what
was going on, that it
wasn't a genuine reset-
tlement
Hilberg said to get
the Jews out of the
Stanislau ghettoes,
"they would be driven
by force, so there
would be no trouble
with recalcitrants
He said the Stanislau
area was unique in
another respect; its
Nazi death camp,
Belzec, described bv
Hilberg as "a pure kill-
ing center
Hilberg said most
Nazi death camps kept
some able bodied Jews
alive to perform menial
chores around the
camp, but not Belzec.
"The life expectancy of
someone going there
was very short He
estimated a new arrival
at Belzec had no more
than three hours to live.
He said from half a
million to 600,000 per-
sons lost their lives at
Belzec.
Hilberg said mass
killings of Jews began
in the Stanislau region
in October, 1941,
when, according to
witnesses from 8,000 to
12,000 persons were
shot. Killings continued
to the beginning of
1943.
Among those
slaughtered, he said,
were members of the
Jewish police force
established by the Nazis
inside the Stanislau
ghetto. Witnesses
reported seeing Jewish
police hanging from
trees and light posts in
June and August of
1942.
Prosecutor Michael
Wolf of the Justice
Department said in an
opening statement
Monday Ukranian
underground group
willingly helped the
Germans herd Polish
Jews into ghettoes
where they were beaten
and killed.
Wolf said the
government would pro-
duce evidence about
one case in which
Koziy. serving as a
policeman, arrested a
young Polish girl who
had been hiding a
Jewish baby. He then
beat the girl and killed
the child in the cour-
tyard of a police sta-
tion. "The defendant
dragged the child over
to a wall, took out his
pistol and shot her
said Wolf.
Koziy' s attorney,
Philip Carlton, said the
charges are "simply not
true He said his client
came to the U.S. "and
worked as a
dishwasher, a gas sta-
tion attendant and has
occupied his time with
good decent living all
these 32 years
Carlton said Koziy is
"being slanderized
In the packed cour-
troom on the first day
of the trial were
members of two South
Florida Jewish
organizations and a
Ukranian cultural
organization.
ABORTION
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ECU-N.C. STATE
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BEFORE
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GAME
T





