The East Carolinian, September 15, 1981






�he
Carolinian
i
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 7
Tuesday,September 15, 1981
GreefTilk, North Carofcu
12 Pages
ECU'S Student Health
Operates With $309,20'
By SUSAN R1ES
Staff W rilcr
In these days of austerity and
budget cuts, there is one operation
on campus that seems to be relative-
ly unaffected.
The ECU Student Health Service
(often called the infirmarv ended the
1980-81 fiscal year with a $309,207
surplus.
"The health service saved money
because they went without a nurse, a
secretary and they didn't hire the
director till the middle of the year
said Dr. Elmer Meyer, Vice
Chancellor for student life. "They
saved $85,000 that way
A nurse working at the health ser-
vice is paid $14,000 to $20,000 a
year and a secretary makes $8,000 to
$10,000 annually, according to Kay
Van Nortwick, the administrative
manager of the health service.
$55,000 is left over from that
$85,000 figure to pay for a director
for six months.
"The rest of the money comes
from dividends from bonds that the
state invests for the student health
service said Meyer. Investing
reserve funds is a typical practice by
the state, according to him.
However, Meyer speculated that
it took 10 years to save up the
$50,000 necessary to pay for the
renovations to the student health
center and he was surprised to learn
that the health service had a
$309,000 surplus at the end of the
fiscal year. Meyer had not seen the
health service's financial report.
The student health service
operates within the division of Stu-
dent Life and is responsible to
Meyer. The service is self-
supporting and operates solely on
student fees, according to Meyer.
While Meyer calls the surplus
"dividends and savings Van Nort-
wick calls it a reserve.
"You never know when the roof's
going to fall in she said. The stu-
dent health service asked for a
$10.50 student fee increase in 1980,
because it looked like the health ser-
vice would have to spend $100,000
of its reserve money, Van Nortwick
explained. The health service got the
fee increase and ended the 1979-80
fiscal year with a $187,000 surplus.
When the student health service
asked for the increase they had a
$225,000 cash balance, according to
Vice Chancellor for Business Af-
fairs Clifton Moore.
"Some of the people that work
for Dr. Meyer project that they (the
health service) will have over a
$100,000 loss their expenditures
will exceed their receipts bv over
$100,000 for the rest of this year
Moore told the board of trustees at
their February meeting. Moore
denies making that statement. Each
ECU board of trustees meeting is
taped and available on cassettes in
Joyner Library.
The health service has never been
in debt in the 19 years Moore has
worked for the University, he says.
However, student fees won't be
lowered just because the health ser-
vice has some cash left over at the
end of their fiscal year.
"You could lower fees, but you'd
only have to raise them in a couple
of years when prices go up. It's
easier to keep fees constant Meyer
said. The surplus was built up over a
number of years from interest from
student-fee-bought bonds, accor-
ding to Meyer
"I do understand how the
students1 feel and we try to
remember that we're using student
fees said Van Nortwick. "The
reason we got the '80 fee increase is
because we were about to go into
reserve monies
Van Nortwick feels that the stu-
dent health center needed renova-
tions. "We try to use student money
to benefit the most students she
said. Renovations include new,
upholstsered chairs, track lighting
and longitudinal Levelor blinds for
the second floor waiting room that
had to be specially ordered.
Photo By GABY PATTERSON
Renovations to the waiting room at the student health center were
made possible by student fees.
Broad Education May Widen Job Possibilities
By MIKE HUGHES
Suff V rilrr
Few college students find the deci-
sion of choosing a career an easy
one. Most students base their deci-
sions on several factors, such as job
appeal, the prospective job market
and the educational requirements
for a specific occupation.
Some are fortunate enough to
make what they consider the correct
decisions the first time around,
whereas others change their degree
programs in an effort to find an
agreeable career.
The selection of majors, minor?
and degree programs is diverse, and
for many the choice is difficult. But
though the degree of appeal of a cer-
tain occupation will vary from per-
son to person, an awareness of the
prospective job market is a district
advantage for anyone entering the
work force.
In 1976, the United States Depart-
ment of Labor issued a report with
their projections for annual open-
ings through 1985 in major occupa-
tional categories.
Though the projected number of
openings appears to be improving,
the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
estimated that in those 10 year5;
(1976-1985), the number of college
graduates entering the job market
will exceed the number of job open-
ings traditionally filled by college
graduates by 2.7 million.
Therefore, many college
graduates may have to downgrade
their career expectations or, in cer-
tain cases, upgrade their levels of
education.
The same statistics predict that
between 1976 and 1985 the demand
for professional and technical
workers will increase at twice the
rate that demand will rise for all
other workers.
According to that report's projec-
tions, the greatest job opportunities
for college graduates will be in the
fields of nursing, medicine,
engineering, computer programm-
ing and systems analysis.
Among the worst outlooks for
openings are in the areas of
teaching, law and veterinary
medicine. Though these were once
considered sure and safe careers, to-
day all three are overcrowded, ac-
cording to the report.
The changes are not strictly
limited to job outlook shifts.
Economist Sylvia Porter predicts
that changes will occur in some of
the country's basic working habits.
For example. Porter cites the fact
that thousands of Americans are
already moving to a four-day, forty-
hour work week and that several
workers unions have proposed vary-
ing schedules.
The trend, Porter says, is toward
what is known as "flextime"
scheduling. Under this system.
workers have the option of setting
their own hours within certain
specifications. Porter maintains that
the trend will prevail in the years
ahead.
With all the changes that have oc-
curred in the working world in re-
cent years, there is no guarantee that
a specific favorable job outlook will
remain favorable. To counter this
threat, Porter offers a suggestion,
not necessarily to be used as a
safeguard against the fluctuating
job market, but as a foundation and
preparation for the possible changes
ahead.
Porter suggests learning a foreign
language. She predicts that a
language skill coupled with other
skills might double the college
graduate's chances of getting the
job he or she wants.
Though the United States is the
fourth largest Spanish-speaking
country in the world, and Spanish is
the most popular second language
to Americans, Porter suggests that
German, Japanese and French are
equally useful, as they are spoken in
top business cities.
Porter also recommends that a
student try to acquire as broad an
education as possible. Those who
wait to chose a specific field of work
are increasing their opportunities,
she says, because they will have the
widest range of capabilities when
entering the job market.
In Wake Of Brewer Resignation
Students Not Surprised By Decision
Chancellor
to many s
Thomas B.
tudents.
PeK By MAKiANME �AINES
Brewer's decision to resign comes as no shock
By CHADBUFFKIN
Staff Writfr
In spite of what you read or hear,
the announcement of Chancellor
Brewer's resignation last week war-
ranted more concern among ECU
students than casual over the bar
chit-chat.
Many students expressed concern
for Brewer, for the administration
and for ECU in general.
The following students expressed
their feelings:
"I had seen him on the news every
night for the last three or four
weeks. It didn't come as a big shock
to me when he resigned. I don't
comdemn the man at all for looking
for a job somewhere else
�Deborah Daniels
English
"It was no shock to me that he
resigned. It seems I heard something
like this last spring. If he wants to
move up in the world, that's his
perogative
�Susan Marshall
Intermediate Education
"I felt it would happen eventually
anyway. The administration didn't
want to accept all the changes he
was putting them through. Occa-
sionally you would hear about him
applying for another job and that
proved that he wasn't completely
satisfied here
� Willie Chapman
Accounting
"I was surprised that he resien-
ed
�Glenda Arnold
Medical Technology
"If he's using ECU as a stepping
stone, or a short term glory to get
ready for another job, we don't
need him as a chancellor. His focus
should be on long term growth and
benefit for the school
�Bill Rapp
Business
"I was happy. I didn't think he
was good for ECU. I think he is tur-
ning this place into an N.C. State
with concrete everywhere. I realize
this is a minor objection; he didn't
have any sense of aesthetics. He wa
alienating the faculty members by
pushing for change too fast
�Doug Queen
English
"I think that a lot of it has to do
with politics that no one will ever
know about
�Bryan Watson
Underwater Research
Campus Media Seek Cover Change, Editors
By TOM HALL
Covers for the 1981 Buccaneer
have been printed and mounted
and are now ready to be bound to
the finished product � or are
they?
The cover in question, design-
ed by former editor Barrie
Byland, has a four-color
lithograph of the lower half of a
woman leaning against an
automobile with "Buccaneer"
superimposed in bright pink let-
ters. Editor Amy Picket! admit-
ted the pictoral design met the
specifications sent to the
publisher, but added that color
separations and type styles used
did not.
"I would rather have a cover
that won't be thrown in the foun-
tain Pickett told the Media
Board Thursday. She explained
that she had sought the opinion
of several students, including art
majors, of the cover and the
general response was "they
would not pick up their copies
with that cover on it
Mew covers will cost an addi-
tional $5900 to print, but accor-
ding to consultant Craig Sahli
will have a "design more accep-
table to the student body
A four-color lithograph will
have the yearbook title reflected
as if by a mirror, Pickett stated.
"If it (the money) is in my
budget, I feel that I can change
it Pickett said, adding that she
would not put her name in the
book as editor if the old cover
was used.
Funds for the new cover will
come from sacrificing color
photos in the men's and women's
basketball sections of the year-
book. While admitting color
would add to the sports section,
Pickett maintained the need to
change the cover.
SGA President Lester Nail said
Byland's cover "isn't worth two
cents Some members of the
board suggested that the covers
be used in an art show or sold to
See YEARBOOK, Page 2
� mm �
�aa,��. .MNt i M �

�INMMi
c �ifc
Edward Nesbitt
�V OARY PATTiaSON
By TOM HALL
Nrws bdilor
The Rebel needs an editor. The
Ebony Herald has an editor, but
he's in Washington, D.C.
Angela Brinn, who was chosen
last spring as editor of the ECU
literary magazine, has submitted
her resignation to the Media
Board. Lamont Byrd, editor of
the campus mi.ority newspaper,
has not offered his resignation
although he plans to work this
semester through the cooperative
education program.
Brinn's resignation was ac-
cepted by the board. Media
Board Chairman Ron MaxweH
said Thursday that Byrd had not
told him about the co-op job.
"I think we should wait until
Lamont comes back before mak-
ing a decision Maxwell said,
adding that Byrd had
demonstrated his leadership abili-
ty.
SGA President Lester Nail said
he thought the board should
replace Byrd. "I think it's his
responsibility to communicate
with the board about this Nail
said.
The board voted to wait ten
days and contact Byrd before
making a decision. Nail abstained
from voting.
Edward Nesbitt, assistant
editor of the Herald, said he does
not want to be made permanent
editor of the newspaper, citing
two other jobs and a heavy
course load. Nesbitt added that
he, Safari Mathenge and John
Weyler were working toward a
September 23 publication date.
The board will advertise for the
Rebel editorship for two weeks,
as well as for a day student
representative to serve on the
board.
The board has been without a
day representative since April
when David Creech's term ex-
pired. Creech, who also served as
chairman, decided not to apply
for a second term.
?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1981