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1981
A
A mericans Marked By Terrorists,
According To German Official
HEIDELBERG,
West Germany (UPI)
� The West German
interior minister said
today terrorists have
marked Americans as
their main targets and
security officials expect
the ambush of the
commander-in-chief of
the U.S. Army in
Europe to be followed
by more attacks.
Gen. Frederick J.
Kroesen, his wife, aide
and German driver nar-
rowly escaped death
Tuesday morning when
terrorists attacked the
general's armor-plated
car with a Soviet-made
anti-tank grenade and
small-arms fire.
The general had been
given the armored car
and a special German
police driver when
security officials learn-
ed people with terrorist
ties were watching the
general's movements.
Interior Minister
Gerhart Baum said in
an interview in the Bild
Zeitung newspaper to-
day the target of Ger-
man terrorists have
now become mainly
Americans and
American installations.
His statement was
believed to reflect inter-
nal reports of West
German intelligence
that the Red Army Fac-
tion, the main German
terrorist band, is plann-
ing new attacks on
Americans.
"I don't know who is
responsible a relaxed
Kroesen told a news
conference after the at-
tack. "1 do know
there's a group that has
declared war on us and
I'm beginning to
believe them They
are making the job less
than fun
He referred to the
Red Army Faction,
which still exists
although its founders,
Andreas Baader and
Ulrike Meinhof are
dead. Mrs. Meinhof
killed herself in a Stut-
tgart prison in 1976 and
Baader committed
suicide a year later in
the same top-security
prison.
Police said if the
badly damaged
Mercedez-Benz of the
58-year-old U.S. Euro-
pean Army commander
had not been armored
it would have been
almost totally
destroyed. The general
and his wife were cut by
flying glass.
The terrorists carried
out their carefully
prepared plot at 7.20
a.m. as the general's
car stopped for a traffic
light on its customary
15-minute route from
his suburban home to
his headquarters in
Heidelberg.
The West German
federal prosecutor's
Office said its
preliminary investiga-
tion showed at least one
Russian-made anti-
tank grenade was fired
from about 200 yards
away in a wooded slope
on the edge of
Heidelberg.
Yearbook Dedicated To Jesus
HOUSTON
(UPD�Parents and
school officials are con-
cerned because the
dedication of the Strat-
ford Senior High
School yearbook to
Jesus Christ violates
the doctrine of separa-
tion of church and
state.
The dedication in the
front of the 272-page
book reads in part:
"To Jesus Christ who
calls all Spartans
(school nickname) to
take a closer look at
their lives. Through His
insight and encourage-
ment, the contents of
this book fell together
"If you confess Jesus
as Lord, and believe in
your heart that God
raised Him from the
dead, you shall be sav-
ed
"It's really a good
book, except for the
dedication said Dale
Stafford, principal of
the school in the subur-
ban Spring Branch In-
dependent School
District.
The dedication was
written bv a student
and accepted by the
staff yearbook adviser,
Brenda Sandino. Staf-
ford said Tuesday Ms.
Sandino now realizes
her mistake.
"They're using
school monies. Clearly,
it's about as severe a
manifestation of insen-
sibility I've seen come
out of school
Mitchell's Hair Styling
Special for all Students
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5.00
special price
Offer expires Sept. 19
Located at
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756-2950
or
756-4042
1
CAROLINA EAST
GOES WEST-ERN
SEPTEMBER 18 & 19
?Carolina Records Recording Aritist,
Nicky Harris Band � Friday 7:00-9:00 p.m.
?Carolina Opry House presents The North
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SPYRO GYRA
Morning Dance
inducing
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Various
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J YcIIMMY BUFFETT u had to be there TJBr 1 W III
u
Mwthrtfltl
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Opfe RECORDS & TAPES m �P
Record Bar
Pitt Plaza Carolina East Mall
MCA
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at
THE EAST CAROl INIAN
Style.
SEPTEMBER It. 1981
Page 7
Concert Tonight
ECU Will Rock And
Roll With Blackfoot
Ticket sales for tonight's
Blackfoot. Johnn Van Zant and
Def L eppard concert have been
lower than predicted according to
Major Attractions Chairperson
Charles Sune.
Sune, who had predicted a sell-
out concert, revealed yesterday that
only an estimated 3,200 tickets had
been sold.
"It's not a sell-out, but then you
can't have sell-outs every time
said Sune. "We're not losing
money, but we're not going to have
a sell-out
Sune sttessed that the lower ticket
sales did not mean that the concert
would lose money. He also said that
he still expects a big crowd for the
show and cited a large amount of
local ticket sales as the reason.
Tickets will be sold to students at
the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center until 6
p.m. today, two hours before the
show at the price of $6. Tickets will
also be sold at the door at a price of
38 per ticket for all buyers.
Sune said that the student
response to the concert was
"unfortuante because we give the
students every possible break" (in
allowing them to purchase tickets).
Sune was uncertain why the
response was lower than expected,
but said that they would know
tonight.
Blackfoot will be available for
autographs and questions today at 4
p.m. at the Carolina East Mall
Record Bar. The "in-store" is being
sponsored bv Record Bar and the
ECU Student Union Major Attrac-
tions Committee.
The concert marks the only area
and clubs across the nation to
become a true music phenomenon.
Guitaristvocalist Ricky
Medlocke, drummer Jakson Spires,
bassist Greg T. Walker, and
guitarist Charlie Hargrett are four
musicians whp believe in the time
honored doctrine of high-voltage
rock'n'roll.
The Blackfoot story began in
Jacksonville. Fla one of the hottest
rock breeding grounds in the coun-
try. Since the late '60's, the tiny
clubs that dot the Jacksonville land-
scape have spawned an impressive
list of rock supergroups: The
Allman Bros. Band, Lynyrd
Skynyrd, Molly Hatchet, .38 Special
and Blackfoot.
"1 think on 'Strikes' (their second
appearance for the three bands who album) we proved that we weren't
just any southern band says
Medlocke. "Sure we're from the
South, and we're proud of it. but we
never believed in letting our heritage
See VAN ZANT, Page 10
are touring extensively to promote
new LPs.
Blackfoot hails from Jackson-
ville, Fla. and has emerged from
over a decade of dues-paying in bars
Ph.Mo H (.AK P4TII-RSOK
The Student Union will be selling tickets in front of the Student Store again today. Tickets are $6 for students
up until 6 p.m. at the Central Ticket Office.
aiso oe soia ai inc uuui ii a. puu wi -�-� - �r � - � - aT Y �
Daytime Dramas Have Impressive Following
B KAREN WENDT
si.k Mllor
Mike's daughter Hone has decid-
ed to reconcile with Alan and
forgive him for his affair with her
uncle's wife Rita. Ed (Rita's hus-
band) is carrying on with Vanessa
who is searching for something to
blackmail Alan and Diane.
Vanessa's father is fighting Diane's
blackmail with the information
about his illegitmate son. Jackie is
so terrified that her husband Justin
will find out that Alan's son Phillip
is really she and Justin's son that she
has sought psychiatric help. Morgan
and Kelly are happily married and
fmdtng a new life together despite
Nola's attempts to get Kelly to
marry her and be the father of her
child which Floyd fathered.
Morgan's half-sister has reverted
back to her childhood and plays
with dolls all day after the loss of
her baby asnd her husband. Andy
has gone on trial for blackmail and
been convicted and everyone hopes
that he will get the psychiatric help
that he needs. Rita is missing. Holly
is in Paris and Roger is still dead
(Roger has been reported dead at
least three times and there is still
some scepticism that he is really
dead.)
If this scenario does not sound
familar then you are not one of the
many people on this campus, and in
this country who regularly watch
daytime serials or "Soaps (The
above comes from CBS'a The
Guiding Light).The basic theme is
an ongoing program dealing with
the lives of a certain group of people
from the same town (Oakdale. Spr-
ingfield, Monticello, Henderson,
Bay City, Rose Hill) and about their
day to day lives, loves and lusts.
The addiction is vast and it is
growing. This week there were a
sudden surge of whispers in the in-
firmiry when a girl came in and
changed from CBS's The Guiding
Light to ABC's General Hospital.
"I mean she didn't even ask said
one neaby student.
The rivalry for tlcvisions is pre-
sent in the dorms also, a student will
try to get the television first so that
he or she can watch their own
favorite network of soaps
throughout the afternoon. Students
schedule classes so that they will
have free time when their favorite
show is on. The shows are discussed
often and the v ewers are expected to
know many intricate variations on
each characters psyche.
Soaps began in radio, before
television was even born. The took
their names from their sponsors, a
variety of soap companies including
Oxydol. Bab-O, Old Dutch
Cleanser, Spic and Span and Rinso.
The first soap is generally thought
to have bee� The, Smjlh family
Weekend Flicks
Western And Rock Late Shows
This Thursday night at 7 p.m. and
this Friday and Saturday nights at 5,
7, and 9 p.m the Student Union
Films Committee will present the
rousing Western saga The I ong
Riders.
Also this weekend. The Who are
the subject of the vibrant rock-
chronology The Kids Are Alright.
The film will be shown as a special
late show this Friday and Saturday
nights at 11 p.m.
The Kids Are Alright chronicles
one of rock's most creative bands,
The Who, in what is much more
than just a film for their fans; it is a
ipcrbly edited documentary that
reveals a changing vouth culture
acutely perceived and forcefully
reflected bv The Who's music. Band
members Roger Daltrey, John Ent-
wistle, Peter Townshend and Keith
Moon are captured together in rare
and electrifying concert perfor-
mances (including the late Keith
Moon's last performance with the
group while performing for the
album Who le You), as well as in
creative and revealinglv somber
moods that are disarming, honest
and engaging. There is a penetrating
energy, even after 15 years:
"It offers thrills, spills and laughs
in sufficient abundance to qualify as
essential viewing for everyone. The
Who was arguably the most thrilling
live rock art of the '60s. They were
verv nearly frightening. Indeed,
they were positively liberating. Ex-
tramusical pleasures abound as well,
so numerous are its moments of
high hilarity. There are sad
moments to be sure. There's a thrill-
ing montage of show-ending guitar-
smashing towards the end. The Who
is amazing to watch, each player's
gestures juxtaposed with those of
his accomplice. It's nearly impossi-
ble to believe that anyone who has
ever loved The Who won't love The
Kids Are Alright, a film which sue-
Will Appear
ceeds remarkably in reminding us of wav-
Roger Daltrey stars in "The Kids Are Alright" this weekends late show.
the unsurpassed glory that has been
The Who for a decade and a half
� John Mendelsohn, Los Angeles
Times
"The Who are one of the most en-
during and inventive rock bands;
their history is one of rock's great
legends. The film contains some
fascinating footage. Mr. Stein has
managed to tackle his very in-
teresting subject with diligence and
intensity. He has done very, very
well. The wit and antagonism of the
British group's members, their her-
culean efforts to make themselves
glamorous, the thinking man's
ecstasy that animates their music
and the harrowing cost of a commit-
ment to rock a.d roll when one is
well into adulthood � these are all
ingredients. Mr. Stein addresses
himself to the group's fans. His film
contains wonderfully obscure and
diverse footage of the group. Keith
Moon is so intent on playfully
upstaging the group's more somber
guitarist, Peter Townshend, that he
winds up ripping Mr. Townshend's
sleeve off.
"Mr. Moon was a brilliant drum-
mer and one of rock's most incor-
rigible clowns. Their music doesn't
seem dated. The best concert
numbers here are 'Baba O'Riley'
and 'Won't Get Fooled Again The
band keeps the film interesting. Mr.
Townshend is an innovative musi-
cian, and in interviews he has always
sounded like a very thoughtful
man
� Janet Maslin, New York Times
"The film begins, for the
uninitiated, with some long clips
from the group's appearance on The
Smothers Brothers Show. The
visuals are crisp . . . and The Who
wear well through the years. John
Entwistle and Keith Moon are en-
thusiastic practitioners of the put-
down and absurdist interview with
media types. The reportage format,
like a newsreel through the years,
befits their status as one of the
longest intact major rock groups.
Yes, the kids are alright
� Andrew Sarris, Village Voice
See FILMS, Page 9
which first aired in 1925. The show
was different from those of today
because it was a comedy. It was
followed by such programs as Amos
and Andy, The Goldbergs and
Clara, Lee 'n' Em. The dialogue in a
show at that time went about like
this:
BILL: 1 love you, Rosemary, the
way�the way a man loves life-the
way he feels when he's on a bat-
tlefield and men are dead all around
him and he's unhurt and takes great
gulps of air into his lungs and sobs
"I'm alivethat's how I love
you�
ROSEMARY: Oh Bill-
BILL. 1 love you the way a man
loveslovcs his home, and the sky at
night full of stars, and a fire on the
hearth-the way he loves the ocean
and the way he loves mountains and
the way he loves litle quiet places
under the trees-
ROSEMARY: BillBill!
BILL: My darlingmy lovemy
precious
(Sound of Kiss)
ROSEMARY: 1 love you that
too. Bill-it doesn't make
sense. I haven't known you long. 1
don't know what you're really like,
but I love you-with-with all I've
got to love a man with-all of me
every ounce.
The above was written by Elaine
Carnngton, a prolific writer during
the radio days. According to reports
Carrington was writing 38,000
words each week.
The age of television brought the
demise of radio. With their audience
turning more and more toward that
box with a picture radio began los-
ing its sponsors for the soaps.
Some soaps made the conversion
from radio to television, most
notably The Guiding Light which
even took some characters along
The first televised soap was Big
Sister which aired in 1946 and only
ran one program. High costs killed
this and many other emerging soaps
during this period.
The first successful soaps emerg-
ed in the same year, 1951, Search for
Tomorrow and Love of Life. Both
shows are still running today.
Taoday's soaps are not limited to
daytime television. Two of televi-
sions biggest hits Dallas and Knoll's
Landing are classified by many as
soaps and fill prime time slots.
Then, the question may be asked
just what makes a soap different
that any other television show.
The difference lies in the story
line. On most televison programs a
problems emerges, ts dealt with and
is concluded in the same show; at
kast it is not brought up again. Dur-
ing the next episode of the show the
last episode is not mentioned or
dealt with.
But with a soap the problems that
are being dealt with were in the last
show and will probably be in the
next episode. Shows can go for
years at a time without ever resolv-
ing a problem. Problems can
reemerge when necesary to add a
new twist to a plot. Characters can
emerge or reemerge at any given
moment and even be brought back
to life in some cases. And with the
audience believing it fully and often
getting so involved with them that
the audience feels the problems just
as much as the character is supposed
to.
The soap watchers are a dedicated
bunch too. This article will probably
spark letters asking why their
favorite was not mentioned. If a
character is hurt or ill letters from
fans will often make the decision as
to whether the character will come
out of the coma or die.
Will Lisa remarry Bob? Will
with it (Charita Bauer who plays a
matoronly character on Light was !f�nnm9urderer be f�und?
with the show when it was on radio
and is still with it today.)
soaps go on.
I can answer one of these. Soaps
will go on. And on. And on.
Trivia Quiz Is Back
Variety Shows
Bring Questions
1. What was the name of the
mouse on the Ed Sullivan Show?
2. Who did Jackie Gleason and
Crazv Gugenheim talk to in the bar?
3. What did Carol Burnett do at
the end of each show?
4. What was Sonny and Cher's
theme song?
5. Who was Geraldmes boyfriend
on the Flip Wilson Show?
6. What was the name of the
hillbilly character played by Red
Skelton on his show?
7. And the Western Character?
8. What was Dan Akroyds' new
way of cooking fish on Saturday
Night Live?
9. What was Art Carney's wife's
name on the Honeymooners?
10.Who was the bandleader on
the Jackie Gleason Show?
11 .Who was the Dear Abby type
colunist in American Scene
magazine?
12.What was the name of the ec-
centric Southern lady played by
Carol Burnett?
13.Who were the original Prime
Time Players? (clue: there were
seven)
14.Who is Jane Curtin in love
with?
15.What was the name of the
Soap opera spoof on the Carol
Burnett show?
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8
1 HI lMi -KOl IN1AN
SI PTFMBFR 17, 1981
Money Worries Inspire
Rx( HADHl KKK1N
Everybody iv v orried
a bout m o n c
nowadays. Everything
seems to be getting
higher except
paychecks.
Although many peo-
ple share this problem,
some, like myself, jusl
can't hear the idea ot
holding down more
than one job ai a time.
That doesn't mean
however, that we uist
sk around in out spare
time doing nothing In-
stead we sit around
staring at walls and tr -
me to come up with a
blockbuster scheme
that will make us rich
o v e r n
We're the ones that
clip ads hat say:
HI COMI v-
Mll 1 IONAIRI IN
JUST 5 DAYS. lOR
m ll S, SI ND5 .25
to Fastbuck, M. or.
t R BIG MOM N
BUILDING v I
BOXI S IN YOUR
sp Rl 1 IM1 SEND
ONI N $39
T he last one of those
1 tried didn't work SO
ell. li was a Si; book
now ro
OMB YOl R H MR
FOR Sl'CCl SS
friend of mine
broke through
( hristmas He got
e � � I ianksei
H out the next
ind bought
i Sa -i C laus
suit. For $300, he got
the cap, beard, boots,
outfit, everything but
the reindeer.
That evening he call-
ed everyone he knew
who had kids and made
appointments to visit
their homes at a certain
time before Christmas.
His fee was $10.
He probably would
have made it, poor guy,
hut at his first house,
the kid crawled in his
lap and started chewing
on his beard. Next
thing he knew the kid
was throwing up all
over his $300 outfit. All
the cleaners in town
couldn't get the stains
out.
Situations like that
are not uncommon.
Several of my own
ideas have blown up in
my face.
Our biggest problem,
once we get an idea, is
living to decide if we
should discuss it with
someone. After all. two
heads are better than
one. What worries us
most is that thev might
try to steal the idea.
Just last week. 1 had
a good idea, but some
compelling force was
.aving to me. "Tell so-
meone about it. get
another opinion
After agonizing for
two davs, 1 could fight
the urge no longer. The
next morning 1 ap-
proached my
economics professor
alter class. I knew Dr.
(Irossburger was an
honest man with an
open mind, and 1 was
sure I could count on
him for some sound ad-
vice.
He listened patiently
as 1 described my idea
about opening up a
theater for dogs.l ex-
plained about showing
old Lassie and Rin Tin
Tin movies and a few
Benji flicks, and about
how I planned to sell
boxes of dog biscuits.
He listened intently as 1
described how peopl
smile.
"It's brilliant he
said excitedly.
"Absolutely brilliant.
remarkable idea
He asked me several
questions and then
would take their pets to
the movies and how
dogs could start dating
and walking each other
home. I couldn't
believe it when his face
broke out in a broad
See IDEA, Page 10
I
GANT
Kv