Homecoming Planned
Live entertainment, a
cross-country run and
the traditional parade
are only a few of the
events now being plan-
ned for this year's
Homecoming Day.
"Paint the Town
Purple and Gold" will
be the theme of the
Saturday, Nov. 7 event,
according to chairper-
son Diane Davis.
"The only problem
we have now is getting
major entertainment
for Friday night
Davis said. "We only
have $750 in our
budget, and Minges
(Coliseum) has already
been booked by the
(Student Union) Major
Attractions Commit-
tee
Davis said the
"mini-concerts" in
Mendenhall Student
Center following the
homecoming game had
not been entirely suc-
cessful because
students and alumni
had "gone their own
way She added that
the homecoming com-
mittee was willing to
"go in with" the stu-
dent union for a
homecoming concert.
A concert on the ECU
mall may be scheduled
for the following Sun-
day afternoon, Davis
added.
The parade is
scheduled to begin at 10
a.m. from Rose High
School on Elm Street
and move down Fifth
Street. The cross-
country run that is now
being planned by the
university intramurals
department would
possibly begin at 9:30
a.m Davis said.
"We're also trying to
get the SRA (Student
Residence Association)
to sell pompons to add
color to the game she
said, noting that the
(ECU) Pirates would be
battling the Buccaneers
from East Tennessee
State.
The homecoming
committee includes the
following sub-
committees and
chairmen: Marlene
Clay, bands; Jackie
Boys, decorations; Kim
Futch, halftime; Patti
McKelvey, entertain-
ment; and Irma
Thomas, publicity. The
parade committee
chairman has not been
selected, Davis said.
Anyone wishing to
join a committe should
contact Davis at
756-6966.
Event Tomorrow
The East Carolinian
needs staff writers.
Call 757-6309,
757-6376 or 757-6377
today!
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus t ummuniv
mkv 1923
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ticial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: $20 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville, N.C.
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C.
Telephone: 757 6344, 6347. 630
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending a
Greenville, N.C
The
BEST
Gets
BETTER
?
meeti!
mgtr
'he
interfl
neio
Ri
come
By OTIS ROBINSON
Staff Writer
The Society of United Liberal
Students (SOULS) will present
"Souls on the Mall" Wednesday,
Feb. 15.
The program, scheduled to begin
at 4:30 p.m will include many
games and activities. Among them
are volleyball, football and singing.
Tables will be set up displaying in-
formation about the various
organizations which make up
SOULS.
All minority organizations which
make up SOULS are expected to be
on the program. Mary Williams,
gift librarian of ECU'S Joyner
Library, will be the guest speaker.
According to Haywood Womble,
SOULS vice president, this years
goal is to promote minority student
participation in the society.
"It ("SOULS on the Mall") is an
annual affair to orientate new
students with the organization
said Womble. "Many people hear
of SOULS, but they never get to
Find out what really goes on. The
program is designed to give the cam-
pus an idea of what SOULS is all
about
The program will be from 4:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Refreshments will
be served. All students are invited to
attend.
Yearbook
Covers May
Be Changed
Continued From Page 1
students to defray the cost.
"What good is a plain book
cover?" asked Ron Maxwell, the
board chairman.
Byland resigned from the
editor's position in June after
complaints to the Media Board
by the publisher's local represen-
tative that she had only com-
pleted 13 of 336 pages before the
July 13 deadline. A new deadline
of September 7 has been met, ac-
cording to Pickett, who was pick-
ed bv he board to replace
Byland.
The yearbooks should be
delivered by the Christmas holi-
day, Pickett said.
Psssst .
Book
Lovers
Full line of
hardbacks, paperbacks
& magazines. Local
& ou' of town
newspapers.
Greeting Cards
For All
Occasions!
h
Books, Books
& More
BOOKS
BOTH STORES OPEN ALL DAY
7 DAYS A WEEK
CENTRAL NEWS &
CARD SHOP
321 Evans St. Mall
752-3333
CENTRAL BOOK
&NEWS
Greenville Sq. Shopping Ctr
756-7177
FREE
Beverage
rear
NA


Night
Long
nous
1
SOI
Wachovia Teller II
mm
Sooner or later,
you're going to
need one.
For free refreshments and Teller II demonstration,
come by the University Branch Office, 802 East Tenth Street,
September 15 and 16
Wachovia
Bank 8t Trust
Member F.D.I C.
SP
�PS
-ear
I
T
loris
FRE
Pic kin
On Friday
No
Admission
Starts at 3:00
?APA
KATZ
758-7192
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS, 1981
Announcements
e
.
KYF
Kings Youth Fellowship
meeting at 8 p m on Tuesday
night. September 15 Sponsored by
the local Pentecostal and Full
Gospel Churches in Greenville
Please attend and be a part in the
B'ble study and warm and friendly
fellowship Refreshments will also
be served
CANOE
The tenth Annual Southeastern
intercollegiate Canoe Race will be
held Oct 3 l�8l on the Catawaba
River Any persons interested in
competing should call 75? ??78
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma Freshmen Honor
Society will hold an organizational
meeting on Thursday. Sept 17 at 5
p m in room 221 Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Plans tor the coming
year will be made All members
are urged to attend
NAACP CONVENTION
Greenville will be hosting the
38th annual NAACP Convention at
the Ramada inn October 8 11
Anyone interested m attending,
please contact Virginia Canton at
757 6180
FRISBEE
It yoiu want to play you are
okay! Ui'imale Team I F A at
filiation and officer elections on
3genda for this Thursday evening
7 00 pm, room 221 MendenhaU Stu
dent Center
LACROSSE
For an persons interested in m
formation on, and membership m
the East Carolina Lacrose Club
There will be a meeting on
Wednesday. Sept 16 at the Be'a
house 603 E 9th Si (Behind
JOyner Library a' 6 00 p m For
further information call 757 1366
ana ask tor Tom
SOULSON THE MALL
Souls on the Mali will be held
Aednesday Sept 16 from 4 to 8
p m Music, games displays
refreshments Come and join in
this get together
SOULS
Meetings every Thursday at 7
p m at the Leoonia S Wright
Culture Center
MODEL UNITED
NATIONSCLUB
Organizational meeting on
September 17th Thursday at
p m in B'ewster C 105 Agenda m
dudes eiect'or Of officers tor the
year and discussion of plans tor
'he up coming year Faculty, staff
and students are welcome
POETS
The American Collegiate Poets
Anthology and International
Publications is sponsoring a Na
tional Poetry Contest in the fall of
1981 The deadline is October 31
For more information write to In
ternational Publications. P O Box
44927 LOS Angeles. Ca 90044
PRE-PHYSICAL
THERAPY
Deadline tor W82 admission to
professional phase is October 14.
1981 All general college and
physical therapy credits must be
completed by end of Spring 1982
Allied Health Professions Admis
sions Test must be taken in
November Application and inter
view appointments are to be made
by September 24, 1981 m depart
mental office (Room 308, Belk
Building, 757 6961 ext 231)
CSO
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities (CSO). School of
Medicine, is currently seeking
highly qualified undergraduate
and graduate students to work
part time as tutors Interested
students with expertise in either
chemistry, anatomy, physiology
biology, math physics. English or
SLAP are encouraged to apply
Other academic areas are also
considered Competitive wage
Contact Dr Frye. Center tor Stu
dent Opportunities, 217 Whichard
Annex; or call tor an appointment
at 757 6122,6075,6081
GAY?
Or love someone who is' We're
forming a Gay Support Group in
Greenville and we need your in
put For all those interested in
helping out there will be a short
meeting at 5 p m . Sept 22 in the
Newman House on loth St For
directions or more information
call 752 4216
THE WAY
Everybody wants to be at peace
with themselves The only way to
do that is to study the word of God.
the Bible so you will learn so you
can change (Romans 12 2) That
takes effort, you have to DO
something We make the effort
Thursday, (Sept 171 at
Menoenhall Student Center, (A) at
Ham. room 212 (B) at 7 30p m .
room 242 Come by if you want to
learn
P.E. MAJORS
Are you interested in educating
your peers' meeting maiors from
other schools? or having a great
time' The P E Maiors' student
convention will be held October 2
and 3 at Western Carolina Univer
sity It is a great opportunity for
all maiors An organizaional
mee'ing for ECU maiors will be
held m Minges Sept 23 at 7 30 pm
Get together w.th fellow maiors
and choose a topic you would like
to present
CAREERS
' Career By Choice Not
Chance A two part mini series
offered at no cost Dy the Universi
fy Counseling Centr. will oe held
September 21 and October 5
September 22 and October 6 at 305
Wright Annex (757 6661) from
300pm 500pm
CIRCLE K
Circle K will meet at 6 30 p m in
room 221 at Mendenhall Student
Center This week we will discuss
'he plans for our spec at up
coming weekend All interested
students are nvt'ed o a'teno 'he
mee'ing
AKA
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
greets both new and returning
students this fall semester, and in
vites collegiate women to their
Fall Rush, Wednesday Sept 16,
1981 a' 7 p m , in Mendenhall room
221 The sorority will also be spon
soring a bake sale that day, and
will present a block show at 11 50
am m front of the book store
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test (GMAT) will be of
tered at East Carolina University
on Saturday. October 24, 1981 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to GMAT
Educational Testing Service, Box
966 R. Princeton. NJ 08540 Ap
plications must be postmarked no
later than September 21. 1981 Ap
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center, Room
105, Speight Building
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina
?ion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
October 17, 1981 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service. Box 966 R. Princeton, NJ
08540 Applications must be
postmarked no later than
September 17, 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Room 105. Speight
Building
CO-OP
A representative from the Na
tional institutes of Health Normal
Volunteer Program in Bethesda,
MD will be on campus Sept 28 and
29 to interview students for Spring
1982 pla emenf Anyone interested
in any aspect of the health care
field or in research would find this
experience valuable For more in
formation contact the Co Op Of
tice, 313 Rawl or telephone
757 49796375 today!
PTC
The Greenville Public Transpor
tation Commission will meet at
Public Works Facility Progress
Room at 7.30 pm Wednesday,
Sept 16
IVCF
inter Varsity Christian
Fellows) p will meet this Wednes
day night in the Methodist Student
Center at 7 30 p m This weeks
topic is Temptation Everyone is
welcome
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigm Pi Na
tional Honor Fraternity will meet
at 6 p m Wednesday in 132 Austin
SGA ELECTIONS
For all students who art con
cerned about East Carolina
University, here is your chance to
have your voice heard Filing
dates for SGA dorm and day stu
dent legislators and class officers
will be Sept 9 Sept 19 Come by
the SGA office in Room 228
Mendenhall
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
win be offered a' East Carolina
University on Saturday. October 3.
19o81 Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed 'o Educa
'�onal Testing Service, Box 966 R
Princeton. NJ 08540 Registration
postmarked after this date must
be accompanied by a SIS. rrn
refundable late registration tee
DAT
The Dental Aptitude Test will be
offered at East Carolina Universi
ty on Saturday October 3. 1981
Application blanks are to be mail
ed in time 'o be received by the
Division of Educational
Measurements. American Dental
Association 211 East Chicago
Ave . Chicago Illinois 60011 by
September 7 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center Speight Building,
Room 105
JEWISH STUDENTS
You are cordially invited to ECU
Hillel's first get together On
Thursday, Sept 17. at 6 30. come
and participate in a free hot dog
supper This will be held at the
synagogue. 1420 E 14th street We
will gladly provide transportation
Don't hesitate to call For rides or
more information, call Jerry at
752 5942. or Dr Resnick at
756 5640
SOCIAL SECURITY
FORUM
Have you been wondering
whether you will ever get back the
money you put into Social Securi
ty? The League of Women voters
is sponsoring a forum on
"Financing Problems and Current
Legislation Proposed for the
Social Security System Tues
day, Sept 15 at 8 p m , First
Presbyterian Church, 14th and
Elm, Greenville
Fred Lilly. District Mazier of
the Greenville Social Security of
fice will discuss the issues around
Social Security All interested per
sons are invited to attend and to
participate in the discussion
NAACP
The ECU Student Chapter is
seeking membership All in
terested persons please come by
the Student Organization both first
floor Mendenhall for registration
and Information 12 5 until Friday
Regular meeting tonight at 6 30
p m m room 244 Mendenhall
PARKS AND
CONSERVATION
Dr Wendlmg coordinator of the
Parks and Conservation option of
the Parks. Recreation and Conser
vation Program, would like to
meet with students interested .n
the option (as in 221 Mendenhall
The iub market description of the
option area spring registration,
summer work, senior field work
and a fall get together will be
discussed
SOCIAL WORK
Students who wish to apply for a
major m social work or correc
tions should contact the Depart
ment of Social Work ' Correctional
Services for an application and
schedule appointments for the re
quired interviews (757 6961) To be
eligible to apply, 'he student is ex
pected to have a' least a 2 5 QPA
and have had at least one course in
social work or corrections
Deadline for submitting an ap
plication and having completed
the first interview with one of the
departmental faculty is
September 16 The Department
Chair will be holding the second m
terviews on Sep'ember 17 18. 1981
POETRY FORUM
First meeting of the ECU Poetry
Forum will be held on Thursday.
September 17. m room 248 of
Mendenhall Student Center at 8
p m
Meeting is open to anyone
wishing feedback on hisher
poe'ry Those planning lo attend
are asked to bring at least six
copies of each poem
SNEA
All education maiors are invited
to attend the organizational
meeting of the Student National
Education Association on
September 16 1981. Wednesday, in
Speight 129 at 4.00 p m
NTE
Students completing teacher
preparation programs and ad
vanced degree candidates m
specific fields may take the Na
tional Teacher Examinations on
Nov 14, 1981. Feb 20. 1982. and
April 17. 1982, at test centers
throughout the United States
Prospective registrants should
contact the school districts m
which they seek employment,
slate agencies in which they seek
certification or licensing 'heir col
leges, or the appropriate educa
tional association tor advice about
which examinations to take and
when to take them
The NTE Bulletin of intorma
'ion contains a list of test centers
and general information about the
examinations as well as a
registration form Copioes may be
obtained from college placement
officers, school personnel depart
ments, or directly from National
Teacher Examinations Box 911.
Educational Testing Service,
Princeton, New Jersey 08541
LAW SOCIETY
An organizational meeting tor
the ECU Law Society will be held
Thursday. September 17, at 7 30.
pm, in Room 221. Mendenhall All
interested people please attend
For further information, please
contact Diane Jones, 756 6556 after
7 pm
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
The Fleming Center has been here for you sinoe 1974
providing private, urerstanding health care
to women of all agee at a reasonable oost
EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. 9th St. 752-2332
�Variety of Fresh & Frozen Seafood
�Lobster Tails 'King Crab Legs
�Clams Crab Meat
�Hard Crabs
DAILY SPECIALS
MONDAY - $i OO
CHOPPED STEAK I .77
TUESDAY - $1 OO
BEEF TIPS I .77
WEDNESDAY - $�� qq
CUBED STEAK 1.07
THURSDAY - $1 �tO
STEAK SANDWICH � .07
FRIDAY - $o -7A
U.S.D.A. RIB EYEJ.7
SATURDAY - $0 OO
BARBEQUE RIBSa4.77
SUNDAY - $�� OO
STEAK ON A STICK I .77
All Meals are Complete
Including Baked Potato or
French Fries & Texas Toast
(
?





Sttie Cast (HwtclMnn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. &,��� a.
Chuck Foster. ���. a, Jimmy Dupree. �.���&�
Chris Lichok. ����, m��� Charles Chandler. ��, ���,
Alison Bartel. pro! Manner Tom Hall, semo,
Steve Moore. - rr m,� Steve Bachner. mmm �tf��r
Scpiembcr 15. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Brewer
Following In A Legend's Footsteps
With the resignation of
Chancellor Brewer, East Carolina
has taken a step backwards towards
the days of ECTC. You see, the
ultimate cause of his resignation
was nothing so much as a reluctance
by certain members of the university
community to move into the 1980s
with a new chancellor.
While Brewer was attempting to
move ECU ahead in academics,
athletics and student life� to name
a few areas� various members of
the board of trustees, administra-
tion and faculty were reminiscing
about the good ole days under Leo
Jenkins.
Don't get us wrong. Jenkins was
a great chancellor� for his time. He
did a tremendous job of building up
the university's physical plant. He
was primarily responsible for ex-
panding the school to its present
size.
His emphasis was on big;
Brewer's, however, was on better.
Even Ashley Futrell, board of
trustees chairman and one of
Brewer's most vocal opponents,
conceded that the chancellor's em-
phasis on academics was a major ac-
complishment of his three year
tenure.
But Brewer made too many
changes too fast to suit Futrell and
osiers. He moved in and reorganiz-
ed the administration, demoting
and even firing a number of
Jenkins' longtime cronies. In put-
ting his own stamp on ECU, he
angered the powers that be: Leo
wouldn't have done things that way.
Leo knew exactly how to play
North Carolina politics. Tom
didn't� or maybe he refused to.
Maybe he thought his plans for
ECU should stand on their own
merits and not on how well he
played politics.
As chancellor, Brewer's ac-
complishments were numerous. He
streamlined the university's ad-
ministration, eliminating much red
tape and duplication of services. He
improved on-campus housing,
renovating several dorms and
reorganizing student residence
government. He pushed ECU
toward the athletic big time, hiring
Ken Karr as athletic director.
ihe Planning Commission, one
of the most innovative programs at
ECU, was his conception. He sup-
ported a fall break� a break that
students wanted but faculty did not.
But the dye is cast. It's too late to
reconcile Tom Brewer and East
Carolina. We can only hope that
future chancellors will be judged by
their own deeds and not those of
their predecessors.
Hunger Strike Senseless
Hunger. It's has always been a
dirty word, one of the scourges of
civilization that man has fought for
centuries to eradicate. But now, in
seeming contradiction of human
nature, a group of men in Northern
Ireland are deliberately starving
themselves to death.
Since May, 10 Irish nationalist
prisoners in Maze prison outside
Belfast have died as a result of a
hunger strike designed to protest
British policy in Northern Ireland.
The strike is only the latest con-
frontation in the ongoing battle bet-
ween Northern Ireland's Catholic
minority and the British govern-
ment; the battle has dragged on for
hundreds of years.
The most immediate purpose of
the strikers has been to have condi-
tions in the prison upgraded. Part
of what they want is to have their
status as prisoners changed from
criminal to political. Their ultimate
aim, however, is to free Northern
Ireland from British rule and unite
it with the rest of Ireland. The hitch,
though, is that Northern Ireland's
population is two-thirds Protestant,
D00NES8URY
and the Protestants are obviously
reluctant to unite with a
predominantly Catholic Ireland.
Meanwhile, Northern Ireland's
Catholics feel under-represented
and mistreated under British rule.
Prim Minister Margaret Thatcher
has been adamant in her refusal to
concede to any of the prisoners'
demands, but the strikers have pro-
ved to be just as stubborn, and the
two sides have reached a standoff.
The strike, rather than
precipitating any sort of settlement,
has only pushed the two sides fur-
ther apart while increasing violence
considerably in Northern Ireland.
In addition to the 10 dead strikers,
seven people have died as the result
of violence stemming directly from
the strike.
For President Reagan to play
tough with the jobs of air traffic
controllers is one thing, for Prime
Minister Thatcher to play tough
with human lives is another matter
entirely. It is the duty of the British
government to negotiate an end this
senseless situation.
by Garry Trudsau
soAKmm neoKXB?
TCCAlAHEMB&tCY
vtaecnAPBmv ?A 7,
mwsmtf.prxrw
mfTTO-MOU TUt HKU jug,
wtrtOhievmiAHP ��?
uwHSOCBvmmpA l�Z'
CAU fORMTH �
TKNT
iwrnmeo-
iwseMte
�JS�TWME pRASV,VMfS
AtAWJUY
msncK
iimom
W,0�� OSCUSSH6
Jh wak, srmwfmi
oeA&sri thapus. I
UH0&A-
HI
IMF kJfLflUHz Twat& puTfwyeCoSt'
ameer hop
OFAJATT?
st�5At�K.mrmme
AtamhTTHNSSTDCDim
un mummwesBCABUKaF
unrr WaMA$AAP&J
; AUOJBCN ' -
fcHEAfvtXAi. ne
OAUWAMMCKBCr
AUKELr MEETSOF THtSOAK
SKKi. HK TO
��. �V��
SKI TOM PASS ME THE WANT ADS SECTION
WHEN V0WB THROUGH WITH Tf
"Mi 2