Cv



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Trained Stylists
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Effective r
19 1981
We're at the head of the claaa
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ADVERTISED HEM POLICY
E-arh o these advertised items is required to be eadiiy
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Films Reviewed By Critics
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1981
Continued From Page 7
'The kids Are Alright
will do. No self-
respecting Who fan will
miss seeing it. The
movie vividly illustrates
lust how important the
manic humor of the
late drummer Keith
Moon was to the spirit
of the group; the movie
can be taken as an af-
fectionate memorial for
htm
� Ernest 1 eogrande,
fH York Daily Sews
For yeats the legend
of the Jesse James gang
has been a Hollywod
favorite. Using a
similar story, superior-
action director, Walter
Hill (The Warriors.
Hard Times) has
created the best
Western to appear in
over a decade.
By endowing the
gang with neither virtue
nor evil. Hill brilliantly
sticks to the facts of
history, while giving
the film the look and
feel of sheer western
myth.
He is aided by the
spectacular
cinematography of Ric
Waite and music by Ry
Cooder. The cast of
famous actor-brothers
unifies the film perfect-
ly, Stacy and James
Keach play Frank and
Jesse James. David
Carradine gives the
outstanding perfor-
mance of his career as
Cole Younger, ably
supported by his
brothers Keith and
Robert.
Randy and Dennis
Quaid are the Miller
brothers and Nicholas
and Christopher Guest
are the cowardly Ford
boys. It's the exciting
action that counts
most: the fast gun-play,
the barroom brawls,
the hair-raising
getaways.
"The Long Riders is
part Western, part
American heritage,
part law and disorder,
part adventure, part
and parcel the best
Western to come along
in a long, long time.
The film is about
outlaws, but it's also
about honor among
friends, and about
desperation, about
women waiting, and
about brotherly love.
The Keach brothers are
sensational, so are the
Carradines, so are the
Quaids
� Gene Shalit, NBC
MADRTGal DINNER
,An �iliiabetlan (Eljristmas 3feast!
dtmted bg Charles iRoore
Becember 1-2-3-4-5, 1981, 7:00 p.m.
Jflertrlerthall Student Center iflulti-lurpoBe IRoom
Hast Carolina Mmueraiirj
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AOVANCE TICKETS ONLY
ECU STUDENTS$9 00
PUBLIC$11 00
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A MSC PRODUCTION (jjjjfftg
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Photographer Needed
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Old South Building
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Carolina east man Kgreenvale
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17,1981!
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T