K
vl
UJ
Campus Forum
Chancellor's Supporters Rally
In all the negativism that has cir-
culated throughout our campc .s and in
North Carolina concerning Chancellor
Brewer, I would like to express my
sincere regret in his resignation.
Personally, I have the utmost respect
for Dr. Brewer. Our women's basketball
program has grown and been inspired
through the sincere support he has given
us.
I love East Carolina a great deal and I
am saddened by the abuse our college
has given him.
In a time when women's basketball
was just a token sport here at East
Carolina, he was a catalyst to its na-
tional growth. Three years ago there was
no academic counselor and tutoring was
limited to men's football and men's
basketball. But, academic excellence was
a priority to Brewer and now our players
are provided with this needed service.
Yes, Tom Brewer supported athletics
at East Carolina and women's basket-
ball is living proof. I can't tell you how
much I and the Lady Pirates will miss
Tom and Betty Brewer. Their impact on
me will never be forgotton. I wish them
the best. He's a first class man who has
done a tremendous job!
CATHY ANDRUZZI
Head Coach
Women's Basketball
Cartoon Humor?
We wish to express our disappoint-
ment over the cartoon which appeared in
The East Carolinian Thursday, Sept. 10,
1981. The East Carolinian is often used
as a voice to tell university organizations
what their responsibility is to our univer-
sity, but the embarassment from this
shows a lack of resonsibility that will
cast a shadow over us for years to come.
For example, The News & Observer used
the cartoon as an example to the state
about how the students felt about Dr.
Brewer's departure. This kind of action
gives the university a very bad image.
The job of chancellor is a very tough
one and some of your finer moments
often go unnoticed. When Dr. Brewer
overruled the Faculty-Senate and ruled
in favor of the SGA's request for a fall
break, he received a lot of criticism but
did not back down from his decision and
now students returning next fall will
have a fall break. He formed the Plann-
ing Commission which will be an impor-
tant document for the future of this
university.
We admit some controversy was evi-
dent during Dr. Brewer's tenure here,
however, displays such as last Thurs-
day's cartoon will not help to soothe the
wounds left from his departure. The
university is at a turning point in its
history and it is important that we
recover from the void left from Dr.
Brewer's resignation and look forward
to the upcoming months with great an-
ticipation. We are a proud and growing
institution and for us to achieve the high
standards we have set for our future, we
must do it as a team.
The SGA, Board of Trustees and
Faculty-Senate will be facing an impor-
tant task this year and when gains are
made, cartoons like the one Thursday do
nothing but set us back in the eye of our
fellow North Carolinians. We hope in
the future better judgement is made on
issues such as this, not only in the best
interest of the university, but to uphold
the quality of The East Carolinian too.
MARVIN BRAXTON, SGA Vice-Pres.
LESTER NAIL, SGA President
I am writing this letter to express my
vehement objection to the editorial car-
toon printed on page four in the Sept.
10, 1981 issue of The East Carolinian.
Such coarse jesting is in very poor taste,
and Dr. Brewer did nothing so terrible as
to warrant this type of brunt from The
East Carolinian.
If the purpose of this cartoon is sensa-
tionalism, it is a very embarassing and
ignominous deed at the expense of Dr.
Brewer. It totally lacks humor, and
presents an undesirable reflection on the
integrity of The East Carolinian as well
as on that of the cartoonist. Do you
believe that this cartoon reflects the at-
titude of our school? If so, I challenge
you to re-evaluate your statement.
I am firmly convinced that sound
moral judgment should be exercised
when publicized statements are made
concerning others, especially those in
authority. Better care should be taken in
the future to protect the image of the
university as well as the image of The
East Carolinian. This cartoon poorly
represents a newspaper of which this
university should be proud.
PEGGY A. SINGLETARY
Graduate, School of Art
ACC Comparison
I was disappointed with the words of a
fellow ECU student in even thinking
about comparing us with "the likes" of
an ACC school in either athletics or
behavior. Who the hell do you think
they are? Why, the starting quarterback
of the number one ranked team in the
ACC and number twelve ranked team in
the country (football) stated (last week's
Sports Illustrated) that most of their stu-
dent body "get drunk" at the football
games. That is not only the truth, but it
is also a stupid thing to say about your
own school. And to think that anyone
would even consider comparing an ACC
school with East Carolina.
CARLISLE JENNINGS
Senior, Technology
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
Uganda Battles Economic Strife
By JOSEPH C. OLINICK
Compared to some of the other nations
in the world, America is quite well off.
Considering all of the problems that the
U.S. faces, that may be hard to believe.
However, a conversation with one of
ECU's African students will convince
anyone that conditions are very good in
America.
An ECU student from Ugnda made
America's economic problems seem trivial
when he told of the conditions in his coun-
try. He said that in his country almost
everything must be bought on the black
market and that the black market prices
are extremly high and more than most
Ugandans can afford. For example, a loaf
of bread is $35. A carton of milk is $50. A
gallon of gasoline is $50. A pack of cigaret-
tes is $70. A bottle of beer is $100.
Medicine and other necessary items are
rarely available.
The Ugandan student went on to say
that food and medicine sent to Uganda by
relief organizations are confiscated by the
Ugandan Army for thier personal use.
Moreover, Ugandan soliers confiscate
whatever they desire. For example, soldiers
commonly stop cars, force the driver and
passengers out, and take the car. Also, it is
common for soldiers to attack private
homes, and ransack them.
Campus
Spectrum
According to the Ugandan student, the
government of Uganda is responsible for
the economic problems and violence in the
country. Government controlled troops
confiscate food and medicine and, thus,
create a shortage which results in a black
market and inflation. Furthermore, the
government allows and uses it's troops to
strip the Ugandan people of their wealth in
order to fill it's treasury or to fill the
pockets of the government leaders.
The Ugandan student said that condi-
tions in Uganda are much better than they
are in most African nations. He, also, in-
dicated that he believed the Soviet Union is
taking over much of Africa and that the
people of America are not getting an ac-
curate view of what is taking place in
Africa. Then, he firmly stated that the
Soviet backed regimes in Africa have done
nothing to improve the conditions in
Africa and that the people of Africa do not
want the Soviets or communism on their
continent.
Unlike Africa, America is a politically
stable nation. It does have some problems,
but they do not compare to the problems
of Uganda and similar nations. America
has an abundance of almost everything
while African nations have a shortage of
almost everything.That is, the items and
products that Americans so casually take
for granted are very rare and highly valued
in Africa.
More importantly, the American
government tries to aid it's citizens, not
persecute them, as is the case Uganda. In
America, one can drive down a road
without having to worry about being stop-
ped and robbed by marauding soldiers, or
one can go to bed without having to worry
about a sudden attack on his home by
government troops. All in all, when com-
pared to a country like Uganda, America is
a rich, safe haven with very small pro-
blems.
Joseph Olinick is a sophomore from
Durham enrolled in general college.
Olinick's column is only the second entry
in Campus Spectrum � a new column pro-
vided by this newspaper for students and
faculty to present their fews on current
topics of concern to campus, community
or nation.
Kids
Thb Thursi
Johnny J ant
concert at Si
ly approach
Tickets are
outlets as m
Store (betm
and 2 p.m.
the MS( (
been extern
this Thursdi
By PI
Less than
of enthusia
a rock antil
dustriai con
some here
of their ho
dream, that
hopes tor,
already Lepj
jor force aj
of heavy m
Short I v
Hi
HOLLY
its revenge
Emmy a;
television,
consecu 0
The high
took aarc
NOU
dent
t





N
yl Vv

o

SJ
K
Uj
A D N
1 HE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 15, 1981 Page 5
Kids Promise To Be 'Defening'
This Thursday night's Black foot.
Johnny an ant and Def I eppard
concert at Minges C oliseum is rapid-
ly approaching sell-out proportions.
Tickets are still on sale at all area
outlets as well as the Student Supply
Store (between the hours of 10 a.m.
and 2 p.m.). Also, ticket hours at
the SfSCentral Ticket Office have
been extended until 6 p.m. through
this Thursday.
By PETE MAKOWSKI
sprviat
1 K r �s: aninian
Less than two years ago, a group
o' enthusiastic kids were reenacting
a rock and roll fantasy in the in-
dustrial confines of a cutlery factory
somewhere in the working class area
of their hometown. Sheffield. This
dream, that every aspiring musician
hopes for, has become a reality and
already Leppard have become a ma-
jor force amongst the current crop
of heavy metal acts.
Shortly after the release of an
independently-produced EP, Lep-
pard won the acclaim of the media
and were signed by Phonogram
U.K. Their debut album. On
Through the Sight, lived up to its
promise. For a band so young
(average age being twenty) the
album demonstrated that Leppard
already had a great deal of depth
and maturity, both lyrically and
musically. Now, with their new-
album. High 7V Dry, Leppard have
taken a mighty leap ahead, proving
their worth and leaving no doubts
that they have the makings of a top
league group. Produced by the
legendary figure who put a new
charge of high voltage into AC DC,
Mutt Iange, this album
demonstrates the strengthcon-
fidence and wealth of talent that has
always been evident in leppard's
make-up. With the help of Mutt,
their sheer energy and dynamics are
exploited and amplified resulting in
See DEF, Page 6
Heavy Metalists 'Def Leppard' Appear This Thursday Night
With an average age of only 19-years, Heavy Metal experts "Def Lep-
pard" have already achieved a status that many rock bands only dream of.
The British group will assault some six-thousand pairs of ears in Minges
Coliseum this Thursday night along with southern groups Blackfoot and
The Johnny Van Zant Band. Tickets are still on sale for the concert at all
area ticket outlets.
Hill Street ys Revenge: Emmy
r
HOLLYWOOD. I
its revenge on the ra
Emmy awards, more
television. "Taxi" toi
consecutive year.
The highly praised
took awards for best
PI � "Hill Street Blues" wreaked
tings Sunday night winning eight
than any series in the history of
�k the comedy honors for the third
but little watched "Hill Street"
actor, actress, supporting actor.
writing, cinematography, sound editing, directing and
capped the night with the award for most outstanding
dramatic series of the year.
The cast and producers rejoiced calling it a victory for
quality and hoping the triumph will attract enough
viewers to keep it alive.
'Taxi" won six awards in the comedy class including
m
ire from
fege
nj cntrv
tolumn i
I fits and
�n current
" munitv
Buckminster Fuller On The '81 College Circuit
Noted inventor Buckminster Fuller will appear on campus on Tuesday, November 17 in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's Hendrix Theatre as part of the MSC Lecture Series.
best comedy series, for the third straight year, and a best
actor award for star Judd Hirsch.
"Shogun the romance of an English navigator ship-
wrecked in feudal Japan, won the prestigous award for
oustanding limited series besating out "Masada
Thesre was an emotional tribute to four-time Emmy
winner Lucille Ball, one of the nation's first TV stars
who was praised by co-host Shirley MacLaine as "a na-
tional treasure
Miss Ball, 70, burst into tears as the audience of TV
stars rose to their feet to applaud her 23-year career in
"I Love Lucy" and its successors.
There were also special tributes to Lawrence Welk
and the late playwright Paddy Chayefsky.
"Hill Street based on fast paced tales of a dozen
idiosynchratic police officers coping with life and death
in a northeastern city slum, is the lowest rated series ever
renewed by NBC.
Daniel J. Travanti, who plays the concerned
beleaguered Capt. Furillo on "Hill Street was chosen
oustanding lead actor in a series and the top actress
award went to Barbara Babcock for her portrayal of the
man-hungry interior decorator Grace Gardner.
The award for best supporting actor in a drama went
to Michael Conrad who plays the warmly paternal but
unflinchingly competent Sgt. Esterhaus.
"It's better than anything I've ever sen on TV and our
audience is growing Conrad said.
Travanti, breathless with excitement and waving his
fists aloft in a victory salute, thanked NBC for its sup-
port and said: "We've only been in existence for seven
months � you can't even make a baby in that time
Co producers Michael Kozoll and Steven Bochko also
shared an award for writing.
"Playing for Time the story of women musicians in
a Nazi death camp, picked up four awards. It was
chosen outstanding drama special and the script won
celebrated play w right Arthur Miller the writing prize in
the special program class.
Jane Alexander was picked best supporting actress
and Vanessa Redgrave took the statuette for outstan-
ding lead actress for her outstanding lead actress for her
portrayal of Jewish musician Fania Fenelon. Miss
Redgrave held onto the role over widespread protests
from Jews who objected to her anti lsreali political ac-
tivities.
The best actor award in the same category went to
Anthony Hopkins, coincidentally enough for playing
Adolph Hitler in "The Bunker
Boosted by the "Hill Street" triumph, NBC . which
has trouble with the ratings, won the network
sweepstakes with 20 Emmvs. CBS got 18; ABC got 12.
and PBS 8.
The "Hill Street" truimph, NBC surpassed the
previous Emmy record for a series, the seven won by the
Julie Andrews Hour in 1973, but was still short of the all
time Emmy champion. "Eleanor and Franklin which
won 12 in 1976.
Nancy Marchand. who plays the publisher Mrs. Pyn-
chon on "Lou Grant was named best supporting ac-
tress in a dramatic series.
The comedy series actress prize went to Isabelle San-
ford, Louise on "The Jeffersons who was so surpris-
ed to win that she went on stage still chewing the cheese
she was nibbling on in the audience.
"1 waited so lone, all mv humilitv is none" she crack-
ed.
American Farce
18-Wheeler Better Than Some
ByJOHNWEYLER
Staff Writer
You would probably think a movie with the title
"Honky Tonk Freeway" would not be a cinematic
masterpiece. You would be right. However, the Film is
not as bad as expectations and evident box-office failure
(the film will be playing for one dollar at all showings
until this Thursday at the Buccaneer Theatre in Green-
ville) allow.
"Honky Tonk Freeway" is an eager-to-please little
movie. It has a few good gags, some goofily-engaging
characters, and even a wisp of wit here and there. The
movie is meant to entertain, nothing more. If it has any
theme at all, it is the power of good oV American in-
genuity and spunk.
The basic situation of the plot is this: a new freeway
has been built, bypassing the tiny town of Ticlaw,
Florida. As there is no exit from the freeway to the
town, the residents realize their city will wither up and
die without the tourist trade it depends on. Led by
Ticlaw's mayor and minister (the same person, played
by William Devane) they try everything from bribery to
painting the entire town pink to exhibiting a water-
skiing elephant in an attempt to tempt visitors.
Meanwhile: a copy machine repairman who writes
children's stories about man-eating horses meets a nym-
phomaniacal southern belle who carries around her
mother's ashes in an urn while a couple consisting of an
aging ad-man and his alcoholic wife have their car
stolen by a lacernous pair who later steal a car belonging
to two nuns who end up hitching a ride with a
constantly-fighting family while two other crooks give a
ride to an always-stoned cocaine dealer. During all the
above, a would-be songwriter is transporting a
rhinoceros cross-country.
Most of the movie is spent on the road and at various
stops along the way such as restaurants and massage
parlors, as the various stories weave in and out of each
other, until everybody ends up in � you guessed it �
Ticlaw, Florida. How the Ticlawians accomplish attrac-
ting so many travellers must remain a mystery here. Just
chalk it up to American ingenuity and explosives.
The tourist-trappers triumph over the uncaring and
crooked government. This celebration of the common
man's courage and self-sufficiency gives the film a cer-
tain spark. It doesn't, however, ignite into anything ex-
traordinary, as the flick is chiefly concerned with gags,
the kooky characters and an occasional car crash. (Has
there been a movie released in the past few years that
has not had at least one car chase crash?)
Since the above elements are common to the point of
overpopulation in today's films, why is "Honky Tonk
Freeway" not as successful as so many other slapstick-
and-sex comedies? Perhaps because there is no single
character prominent enough, or actor popular enough,
for mass appeal. Perhaps because the title makes pro-
spective audiences think the film is yet another corn-
pone trucking .movie, a trend that has hopefully moved
on down the road.
At least "Honky Tonk Freeway" has one strong
point: the skillful direction of John Schlesinger, who is
most famous for the award-winning "Midnight
Cowboy" in 1969. His expertise lifts this film high
above the level of such money-making but mediocre-
made comedies as "Arthur" and "Stripes But most
moviegoers could care less about the art of Film as such.
Apparently, the producers of "Honky Tonk Freeway"
are going to have do to attract audiences what the
citizens of Ticlaw did to attract tourists.
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1981
I 1 I
To�, yoo jvsr hct yovK
'4LCf m AU.THAT Mt
WHO PIP ALL THIS
� r � J'
AW AjUj GMWIsJGSf
Def Leppard's
Success Comes
At Early Age
Continued From Page 5
maximum potency.
Leppard's formative years read almost
something like a fairy tale. It involves five high
school kids with one thing in common � a total
love affair with rock 'n' roll and a burning ambi-
tion to break away from the rut a lot of people
around them were falling into and make some
music.
The story starts with Pete Willis and Rick
Savage (commonly known as "Sav"). They both
knocked around in youth club type bands and,
when they left school, decided to take their
musical career a step further. They formed a
group called Atomic Mass (mainly playing
material by Thin Lizzy and T. Rex). The band
featured a drummer named Rueben, who played
on their "Getcha Rocks Off" EP and a singer by
the name of Holland. Things began to gell with
the exception of the lead vocalist, who, from all
accounts, got up to some bizarre and eccentric
antics � he had to go.
The group acquired their present-day "throat"
(as he describs himself), Joe Elliot, by sheer luck.
At that time, Elliot had aspirations of being a
drummer, and only made contact with Willis in
order to buy one of his practice amps. As Willis
recalled, "Me and Joe had met up when we kick-
ed our other singer out, so I asked Joe if he fan-
cied a crack at singing. He agreed. Rueben got us
this practice place, we had three drums, a guitar
and half an amp. In that first rehearsal, we wrote
two songs and worked out 'Jailbreak' and
'Sufragette City "
This was the first time Elliot had sung, as he
recalled painfully, "I was fucking awful, but I
was much better than the guy they had before, so
God help him
Next person to join was the "other" axeman,
Steve Clark, who Pete Willis met at college. "We
were in the same class and I used to see him
reading a guitar book, so I thought he must play
guitar. Next thing, I met him at a Judas Priest gig
and invited him down to a rehearsal for a jam.
When he came, he played the entire solo of
"Freebird" on his own so we immediately asked
him to join
Drummer Richard Allen was the last person to
join and, at 17, is the youngest member. He is the
darkest horse of the group and will just tell you
he's played in various kinds of groups. His
brother Robert is Leppard's tour manager � it's
a family affair.
During this period, the band spend most of
their time rehearsing. Soon, they decided it was
important to play on stage. Joe: "We were prac-
ticing too much, almost everyday. We almost
split up before our first gig because we had 15
songs worked out and weren't playing anywhere
and some of the band were getting fed up with
the situation
But, before I take the story any further, 1 must
let Joe explain how the group got their name:
"The name, in fact, came about two years before
1 joined the group. At school, 1 just used to draw
posters for imaginary gigs and I made the
group's name up. The rest of the guys were up in
the bedroom one day and saw the poster and
took to the name it could have been
anything
initially their monicker was spelled in its pro-
per form, but. after five months, the group
decided to change the spelling, because, for some
reason, the name was attracting a lot of punks to
gigs. "Everyone said we did it 'cause it looked
like Led Zeppelin " said Joe, "We didn't mind.
It was belter to look like them than the Boom-
town Rats
The group played their first gig in July, 1978.
They began to draw a local following and even-
tually decided to record an EP, which they releas-
ed on 'heir own tastefully-named Bludgeon Rif-
fol label. It received plenty of exposure and Lep-
pard were almost instasntly regarded as the
cream amongst the crop of the new wave of
heavy metal bands. The band signed up with a
management company who negotiated their
recording deal with Phonogram. After the first
album, the inevitable rigorous touring schedule
followed, and it was when they supported
ACDC that they met up with ACDC manager
Peter Mensch. who showed more than a passing
interest in the group.
Joe: "Peter made it obvious that he wanted to
manage the band and it was at this period that we
realized our old management was out of their
depth
The group soon entered headline status in Bri-
tain and went over to tour the States, where they
made quite an impression.
Leppard LP Reviewed; See Page 7
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS MOM U-H
WEEKS
AT FUCTHCR EXPENSE
HIS 00 rr.�ii.rtev T��t, lift
Control, and Probitm
r�9��ncv Cow���lii��. For
further inlormotiO" call
U30S3S (Toll Fro Number
�0O-17V2SM) betwoon � AM
and S PM Weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 We! Morgan St
Raleigh, N.C
Get the bugs out.
If your bicycle is in less than peak riding condition,
come to us. Our professionals are specially trained to handle
all aspects of bicycle servicing -from a simple tune-up to
major repairs. And we use only quality authorized parts.
No matter what condition your bicycle is in, we'll help
you get the bugs out.
BICYCLE POST
530 Cotanche St Greenville, N. C.
Phone: 757-36.6 Store Hours: 9:30-5:30 MonFri. 9:00-4:00 Sat.
When you know bicycles, you want Raleigh.
WANTED:
Representative on
the Media Board.
Pick up applications in Media
Board secretary's office. 8 a.ml
p.m. and 2 p.m5 p.m. Monday-
Friday.
a
WEEKLY SPECIAL
Stop in for a "special lunch
Now!
Ex-Long Coney
Here's a chance to get a terrific deal on your next
Sonic Coney. Just take the coupon below to a par-
ticipating Sonic drive-in and enjoy our delicious
Sonic Coney with chili and mustard. You can get
onions or relish, too, if you want. And for a little
extra, order your Coney with cheese. So, bring your
coupon into a Sonic soon for a great deal on a deli-
cious Sonic Coney.
SONIC
ADVERTISED
ITEM POllCt
Each ot these advartised item � required to be raadrty availableJor
) below the advertised price in each AAP Store, escapt as speemcaiiy
in this ad.
saiealoA
noted J
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT SEPT. 19. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, N.C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Hiway 264 By-Pass Greenville Square
Shopping Center � Greenville, N.C.
111
AIL
Enjoy great foodAnd great savings with Green Ps
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH FRYER
Box-0 Chicken
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole Both
Eye Rounds
Cut Free hito
Eye Round Steaks,
end Roast, Bottom
Round Steaks and b.
Roast, Ground Round
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Fresh
Whole F
EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM COUNTRY FARM
Pork
Roast
FLORIDA GOLD
&�20&
PLAIN - UNBLEAI
Orange Juiceuu9S Red Band ,
l ISFIour 5-89
ANN PAGE
ANN PAGE
Potato Chips Vegetable Soup
Regular or Rippled
8oz.
twin
pack
79
GOLDEN QUARTERS
Mrs. Filberts
Margarine
Hb.
pkg.
59
BURGUNDY �CHABLIS� RHINE �
DRY RED � DRY WHITE � CHENIN
REISLING � ZINFANDEL
Taylor Win
059
FROZEN
Ann Page Pi
�Hamburger
Papparoni
�Sausage 12 oz.
� Cheese P9
SAVE 76
Sealtest
Ice Cream
t59
ASSORTED
Hi Dri Towels
LIQUID
5 OFF
ft
Bleach
You Pay Only
69
SONIC SPECIAL
FOOT LONG CONEY
Regular French Fries
Med. Drink
�1.89 -
618 Greenvile Blvd. � Only
Good Sept. 14 - 20
with coupon
�TrESNWTTHQUALITY�
CALIFORNIA CRISP SOUD ICEBERG
Head
Lettuce
GOLDEN RIPE
Dole Bananas
CALIFORNIA PLUMP SWEET JUrCY
Seedless Grapes
SONIC
t somc ttusTtmi mc mi u. oi mmnvto
3& 1
N.C.GROWN
49�
Au
The
The Glasi
by Tennesv
will be prt
November 1
Methodic
Center I r
hast Fifth
Greenville
The !
be p r o di
directed ds
Finnan
member
Drama a r
Depart men)
lion with
Foundation
vine.
The drar
ed bv Wi
"mem
� onsidered
classic P
best know!
respect
Cla
FOR
WATERBEDS
buy a wate'bn
direct trom mi)'
to ' retail Com
Iff Mdff
ranty thermos
liner frame m
tor as low as I
Call Oa�iO Dei
Small retnqe'
cellent t
A '
Can tV 3710
t by 10 can
Weyltr cartoo
Carolinian ar
Times tormer
artist tlO tor b ,
or Can '52 srrsj
Custom
Shirts. J5 to tlO
protessio
and My
ask tor M .
1.76 CneveMe
Good condition
ly 75�-07�4
So you both br
Rent one
1 Jar .is . 75J
Two tickets
game will sai
rsj 13jo
Dictaphone he�
ceilenf con!
reasonable ott.
For Sale
inch speed Di�'
2 00 p m
For Sale
refrigerator &c
year oil ?S� t
FOR
FEMA
house
ijmpi
included Pile
�oov
Great ick
ECU and do
Female root
share : oeor
located 5 mm
the N
month
752 �
"� � �
$$
L�
Tl
LI
G!
ABRi
MELI
PEPf
coa
DO.
BRO
UNI'
SUNI
APP
THEI
the
ECI
THI
i
� -V
�aBBM aaa i tiNn