10
1Mb: LAST CAROl INI AN
SLPTLMBLR 17, 1981
A
Van Zant And Def Leppard Tonight
� i . .1. nrnuino th�ir u.T�rth and Ui.l.r
( tntinned From Page 7
dictate the kind of
music we could play
"Strikes" spawned
the smash hits "Train,
Train "Road
Fever and their big-
gest hit, the melodic
and haunting ballad,
"Highway Song
Now with the release
of their latest album,
"Marauder the
newest chapter in the
Black foot story is
about to unfold. With
the MedlockeSpires
song-writing team pro-
ducing ten of their most
dynamic and accessable
songs yet. Black foot
displays a maturity and
artistic polish that only
serve to enhance their
hard-rocking style.
"We worked long
and hard to get this
record just right
stated Medlocke. "1
can honestly say that
it's the best thing we've
ever done. I guess you
could say that with this
album Blackfoot shows
everybody how to
rock'n'roll
Brother of the late
Ronnie, who fronted
Lynyrd Skynyrd, and
Donnie who heads .38
Special, young Johnny
Van Zant inherits his
legendary family's rock
tradition.
Accompanied by the
blistering twin lead
guitars of fellow band
members Eric Leif-
Lundgren and Robbie
Gay, the steadfast bass
of Danny Clausman,
and the propulsive
drumming of youthful
Robbie Morris, Johnny
Van Zant's soulful
vocals are the full-tilt
backing they deserve.
For many years,
Johnny Van Zant
refused to use his own
name for the group
because he didn't want
people to get the wrong
idea. His father and
mother nurtured the
band themselves, as
they did for their other
two sons, giving the
boys a practice house to
get their act together.
And, in addition, Ron-
nie would tell anyone
who would listen that
his kid brother would
one day challenge, if
not surpass, the elder
Van Zant.
With the release of
the group's new album
"Round Two
Johnny Van Zant is out
from under the long
shadow of his famous
family, emerging from
his influences and per-
sonal tragedies to
create a work that
would make those who
have inspired him pro-
ud.
Opening the show
are British heavy metal
artists Def Leppard
who, only two short
years ago, were just a
group of enthusiastic-
kids reenacting a
rock'n'roll fantasy in
their hometown of
Sheffield, England.
This dream, that
every aspiring musician
hopes for, has become
a reality and already
the group is a major
force amongst the cur-
rent crop of heavy
metal acts.
For a band so young
(average age being 20),
their new LP, "High
'N' Dry" demonstrates
that Leppard already
has a great deal of
depth and maturity �
both lyrically and
musically: they have
taken a mighty leap,
proving their worth and
leaving no doubts that
they are a big-league
band.
The band consists of
lead singer Joe Elliot,
lead guitarists Pete
Willis and Steve Clark,
bassist Rick Savage and
drummer Rick Allen.
Riding the crest of
"High 'N' Dry the
group has just com-
pleted a successful tour
of Europe. Some say
the group were suc-
cessful too soon. But as
Elliot puts it, "I agree
that other bands have
had time to evolve and
mistakes in front of
thousands of people,
but I still wouldn't have
wanted it any other
way
Singer Elliot explains grow up in small clubs
how the group acquired We're making our
its unusual name: "Our
name, in fact, came
about two years before
I joined the group. At
school, 1 used to draw
posters for imaginary
gigs and 1 just made the
name up. The rest of
the guys were up in the
bedroom one day and
saw the poster and took
to the name it could
have been anything
"If you need ski equu
or clothing, Gordon F
Greenville Country
has one of the I
selections of ski equi
and clothing
Carolina
in
Gordon Ful
located at
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750504 OPEN 7 DA
Money
Continued From Page 8
began patting me on
the back. "By all
means keep me posted
on your progress he
said enthusiastically as
1 left his office.
I was so excited I
practically floated
down the hall. I was
grinning like a fifth
grader playing spin the
bottle.
About that time. Dr.
Highbrow the accoun-
ting professor stepped
out o his office and
saw me.
"What are you so
happy about?" he ask-
ed. "Today isn't Fri-
day
My mind quickly
jerked back into gear,
"You can't tell him,
can you?" Oh, what
the heck. 1 explained
my idea to him and
then told him how Dr.
Grossburger had
thought it was brilliant
and encouraged me to
go ahead with it.
Before 1 could finish,
Dr. Highbrow doubled
up with laughter and
began pounding the
wall with his fists.
I stood there looking
puzzled trying to figure
out what was so funny.
He finally stopped
laughing and looked at
me with tears in his
eyes.
I cried, "What in hell
are you laughing at?"
Again he burst into a
fit of laughter. "Old
Grossburger tried that
idea himself last month
son. He lost his house,
his car, his wife, why
do you think he keeps
that sleeping bag under
his desk?"
I
I
Buy one meal and
get $1.00 off the
second one.
With this coupon, when you buy
one meal at the regular price, you
can get a second meal of the same
value for a dollar less.
Must be used at time of purchase
Does not include sandwiches,
unlimited salad bar, or specials
Offer good through
end of Month of
1
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I
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
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f
i
Religious
Society
of Friends
(Quakers)

Greenville
Worship
Group on Sun
September 20
at U00 a.m.
Planter's Nationa
Bank -
� 9SI10l IfSOM � 9nO IfSOM � 9Sf10! qSQM � asnot
Downtown
Please join us
for quiet worship i
1 � mm -mmm- -m
"The Place to
Wash"
) �
The 4JiL
WASH
HOUSE
m E. 10th St. (Across from Krispy Kreme)
514 E. 14th St. (Across from Hot Dog City)
�Color TV �Attendant on Duty
�Pinball -Lots of Washers & C
COUPON
Good for on� FREE WASH on Mon or Thurv
9 a.m4 p.m. � Offor expires Sept 30
wash house � wash house � wash house � wash
DOC
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DOC
DOC
This week at the Coffeehouse
JACKS
Add Greenery
to your
Scenery
We have a thriving selection
of 5" hanging baskets on sale
now for $5.00. It's the natural
way to decorate your dorm
room or apartment. Stop by to-
day and make your selection.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOI
1027 S. EVANS
CORNER 11th & EVANS 758 2774
Good Sept. 8 thru 19
Closed Wed.
LARRY MANGUM
Friday only, Sept. 18th 9:00-11:00 p.m.
In the Multi-Purpose Room
Mendenhall Student Center
Admission � 50C
Watch for announcements of Upcoming Auditions!
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
DOC
Opening
Special
$42.90
reg. $58.00
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
Q0'
s
for men
DAILY SPECIALS
MONDAY - $-1
CHOPPED STEAK I.
TUESDAY - $1
BEEF TIPS I-
WEDNESDAY - $1
CUBED STEAK I
THURSDAY - $1
STEAK SANDWICH � .
FRIDAY - $q
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE �
SATURDAY - $� ,
BARBEQUE RIBS A.
SUNDAY - $
SI EAK ON A SI ICK I �
All Meals are Complete
Including Baked Potato or
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24 By Pass � 7S4-OO40 � Hours 11 a.m. 10 p.m. � Mon. Thurs.
10a.m11 p.m. FriSun.
t