A uditions Held For
The Glass Menagerie
The Glass Menagerie
by Tennessee Williams
will be presented on
November 10-15 at the
Methodist Student
C enter Theatre, 501
last Fifth Street in
Cireenville.
The production will
be produced and
directed by Stephen B.
Finnan, former faculty
member of ECU's
Drama and Speech
Department, in associa-
tion with the Wesley
Foundation of Green-
ville.
The drama, describ-
ed by Williams as a
"memory" play, is
considered a modern
classic. Perhaps the
best known and most
respected of Williams'
works, critics have call-
ed The Glass Menagerie
"one of the greatest
American plays every
written
Finnan is planning
The Glass Menagerie as
the first in a series of
productions. His goal is
the establishment of a
little theatre organiza-
tion in cooperation
with the Wesley Foun-
dation of Greenville.
Anyone interested in
being involved in this
project is invited to res-
pond.
Auditions will be
held at the Methodist
Student Center
Theatre, 501 East 5th
Street, on September 24
and 25 at 7:30 p.m.
Evening performances
are scheduled for
November 10-14, with
a matinee showing on
Sunday, Nov. 15. Fur-
ther information can be
obtained by calling
757-3546 or 758-2030.
Stephen B. Finnan
has produced and
directed several Off-
Broadway productions
in New York. He has
also taught and
directed at Brooklyn
College and Michigan
State University.
Last Spring Finnan
directed the very suc-
cessful dinner theatre
production of And
Miss Reardon Drinks A
Little at the
Mendenhall Student
Center.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1981
Group Merits Raves
Director Stephen B. Finnan: Working to
establish a little theatre organization in Green-
ville. Under his direction, "The Glass
Menagerie" opens at the Methodist Student
Center Theatre on November 10.
The following review originally appeared in the
June 26, 1980 issue of Rolling Stone magazine.
Use by permission � all rights reserved.
"Fans insist that it never went away. Critics
wish it would. But heavy metal, that belligerent
bastard son of American blues and macho
English rock-star attitudes, is back. It's also big-
ger, louder and � hard as this may be to believe
� better than ever, rising to punk-rock's
chalienge by adding some new risks to the old
riffs.
"With an average age of eighteen, the five
members of Def Leppard are barely old enough
to remember the first Neanderthal rumblings of
Black Sabbath and Deep Purple. Yet On through
the Might shows they not only respect their
elders, they've taken cues from their New Wave
peers, too. Ignoring heavy-metal's unwritten law
requiring long guitar solos in every other tune,
guitarists Pete Willis and Steve Clark shoot from
the hip, packing their licks into tight, three-
minute pop arrangements. The anthemlike
"Rock Brigade" and "Hello America with its
Queen-aphonic harmonies, are apt examples.
"Even when they dare to wax poetic in such
apocalyptic sagas as "When the Walls Came
Tumbling Down ' and the seven-minute, Rush
style "Overture Def Leppard rarely let theii
ambition outstrip their rock & roll sense. Bassist
Rick Savage and drummer Rick Allen apply the
same youthful muscle to a breast-beating ballad
("Sorrow Is a Woman") as they do to a Thin
Lizzy-like raver ("Wasted"). And while Joe
Elliott isn't a lead singer on the sanctified level of
Robert Plant, he wails wonderfully in a
resonating tenor, fortified by backup harmonies
and Tom Allom's battering-ram production.
"Displaying a wisdom beyond their years, Def
Leppard take the timeworn basics of heavy
metal, give them a punky Eighties overhaul and
come up with, uh, heavy melody. On through the
Might is awfully impressive for a band making its
vinyl debut
� David Fricke
LVWyiMB
Classifieds
FOR SALE
WATERBEDS Now students CM
buy a wjterbed (Queen of King)
direct trom mgl You can save up
to � retail Complete beds with is
yr. warranty mattress. 5-yr. war
ranty, thermostat, heater, liner,
liner frame, headboard, pedestal
lor as low as 18 Queen 19 King
Call David Delivery adv 758 2408
Small refrigerator. Sanyo, ex
cellent condition, used only one
year Why rent when you can buyc
Call 757 3710
8 by 10 caricatures by John
yVeyler cartoonist lor The East
Carolinian and the Greenville
Times, former Carowinds portrait
artist $10 for b and w $15 for col-
or Call 752 5775
Custom airbrush artwork (tee
shirts! $5 to $10. Artist has worked
professionally at Daytona Beach
and Myrtle Beach Call 752 6311.
ask tor Mike
1976 Chevette AM FM. air cond
Good condition Call weekdays on
hj ?5807�4
So you both brought your stereos
Rent one to me Price negotiable
Al Uarvis) 758 9471
Two tickets to the ECU State
game will sacrifice tor $8 Call
757 1330
Dictaphone headset included. Ex
cellent condition Make
reasonable offer Cal 757 3124
For Sale 24 inch 10 speed bike. 26
inch speed bike Call 758 3318 after
1 00 p m.
For Sale 3 2 cubic foot
refngen�for Good shape $50 One
year ol7M ��03
FOR RENT
FEMALE roommate wanted in
house on Charles St l block from
mpus $100 per month (utilities
udt-ci Phone 758 7010
ROOM for rent immediately
Great location one block trom
ECU and downtown $75 Call
752 2659.
Female roommate wanted to
share 2 bedroom mobile home
located 5 mms. trom campus on
the No-th end Of Greenville $75 a
month plus one halt utilities. Call
'52 7973
�t ' amcufiacjAj Faticjues
iltMis Sleeping bays Barnpv
i.a,mpiny fquipmnt Mee' Ti6
fchoas D.shes Aid 0�e- 'jil )�'
terenl New And Us�c '�! �
IvOobor BuO's JjS 9
ARMY-NAVY STORE
�bC! S I .Hi S'lfr'1
ROOMMATES wanted to share a
partially furnished 3 bedroom
house With young couple in Lake
Ellsworth-Greenville. $140 per
month utilities included. Call
756 6308 after 5 30 p.m.
Female roommate needed to
share 7 bedroom apt. at
Greene Way $112.50 per month
rent plus ' utilities Call 355 4718
Female roommate needed to
share 3 bedroom apt. at
Eastbrook $87 plus one third
utilities Call Sheila at 7 58 2506
Apartment to rent. Studio with
priv. entry and bath. Near cam
pus. Available now. $90 incl.
utilities. 752 2615
Roommate needed. One block
trom campus Share one fourth
rent and utilities Call 758019.
Roommate wanted: Private room
in 2 bedroom Townhouse Walking
distance of campus. $90 plus one
third utilities 752 7443 or 757-4344.
Ask for Chuck
For rent two mobile homes.
Completely furnished Both have
two bedroms and are approx
� mateiy three miles from ECU.
One rents tor $150, the other is
$175 Phone 758 1975 between 7 10
PERSONAL
Typing tor students, professors,
etc Kempie Ounn 1019 E. Wright
Rd. Greenville, NC 27834 Call
752-4733 alter 1 p m
Notary Public: convenient and in-
expensive. Call Amy at 757-3734.
Female resident counselor: must
take training and internship. Pay-
ment in kind (tree room, utilities,
phone and house privileges) Ex
cellent opportunity for students in
human services. Catal 75S-HELP.
Clip Joint" has moved to 119 Gar
rett Call Marlena at 758 8832
Faculty, students, staff looking
tor extra income Part-time tob
with unlimited future. Minimal in-
vestment. Free training. Interna-
tional organization Send name,
address, phone number, where
you can be reached and a brief
resume to FUTURE, PO Box 97,
Greenville, NC 27834 You will be
promptly contacted.
Reward offered tor return of lost
notebook with "John Weyier in-
scribed on cover. Contains notes
valuable to owner but worthless to
anyone else. NO questions asked.
Call 7S1 5775.
Wanted: Journalist sports writer.
Excellent oppoprtunity to be your
own editor. We are looking for a
sports writer with experience in
lay rvt, design, and copy fitting
tor Tennis Shoe Tidbits. If in-
terested, please contact Ms. Miie
at 757-4M7.
fjjWjaa
I7S8-OJ37
Introductory
Specials
Tuesday & Wednesday
Shrimp or
Flounder
includes French Fries, Cole Slaw,
and Hushpuppies
lllllll llllll! '1111111111
HMIILV
Tuesday
Night
E From 4 P.M. To 9 P.M. i
$2.49
Reg.
2.99
Includes our No.
and Dinner Roll.
2 Ribeye Steak, Baked Potato
Combination Shrimp
and Flounder
includes French Fries, Cole
Slaw, and Hushpuppies
3.95
Crosii Tar RKer bridge �
take left at light �
building located on left
38!��?J,
Mi
SAAD'S
SHOE
&, REPAIR
f 113 Grande Ave
H ifb 758-1228
M
JO.
Quality
Repair
.
JACKS
600 W Greenville Blvd
Greenville. NC.
Added Feature
Drawing
Each Week For FREE Dinners
Reaisterfor FREE ECU TiChetS!
n� pure naaaaMnj �o�iw .v. ca.3x io w.n
Ml
Back to
School
Eyeglass
Special
For all ECU Students,
Faculty & Staff
Offer Good Through
Sept. 30, 1981
Located across Dr. Park
752-1446
OPTICIANS
opticians
of amenca
9-5:30
Mon
Fri.
VISA
Interested
CR-
V
"V
Sm �mm �
THE STUDENT LIFE CELEBRATES COMMITTEE WOULD
LIKE TO THANK THE FOLLOWING SPONSORS FOR THEIR
GENEROUS CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUR CELEBRATION
ABRAMS BARBECUE
MELLO YELLO
PEPSI COLA
COCA COLA
DOMINO'S PIZZA
BRODY'S
UNIVERSITY BOOK EXCHANGE
SUNSHINE GARDEN CENTER
APPLE RECORDS
THE BOOK BARN
THE COLLEGE SHOP
ECU STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
THE PIPELINE
THE WESTERN STEER
THE CROW'S NEST
THE PLAZA CINEMA
THE BUCCANEER THEATERS
BASKIN ROBBINS ICE CREAM SHOP
THE RECORD BAR
MILLER BREWING CO. CO. Tankard Co.
BUDWEISER JEFFREY'S
BEER AND WINE
PLITT THEATERS
OVERTON'S GROCERY STORE
OVERTON'S SKI SHOP
Yearbook
Design?
The BUCCANEER will hold its first staff
meeting September 16 at 7:00 p.m. All
interested students are urged to attend.
The BUCCANEER office is located
upstairs in the Old South Building, across
from Joyner Library.
�� �,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 15, 1981 Page 8
Long Scoring Streak Halted
Bryant, Heels Smash Pirates, 56-0
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport, r dllw
Tailback Kelvin Bryant rushed
for 211 yards and an Atlantic Coast
Conference record six touchdowns
Saturday to lead 14th-ranked North
Carolina to an impressive 56-0
whipping of East Carolina.
The final tally probably came as a
surprise to many observers across
the state who have watched these
two teams take part in some intense
battles in the past.
But in this, the last game schedul-
ed between the clubs the Tar Heels
were totally dominant.
"I'm totally embarrassed that we
did not play better said ECU head
coach Ed Emory. "I felt this team
was as well-prepared as any I've
ever had. But we have a young team
with lots of new faces. On paper we
are not as good as they are, but I felt
we could play on emotion and com-
pete with them. But we just got em-
barassed in every way a football
team can be
The shutout was the first for ECU
since 1971 and broke a 110-game
scoring streak for the Pirates. That
streak had been the third longest in
the nation, behind Oklahoma and
Southern Cal.
The fabulous Bryant, a junior
from Tarboro, darted, dashed, cut
and slid through the Pirate defense
all day toward a career high rushing
performance. His assault on the
ACC record books may be un-
precedented. He set conference and
school records for: most TD's
scored in a game, most TD's respon-
sible for in a game and most TD's
scored by rushing in a game.
"I think I did a good job
Bryant said in an understatement
following the game. "But 1 can't
take all the credit. Our line did a
good job and the passing attack
helped me alot
The man most responsible for
that passing attack, quarterback
Rod Elkins, had only good things to
say about Bryant after the game.
"He's just amazing to me
Elkins said. "He looks quicker this
year than last year. I didn't see how
that could happen. It's just
unbelievable that someone can run
like that
The game, which had been spiced
Kl 00 09- - 0
IM 7 It U 75
I NC � RrMni 1 run ilitin Ueh)
1 N Brvani 45 ma iUmu kick)
( M Burnu 1 run (Maya BCkl
IM Brsanl 4 run lHasrs kick!
1 M Brsanl " kirk (Hun kick)
I M Brsam X2 run lHasrs kick)
I NC - Brsanl 4 run Hairs kirk �
( S( - Rallitf 2 run iMavrs kick)
KlI N(
) .rst d"�ns QM
Uushrs ards 50-14.167-19.1
Passing ards III7�
Passes 5-1)19-11-1
Punls 9-42.112-45 5
) umhtrs-l.isi 4.22-1
Prnallirs-sards 7-654-46
nial nffl� 16)571
imihii;i 41 LEABOB
Hushm� � ECU: B)u� 10-49, etson 12-15.mmmm 5)9.
Binrr 5-9. V iU-s 5-7, nb 4-9. Mr an4-�.CmmJ 3-9.
1 M : BrM.ni 19-2)1. Hailitf 14-57. Burrus �-34. ftaanaMaj
IB-II, Jones 4-33
Passing - 1 . Nrkon 4-1-1-18. Ingnm 1-0-0-0 I St
Hklas 1�-HM-11. Mankatafr I-I-4M7.
Hr.ns.ng - Kl: ann lit. IN(Richardson 3-37.
i.nffm 2-43. Brvani 1-20. Nickrb 1-2.Rat1-17. Burrus
1-12. RobtMoa 1-6. Saattfc 1)5.
by Tar Heel coach Dick Crum's ac-
cusations that ECU coaches had
spyed on his team and the stealing
of the UNC mascot by ECU
students, was, at the very least, a let-
down.
The Pirates came out fired up and
held the Heels on their first two
possessions. UNC made the most of
the third possession, though, going
82 yards for the game's first score.
The way that one came about
seemed to foreshadow the way the
day would go for the Bucs. Bryant
ran from the ECU 24-yard-line to
the six and then fumbled the ball
forward. A number of Pirates were
in the area, but the loose pigskin
was recovered by Tar Heel receiver
Doug Sickels on the one. Bryant
went over for the first of his six
scores on the next play.
Early in the second quarter
Bryant put on what was probably
his most awesome display of the
day, weaving his way 45 yards
through ECU defenders for a score.
Jeff Hayes' extra point put the
Heels up, 14-0.
Later in the quarter the P:rates
made a move to narrow the Tar
Heel margin, driving from their own
38 to the Carolina 12. The Bucs ran
out of downs and had to settle for a
field goal attempt. ECU kicker
Chuck Bushbeck pushed his 28-yard
try wide to the right, though.
That seemed to change the entire
chemistry of the game. The Heels
drove to the ECU 45 and, on a
third-and-nine situation, came up
with what may have been the key
play of the game. Elkins hit wide
receiver Larry Griffin on a 24-yard
pass play to the ECU 21.
Two plays later fullback Alan
Burrus went over from the one with
4:13 left in the half. The Heels ex-
ploded for two more scores before
the half was over, Bryant scoring
both � from four and seven yards.
The 28 points scored in the second
quarter by the Heels tied the school
record for points in a single period.
The 21 points they scored in a span
of 3:09 at the end of the half pro-
bably set another.
The'&'cfftfffTialf was no better for
the Pirates. The Tar Heels added
two more scores in the first 7:46 of
the third quarter, Bryant getting
both on runs of 32 and four yards.
The second was set up bv a Pirate
fumble on the ECU 20.
The final Tar Heel TD was scored
by reserve tailback Bob Ratliff.
Following the game UNC coach
Dick Crum praised his team's ef-
forts.
"We were a little bit rusty at first,
but then we managed to get things
going. Kelvin is a premier back. I
was also pleased with our defensive
plav. But we've still got a lot to
learn
The fourth-year UNC coach said
that the ECU wishbone did not pose
a problem to his club.
"The only wishbone we've had
trouble handling was Oklahoma's
wishbone. There's a lot of dif-
ference in a wishbone and an
Oklahoma wishbone
The Pirates, now 1-1, travel to
Raleigh this Saturday to face
unbeaten N.C. State.
Kelvin-ating
The Pirates
North Carolina tailback Kelvin Bryant
(44) sweeps around ECU safety Marvin
Elliott. Bryant ran by, over and around
the ECU defense to the tune of a
211-yard, six-touchdown performance in
the Heels' 56-0 win Saturday. The six
TD's by the Tarboro junior set an ACC
single-game record. (Photo By Gar
Patterson)
UNC's Bryant: A Star Is Born
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
?.ssjslam Sports 1 ditm
Tfie y,jra'st "Carolina-North
Carolina football game played this
past Saturday in hot, sunny Kenan
Stadium was a game of stars � one
rising and one fallen.
The rising star, junior tailback
Kelvin Bryant, shot through the
East Carolina defense on his way to
a career-high 211 yards on 19 carries
and an Atlantic Coast Conference
record six touchdowns.
The fallen star is former All-ACC
defensive back and punter Steve
Streater, who no longer terrorizes
wide receivers because of an
automobile accident last summer
that left him paralyzed from the
waist down. The accident occurred
just after Streater had signed a pro-
fessional contract with the
Washington Redskins.
But on this Carolina Blue after-
noon, even Streater had something
to smile about.
The rising star did not forget the
fallen one. After his first two
touchdowns, Bryant gave his former
teammate game balls which Streater
spiked in celebration from his
�I 1 Jfc
wheelchair in the endzone.
"I had decided before the game to
give the ball to Steve Bryant said
following the game. "Steve worked
so hard with the Redskins. I know it
made him feel good. We wanted to
win the game for Steve
Coach Dick Crum was a little
"worried" about his tailback's ac-
tions.
"We didn't dedicate the game to
Steve he said. "Kelvin just started
giving him the ball. I was afraid we
were going to get penalized for not
giving the ball back to the official
The 6-2, 195 pound speedster
from Tarboro gave the Pirate
defense fits all afternoon. His first
score came late in the first quarter
when he smashed over the right side
from one yard out. Early in the se-
cond period, Bryant took the han-
doff from Elkins, cut right, then
left, then left again, and evaded the
entire ECU defense on his way to a
45-yard touchdown.
After an East Carolina fumble in
the same period, Bryant took a pitch
on the right side and leaped over a
defender at the goal line for his third
score of the half, a run of four
yards.
The record-tying score came on a
pitch on the right side, where Bryant
cut right, then left and outran Clint
Harris for a seven-yard touchdown.
Bryant broke Stan Fritts
(formerly of N.C. State) and Don
McCauley's (formerly of UNC)
scoring record with 10 minutes left in
the third quarter on a pitch left,
which he took 32 yards for a
touchdown. He left the game with
seven minutes remaining in the third
quarter.
Bryant refused to be left alone in
the limelight. "Our offensive line is
big and strong he said, "and they
did a great job. Our passing attack
helped a lot, also. They (ECU)
didn't know what we were going to
do. I think 1 did a good job, but I
can't take all the credit. I do think
I've gotten a little quicker this
year
Crum couldn't find words to
describe Bryant's performance.
"What can vou say? He's a
premiere back. You (speaking to
media members) can describe it
beter than I can
Quarterback Rod Elkins found
the right words.
"He's just amazing to me he
said. "He looks quicker this year
than last year. I don't see how that
could happen. It's just unbelievable
that someone can run like that.
"It'd look like he was going to be
tackled, and he'd run around them.
I've never seen anyone like that
Bryant's backfield mate, Allan
Burrus, described Bryant as
"awesome. I'd make halfway of a
block and all of a sudden I'd see him
dart around me. I really tried to gel
down there and make a block, but
he would go so fast
The star running back said he
once considered going to East
Carolina, thus giving him an added
incentive to perform well. "1 jut
wanted to beat ECU because it is so
close to my home" (30 miles away).
"I considered going there at one
point but then I came up here and
that changed my whole idea. When
they would lose here, they would
stick together. At ECU, when
they'd lose, everybody would be try-
ing to put it on everybody
In his third year at Carolina after
making the big decision to become a
Tar Heel, it appears that a star is
born in Chapel Hill � a rising star
at that.
Shaken Emory Believes
Bucs Will Bounce Back
Converging On Nelson
North Carolina noseguard Steve Fort son
(96) works his way by the East Carolina
offensive and heads towards Pirate
quarterback Carlton Nelson, who seems
aware of the Tar Heel's presence.
(Photo By Gary Patterson)
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Koilor
"1 think this football team will
redeem itself
East Carolina football coach Ed
Emory made the statement on Mon-
day, two days after his team suf-
fered a humiliating 56-0 defeat at
the hands of arch-rival North
Carolina.
"That has to be the biggest blow
of my career he said. "But it is
over with. You can't change the
score now. We practiced yesterday
(Sunday) and will not stop until we
get things turned around
The Pirates face another difficult
task this weekend, having to travel
to Raleigh to play always-tough
N.C. State. Emory likes the idea of
playing the Wolfpack immediately
after the big loss to Carolina.
"If I were a player he said, "I
would think it's the greatest thing in
the world. Our players can redeem
themselves in five days. Sometimes
in life you are never able to do that.
But we have that big chance against
a great N.C. State team this Satur-
day
"Losing is one thing but losing
the way we did is the hardest thing
to overcome. I do feel like this team
has character and will regroup and
bounce back against a very fine
N.C. State team this weekend
Emory pointed to one particular
play in which the Pirate defense,
which surrendered 571 yards in the
loss, fell apart. He claimed that the
defenders lost it in the second
quarter after the offense drove to
the UNC 12 and did not score. The
Heels led at the time, 14-0.
"The defense played good for 11
minutes Emory said. "When we
didn't score a touchdown and
Chuck Bushbeck missed that field
goal; I think that was the time that
they didn't reach down and grab
their guts and pride. I don't think
the difference. I'm just sorry and
embarrassed that it didn't turn out
that way
Emory said the loss was especially
painful after last week's big build-
up.
"Our people were so fired up for
this one he said. "The at-
mosphere on campus last week was
great, I guess because this was out
last game with Carolina. Heck, I
thought the team was as well
prepared as any I've ever had. I hate
to see this happen after we had
everybody so excited
The second-year coach called for
Pirate fans to stay behind the team,
adding that nine games remained on
the schedule.
"There's nothing we can do that
can change what happened Satur-
day he claimed. "This team needs
they laid it on the line. That's the
hardest thing for a coach to accept, the fans and student body more now
that you team just didn't play wrth than ever. We can comeback.
intensity and pride "Look at North Carolina last
Emory said that the Pirates' year Emory added. "The same
chances at success were dependent thing happened to them at
on "intensity and pride Oklahoma. They lost 41-7 and it
"1 knew going in there that, on could have just as easily been 91-7 if
paper, we were not as good as Oklahoma hadn't called the dogs
them he said. "But I felt we could off. Well, Carolina came back and
Emory said, though, that coming play on emotion and intensity and finished 11-1 after that loss. I'm not
back would be a real test for his compete with them. 1 really believed saying that we can do that, but we
team. the last eight minutes would make can and will bounce back
Pi
Mi
A
Las, (
Ed Em
to V
"embarras-
understat
I he
humiha
SCheduli
schools r
made
sche
mo
w
i he Pii
w ee r