THE FAST CAROUN1AN
Sports
The Story Of The Lost Carolina Ram
BOM �
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3
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X
X
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o

K
:xx�:
9
9
9
9
9
9
?-now By Jon Jordan
Ramses VI, the INC mascot, is escorted by Chapel Hill
police to a van Saturda afternoon
Saturday was definitely a day of
disappointment for East Carolina
University. The football team fell to
arch-rival North Carolina, 56-0. To
make matters worse Ramses VI, the
Carolina mascot that had been
taken and given a purple glow by
four ECU students, never made it
onto the Kenan Stadium field.
This past Monday one of the tour
nappers, Dave Severin, ventured in-
to The East Carolinian office with a
disturbed look on his face. He wish-
ed to explain in his own words ex-
actly why Ramses failed to enter the
Carolina Blue gates.
It might be noted that the story 01
the ram's adventures in Chapel Hill
that follows is based strictly on
Severin's account. At the conclusion
of his account there is an explana-
tion bv Ramses' owner.
Severin began by saying that three
of the fearless foursome took oft
for Chapel Hill on Friday night.
Ramses was left at the home of Bob
Daniels, the father of Chip Onffin's
girlfiend Bobbie. Chip, of course,
was one of the brave four.
The ironic thing about this loca-
tion was that the Daniels' live only
one mile from the Hogan tarm,
where Ramses is "safely" kept.
While Ramses stayed with the
Daniels, and Severin and two others
Charles
Chandler
waitied in Chapel Hill, the fourth
ram-napper, Jim Wagner, went to
the Greenville Police Deptartment
looking for help. Severin said Grif-
fin was told that two Greenville
policeman would be at the stadium
Saturday.
Wagner took off for Chapel Hill
Saturday morning and double
checked with state patrolmen at
Kenan Stadium as to the safety of
getting the ram in. He was told to
bring Ramses at the start of the se-
cond quarter and that the patrolmen
would be there to help.
Severin said that he, Russell,
Dave McPhail and Chuck Brown
pulled into the designated gate
(behind the UNC fieldhouse) just as
the first quarter ended. This is
where the story gets interesting.
"We were met by one state
highway patrolman and 15 Chapel
Hill policemen Severin explained.
"We thought that was great, that
Bucs Trying To
Regain Respect
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sporiv Mill"
��We've been one hell of a sister
utution these last ten days.
East Carolina head football coach
Ed Emory made the remark at his
weekly press conference Wednesday
following his team's 56-0 loss to
North Carolina last week.
��North Carolina has certain!)
gotten lots of publicity thanks to
us, the second-yew coach s�id.
�'las- week with all the pre-game
i the East Carolina-Carolina
ne was about all the media was
talking about. After the game we
helped to put them in the top ten in
the nation and made one ot them
(halfback Kelvin Bryant) the na-
tional player o the week "
Emorv hopes the Pirates cease be-
ing a "good sister" as this
weekend's matchup with N.C. Stare
approaches.
"The greatest thing ung man
can do is redeem himself he said.
��1 told our guys Sunday they can do
that in six davs. Now its three
Emory added that playing the
highly-respected Wolfpack, winners
of theirt first two games this year,
should be advantageous for the
Bucs.
"As a coach Emory aid, i a
probablv rather have an open date.
But as a player I'd be biting at my
bit to bite into the Wolfpack this
Saturdav night. I'd be wanting to re-
establish myself and my team
Following a lashing like the
Pirates took Saturday
"re-establishing" themselves is
almost a necessity. Emory says he
believes the team can regain some
lost respectability.
�N C. State is an awfully fine
football team he said. "But I
believe we have the kind of
character that the guys, myself and
the staff will make a conwnitnviem
for improvement and will do the job
Saturdav
Emory said Saturday's embarass-
ing defeat to the ninth-ranked Tar
Heels was the worst thing that could
have happened to the Pirates and
the school.
"No one thing could have hurt
the football program more than
Saturdav did he said. "We dug
ourselves a very deep hole. Satur-
day's embarassment affects fund-
raising, recruiting and every aspect
of this program. It's now up to me,
the team and everyone concerned
with East Carolina to dig out of that
hole
As would be expected, there have
been a few "hate" calls and letters
mixed in with calls of encourage
ment to Emory over the past few
days. The coach says that he has ex-
pressed to everyone that he still has
much self-confidence.
"Anybody that knows Ed Emory
knows "that he is not a quitter. If I
didn't feel that I could get the job
One Of Two
Last Carolina running back Leon Lawson (7) drives
through ihe middle of the Pirate line in last week's game
against North Carolina. The Virginia Beach, Va. native
is one of two Lawson's who figure to play major roles in
this Saturday's ECU-N.C. State game. Leon's brother,
Larmount, is a Wolfpack tailback.
(Photo By Gary Patterson)
done 1 would let someone else have
it. 1 went to East C arolina and I love
the school that much. But, 1 have
total confidence that we will get the
job done. It'll take a total committ-
ment but we will do it
The Pirates started preparing for
State almost immediately atter the
big loss, taking to the practice field
Sunday afternoon. Emory says his
staff and team have not ceased
working toward improvement since
those preparations began.
"I've always said if anybody beat
my butt and someone wanted to
stick with me they'd have to bring a
breakfast, lunch and supper cause
I'm gonna be there all day. It's the
same way with the East Carolina
program.Whatever it takes we are
eoing to do
Emory complained that the main
problem the Pirates had Saturday
was a lack of "intensity and
desire He added that steps were
being taken to assure that does not
happen again.
��We will not allow our players
not to have a committment to ex-
cellence. We will have desire and a
committment to victory. 1 can pro-
mise that
they were there to help us. As it
turned out we had to deal with some
very mad, beligerant policemen.
"We honked the horn to get there
attention. At the time we were just
15 yards from the field. I could see
the golden gate. Before I could even
open the door, a policeman grabbed
the door and threw it open. He
grabbed the ram by the horns and
led it to the paddy wagon.
"He said 'What the hell are you
guys doing? then told us to shut up
and get out of the car. All of us got
out and yelled, asking him why he
was doing this. We were cussing and
they threatened to take us in. We
couldn't believe what was going on.
One of the policemen even grabbed
his gun to shut us up
Severin said that the police told he
and his friends that Ramses' owner,
Bob Hogan, did not want the ram in
the game. Severin does not believe
that one, though.
"The whole thing is very simple,
he said. "We trusted somebody and
got burned. I believe the whole thing
was a setup
I took the liberty of calling Bob
Hogan, Ramses' owner, Wednesday
night. He said that he had no objec-
tions to the ram being taken into the
stadium, but added that the
Kiffin Says
State Has
Weaknesses
Head N.C. State coach Monte
Kiffin takes nothing for granted.
Not even his Wolfpack's 2-0 record,
as he readies his team for East
Carolina.
"We're not a great football
team the second-year coach says.
"We're a god football team. Great
football teams put people away
when vou got them them 21-6 or
21-12.
"Look at Richmond or vake
Forest Kiffins says of his team's
victims, "In all due credit to their
teams, they're 0-4. We haven't beat
a team that's won a football game
yet"
The Wolfpack had substantial
leads in both contests only to hold
back the two clubs in the final
minutes. State defeated Richmond.
27-21, and Wake Forest, 28-23.
The State secondary has been
under scrutiny early in the season,
even though it was a higly-
publicized unit in preseason football
periodicals.
The secondary gave up 369 yards
and three touchdowns in the two
games. However, Kiffin says, the
unit is bound to "jell soon
The State running game is one
aspect of the team that hasn't been
criticized � thanks to super frosh
Joe Mclntosh, last year's high
school Associated Press player of
the year in North Carolina.
So far in two games, the Lex-
ington freshman has rushed for 355
yards while averaging eight yards a
carry.
policemen were not as cruel in their
judgment as perhaps the ram
nappers suspected.
"I talked to some of the kids and
wanted the ram to be brought on the
field Hogan said. "I hated to see
it not get out there
Hogan then explained how, as he
understands it, the police came to
their decision.
"The police met the night before
the game (Friday) and decided not
to let the ram in the gate. Coy
Durham, a captain, told me it was
done to prevent any problems that
might have come up. 1 think they
feared that someone, or the ram,
might get hurt. He said that they
were undermanned anyway and that
they could not control an outburst,
should one occur.
"Personally, I think if the right
steps had been taken it would have
been alright to bring him in the
game. But, also, I think the police
did the right thing. I would hate to
have seen anybodv get hurt
Hogan said that the II
some had apparently treated
Ramses very well.
"As I expected, its horns were
painted purple and gold he said
"But that's no problem. They cer-
tainly did nothing to hurt the ram. It
definitely looks well-fed
State QB Tol Avery
"We've turned into a good runn-
ing football team Kiffm says pi
udiy. "You've got to be pleased
when you gain over 300 yards two
weeks in a row.
"Joe Mclntosh makes a lot oi
things happen. He can take a
10-yard play, break two tackles and
it's a 35-yard touchdown run. I
think the players realize he has
talent and get excited when he's in
there.
"Joe's not ready to cany the ball
35 or 40 times a game because he's
still a freshman. He carred it
times the other night (against Wake
Forest), and he was tired.
MkliUosh's performances in the
Wolfpack's first two contests hav
earned him a starting position in
front of Larmount I awson tor
Saturday's contest with the Pir;
"This is not a demotion for
1 awson Kiffin explains. "It's a
promotion for Joe Mclntosh.
"Joe did some things last Saturav
I didn't expect. He was the dif-
ference. He's handled everything
well. Nothing's been given to him
Rookie Collins Proves His Point
U nttanfW
'
Collins takes handoff from Pats' quarterback
Matt Cavanaugh In Pre-Season Game
By CHARLES (HANDLER
spurls tdilor
He is no longer "A.C
They now call him "Tony
but for East Carolina football
fans watching the New
England Patriots' rookie is
just as sweet as ever.
Anthony "Tony" Collins
finished his career as a Pirate
last year, leaving as the
school's fourth leading rusher
of all-time. In last April's Na-
tional Football League draft,
Collins was chosen early in the
second round by the Patriots.
After having a sterling pre-
season Collins earned a star-
ting bid as the Pats' number
one halfback. He came
through, rushing for 81 yards
in a tough loss to the
Baltimore Colts. He followed
that up with a 75-yard perfor-
mance this past Sunday
against the Philadelphia
Eagles.
The Pats lost that one too,
by a 13-3 margin, but the se-
cond straight impressive per-
formance by Collins entrench-
ed him into the starting role
that he worked so hard to
earn.
"I was determined to do
well when I got here Collins
said Wednesday via telephone.
"There was a rap on me up
here. They said I did my best
running on the sidelines, that
I'd run out-of-bounds a lot my
senior year at ECU.
"1 felt like I had to establish
myself Collins continued.
"1 wanted to prove what they
were saying was wrong
Now that he has established
himself, Collins says that he
would like to follow up on
some goals that have been set
for himself and the team.
"I have a lot of goals said
the Penn Yan, N.Y. native.
"Of course, I always want to
rush for 1,000 yards. The team
goals are to win as many
games as possible and make
the playoffs. 1 guess I've got
thoughts of the rookie-of-the-
year award in the back of mv
mind
AH f these dreams must
have been the farthest thing
from Collins' mind one year
ago. He was suffering through
a disappointing campaign �
his rushing totals dropped
from an impressive 1,130
yards in 1979 to 503 last
season. The Pirates too, were
disappointing, finishing 4-7 in
the only losing season during
Collins' ECU career.
"If somebody would have
told me this would be happen-
ing to me I wouldn't have
believed them Collins said.
"I would have told them they
were crazy. As a rookie, I was
just thinking about working
into the system
Collins says he does not
believe he has changed since
gaining some professional suc-
cess, with the obvious excep-
tion of his name change.
"That happened Collins
explained, "because there was
already an 'A.C here, a guy
named Alan Clark. He had
been here for three or four
years so I was the one that had
to make the change. 1 still like
'A.C, though. I feel at home
when people call me that
Collins' fast success has
been well-documented na-
tionally. His name often ap-
pears on nationwide televi-
sion, announcers praising the
"rookie sensation from East
Carolina Collins says he en-
joys the attention and hopes
that his alma mater will
benefit from it.
"As I do for myself 1 also
do for my school he said. "1
will always be associated with
East Carolina. 1 hope to put
both myself and the school on
the map
In Action Against Tampa Bay
.
T





12
THEEASl �. AROIINIAN
SEPTEMBER 17, 1981
Davidson Has
Team Young,
By CHRIS HOLLOMAN
M�fl �ni�r
The Hast C'arolna women's volleyball team will
open its 198! seson tomorrow in Durham as they
lace the Duke Blue Devils. The Pirates, who
finished 16-26 last year, have a new head coach
and a group of young but talented players enter-
ing the contest.
Head coach Lynn Davidson, an assistant coach
last year at ECU, replaces Alita Dillon who is
now the head volleyball coach at Texas Women's
I niversity. She is looking forward to this season
even though the young Pirate team still has a way
to go as far as overall development is concerned.
"We have a number of returning veterans from
last year's team, but we haven't got a single senior
on the squad, so you might say we are still on the
inexperienced side Davidson explained.
Davidson did, however, have some good luck
recruitine, bringing in two spikers who will be
able to offer immediate help. One of these players
is Jenny Hauser, a standout performer at Raleigh
Sanderson High School.
Another top recruit who will see playing time
with the Pirates this season is L.ita Lamas, a
transfer from Miami Dade South Junior College.
She comes from a volleyball program that is rank-
ed fifth in the junior college standings.
One of the strongest returning players on the
team is Stacey Weitzel, considered one of the
strongest hitters on the team. In addition to
Weitzel, Mitzi Davis returns to provide strength
and leaership to the team.
Another veteran standout this season will be
Dale Lavant. She will be at the middle blocker
position, even though she is 5-7. She does,
however, possess an excellent vertical jump.
One of the problems that the volleyball team
will be facing this vear is a lack of height. "Our
team is not one of the taller volleyball teams in
the state this year, but we have some good abili-
ty Davidson said. "In fact, our tallest player is
orilv 5-9, so vou can see our situation
Despite the lack of height and overall inex-
perience, Davidson feels that this year's team will
be vastly improved over East Carolina teams in
the past.
"We are facing a very tough schedule this year,
but I think that we will improve our record
Davidson explained. "The difference this year
should be in the closer games. We expect to pull
out more of those than we did last year because of
our experience and depth
"Right now we are in the process of smoothing
out the rough edges before we face a tough Duke
team on Friday Davidson continued. "We will
know a lot more about what we need to work on
after the match against Duke
The Blue Devils will also have a very young
team this year, but head coach Jon Wilson ex-
pects improvement over last year's fifth-place
finish in the NCAIAW tournament.
The Pirates' first home match will be on
September 29 when they face the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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P. O. Box 2 211 Jarvis St.
Greenville, N; C. Phone: 7S2-S025
Name �
ID Number
Purchase
KRAFT
MAYONNAISE
Qt. Jar
Mrs. Filbert's
or Parkay
MARGARINE
Heavy Western
SIRLOIN STEAKS
$2.49
Heavy Western
T-BONE STEAKS
$2.49
Soft'n Pretty
Toilet Tissue
Gwaltney
FRANKS
Lb.
Lb. Pkg.
2$l
00
5 roll pkg.
Limit 2 with $7 50 food order
loitest
ICE CREAM
12 Gallon
Definitely the Last Chance at this Price!
mmmmmm Clip This Coupon �� ��
IVORY LIQUID
22-oz. bottle
98?
Kraft Deluxe Dinner
Macaroni & Cheese
Dinner 14-
Kick
B( HRl
HOLLOS
After one
the 1981 s I
coach Bra
his Pirate
themselve i
record. Thai
eludes a 4-
over powc I
Christian
breaking
strong Ge
The
however,
any eas iei
Pirates
strong i
ARMY-NAVY
uiuuum

5

i
oz.
-i
or Kraft Spaghetti
Dinner �.� 8oV
19 oz.
Star Klst Chunk Light
TUNA
78C
6-Oz. Can
. 3
1
' 1
FRESH JUICY
CANTALOUPES
Generic
with this coupon and $7.50 food order excluding
specials. Without coupon $1.49 Limit one per j
customer. Expires 9 19-81.
69 C
EA.
Potato Chips
$128
Lb. Bag
I
.�matmtummmm
I





I l
.) Si
IALS
THE LAST CAROLINIAN
SFPThMBfcR 17, 1981
13
Barbour Sets Distance
Mark In Spitting Test
TOBACCO SPITN CONTEST
The '81-82 IM Program officially began Sept.
9th as 35 participants attempted to spit to star-
dom in the first annual "ECU IM TOBACCO
SPIT'N CONTEST. Spitters used varied styles
including the "two-finger-power-pucker" and
the "between-the-teeth explosion Spitters
strived for distance and accuracy. There was a
men's and women's division and entered were
such notables as lady Pirate Basketball Coach
Cathy Andruzzi, Associate IM Director Nance
Mizei White Residence Director Vanessa
Higdon and former ECU Baseball Coach
George Williams. After the juice settled, a
three-way tie resulted between Shirley Brown.
Bob Barbour and Todd SMith. Smith was
awarded the "Brass Spittoon" in a "spit-off
Barbour's spit of 20' 3" stands as an ECU
IM record while Ron Bower and Charlie Smith
scored 14 of 15 possible points in the accuracy
area. We acknowledge that the R.J. Reynolds
Co. sponsored the event and all "would-be"
and "could-be" spitters are invitee to enter
next year's contest.
BICYCLE RACE
A total of 13 teams fought it out in the second
annual ECU-1M Bicycle Race last Thursday.
When the dust settled the "Last Minute
Riders" were on top in the men's division and
"100 Percent Cotton" finished first in the
women's race. It wasn an exciting race from
start to finish and no less than four teams were
within one lap of the lead at th' finish of the
men's affair. Congratulations go to the winners
and all who entered making the race a big suc-
cess
ENTRY DATES
Please remember that the following sports
are opened to entering teams. They are 3-On-3
Basketball, Co-Rec Softball, Punt, Pass and
Kick. Singles Tennis Tournament, Co-Rec Flag
Football and Almost Anything Goes. For fur-
ther information please contact the IM Office
at 204 Memorial Gym or Ext. 6387.
ECU Soccer Action
Kickers 1-1 After Week
B CHRIS
HOLLOMAN
Miff S nit:
�Vtter one week of
-1 soccer season,
ach Brad Smith and
Pirates find
hemselves with a 1-1
d. That record in-
udes a 4-2 victory
.er powerful Atlantic
hristian and a heart-
Ning 10 loss to
g George Mason.
season,
I esn't get
easier though as the
V
tace
Elon
a ver
College
i' mniill��.1 �tiques .
Si�wping Bay. fl�(�;�'�
� : lfi fqjiem�r! i'����' '�
'� fjttho. A"J Otf �'��'
�� New Ar.a sue :
(�iftfea RwG's i A is
ARMY-NAVY STORE
team.
"Elon should be a
challenge to our team
because they have 12 or
13 returning starters
coming back from last
year, as well as one or
two good recruits
Smith said in discussing
the Fighting Christians.
"They beat N.C. State
in last year's indoor ��
soccer tournament, so
we know that they will
be very tough to play
against. I just hope tha'
TT SAAD'S
JgL shoe
�stoREPAIR
nT r-3 Grande A ve
�PR 75�
J&K Quality
g Repa.r
our midfield play and
our offense as a whole
has improved enough
to get the job done
As far as the loss to
George Mason is con-
cerned, Smith felt that
the Pirates could have
won if they had played
hard the entire game.
- COUPON ��-d
ECU
PIRATE HAT
SOUTH
NO. 6
ROCK
CLUB
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK. OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 1) 14
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
V1U.00 Prceivancv Tctt. tirth
Control. nd Probl�m
Prtgnancy Coun�ling For
turther inlorrration can
832 0535 (Toll Free Numwr
800 721 254) between 9 A W
anaP AA. Weekdays
HALEIGH WOAAEN S
HEAtlH
ORGANIZATION
917 W�iT AAOrgdO 5'
Raleigh. N C
RESEARCH
PAPERS
10,278 on file � all subjects
Send $1 00 (refundable) for your up-to-date,
340 page, mail order catalog
We also provide research - all fields.
Thesis and dissertation assistance available
RESEARCH ASSISTANCE
11322 Idaho Ave206F
les. Calif. 90025
THURS.
BRAZEN
FRI.&SAT.
PEGASUS PLUS

BEGINNER OR ADVANCED Cost i about tha sama as a
semester m a US college: $2,889 Price include iet round
trip to Seville from New York. room, board, and tuition
complete Government grants and loans availaoia or e4igibie
students
Live with a Spanisn family, attend classes four hours a day
�our lavs a week, four months. Earn 16 hr. of credit lequi-
iiet to � semesters taught m U S colleges ovac a two
year time spam 'our Spanish studies will be enhanced bv
opponunities not available m a U S classroom Standard
izad tests show our students anguage skills supaetot to
students completing rwo year programs in U S-
Hurry. it takes a .ot of time to make ail arrangements We
depart Jan 31 and return June 1 1982. FULLY ACCRED-
ITED A program of Trinity Chrrstian College
2.99
BEAT STATE
LIMITED QUANTITY -HURRY
IWESTERN AUTOI
CORNER DICKINSON AVE
READE CIRCLE
5� COUPON ��-I
SUN.
ROBIN
THOMPSON
BAND
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
2442 E. Collar S.E. Grand Rapids. Michigan 49506
(A Program of Trinity Christian College)
CALL TOLL FREE for full information 1-800-253-9008
(In Mich or It toil tree line inoperative call 1-616-942 2541 collect.)
MUUmilWUWUUmilUIHUIIIIIIIIilllllMIIHIIIIllNIWW mMmilBHHmillM
w
FQDD
WE'RE
MPROVING!
CIIHI
LrOOD
ighf
Can
POOD
1
3
Jones Cafeteria, The College Hill Din-
ing Hall, will be closed on Saturday, Sept.
19th, and Sunday, Sept. 20th, for installa-
tion of new carpeting and tile.
However, The Galley and Mendenhall
Snack Bar will be open Saturday from
8:00 A.M. to 6:30 P.M. and Sunday from
10:00 A.M. to 6:30 P.M.
So, come by and see our new im-
provements in Jones Cafeteria this Mon-
day, Sept. 21st. It's just one more way
we're making on-campus dining even
better at E.C.U.

�loot
I Jones Cafeteria Closed for Improvements This Weekend
�MHUWH UHUimmi�.IIMHtlt.HIIIIHII.Hlim�UHUII





14
1 HI 1 sU ROl 1
st vu u k r.iwi
Fearless Football Forecast
V
ECl AT N. STATE (Score)
W kl FORES! M M Bl RN
MIAMI (OHIO) M I N
DUKI M soil H CAROI INA
WES1 V I MAR I AND
Gl ORG1A l til 1SON
GA IT i H Mil OR1DA
l HW1 1 KENTUC k
11 1 AM A I sol I HI R MISS
HOI STON I MIAMI (II A.)
I I A ST ATI A I NI BRASKA
NO I Rl DAM1 l MICHIGAN
CHARLES CHANDLERWILLIAM YELVERTONCHUCK FOSTER
(22-2)(20-4)(18-6
NCSU 27-21NCSU 28-14NCSU 24 10
AuburnAuburnAuburn
INCUNCUNC
S. c arolinaS. CarolinaS. Carolina
MarylandMarylandMaryland
GeorgiaGeorgiaClemson
FloridaFloridaFlorida
Ala.AlabamaAlabama
S. MissTulaneS Miss
MiamiMiamiMiami
NebraskaNebraskaNebraska
MichiganMichiganMichigan
IIMM DuPKEt.
(1S-6)
NCSU 21-14
Auburn
I NC
Duke
Maryland
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
I ulane
Miami
Nebraska
Notre Dame
( IfKIMIOI.I.OMAN
(17-7)
N si 31-10
Auburn
I N
S arolina
West V
Georgia
Florida
Alabama
S Miss
Miami
Nebraska
Mi
Classifieds
FOR SALE
Dictaphone Headset included
E�ten�nt condition Make
reasonable off I'M
l�M HONDA Tit Cjv'om new
dition i'oc miles "is �a6 altei t
p.m
� XIJ toot deep pie t -
gra ISJ-TIOJ
OOBM SIZE relrigera
Like new1 Can 'Sen aftj I
p m
TWO TICKETS tor sale To State
ECU game great seat phone
7Sa '93
WATEWBEDS No students
Buy a mratei bed Quo.
d.rec 'rorr mo you can
�c . fe'a Complete beds wit
yr jna"tv mattress S v waj
rantv thermostat heater liner
trame neaaboaro ped'a1 for as
low as �9 Queen IN I
Oav.d Oe
FOR RENT
TWO MOBII
fjiete '� �
Oedroomi and an approxima
three miles Irom ECU One rents
tc l$0. the otti. "one
Tit l�7J Mtwei
�JOOWMATE NEEDED
block tl
fourth ren 1
'S� M H
APT TO �E NT S'uOiO
entry and bath Near campus
Available now S90 mci utilities
115
t- MALE ROOMMATE needed to
share bedroom apt at
GreneWav 1111 SO month rent
plus one hall utilities Call
F E MAL E ROOMMATE needed to
share 3 bedroom at Eastbrook M?
plus one third utilities Call 5heiia

��mate wanted to
� Oroom duplex near cam
.try nice fully carpeted
II � i-piace One hail rent and
utilities '52 6374 or leave
message at TV 1831
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
hare 3 bedroom house on Elm St
appro one tourfh mile from cam
pus a ��� �� othei gil S Rent S1J5
a month plus one third utilities
Can Tit T24T
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
Oakmont Sq Apts Pool tennis,
cable t us service S78 plus one
third u 1 ties No smokers
1OT4
PERSONAL
ludents professors.
� h Wright
Rd Greenville nc ITU Call
����� p m
REAARO Ottered tor return of
notebook with John Aeyler
inscribed on cover Contains notes
valuable to owner but worthless to
Ise No questions asked
FACULTY STUDENTS
STAFF- Looking tor income
Fart time iob with unlimited
future Mimmaiinvestment Free
training International organua
tion Send name address, phone
number when you can be reached
and a brief resume to FUTURE.
PO Bon 967 Greenville NC 27834
You will be promptly contacted
LORI AND MISSY - See ad on
page 10 CAM
DO YOU NEED a ride this
weekend to Greensboro or
Winston Salem It so call Wayne
758 8331
Clip Joint has moved to 119 Gar
reft Call Ma'lena at 758 8831
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
and inexpensive Call Amy at
7 5 7 3 7 3 4
The Fast Carolinian
- the i.wnpus communi, v
unct 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
� ear and every Wednesday dur
nq the summer
' � � East Carolinian is 'he of
Hoal newspaper of East
li -a University, owned,
operated and published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
Un.versi'y
Subscription Rate: SlOyearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville, N C
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, NC
Telephone 757 tl6 �3�7 63(f9
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, NC
EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. 9th St. 752-2332
'Variety of Fresh & Frozen Seafood
'Lobster Tails "King Crab Legs
'Clams Crab Meat
�Hard Crabs
WE ALSO SELL
USED TIRES 10 .
nc p
Bicycles p
You'll love
ON SALE AT
Complete line of a essories
Complete service department
for most all makes of bikes
�� Free Estimates
Features lifetime warranty
on Taharra bikes
WESTERN AUTO
Onlv at corner ot Dickinson & Reade Circle
- �
d
THRU SATURDAY, SEPT. 26TH
DEF LEPPARD
ELECTRIC LIGHTORCHESTRA
BILLY JOELLIVE
DEBBIE HARRY
5.99
LP, 8-TRACK &
CASSETTE
204 E. FIFTH ST.
L

J -wv
110
- tfl.
W
V
w
V-M'
.
iiyfe$f!
regular
roast beef
sandwiches
this weekend, Sept. 19 and 20
isr
. ,$�
4 4
v ,


l.PV
It's our 17th b!
so this Saturc
Sunday only
Arby's is having
an incredible
nationwide
Happy Beefday celebration.
Arbys regular roast
beef sandwiches
for only 79C!
H - -m . (That's the price
nfDllS theywere
mwmm ym y years agoj)
'�8' Ar
ARBY'S IN GREENVILLE E. GREENVILLE BLVD. IN GREENVILLE SQUARE





Title
The East Carolinian, September 17, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 17, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2790
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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