( ar
plav
dona
piei
Pira
Dow
noth i
V
apar'
seen.
ECl
la: h. :
hav
Pira
RIGG
SH
SHOI
OOWWTO
GREF S .
�s 3 OOO R 5 I
COX FiOSI
.�
SHOEREI
ATTI
VERYBI
758-021
v;
Rl
WE
AM
TRI
AT
YOU
CLOS1
1 CM
CORN! R 01
Ed
Pick
Boon
a.m
Mon
t





I HI l-ASIAKOl INI VN SI I'll MHI K 15, I S� I
0
i

B
n
es
Pirates Have
Much To Prove
After Defeat
i asi c arolina head football coach
HO! ealled hisi cam's56-0 loss
th i1; olina Saturday
em!asstng temeni1 hatvas an
I4th-iankd I ai Heels
ilial;d thePnitcs inthe last-
e bMHtVIlthe two
BlKs peiormance
t I N( decisionto stop
ic I CI Uok like a wise
wwas thblem?Wh did
mpi essive in last
� mover had el Mil! estern against ed up to ken had a s Kenan inging a
V,adium . 1tint and d as !a; t
-ovef a quartei the ame. gh the se-
. droc to the
ame awav with
idow n field
Nothing.
the Pirates fell
�ii! advan
1 nomts in a
ond qiarter and
e Bucs!ailed to ned drive
enit of the


: the ould 1 Cl now a
Charles
Chandler
laughingstock. All that could
change with a good showing at N.C.
State this coming weekend; but for
the time being the Pirates are looked
down upon by every football fan in
the state.
After they failed to score, the
Pirates showed no drive or deter-
mination. There seemed to be no in-
testinal fortitude under the purple
helmets.
This is hard to accept because the
game was the last that the Pirates
have to look forward to against the
lar Heels. The least ECU fans
could have expected was one last
respectable performance. Even last
year's 31-3 loss to the Heels seems
respectable compared to what hap-
pened Saturday.
The Pirates failed one test of
character by the awful showing in
Chapel Hill. All is not lost, though,
for there is always next week.
This weekend the Bucs travel to
Raleigh to face another arch-rival,
N.C State. A strong showing would
redeem the Pirates. A poor showing
could be fatal.
No "3oubt, this weekend's mat-
chup at State will b" closely watched
b all North Carolina football fans
Everyone wants to know if the
Pirates have the heart to bounce
back or if the are, indeed, a
laughingstock.
RIGGAN
SHOE
SHOP
SHOE REPAIR
AT THE
VERY BEST
758-0204
RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
ND AT
IOUHS
WE HAVE A NEW FORMAT,
A NEW MENU AND,
NEW AFFORDABLE PRICES.
TRY THE DINNER BUFFET
AT 5:30 PM EVERY TUESDAY
GIVE US A TRY ECU.
YOUR WALLET WILL LIKE US.
I rO IMl ECUAMP! S
ED IN I Hi MINGES BL II DING
& I VANS si DOWNTOWN GREENVII I I
EN LUNCH AND DINNER MONSAT
WANTED:
Editor for REBEL
Pick up applications in Media
Board secretary's office � 8
a.ml p.m. and 2 p.m5 p.m.
Monday-Friday.
T�

. i

C iM �
w
One Of Eight
North Carolina fullback Alan Burrus crosses the
goal line at left, scoring one of eight Tar Heel
touchdown in the team's 56-0 victory over ECU
Saturday. The official's signal at right was one that
the Pirates became quite familiar with. (Photos B
Gary Patterson)
i ;
z�
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
on
items and Prices
Effective thru
Sept 19 1981
We're at the head of the class
when It comes to delivering
campus needs. Be a high
achiever In value-
shop Kroger Sav-on!
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily
available for sale m each Kroger Sav on except as specifi
cally noted in this ad If we do run out of an item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable item whe� available reflec
ting the same savings or a ramcheck which will entitle you to
purchase the advertised item at the advertised price within 30
days
OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO
MIDNIGHT�Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd.
V
La
mwusco
�a- � m
H
USD A INSPECTED
QUALITY CONTROLLED
Ground
Chuck
$468
RU�
(WW
FLEX
� 41 SAM
"�Oil
P4.
0
n'vEU-0
i-Coa
(&Gk
SAVE
REVLON SHAMPOO
OR CONDITIONER
Flex
$459
16-Oz. f
Btl. �
FLEX
Lb
ANY
SIZE
PKG
NEW CROP
U.S. NO. 1 RED OR
Golden Delicious
vl
2 tu m
N.B.
s�
61-481 LEATHER
LYDELL MITCHELL MODEL
Spaulding
Football
$2
Only � (m&&
Lb.
6-0
Cops
M
"zr-imA
mmm
EXTRA LEAN
SLICED AS YOU LIKE
Boiled
Ham
$999
SAVE
50v
SsfwS
1oM�.s a
PartV ixa
BAGGED
Chips & Snacks
ri
sam
3S
I$
Ol
iiiSaflMO
Of
SuQQ
Nf TAIL
PK
COSMITICS A
FEAGRANCIS
,16
K





10
THt EAST CAROL 1NIAN
SEPTEMBER 15, 1981
P
George Mason
Defeats Bucs
B WILLIAM
YELVERTON
tnbtaM sport fr ditor
1 he Last Carolina
soccer team saw its
dream of an undefeated
season ruined by a
tough George Mason
club Saturday, 1-0, at
Minges Field.
AllAmerican can-
didate Collin Kerr
scored an unassisted
coal with :22 left in
the final period to give
George Mason the win.
lor East Carolina,
goalie Steve Brown had
15 siun. "Steve played
very well at the goal
coach Brad Smith said
aftei the match.
"I i hough I we fought
pretty hard Smith
commented. 'We
dsdn'i pla as well as
we could play. George
Mason has an excellent
team, though
George Mason is
listed in the top seven in
the M id Atlantic
Region, one of the
toughest soccer divi-
sions in the I'nited
States.
Smith said the
George Mason defense
was the big key in the
match. "Their defense
shut us down complete-
ly. They played a fine
man-to-man. We were
beaten soundlv in mid-
field
George Mason, rank-
ed second in their divi-
sion, is now 2-0 while
the Pirates are 1-1.
East Carolina hosts
Elon at Minges Field
Thursday at 2 p.m.
"We need to get
back on the right
track Smith said.
"Elon has a veteran
squad with many letter-
man returning. They
are very well coached.
They know what they
have to do to win
iSPOBTSWORLDI
WELCOME BACK,
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104 E. REDBANKS RD.
756-6000
Chaps
Hwy. 258 North
Kinston, N.C.
Eastern North
Carolina's I argest
& Finest Private Club
Presents in Sept.
p1' �"
j Monograms
Unlimited
16 � Zipper �
18
19
Ladies Night
Band of Oz
Mainstream �
Bikini Contest
$200 � Total
Prize Monev
i
rrac
DOC
30C
DOC
DOC
DOC
This week at the Coffeehouse
"1
r
23 � Castaways � Ladies' Night
25 � Fantastic Shakers
26 � Catalinas
30 � Staircase � Ladies' Night
Oct. 2 � Chairmen of the Board
Bands Subject to Change Without Notice
Get your sweaters
& shirts ready
for the fall. I
I Also, shipment of Polo shirts in solids I
j & stripes arriving the week of Sept. 21.1
Unbelievable price: " each
Co-Ed Outlet f
L
Located Next to Plitt Theater
MonSat. 10 to 9 (all 355-2424
CASH PAID FOR
DIAMONDS AND GOLD
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
407 EVAMS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
MIKE ROBINSON
VALERIE HARRIS
BUSINESS (919)758-2452
INDEPENDENT
JEWELERS
ATTIC
SOUTH
No. 6
ROCK
CLUB
CAS
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
CHINA & CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
LAR
GUM
FriHay only, Sept. 18th 9:00-1 1:00 p.m.
In the multi-purpose room
Mendenhall Student Center
Admission � 50C
Watch tor announcements of Upcoming auditions!
WED. & THURS.
BRAZEN
WEDNESDAY
&RINC
OF � lK e�v IMc
FREE
IVLL ADMISSION
FOR ECU STUDENTS
401 S.EVANS ST.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH)
OPEN 9:30-5:30 MONSAT.
PHONE 752-3866
Plazo Shell
610 Greenvillt Blvd.
Phone 756-3023
Hrs.
Mo-Sat. 7-lt
Sim. 10-it
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
(Foreign & Domestic)
Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
Prices
Road and Wrecker Service
SHEW
Discounts On Repairs With I .D. w "
Mitchell's Hair Styling
Special for all Students
Haircuts � reg. 6.50
special price ��
Offer expires Sept. 14
Located at
Pitt Plaza
756-2950
or
756-4042
FREE monogram (up to 3 initials! with the
purchase of any great looking crew neck acrylic
sweater. Sizes S. M. L XL.
These sweaters come in Red. Navy. Bone.
Kelly Green. Wine. Blue Heather. Pink Heather.
Gray Heather. Only $16 00.
CLIFF'S
Seafood House and Oyster Bar
r s
h?
MonThurs.
Seafood Plate
(Fish, shrimp, oysters)4.50
Ocean Perch2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
Thurs. �
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
East 10th St. � Extension past Hastings Ford
Phone 752-3172 �4:30-9:00 MonSat.
LOCATED BEHIND
THE ELBO ROOM





Title
The East Carolinian, September 15, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 15, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.147
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy