The East Carolinian, September 10, 1981






Brewer Resigns
B PVl 1 COI I INs
M i hirl
rhomas B. Brewer, chancelloi ol Easi
. arolina foi the past three years, announced his
resignation Wednesday in the wake of specula
thai he ma be headed foi West Virginia
I Iniversity as president.
In a pi ess release issued Wednesda morning,
Brev ed that his resignation will take
. �, June - 82. He also said that he has re
ted a ive to begin at a date to be
dele I N( President William Friday.
sei will us me "to prepare toi othei
equested by President
rus ees. I have decided
� 1 ast c arolina
. the newly-elected chairman oi
-lees, expressed hope that
down and ol out
educating the

a
bilitv. w
.
H Ki had been in turmoil since
News ported on ug 28
Brewei was a i he WVl position.
he board had
"The boa'
but 1 di
know what action would have been taken
Friday said Brewer's resignation would be ac
eepted but added that no date had yet been set
tor the chancellor to begin his leave. "He's en-
titled to that (the leave), and the terms of it will
be deeuied in the near future
He added thai he may appoint an interim
chancelloi foi ECU depending on the duration
ot Brewer's leave. "If he ceases day-to-day ac-
tivity as chancellor, I will appoint an interim
replacement
ccording to Futrell, "An interim chancellor
will be appointed soon
1 he UNC president also said that he first
discussed tite situation with Brewer Saturday
but would no! speculate upon what precipitated
the resignation.
"I don' want to be unfair to either faction?
acknowledging thai there are factions
futrell and a number of other trustees were
upset thai Brewer had not informed the board
that he was a candidate for the West Virginia
job. Brewer, however, denied that he was seek-
ing the WVl presidency and said that he had
been nominated tor the job.
"I have never been informed by West Virginia
that 1 was being seriously considered, much less
a finalist
Responding to the concerns of Futrell and the
other trustees, Brewer added. "Anything 1 hae
to say to the board, I'll sav to the board,and if
the board has anything to say to me, they'll say
it to me
futrell said Wednesday that he felt that there
were primarily two factors involved in Brewer's
resignation. "I think the two greatest factors o'
all were, first, the overwhelming feeling of peo-
ple in the Pitt County-Greenville area and in the
ECU community that he was not happy, and,
second, because he made too many changes too
fast
He cited a list oi changes in administrators
that Brewer had made, including two vice
chancellors and a number o academic deans
and department chairmen. "He just made so
many changes within the three years that he's
made a lot o people unhappy
According to Futrell, the board of trustees
was concerned that Brewer was not totally com-
mitted to ECU. He expressed doubt about
Brewer's statements that it is normal in the
academic world for administrators and faculty
to keep abreast ot job openings in the field.
"That's not the view o the trustees he com-
mented. "When a chancellor comes to East
Carolina, he comes to stav
Futrell said he did not know of any specific
reasons why Brewer may have been unhappy ai
Nee BRFWFR. Page 3
Photo By MARIANNE 8AINES
( hancellor Thomas llrewer
�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol. 56 No. (,
Thursday .Neptember 10. 181
Greenville, North (arolina
12 Pages
New Ordinance
Limits Parking
Bv kIH h f

new
I
i par!
B
I .
irkinj
, � nance was
lents
who need
I �, . . .
nienced when n
"ere
" Hie I
tende
often
esiden
tice ol
.n vehic
necessary vehi
noise pollution (and) strains on
the
nance stale- nditions
rk unacceptal ardships on
dents ol -c neigl ds
areas bv caus-
ing t at ion ol ait quality,
af' ue, tranquility
� othei values le in an ur-
residential env ii onmei
1 � designate residential parking
council riiiisi follow
. letermined bv the city
ing department. I he
qua ns are that the street
e must be in a residential
- district, the property has to
be used m a residential manner and
� � a residential parking per-
mil Mon must be shown to
the ifhmission arid signed
bv 51 percent ot the adults living in
I residential parking
.a.
1 in ther qualifications ini
at a parking studv must be done
proving that 70 percent ol the park
-paces in an area are occupied
during a two-hour period I he study
also musi prove that a minimum o
Two-Hour Parking
may he found in residential areas near the ECU campus.
5 percent ot the parked vehicles are
owned bv non-residents.
Persons living in a controlled
residential parking area must pur-
chase a $5 deca! to park on the street
Campaign Guidelines Announced
Fall Elections Approaching
Bv IIMVn DuPRFF
Attention politicians: ire! out youi
e makers
:all SC i
lund the corni
Dasha I t ird-1 ittle, n
appointed elections chairperson,
nounced guidelines Wednesday foi
candidates for class offices and the
legislature.
Anyone interested in running
musi sign up at the SGA office in
Mendenhali Student enter room
228 Sept 10-18, with no applica-
tions accepted after 5 p.m. of the
Final day.
Freshmen, sophomores, junior
and graduate students will be elec
ting a class president and vice presi
dent, while seniors will also choose a
secretary-treasurer.
Representatives from each dor
mitory and an undetermined
number of day legislators will also
be held Get 7. Polling booths in the
dorms and at Minges Coliseum will
be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m
while those at theroatan,
Mendenhali and the Students Supp-
ly Store will remain open until
p m.
"If someone is concerned about
last Carolina and their student tees
and how ihev are spent, then this is
their stepping stone to having their
voice heard I ittle said. "We want
much representation of the
mizations and individuals on
campus as we can get. Thai way it
something comes up you object to,
ir vote can count against it
Little, a three vear veteran ot the
legislature, pointed out candidates
must be full-time students and have
a! least a 2.0 grade point average.
( ampaigning will begin mi-
mediatelv following a Sept. 21
meeting ol the candidates and elec
tions committee. Candidates for
class office are allowed under the
SGA Constitution to spend up to
SUM), while legislature hopefuls are
limited to $75.
Financial reports and a list of
campaign workers must be turned in
to the elections committee bv 5 p m
Sept 30 1 vpenses encountered bv
the candidates must be fully
documented, and anyone failing to
meet the deadline will be dis-
qualified.
"(Th� early deadline for reports)
may cut down the rapid succession
of events just prior to the election
day, but we want to be fair to
everybody involved Little stress
ed "I think college students are that
dependable. If they're not, we don't
need them in the legislature
Students may vote by absentee
ballot bv obtaining an official
Get To Chapel Hill
Early If Parking Car
Bv MIKE HI IGHES
SI.HWrilrr
Anyone who has been to a foot-
ball game at Kenan Stadium in
Chapel Hill probably already knows
that parking can be a hassle, but for
the ECU students making the trek
tor the first time this weekend, and
for those who have been in the past
but have forgotten for one reason or
another, some suggestions might be
helpful.
Andy Hager, who works for the
parking control division of the traf-
fic office at UNC, suggests anyone
wishing to park on campus before a
Saturday football game arrive early.
Some lots are reserved for UNC
students and faculty, and other lots
will be closed.
Cutting Crime A
Full- Time Job
tor more than two hours.
The ones are effective between 8
a.m. and 5 p.m. and are not en-
forceable if a sign is not posted
specifying the two-hour parking
limit.
university excuse to 1 ittle up to 72
hours prioi to voting day. Any run-
off which mav be necessary will be
held Oct. 14. '
Bv (,rk, mm n i
According to Hager, there will be
signs directing traffic and orange-
vested monitors available to assist
fans wishing to park.
On campus, there are two lots
open to visitors, according to
Hager. Areas on the Manning Drive
fringe lot and the North Carolina
Memorial Hospital parking deck
will be available for visitor parking.
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The SGA will
sponsor a bus to C 'hapel Hill Satur
day. It will leave at 9:30 a.m. and
return after the game. Riders must
register at the Mendenhali Student
(enter information desk. Accor-
ding to Marvin Braxton, SGA vice
president, the first 50 students to
register will ride free of charge.)
E( I mav
crime :
Singleton, w
the pi �
says the in,
and studen
department sur
the position I
beding stalled b
tions. she said.
" I he implementai ion
position would sir we the
growing campus stem
Singleton said, adv. it the full-
time position is needed I erly
inform students in how to prol
themselves
Singleton currenth i ducts a
two-part program i university.
One is a slide presentation on ba
crime prevention lips; the othei is a
seminar dealing with assault a
rape
" I he enthu e pas! I
the programs ha- it she
says. "Every student, tasiiitv
member and stall (worker) should
be informed on the methods to pre
ven! a crime from happening to
them
The reception of Sing eton's pro
giams bv the university community
has given Singleton "high hopes"
for the present .ear. She believes
these programs have improved the
rapport between the university
police and student mg aspect
of campus crime prevention.
The first crime prevention pro-
grams o the school vear are slated
to be presented or' Monday, lues
day and Wednesda e first lour
weeks oi October The dormitories
in which the programs will be
presented will be posted once
Singleton finishes arrangements
dence hall
tble on I hut - ark
� stolen.

aui
desi "bask i sense
� Aiwa
: oom, even
i minute.
�Nevei leave ke
tind m
trash cans. "Everybody t
old tricks Singlet n
�Alwavs take youi ke �
door alter unlock .
�Never prop open do
be locked
�Always lock bicycles. 1 Ise a
heavy chain with a lock and �
I oop through as main moveable
pans as possible. Utilize bike racks.
�Report any suspicious per
or around the dorms.
� Viwavs lock your cai
� Don't fumble with youi keys
W.wc them read) �I -
your cai
� Alwav s check the bav. k
cat
�Never leave valuables in youi cai
�Try to walk with someone it you
must go oui at night.
�Stav away from dark, wooded
areas .nd bushes
�Slav alert oi youi surroundings
when walking ou will be !c s likely
to be taken bv surprise.
On The Inside
Announcements-
Opinions4
Features6
Spoils9
Classifieds
Q u a r t e r b a c A
Carl ton Nelson
(pictured at right)
and the II foot-
ball team travels to
Chapel Hill this
Saturday for a
game with arch-
rival Sorth
Carolina. A special
two-page section on
the game and the
history of the EC I -
UNC series appears
in today's sports
section.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, l�81
Announcements
NTE
Students (.ompleting teacher
preparation programs and ad
vanced degree candidates in
specific fields may take trie Na
tionai Teacher Enamir atons on
Nov 14, 1981 Feo 20, 1982 and
April 17 1982. at test centers
throughout the united States
Prospective registrants -inould
contact the school districts n
which thev seek employment
state agencies in which they seek
certification or licensing thcr col
leges or tne appropriate eduta
tionai association tor advice acout
which examinations o take and
when to take them
The NTE Bulletin of Intorma
tion contains a list of test centers
and general information aoout the
examinations as well as a
registration form Cop.oes may be
obtained from college placement
officers school personnel depar'
ments or directly from National
teacher Examinations. Box 911,
Educational Testing Service
Princeton New Jersey 08541
FRISBEE
There will be an organizational
meeting of the Fnsoee Club this
Thursday Sept 10 ' 00 r m
room 221 WendenfM
terested m playing
how to play is welcome V idn us
Officers for the W81 1992 I
year will be elected ana pi
tor the fall semester will be
discussed
ARTS MANAGEMENT
There will be a meeting of all the
Community Arts Management
majors Monday .Septembe- !J at
6 00 D m in jenk ins
Pian to aiena so
year Off r,ght' :
BIOLOGY
The ECU Biology Club is pleas
ed to announce its office hours
The office will be open Monday
through FRiday trom 10 until 2
and is m the lotiby of ttie Biology
building room 102 Please come
by if we can help you
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test (GMATi will be of
tered at East Carolina University
on Saturday October 24 1981 Ap
It Of! blanks are to be COfln
pleted a'lc mailed to GMAT
Educational Testing Service Box
966 8 Pr nceton NJ 08S40 Ap
plications must be postmarked no
ia'e' than September 21 1981 Ap
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center Room
105 Speight Building
GRE
The Graduate Record Examma
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday.
October 17 "81 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service Box 966 R Princeton NJ
- Applications must be
-� � no later than
-�'l '� 'V8l Applications
� . -ire trom the ECU
' S' Centei Room 105, Spe.ght
Buiiam
COUNSELING
IS surviving
enjoy nq .
goal for
UniverSit.

Staff benees so anc a't rffi
�wo part mini-series on How to
Succeed in College arc Ha -
and How to Avoid T's' ft ixiety,
Studen's may � art cipate -1 ,
or ail sessions The session i - ��
'�i Succeed in College anc Hae tun
wiil be conducted Vveuntsaa�
September 9 from 3 00 p m 4 00
Dm m Room 305 Ar.jh' A ���
f setssioron Ho ' Av I Test
Anxiety will be conoucted or
Thursdasy Se, I 'moer 10. from
00 p rr 4 0C C n Room JOS
Aright Annex
Sessions are available 1
students free of c'large interested
�students ma, call the Universi,
Counseling Centet ?57 6661 te-
tjrfher information Registration
s not reau reu
BIOLOGY CLUB
The EC B.i gyClubt -nee'
en Sept 14 it BN ? of the
Pioioc, build u Bortj a
be speaking about eers
biology ava lOle ttii
dent co op sei ' �
�. la �� � I Anyone 11
terested is welcome to atte
CADP
The Campus a ir Ji
aduso Progi a 1 1 its first
"meeting tor tne fa
Thursday See
the conference room on �� . �
'oor of Erwin B Wembers
r3 interested
weic orr.e l itti
BOWLING
MSC Mixed Doubles bowling
leagues are now being Ui med tor
semester Students interested
m � Monday or Tues
� � evening league may sign up a'
� 'in board at
le ' Centei rhe
� � , - eetinq wi'l
beheld Mo epti mbei u at 6
pm Bring son
KISWAHILI
- , � v ��, mot �
-1
1 �
I � tarn
� -
embraces
���� � unti
iPita and
� es me :en
-ies ot Congo.
a" Republic
noi Kiswahil
o tbe western
si ken
. � . . r his yeai
� dents )ven an op
. ' to study an African
language 'or me ' rsl 'ime
. �. � � - - .� 1 nor
�1 � I'stec please
Matnenge at
� ?Continuing
� .
SOCIAL WORK
Students who wish to apply for a
maior in social work or correc
tions should contact the Depart
ment of Social Work � Correctional
Services tor an application and
schedule appointments for the re
quired interviews (757 691) To be
eligible to apply, the student is ex
pected to have at least a 2.5 QPA
and have had at least one course in
sooal work or corrections
Deadline tor submitting an ap
plication and having completed
the first interview with one ot the
departmental faculty is
September 16 The Department
Chair will be holding the second in
terviews on September 17 18, 1981
HAPPINESS
Everybody wants to be at peace
with themselves The only way to
do that is to study the word of God.
the Bible, so you will learn, so you
can change (Romans 122) That
takes effort, you have to DO
something We make the effort
Thursday, (Sept 10) at
MendenhaH Student Center, (1) at
II 00 a m room 212 (2) at 7 30
pm room 242 Also Monday
� sept 14 at 7 30 p m room 242
SGA ELECTIONS
For all students who are con
cerned about East Carolina
University, here is your chance to
have your voice heard Filing
dates for SGA dorm and day stu
dent legislators and class officers
will be Sept 9 Sept 19 Come by
the SGA office in Room 228
MendenhaH
LAW SOCIETY
An organizational meeting tor
the RCU Law Society will be held
Thursday September 17 at 7.30
pm in Room 221 MendenhaH All
interested people please attend
For further information please
contact Diane Jones, 756 6556 after
' pm
CANOE
The Tenth Annual Southeastern
intercollegiate Canoe Race will be
held Oct 3, 1981 on the Catawaba
R .1" Any persons interested in
� ; it.ng should call 752 7978
SPAN
All planning maiors and minors
are invited to come 10m SPAN on
Thurs Sept 10 at 12 15 m the plan
n.ng studic tor a brief business
meet ing
PPHA
The Preprotessional Health
Alliance (PPHA) will hold its first
regular be weekly meeting on
Thursday. Sept 10, 1981 This
meeting will be held at 6 00 at The
Afro American Cultural Center
New plans tor the coming year will
be discussed All members and
any other interested parties are
urged to attend
GRE
� -

i'C Examma
ej at East
�� Saturday
198). Application
ompleted and
it - Fesl
- Princeton Nj
jns must be
uu'ami . me c
lenter Room 105 Spe
SuDDortthe
March of
imes
BOTH
DfffCTS
FOUNDATION
HOUSING
For ECU students needing help
with non university housing, the
Oft Campus Housing Office
publishes a listing of available
rooms, apartments, houses and
mobile homes in the Greenville
area Since materials are updaied
daily, students should come by the
office in person for the most cur
rent information Listings tor
Greenville apartment complexes,
for students seeking roommates,
and a telephone for placing local
calls are also provided The offices
serves faculty and staff as well as
students
POETS
The American Collegiate Poets
Anthology and international
Publications is sponsoring a Na
tionai Poetry Contest in the fall of
1981 The deadline is October 31
For more mlormation write to In
ternational Publications. P O Box
44927, Los Angeles, Ca 90044
SKIING
irs not too soon to start thinking
snow tor skung at Snowshoe. West
Virginia at Christmas and during
spring break Contact Ms Jo
Saunders at 757 6000, Memorial
Gym, Room 205 for information
Limited registration
CARTOONS
Want to see Uncle Sam get a pie
m the face' Stop by MendenhaH
Student Center, from Sept 6
through the 13th, to see the exhibit
of editorial cartoons by John
Weyler Displayed in the lower
gallery (1st floor), the cartoons
appeared m The East Carolinian
trom January 1980 to the present
Subiect matter includes campus
crapola. international idiocy and
predatory Presidents
LSAT
The Law School Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina
University on Saturday, October 3.
19o81 Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to Educa
tionai Testing Service, Box 966 R.
Princeton, NJ 08540 Registration
postmarked after this date must
be accompanied by a 115. non
refundable late registration tee
FRISBEE
If yoiu want to play you are
okay' Ultimate Team I F A af
filiation and officer elections on
agenda tor this Thursday evening,
7 00 pm, room 721 MendenhaH Stu
dent Center
LACROSSE
For all persons interested in in
formation on and membership m
the East Carolina Lacrose Club
There will be a meeting on
Wednesday. Sept. 16 at the Beta
house, 603 E 9th St (Behind
Joyner Library) at 6 00 p m For
further information call 757 1366
and ask for Tom
CORSO
There will be a meeting ot the
Corrections Social work
organization today in MendenhaH
room 221 All social work and cor
rections maiors and intended ma
lOrs are urged to attmd!
UNCTRANSIT
Chapel Hill Transit's Tarheel
Express bus service will be
available for the University of
North Carolina s season opening
football game against East
Carolina University on September
12 This service operates non stop
between each of three park ride
lots around Chapel Hill and Gate 4
at Kenan Stadium Free parking is
available at the Kroger Plaza lot.
located on Elliot Road between
East Franklm Street and the
15 501 bypass the airport lot on
Estes Drive iust west ot NC 86
(Airport Road! and the Glen Len
nox Park Ride lot on NC 54 adia
cent to the 15 501 bypass Buses
leave the lots every 10 to 15
minutes between 11 15 am and
12 40 p m , and depart trom Gate 4
at Kenan Stadium immediately
after the game
One way tares are Si 00 tor
adults, and S 75 tor youth 17 and
under or seniors 65 and over For
passengers showing a valid
Chapel Hill Transit bus pass these
tares are reduced to75 tor
adults, ano S 50 lor youths and
seniors EXACT CJANGE will be
necessary, as the drivers will not
be able to make cna
SIGN LANGUAGE
East Carolina University and
The Program for Hearing
impaired Students will once again
sponsor the ECU Sign Language
Club for students and members of
the Greenville community who
would like to meet and practice
thier communication skills The
organizational meeting for the
1981 82 school year will be held
Sunday. Sept 13 at 7 p m in the
MendenhaH Student Center Multi
Purpose Room on the East
Carolina University campus
MINI COURSES
Register today for a non credit
mmi course m clogging, CPR
training, popular dance or
Calligraphy These courses are
now being offered by MendenhaH
Student Center and are available
to all ECU students, faculty and
stalf MSC members and their
guests
Individuals must register in per
son at the MendenhaH Central
Ticket Office between the hours ot
10 am and 4 pm. Monday through
Friday Registration will be ac
cepted through the day prior to the
drst class meeting The first
course begins Monday, September
14
For further information contact
the Central Ticket Office or Tana
Nobles at 75 6iU Also, course
schedules and detailed mforma
tion are available at the MSC In
formation Center
DAT
The Dental Aptitude Test will be
offered at East Carolina Universi
ty on Saturday, October 3 1981
Application blanks are to be mail
ed m time to be received by the
Division of Educational
Measurements. American Dental
Association, 211 East Chicago
Ave , Chicago, Illinois 60011 by
September 7 1981 Applications
may he obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Speight Building,
Room 105
TUTORIAL
ASSISTANCE
if you ar pursuing a degree m
allied health nursing, pre
medicine, pre dentistry, or
medicine you may qualify for free
tutorial assistance through the
Center for Student Opportunities
iCSO). School of Medicine in ad
dition. eligible students can par
tiopate m individualized or group
learning skills sessions it you
would tike to be considered tor
participation in any ot the COST
FREE services, contact Dr Frye.
Center tor Student Opportunities
217 Wh.chard Annex, or call for an
appontment at 757 6122, 6075 or
6081
RECREATIONAL
CLUBS
Organizational meetings for the
formation of several recreational
clubs will be held at MendenhaH
Student Center on the following
dates
Table Tennis Club - (Monday.
Sept 21 7pm. Table Tennis
Rooms)
Chess Backgammon Club �
(Tuesday. Sept 71 7 pm. Cof
feehouse)
Hearts Spades Club
(Wednesday. Sept 33 7pm. TV
area)
These groups meet on a week
basis so participants can socialize
and enioy some friendly competi
tion with others who share their m
terest m a sport Sign up today at
the MendenhaH Billiards Center if
you would like to participate in
any of these clubs
BOWLING LEAGUES
MSC mixed doubles tX � ' �
leagues are now being lormed lor
ttie tall semester students m
terested in oowling on a Monday
or Tuesday evening league may
Sign up at the ground floor I
board at Mendi
Thf league orgar zaql
meeting will be held Monday
September U at 6 pm Bring
friends and sign up today
COOP
A representative from the Na
�; institutes ot Health Normal
nteer Program m Bethesda
MD will be on campus Sept 2 and
29 to mtervew students for Spring
1982 plarement Anyone interested
my aspe t of the health 'are
would fmd this
1 rnof
nation contact tne Co Op Of
f.ce 313 Rawi or telephone
757 6979-6375 today'
cso
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities (CSO). School of
Medicine, is currently seeking
highly qualified undergraduate
and graduate students to work
part time as tutors Interested
students with expertise in either
chemistry anatomy, physiology
biology, math physics. English or
SLAP are encouraged to at
Other academic areas are also
considered Competi'ivr wage
Contact Dr Frye, Center tor Stu
dent Opportunities, 217 Whichard
Annex or call tor an appointment
at 757 6122.6075,6081
CRAFTS
Crafts workshops are now
available at the crafts center m
MendenhaH Pottery darkroom
techniques, floor loom weaving
photography Christmas pat
chwork. handbuiit Christmas
ceram.es. beginning iewelry silk
screening, and woodworking are
the workshops which are
available
All ECU students, student
dependents, as well as faculty.
staff and their dependents who are
MSC members, are eligible to par
ticipate Everyone must register
for the workshops at the Crafts
Center no later than the Saturday
prior to the first meeting of a
workshop Workshop schedules
are available at the Crafts Center
and MSC Information Cente'
first workshop begins Mo'
September 14
Crafts Center hours are ! ;
10 pm Monday through Fr �
and 12 00 noon until 5 pm Sal
day
For further information ra' the
Crafts Center or Tana No;
157611
BILLIARDS LEAGUE
terested

and women, who are interested m
forming a league to mee' wet �
may sign up at the Mit"1i nhan
Billiards Center An organ.za
tionai meeting will be held T �
day September 15 at 7 00 pr-
the B'Hiards Center
League scores will be I �
ped so persons with . 11
of ability can compete equal �
Trophies will be awai �
several divisions
LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT
University students are remind
ed that, m accordance , tl
University regulations �-�
they enroll tor the first time 1 n
foreign language mat the, studied
m high school they must tat
placement examination in
languagt-
only date on which t
language placement tps's "ay be
taken before Preregistration and
Registration for Spring. 19ft.
Thursday, October I Tests
given at 3 30 p m as follow
Language Room
French BC 301
German BC 302
Latin BC 303
Spanish BC 306
Students mtending to '
a-guage placement test on Oc
totoer 1 msut register tor it
Foreign Language departrr.
office. Brewster A431 on or c-
� Jnesdasy. Sept 30
Language placemen- rest! a
not be given on registration da
during the drop add period dui
Sprmg semestesr 1982
Students not properiy enrolled in
a foreign language course a
nave '0 withdraw from the course
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THE LAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTLMBFR10, 1981
"it M�
Normal
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Scott Back On The Farm� Haw River Style
HAW RIVER
(UPI)� For the first
time in two decades,
Robert W. Scott is back
on the farm his family
has worked since the
1800s.
The former gover-
nor, lieutenant gover-
nor, co-chairman of the
Appalachian Regional
Commission and
soundly defeated
gubernatorial can-
didate has a new
outlook on life from
the vantagepoint of the
1,500 acre Melville
Farm.
More than a year
after losing every coun-
ty in the state to Jim
Hunt in the Democratic
primary, Scott is asked:
Is he politically dead I
"Probably comes
the quick reply from
the man in work
clothes.
Does Bob Scott carer
"No comes the
quicker reply.
The farm has only
164 milking cows and
Scott's concern now is
not for campaigning,
but rebuilding the dairy
herd.
"While I wasn't
around, we got into
some management pro-
blems here because I
wasn't here to look
after all our breeding
schedules and so
forth Scott said in a
recent interview.
"My son is here with
me now and he and 1
think we have about
got it turned so we will
build back up to our
capacity gradually
Scott, like other
farmers, worries about
the weather. Will the
summer thunder-
showers hold off a few
more days until the
combines can get to a
field of grain ready for
harvest?
"I'm my own boss
he says. "Nobody tells
me what to do except
the banker, my
preacher and my wife,
and I'm not going to
say in what order
North Carolina's
40th governor does not
brood over what he in-
sists was his last
political bid.
"When 1 lost this last
campaign, the world
didn't come to an end
as far as 1 was concern-
ed he says. "I en-
joyed it. I don't regret
running for a minute
The reason he was
defeated so soundly are
self-evident to Scott:
He was late entering
the race. Hunt had
already sewed up the
major contributors
who had financed his
past political cam-
paigns, and he just
didn't have the bucks
to be competitive.
Scott is comfortable,
relaxed and refleaive
as he sits in the small
wooden "office" in
back of his father's
house where he and his
wife first lived after
their marriage.
Scott said he learned
a hard lesson during the
primary battle against
Hunt� the campaign
trail has changed.
There is less personal
contact with voters and
the emphasis has
shifted to slick and ex-
pensive advertising
campaigns.
That's another
reason he won't run
Brewer Quits Post
Continued From Page 1
ECU, but a source close to the admimstraion
felt the chancellor's main problem was that he
never became comfortable with the atmosphere
of eastern North Carolina. "He was an out-
sider the source said, "and he never learned to
play ECU politics the way Leo could Leo
Jenkins, Brewer's predecesssor, served a
chancellor for 18 years.
Futrell acknowledged that succeeding Jenkins
may have been difficult for Brewer. "I think
anybody following in Leo Jenkins' footsteps
would have a tough row to hoe
The trustee chairman would not speculate
upon candidates for either the interim or perma-
nent chancellor but said a number of candidates
had been mentioned.
According to Friday, a panel consisting of
five members of the board of trustees, four
faculty members, the alumni association presi-
dent and SGA President Lester Nail would
choose the new chancellor.
Friday will attend the trustee's next meeting,
tentatively scheduled for late September, and
will announce at that time a timetable for nam-
ing an interim and later permanent replacement.
Futrell said the panel will study all candidates
and said he felt the search will be "a very
dedicated effort this time
Friday felt the tendency of the panel would be
to look within the university for a replacement.
"I would assume that having just chosen
somebody from outside, the inclination would
be to consider someone from inside the universi-
ty community
Lester Nail said of the news, "My whole reac-
tion to this is that I feel a loss. I think, as far as
students go, he's done an excellent job
He pointed to Brewer's support of the fall
break as an example of the chancellor's concern
for students. "If it weren't for him, we wouldn't
have a fall break
He added tha he did not yet know whom he
would support to be the new chancellor. "1 am
so inexperienced at that I don't know. I just
want to get a chancellor as good as Brewer
Reacting to the announcement, Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer Meyer said,
"I'm sorry. I guess for me it's sad because I
came here partly because of Chancellor Brewer
and the mutual excitement we had about the
potential of the job (as vice chancellor)
Meyer praised Brewer for his emphasis on the
internal organization of the university and his
stress on academic quality. "I think Chancellor
Brewer is ari excellent man
Brewer, wo could not be reached for com-
ment, was also a candidate for the presidency of
Louisville University in November of 1980 but
later withdrew his name from consideration.
A source on the screening committee at WVU
told United Press International that Brewer was
a candidate for president of the university but
that he had not yet visited the school. The
source added that Brewer had not been ap-
pointed to the position as of Wednesday.
"There have been erroneous reports that we
are going to make the announcement today, and
that is verv off the wall the source said.
again.
"1 never was any
good at raising
money he said. "The
requirement of raising
large sums of money is
distasteful to me. I
know it is necessary,
but that is just
something I have never
been interested in
While his desire for
political office is gone,
Scott's interest in
politics is undeminish-
ed.
"I'll always be in-
terested in government
and politics-who is do-
ing what to whom,
whose throat is being
cut and whose knife is
in whose rib. I suspect I
will be supportive of
candidates, or be
against them,
whichever one will help
them the most as time
goes on.
"I don't anticipate
becoming involved in
anything that would
take me away from
here
From his farm 50
miles from Raleigh,
Scott sees a serious pro-
blem with North
Carolina's government.
The cabinet form of
government, he said,
has been a mistake. It
has taken government
another step away from
the people.
"It has created a
level of bureaucracy far
beyond anything I
foresaw or 1 would
never have recommend-
ed it he says.
"You got the
secretary of a given
department, you got
deputy secretaries, you
got assistant
secretaries. You got a
whole level of ad-
ministrative
bureaucracy that was
not there prior to that
reorganization, and it
has tended to insulate
the management of the
departments from the
working people
There are sources of
pride in his administra-
tion restructuring the
system of higher educa-
tion, beginning the
public kindergarten
system, the first steps
to establish a school of
veterinary medicine,
support of the last
Carolina medi I
school.
The remembered I
times of the administi
tion focus on civil
unrest.
"It as a very ten e
time. We were caught
up in what was happen-
ing across the ent
country and we w
not immune to the
dissatisfaction
young people, par
ticularK over the Vi
nam war, over race
relations, over
dissatisfaction with tl
establishment he says.
"Some of the hard
moments I had as
governor were in deal
ing with race relations,
particularly whe
things got out of ha:
119 E.5th
752-8711
Lester Nail
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Apple Records
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Home Builders Supply
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.
Qtye �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. mw-cn
Chuck Foster, �ww ?Atxnmt Jimmy Dupree, ,���,�, Frf,W
Chris Uchok. �WAn) .���,� Charles Chandler, v� w.or
Alison Bartel, production ttmmtm Tom Hall, nwmw
Steve Moore, cv�w� m Steve Bachner, �� ��
September 10, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Cycle Tips
Common Sense, And Courtesy
It's time for a few lessons in com-
mon sense for those friends of
pedestrians and motorists alike:
bicyclists.
First and foremost on the list of
common sense tips for enthusiasts
of two-wheeled transportation:
don't ride the thing on the sidewalk.
Almost everyone who has toured
the campus of East Carolina on foot
has suffered the trauma of dodging
one of these vehicles of terror. If the
thing gets you to class so much
faster than walking in the first
place, why ride it in an area reserved
for pedestrians?
If common courtesy to people on
foot is not reason enough to stay in
the street, then consider the fact
that it's against the law to operate a
bicycle in a pedestrian walkway.
True, campus police have been lax
in enforcement of this law, and
bicycles are not a serious threat to
our national security. But
nonetheless, the law is the law.
Granted pumping your pedals up
Fifth Street in rush-hour traffic is
not one of the most relaxing ac-
tivities around, but motor vehicle
traffic is relatively light between
classes.
This brings us to a word in
defense of motorists. Bicycles have
as much right to be on public streets
as a Mercedes, BMW or other car.
But common sense dictates that the
bicyclist should realize which
operator is injured more severely in
an accident� the driver of the 2,000
pound automobile or the person on
the 20-pound cycle. (If you're still
wondering, it's not the guy in the
car.)
Probably one of the most puzzl-
ing results of the Arab oil embargo
and subsequent price escalation is
the promulgation of mopeds. The
idea behind this vehicle was the use
of an inexpensive, fuel-efficient
alternative to the car.
Instead, American ingenuity (and
laziness) turned the moped into an
alternative to walking. Now instead
of walking and using zero gallons of
gas, people get to consume an even
greater volume of our world's most
priceless commodity.
The operators of mopeds have
earned special accolades for their ef-
forts to further congest sidewalks
and streets, as well as reduce
petroleum reserves.
The late 1970s and early 1980s
have seen Americans realize the
need for physical fitness, as many
people jog or utilize some other ex-
ercise program every day. But the
most natural and conservative form
of exercise� walking� has
become a threat to personal safety.
A Calm And Reasoned Man
r Campus Forum
ECU Student Embarrassed
I wish to express my disappointment
of the ECU students at Saturday night's
football game between ECU and
Western Carolina. First, during the
playing of our national anthem several
students displayed their limited in-
telligence by their continuous yelling
throughout the number. Secondly,
although alcoholic beverages are pro-
hibited in the stadium there was certain-
ly no lack of "spirits which con-
tributed to the four fights that I witness-
ed. The university police were ineffective
in controlling these problems.
The constant running up and down
the aisles reminded me more of a zoo
than spectators at a football game.
I would like to congratulate the team
on a superb game and Coach Emory
should be praised for rebuilding the
Pirate football team.
In conclusion, I'm not against anyone
having a good time, however there are
limits. In order for ECU to compete
with ACC schools athletically ECU
students must compete with ACC
students by having more of an interest in
the game rather than to the bottom of
their beer can.
GREG PARKER
Sophomore, psychology
Soccer Excitement
Starting my fourth year here at ECU,
I am ashamed to admit that today (Sept.
8) was the first time I've ever attended
an ECU soccer game. Have you ever
seen a soccer game? They are exciting,
fast, and full of skillful players. Our
guys are really great! I think it is a terri-
ble injustice that such a gifted bunch of
guys play their guts out for a crowd of
maybe fifty. With a school enrllment of
thirteen thousand, it seems to me that
more people should be going out to sup-
port ouf soccer team. After watching
our team play today, I know I am going
to become a enthusiastic supporter.
Come out and suport our soccer team.
RICHELIE BRADLEY
Junior, Early Child. Ed.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). i etters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity.
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be pe, mitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
HenthouJ
O'
WASH
PI) - i
O'Connor
the opening
tirmation h
the I
Supreme Co
said today
nov.
vote oi
tes like ah
"I do r
that, a
can tel
might
ticular issue
come be

prepared si
the Senate
Committee
h e a r l:
nination
Her
to be a
blockade
pected be
tions on ho
vote on a
,e-�
abortion anl
Roy Wilkins died Tuesday at the
age of 80, and even though his death
was reported on the front page of
newspapers across the country there
are probably many wondering who
he was.
His name is not a household
word, but his achievements are part
of American history and culture. If
Martin Luther King was the voice of
the Civil Rights Movement, Wilkins
was its mind.
In 1955 Wilkins became executive
director of the NAACP and served
in that position for 22 years. During
Wilkins' tenure, the NAACP helped
lead black Americans from the
shadows of discrimination and
segregation to legal� ifnot always
actual� equality with whites.
In short, he was the primary ar-
chitect of one of the greatest periods
of advancement for an ethnic group
in world history.
His crowning achievement came
with the Supreme Court's "Brown
vs. the Board of Education" deci-
sion in 1954 that outlawed separate
but equal public schools. Wilkins
was the chief planner of the strategy
used in the case, and this classic of
DOONESBURY
American legal history was typical
of the methods he used to win
equality for blacks.
He believed firmly that the court
system was the best way to win
equality and thus led the NAACP
through a long series of court bat-
tles. Wilkins was also a major pro-
ponent of the various civil and
voting rights acts Congress passed
in the '60s. He believed in working
through the sytem.
Because of these beliefs, Wilkins
was criticized and ridiculed by more
militant blacks. But, if he thought it
would do any good, Wilkins never
hesitated to take the civil rights bat-
tle to the streets.
Like King though, he never ad-
vocated violence. Calm, reason and
persuasion were the tools with
which he worked.
Roy Wilkins was a man of whom
not just blacks but all Americans
should be proud. He was the em-
bodiment of what is best in this
country, and if he could give
America one last message before he
died it might have been this: the
fight is not over.
by Garry Trudeau
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Reagan Shadows 'Firesign Theatre9
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
One of my favorite albums of all time is
An LP called Think We're All Bozos on
this Bus, recorded a few years back by a
satirical troupe called the Firesign Theatre.
The highlight of the record, for me, comes
when the protagonist discovers that the
President of the United States is not a real,
flesh-and-blood person. He is, instead, a
hologram � a projected, three dimen-
sional image, complete with a recorded
voice that broadcasts trite homilies dripp-
ing with phony friendliness and intimacy.
Fantasies like that one seem to be merg-
ing with reality now that Ronald Reagan is
president. Here we have a chief executive
who reportedly works only two or three
hours a day. In August, tired and bored,
Reagan took the month off, snoozing
through the dogfight between U.S. and Li-
byan jets, and venturing forth mainly to
buy cowboy boots embossed with the
presidential seal. When Reagan speaks
without a script, aides say, he likes to
reminisce about his old movies.
Some have compared Reagan's style to
that of Calvin Coolidge, but the unreal
president of the Firesign Theatre may be a
better comparison. Like the hologram-
president of fantasy, Reagan is a symbol
and a shill for Things As They Are, a
dispenser of false affability and familiarity
who is occasionally trotted out before the
cameras by the men who really run the
show, to hawk the New Right's political
package. Then he is led back into the
security of the White House, where he
doesn't have to do anything tough, like
recognize his Secretary of Housing and Ur-
ban Development.
Reviewing the old actor's performance,
it's hard to believe that the man is real.
And, actually, there is mounting evidence
to suggest that Ronald Reagan is not of
this earth. The tip-offs, not limited to his
personality and workstyle, extend to his
political positions.
Reagan has, for example, proposed cut-
ting back food stamps, upon which
millions of Americans depend for
subsistence-level meals. Real people have
got to eat.
Reagan proposes to foul the Clean Air
Act. This is all very well for aliens, they
don't have to breathe. People do.
Reagan's National Institute of Occupa-
tional Safety and Health has the names of
hundreds of thousands of workers who are
exposed to cancer-causing substances on
the job � but refuses to tell them about it.
Flesh-and-blood humans get sick.
Most revealing of all, though, is
Reagan's decision to produce the neutron
bomb � you know, the weapon whose
ultra-high radiation kills living things,
while leaving property intact. Linked to
this is the belief of some of the president's
top advisors that we can survive a limited
nuclear war � even though most scientists
and physiciains who have studied the mat-
ter say otherwise, and basic human
psychology tells us that living in a world
devastated by atomic weapons would be a
real-life horror show.
There's one additional similarity bet-
ween Reagan and the Firesign Theatre's
fantasy-of-a-president. On the record, an
alert, quizzical person fouls up the
automated system that operates the presi-
dent by asking a logical question that
doesn't compute. Reagan, too, is thrown
for a loop by thoughtful questions. That's
why Press Secretary James Brady kept him
at arm's length during the campaign, and
why Reagan gives so few press conferences
where he might have to face reporters ask-
ing unrehearsed questions. Logic
scrambles his circuits.
One nice thing about the Firesign
Theatre's White House scenario is that it's
only 38 minute and 49 seconds in lengtu.
The Reagan presidency will last a bit
longer, until Americans, tired of the phony
friendliness and concern masking anti-
people policies, get up and change the
record.
&AY, REMEMBER THE GAS SHORTAGE? PERFUME.
MY ASHTRAY, PLEASE HOW 1 &TOOD IN LINE FOR
HOURfeA LITTLE COGNAC IN TME BATTERY, WILL
YOU?FAYING ANY iACKEP-UP PRICE YOU ASKED
SPlT-POLt&H TME HEADLAMPS, OKAY? PUTTING
UP WITH YOUR RUDENE&SKl�)S MY 7TREg, WON'T
YOU?TOO BAD ABOUT THl� OIL GLUT
Nai
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1981

o
QL


4
3
-e
n
m
that
him
and
rences
rs ak-
gn
it's
length.
a bit
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jnti-
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: FOR
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PEPEIPENTHOU
� Rev. Falwell Drops Suit Against Magazine
Penthouse published an interview with Falwell earlier this year.
ROANOKE, VA.
(UP1) � The Rev.
Jerry Falwell has decid-
ed not to pursue a 50
million libel suit he fil-
ed against Penthouse
magazine earlier this
year a spokesman said
today.
Cal Thomas,
spokesman for the
broadcast evangelist
and founder of Moral
Majority, said Falwell
decided to "let it drop"
after U.S. District
Judge James Turk
dismissed the lawsuit
last month.
"Jerry decided to let
it drop, feeling that the
point had been made
and the message had
gotten out to our peo-
ple that he did not
knowingly or willingly
do the interview with a
magazine that he con-
sidered pornographic
Thomas said in a
telephone interview
from the Lynchburg
headquarters of
FalwelPs ministry.
Falwell had claimed
the magazine bought
interviews with him
from two freelance
writers who had pro-
mised not to sell the
material lo
4'pornographic
publications then
published the material
in March to make it ap-
pear he gave an ex-
clusive interview to a
magazine he abhors.
The freelance writers
Andrew Duncan and
Sashti Brata denied
agreeing to any restric-
tions on how they could
use the material. Pen-
thouse said it clearly
identified the material
as being based on two
interviews by freelance
writers.
In dismissing the
lawsuit Turk chided
Falwell for trying to
convert "what is essen-
tially a private contrac-
tual dispute into a
broad based attack" on
freedom of speech and
press guaranteed by the
First Amendment. The
judge said Falwell
could pursue breach of
contract suit.
After the suit was
dismissed Falwell said
he had achieved one of
his "ultimate goals" in
challenging Penthouse
by letting the public
know he would never
give an interview to a
pornographic
magazine
He also said he
would not know what
to do with money from
Penthouse if he had
won the suit.
"What could a
Christian ministser do
with funds obtained
from a pornographic
industry?" he asked
August 7.
O'Connor Confirmation Hearings Begin
I ROC K.Y M TM
f'E-Vrffc Cps
WASHINGTON
(UP1) � Sandra Day
O'Connor, testifying at
the opening of her con-
firmation hearings as
the first women
Supreme Court Justice,
said today she cannot
now say how she would
ote on controversial
issues like abortion.
"I do not believe
that, as a nominee, 1
can tell you how I
might vote on a par-
ticular issue which may
come before the
court she said in a
prepared statement as
the Senate Judiciary
Committee opened
hearings on her
nomination.
Her position seemed
to be a possible
blockade to an ex-
pected bevy of ques-
tions on how she would
vote on a variety of
issues� particularly
abortion and women's
rights issues. The main
opposition to her
nomination has come
from opponents of
abortion and the Equal
Rights Amendment.
It was uncertain if
the committee would
accept her stance or
press for answers,
although she is ex-
pected to win quick and
easy confirmation.
"This indeed is a
historic occasion said
Chairman Strom Thur-
mond, R-S.C. who
noted it was the first
time the president had
nominated a woman to
the nation's highest
court. "We will con-
duct this proceeding in
a full, fair and non-
partisan manner
Sen. Jeremiah Den-
ton, RAla was one of
the few senators openly
critical of O'Conrwr.
He said there were
"questions with respect
to your credibility"
because of what he said
was contradictory in-
formation about her
background.
Denton, a New Right
conservative, reserved
judgment on her
nomination, but said,
"it is my earnest hope
that your responses will
be neither broad nor
bland, as a lack of
knowledge or lack of
specificity in answers
could easily be perceiv-
ed as a lack of
qualification or of can-
dor
But Sen. Edward
Kennedy, DMass said
based on what he knew
he would support Mrs.
O'Conncr and added
she should not have to
pass a litmus test of any-
single group during the
three days of hearings
bv the committee.
"The disturbing tac-
tics of division, distor-
tion and disay two
dozen marchers for
anti-abortion
demonstrators paraded
in front of the Dirksen
Senate Office building
with signs saying,
"Vote No to Mrs. O
"Dump O'Connor"
and "Stop Abortion
Dear Pirate Fans,
On the way to Chapel Hill
Saturday, show your tickets at the
Happy Store and we will sell you a
89 bag of ice for 25 C.
�Sincerely,
HAPPY STORE �
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
SEPTEMBER 10. 198!
Page 6
L�toH
Florida Band
Blackfoot
Still Developi
Blackfoot is a rock'n'roll band.
That deceptively simple statement
may well be the most appropriate
testimonial to this hard-working
Florida-bred quartet, which has
emerged from over a decade of
dues-paying in bars and clubs across
the nation to become a true interna-
tional phenomenon.
Guitarist�vocalist Ricky
Medlocke, drummer Jakson Spires,
bassist Greg T. Walker, and
guitarist Charlie Hargrett are four
musicians who believe in the time-
honored doctrine of high voltage
rock'n'roll. As shown on their third
Atco album, "MARAUDER they
preach that doctrine with a power
and conviction that few contem-
porary acts can match.
The Blackfoot story begins in the
town of Jacksonville - a small, in-
dustrial city located in the north-
east corner of the Florida panhan-
dle. It's a tough, working-class
town, one that doesn't enjoy that
tropical, sunshine of Miami, the
fashionable boulevards of Palm
Beach, or the "Disney World" ex-
citement of Orlando. What
Jacksonville does possess, however,
is a well-deserved reputation as one
of the hottest rock'n'roll breeding
grounds in the country. Since the
late 1960's, tiny clubs that dot the
Jacksonbille landscape have spawn-
ed an impressive list of hard-rockin'
supergroups, including The Allman
Brothers Band, Lynyrd Skynyrd,
Reggae Gets
Rave Reviews
Molly Hatchet, .38 Special, and of
course, Blackfoot.
Predating any of these groups,
however, was a band called Fresh
Garbage (named after a song by the
group Spirit), which was the most
popular act in the Jacksonbille club
circuit back in 1968. The band
featured the budding talents of four
teen-aged musicians named
Medlocke, Spires, Walker and
Hargrett, and night after night they
would excite the standingroom
crowds with a brash, raw style that
reflected their love for traditional
southern blues as well as for the
British hard rock sound of groups
like The Who and The Rolling
Stones.
The Jacksonville music scene was
incredibly rich at that time, and it
wasn't long before Medlocke made
the acquatintance of three other
local talents - Ronnie Van Zant,
Allen Collins and Gary Rossington -
who were planning to start a band
of their own a band that would soon
be known as Lynyrd Skynyrd. By
this time, Fresh Garbage had chang-
ed its name to Blackfoot. All the
aspiring young musicians would
meet at Medlocke's home in the out-
skirts of town to discuss future
plans and to learn the blues whose
knowledge of blues from Ricky's
grandfather, Shorty Medocke,plans
and to learn the blues from Ricky's
grandfather, Shorty Medlocke, a
legendary local performer whose
� -
DincKioot, appearing with Def Leppard and Johnny Van Zant will be
appearing live in concert at Minges Coliseum on September 17 at 8 p.m.
Tickets are on sale at Mendenhall Student Center and a various local
ticket outlets.
knowledge of blues lore kept the
young rockers enthralled for hours
on end.
Inspired by Shorty Medlocke's
teachings, Blackfoot soon set out on
the road, relocating in New Jersey in
an attempt to escape the restrictive
grasp of the Jacksonville club scene.
At the time, Van Zant, Collins and
Rossington stayed at hiome, busy
solidifying their new group. Their
paths were soon to cross again,
however, when Skynyrd's drummer,
Bob Burns, unexpectedly left the
band only days before thev wre
scheduled to enter Muscle Shoals
Sound Studio to record their first
album. Van Zant sent out a call for
help, and Ricky Medlocke, who had
played drums with a number of
bands as a teen-ager, was soon Mus-
cle Shoals-bound.
"I had been friends with Roonnie
for quite a while by then
Medlocke recalls. "He often came
over to my house because he loved
to hear Shorty play the blues on his
harp. He knew that I had played
See BLACKFOOT, Page 8
By AL AGATE
MtWittn
The real thing came to Greenville
Thursday night. J.Js brought in
Roily Grey and Sun fire, a reggae
band from Trinidad. It was the kind
of show one could only otherwise
get to see in the more progressive
clubs of a major city. Put simply,
these guys were good enough to play
anywhere.
For those of you who spent your
First twenty- some odd years in caves
and , thus, have never heard of reg-
gae, permit me to inform you that
reggae is a form of music which
originated in the West Indies and is
characterized by a distinctive beat.
A lot of religious nad political in-
fluences often go into the lyrics of
reggae songs, but perhaps the best
way to describe the music, in this
print medium, is to offer two ex-
amples of reggae that have been
heard by almost everyone: "I SHOT
THE SHERIFF" (Bob Marley and,
later, Eric Clapton); and "The
Master Blaster (Stevie Wonder).
The band played the songs men-
tioned above, the latter being a par-
ticular crowd pleaser, as well as an
interesting interpretation of Bob
Dylan's "Lay, Lady, Lay But
most of the music played
throughout the three sets was the
band's own. And almost all of it
was good.
Make no mistake: live reggae is
not mellow. Those who came Thurs-
day, misled by some recordings into
thinking that reggae is something
you listen to when you smoke lots of
ganja and slip into a coma, walked
into a house that was jumping with
energy and excitement. People were
on their feet, all of them dancing-
cither on the dance floor
(intentionally) or on the sidelines,
tapping their feet and rocking back
and forth in spi'e of themselves
Those who came slaved; so by the
end of the night there was a decent
crowd. "Decent I say, for it to
have been appropriate, and com
mensurate with this band's quality,
there would have been a packed
house and a line out the door. There
was neither.
Yes, yes, I realize that it's
frustrating reading a rave review on
something you missed out on. I've
had the same experience myself
Either you feel bad that you missed
out on something good, or you con
elude that the reviewer must be
wrong, as some kind of defense
mechanism against feeling bed. This
time do neither. Make a mental note
that when Roily Grey and Sunfire
come back here, you won't want to
miss them.
Meanwhile, over at the Attic last
weekend, EAZE, a five piece rock
band out of Tampa, Florida played
to packed houses, in what can best
be described as a apparenth
unintentional nostalgia act. While
their song list, by copy-band star.
dards, was not particularly out-
dated, this musical interpretation of
their material was very much heavv
metal circa 1973. Even their ap-
pearances, (save for the lead singer)
seemed outdated, their haircuts
reminiscent of the kind I had as a
sophomore at Curtis High. 1975.
Lead singer, Melody Eagan, was
the band's sole strong pont. and a
substantial one. Her clothes were
contemporary�she could easiilv
See EAZE, Page 7
Cheerleaders: A Nuisance Or A Necessity ?
By KAREN WENDT
Fralum Mllor
Last Saturday's game brought to
the forefront many things. Our
ECU Pirate football team, our Mar-
ching Pirate Band, our symbol, the
Pirate ship and many other things.
But one item that has gone for the
most part unnoticed in the past and
probably in the future is the ECU
Cheerleading squad. Those gallant
guys and gals who try to get you, the
audience, to show your school spirit
and pride with such rousing cheers
as Go Go, Go Go, Go, Go Hey
Let's Go. (An actual ECU pirate
cheer).
Cheerleading has not been mak-
ing the impression it once made.
The cheerleaders regularly come
under fire for taking up too much
time, or for interfering in a viewers
line of vision or for making too
much noise. Such was not always
the case.
Back when we were in high school
cheerleaders made more of an im-
pression than they do now. Of
course the experience was different
then. In high school they only had a
crowd of one thousand or so to con-
trol and keep occupied between
plays. The college cheerleader has to
keep a crowd of 20,000 happy and
cheering between plays. No small
chore.
And cheerleaders in college are
not usually as popular as they, were p
in high school. You remember in
high school the cheerleaders were
the ones who dated the quarterbacks
and were elected homecoming
queens and went to all of the dances
after they debuted (the females, not
the males). Cheerleaders gained a
different image a few years ago,
with the advent of National League
Cheerleaders.
A few years ago National Foot-
ball teams decided to try out
cheerleading squads of their own.
They were an amazing success for a
limited time. The photos of the girls
in their ranks made every magazine
in the country including a rather ex-
posing spread in Playboy magazine.
The girls appeared on many of the
major talk shows and were critisized
by womens groups. A man received
national publicity when he charged
discirmination and demanded to be
put on a squad.
Cheerleaders have very definite
objectives, according 'o
Cheerleading by Newt Loken
(published in 1945, the most recent
book that Joyner library had on the
subject). The following list is drawn
from the sections on Game Behavior
and Cheering Behavior:
� Maintain dignity at all times (Not
easy when reciting-
Purple, Purple, give 'urn hell purple
Gold, Gold, give 'urn hell gold
Purple, Gold, Go (drawn out)
Pirates!).
� All bench behavior must be done
as a group (sitting down in unison is
an asset.)
� There should be no cheering by
boys and girls together (we think
this is no longer applicable but we're
not sure).
� Cheerleaders should show spirit
at all times (this does not mean the
alcohol type).
� Physical movements in accom-
paniment to music-except school
songs and clapping- are not to be
led or indulged in by cheerleaders.
(That's right boys and girls, leave
the dancing to the pom-pom girls.)
Cheerleading also involves a wide
variety of physical motion including
Salutes, Arm Thrusts, Handclapp-
ing, Finger Snapping Arm Flinging,
Trunk Twists, Knee Slaps, Stag
Leaps, Knee Plunges, Partner Side
Leans, Straddle Touch Leaps and Beat 'em boys, beat 'em!
Partner Shoulder Sits.
Cheers from the 40's were often
to give the opponents a boost such
as:
Hello, Opponents, Hello!
Hello, Opponents, Hellc!
No matter who wins
We'll always be friends
Hello, "Opponents Hello!
Or:
Come on, Bulldogs
Get on the Beam
Let's say hello
To the visiting Team
But not ali of the cheers
friendly. Two which were
opponents were:
Let's go Let's go
Let's really go
Let's fight Let's fight
Let's really fight
Let's win Let's win
Let's really win
Let's Go Fight Win
Beat 'em boys, beat 'em
Beat 'em boys, beat 'em
Beat 'em fair
Beat 'em square
were
anti-
The ECU cheerleaders have been
the target of many complaints,
shouts and coke filled pirate cup
missies. Complaints that they can
not be heard are common. Some say
that they can not understand the
words of the cheers. Many students
don't understand what those people
in the unusual outfits are doing
down there in the first place.
Cheerleaders have gripes too.
They say that they are ignored and
the target of flying debris. They
must be out there despite the
weather in the hot and the cold in
uniforms that are often skimpy at
best.
We at The EASt Carolinian
would like to change the fighting .
The following are some of the
cheers that the ECU squad uses. We
print them in the hope that they will
be used by all to cheer our team to
victory in the upcoming season.
� Go Pirates, Beat Western, Go
Pirates, Beat Western,(Clap, clap,
clap, clap, clap).
� Let's Go Pirates,(Clap, clap,
clap, clap, clap).
� E-C-U, Hey E-C-U (Repeat)
� Rip um up, tear um up, give 'urn
hell Pirates.
� Purple, Purple, give 'um hell pur-
ple
Gold, Gold, give 'um hell gold
Purple, Gold, Go . . . (drawn out). .
. Pirates
� Well I got myself a rooster
(repeat)
And I put him on a fence (repeat)
And that rooster cheered for
Western (repeat)
'Cause he had no sense (repeat)
So I got another rooster (repeat)
And I put him on a fence (repeat)
And that rooster cheered Pirates
(repeat)
'Cause he had good sense (rpeat)
I said a root, a root, a root, a toot
toot.
For the East Carolina Pirates.
And of course the classic:
� Hey Hey Hey Hey, EC, vou look
so good to me (repeat).
Ordinary People
Sutherland Stars In Weekend Flick
Ordinary People, staring Mary Tyler Moore, Donalds Sutherland and Tim Hutton will be appearing at Hendrix
Theater this weekend for six shows. The film is sponosored by the Student Unions Films comittee.
This Friday and Saturday nights in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's Hendrix Theatre, the Student Union
Films Committee will present this year's Academy
Award winner for Best Picture, Ordinary People.
Times for the film are 5, 7:15, and 9:30 p.m. for both
evenings.
Ordinary People stands alone as one of the most
heart-wrenching and incisive dramas in years � both a
critical and popular hit as well as winner of more major
awards than any other American film at last year's
Academy Awards (including Best Director, Robert Red-
ford; Best Supporting Actor, Timothy Hutton).
The performances are stunning in this story of a
teenager (Hutton), troubled over the fact that he failed
to save his older brother from drowning, who attempts
suicide.
His parents (Mary Tyler Moore, Donald Sutherland),
affluent Chicago's urbanites, can't seem to be able to
restore the boy's confidence in himself, nor can they
themselves appear capable of true understanding.
Only over a period of time is the family able to recon-
cile itself to life's difficulties. Director Redford tells the
story with genuine compassion.
"One of the finest films of the year. Ordinary People
is extraordinary entertainment, a sensitive, artfully-
made exploration of love and loss. It's a memorable
first film for neophyte director Robert Redford, who
leaves the acting to an impeccable ensemble
� Joseph Gelmis, Newsday
"Ordinary People is excellent. It is so well-acted and so
crisply directed by Robert Redford. One performance is
better than the next
� Gene Siskel, Chicago Tribune
"Best Film of the Year
� New York Film Critics
� National Board of Review
Next weekend, the Popular Film Series returns to its
usual format with a single 7 p.m. showing on Thursday
night in addition to its six FridaySaturday night show-
ings.
The film for next week, September 17, 18 and 19, is
the rousing western saga The Long Riders, starring
Keith Carradine and Stacey Reach.
Coming soon are Fame, The Stunt Man, Private Ben-
jamin, Stir Crazy, The Great Santini, Halloween, and
Nine to Five, among many others.
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THE EAST CAROI INI AN
SEPTEMBFR 10. 1981
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lnn. Private Ben-
Halloween, and
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, EAZE Disappointing
For ECU Reviewer
Chimney Sweeps Still Lucky
According To Greenville's Own
��! If Vim fA f ft o
B SI SAN RIES
Mark Petterson still
gets invited to a lot ol
weddings, but he no
longei wears a top hat
or climbs around on
your root
Petterson, the owner
ol Carolina Chimney
cleaners, is a
e e n i 11 e - b a s c d
chimney sweep who
esn't cater to tradi-
tion. Petterson said his
black top hat get
knocked o his head
when he's peering up
chimneys.
"Chimney sweeps
began wearing the hats
�or two reasons-first,
to poke fun at the
nobility, who they were
working for, and se-
cond so they could tell
who they had lowered
into the chimney he
said. Petterson explain-
ed that the top hats
were worn to identify
who va working in the
chimne.
He said it is good
luck tc invite a chimney
sweec to a wedding. "I
still keep the full regalia
in my closet, just for
kissing the bride
Cleaning chimneys
has changed a great
deal since the Middle
ages. "Chimneysweeps
always had big
families, and the two-
year-olds got the task
of sliding down a dirty
chimney. If you didn't
have any kids, you
could always hire a
street kid for a pence a
week Petterson said.
"Some sweeps used
swan or geese. They
just tied their feet
together. The flapping
wings knocked out all
the creosote off the
sides of the chimney
However Petterson
admitted there would
be a problem with using
the birds today. "I
think the ASPCA
(American Society for
the Prevention of
Cruelty to Animals)
would take a dim
view
The sweeps wear
coveralls, a cap and a
specal mask that
doesn't allow ash or
any poinsonous
substances through.
The cancer and tuber-
culosis rate was ex-
tremely high among the
chimney sweeps in
Europe. "Creosote is
very corrosive and ash
wili turn to lye when it
hits the moisture in
your lungs. That's why-
sweeps has to have lots
of kids. The mortality
rate was astounding
he said.
Dress is not the only
difference between Pet-
terson and the chimney
sweeps of the Middle
Ages. He cleans a
chimney from bottom
up instead of from the
top down. He says
many homeowners
neglect their chimneys,
letting the mortar erode
and making a once-
strong chimney into an
unstable pile of bricks.
"It's not safe doing
it (cleaning chimneys)
that way. I've seen
chimneys topple over at
the slightest touch
Petterson said. For
safety's sake he sits in
the fireplace, removes
the damper and uses a
high powered vacuum
cleaner to suck the ash
out of the chimney.
"Old chimneys's are
a lot more dangerous
than the new ones. The
older ones are crusted
with creosote he said.
"The only way to have
a fire in your fireplace
and not have to worry
about creosote is by
burning those
smokeless logs they sell
in the supermarket
adds Petterson.
"I've seen new
houses, less than a year
old. completely
destroyed by a fire that
started in the chimney.
It's the creosote that
burns
Petterson says that
even with the energy
crisis, he hasn't noticed
a dramatic increase in
his business. "Oil is
still cheaper than
wood. In Virginia, a
cord of wood is going
for $200 Petterson is
still the only sweep in
Greenville.
In his job, Petterson
comes in contact with
much more thatn
creosote and it's impor-
tant for Petterson's
employees
who's boss.
know
If we have to go
under a house or far-
ther into a chimney that
we expected, 1 make my
assistant so first, to
scare away the spiders
and snakes
Continued From Page 6
have fit in with a new wave band.
Her singing was competent, but
more importantly her magnetic
stage presence and apparent con
fidence projected a personality.
Clearly she was a woman, not a girl
as so many female lead singers are,
and belonged onstage.
Yet despite the general excellence
of Miss Eagan, she could not
counteract the band's performance,
for the guitar dominated and in
clearly detrimental ways. Almost
every song the band played both
contained and was concluded by a
noisy, repetitious guitar solo. Occa-
sionally solos would introduce
material, reaching the height of ab-
surdity when the Stones' blues-rock
"Tumblin' Dice" was led into by a
Zeppelinesque quitar break.
Rock and roll cliches abounded; 1
began to be able to guess what
would happen next. Take the
following example: the lead guitarist
stepped out to do his obligatory ten
minute guitar solo - discordant,
deafening and completely irrelevant
to the song this was to lead into
(Ain'i That A Shame"). He had his
cigarette in the fret of his guitar
where else right? He looked into the
front row like, "Get a load o' this
He slapped his guitar with his hand,
then began slapping it with a piece
of cloth that looked like a tie. He
put the guitar on the floor and
began flaggelating it with a towel. I
wondered, "When will he play the
guitar with his teeth?He didn't
disappoint me. He did that too. His
guitar ran the gamut of sexual com-
motation, but only put out noise.
To the extent that theirs was a
nostalgia show, it was a unique one.
I can't help but feel that this band
would best serve its talents (which I
don't deny are evident), if they
remembered that this is 1981 and ar-
ranged their music accordingly.
Hendrix is. afierall, dead, and Jim-
my Page's golden age is gone.
LLAR .
OFF. I
Buy one meal and
get $1.00 off the
second one.
With this coupon, when you buy
one meal at the regular price, you
can get a second meal of the same
value for a dollar less
Must be used at time of purchase.
Does not include sandwiches,
unlimited salad bar, or specials.
Offer good through
August 31. 1981
JACKS
I
I
I
PIRATE COUPON
10 Discount on
ANY FOOD ORDER
Regardless of size.
Present this coupon and show your ECU ID
to cashier. Offer expires Sept. 13th.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1981

Blackfoot Still Developing
Musical
Continued From Page 6
drums in some bands
before I switched to
guitar with Blackfoot,
and when he asked for
help, man 1 was ready
to give it! I just put
Blackfoot on 'hold' for
a while and headed
down to Muscle Shoals.
We went into the studio
with Jimmy Johnson
producing; and we
recorded a whole bunch
of tunes that finally
came out a few years
ago as Skynyrd's
'FIRST AND LAST'
album. I contributed
four songs: 'White
Dove 'Preacher's
Daughter 'The
Seasons' and 'Wino
and we even got Greg
(Walker) in the band
for a while when
Skynyrd's bassist left.
That was rally a fun
time
Medlocke stayed
with Skynyrd for nearly
a year before Burns
decided to rejoin the
band. His rturn was a
relief to Medlocke in a
number of ways, for
while he enjoyed per-
formeing with
Skynyrd, he longed to
get back to playing
guitar and fronting a
group of his own. Un-
doubtedly, he could
have stayed on with
Skynyrd, which as soon
to add a third guitarist,
but for Ricky the desire
to lead his own band
far outweighed his
drive to play a subor-
dinate role in Skynyrd's
rise to fame. "Skynyrd
already had two pretty
fair pickers in Allen
and Gary he ex-
plains, "and everybody
in the band could write.
There really wasn't
enough room for me to
do what 1 wanted,
which was to get back
to writing and playing
the guitar. When their
drummer came back, 1
felt free to get
Blackfoot going
again
It was 1972 when
Medlocke reformed
Blackfoot, and once
again the band headed
North to be part of the
flourishing New Jersey
club scene. Medlocke
knew that the road
ahead would be filled
with detours and
hurdles, but he felt con-
fident that Blackfoot's
special approach would
eventually bring them
their own recording
contract. For the next
three years, the group
beat an incessant war-
path between their New
Jersey stronghold and
Texas � the only other
market that seemed to
respond to the band's
unique blend of
southern blues and
Anglo heavy-metal.
By 1975 Blackfoot
had developed a diverse
and powerful repertoire
of material, and they
felt ready to record
their first album.
Medlocke, on a dare,
called up producer Jim-
my Johnson, who he
had worked with dur-
ing the Skynyrd ses-
sions, to see if
Blackfoot could book
some time at Muscle
Shoals. Much to his
surprise, Johnson's
response was im-
mediate and en-
thusiastic, and soon the
band was in the studio
under his watchful eye.
The result of their
labors was an album
called "NO RESER-
VATIONS a no-
holds-barred gem of a
record that packed the
wallop of a loaded .45.
Blackfoot tore through
such tunes as "Take A
Train" and Shorty
Medlocke's "Railroad
Man" � only to be
totally ignored by fans,
press, and radio pro-
grammers alike. "I still
love some of the things
on that album
Medlocke says. "I
guess it was just a case
of being in the wrong
place at the wrong
time. The record com-
pany we were with at
the time gave it no sup-
port, and it just died
The band changed
labels for their next
album, "FLYIN'
HIGH a disjointed,
lackluster effort that
exhibited little of the
hard-rocking energy
displayed on their first
album. "Our managr
at that time jsut walked
in one day and said,
'You've got a new
record deal, now go
ahead and make a
record " Medlocke
says with a laugh.
"We'd been concen-
trating on our live
shows and we really
didn't have any new
material ready. Unfor-
tunately, I think the
finished product show-
ed that
While their records
were generating only
minimal interest,
Blackfoot was slowly
building up a dedicated
core of followers in
both New Jersey and
Texas by playing a
countless string of one-
night stands. It was at
one such Texas perfor-
mance that the band,
appearing as an open-
ing act for Brownsville
Station and Black Oak
Arkansas, was first
seen by Brownsville's
manager Al Nalli.
Overwhelmed by
whawt he heard, Nalli
moved in to sign the
band to a management
contract and soon
began redirecting their
stagnant recording
career.
Aligning the band
with Atco Records,
Nalli quickly :ook
Blackfoot into the
studio to begin work on
what would become
their breakthrough
album, "STRIKES
Providing Medlocke
with the room he need-
ed to properly display
his superlative guitar
and vocal abilities,
Nalli (aided by former
Brownsville drummer
Henry Week) helped
the band produce a
rock'n'roll classic. On
such MedlockeSpires
compositions as "Road
Fever" and "Highway
Song" and Shorty
Medlocke's "Train,
Train as well as on a
superlative rendition of
Free's "Wishing
Well Blackfoot
managed to magnify
their stage energy and
prove that they were a
force to be reckoned
with on the rock'n'roll
scene. In the wake of
the album's immediate
acceptance by fans and
FM radio stations from
coast to coast,
Blackfoot began
escalating their touring
schedule, mixing open-
ing act engagements
with headlining gigs
across the nation. After
nearly ten years of
struggling, Blackfoot
was suddenly an
"overnight sensation
"I think on
'STRIKES' we proved
that we weren't just
another Southen
band Medlocke
states. "Sure, we're
from the South, and
we're proud of it, but
we've nevr believed in
letting our heritage dic-
tate the type of music
we could play. Our
roots are just as much
in The Who and Free as
they are in southern
boogie
The band followed
the RIAA gold success
of their Atco debut
with a more expansive
; e f f o r t ,
"TOMCATTIN
With the album
showcasing the entire
spectrum of their hard-
rockin' repertoire,
"TOMCATTIN' " fur-
ther enhanced
Blackfoot's growing
reputation as a top-flite
American rock unit.
On songs such as "Fox
Chase" (featuring a
rockin' harp intro by
Shorty Medlocke),
"Gimme, Gimme,
Gimme and the
athemic "Every Man
Shouuld Know
(Queenie) Blackfoot
gave ample evidence
that they were now one
of the best rock'n'roll
bands in the world.
They supported that
contention with an
s.r.o. 1980 world tour
that saw them play
before enthusiastic
crowds throughout
America and Europe.
Now with the release
of "MARAUDER
the newest chapter in
the Blackfoot story is
about to unfold.
Recorded at Al Naili's
private studio in Ann
Arbor, Michigan,
"MARAUDER" is a
tour-de-force display of
rock'n'roll at its very
best. From the incredi-
ble full-tile energy of
"Dry County" to the
hook-laden power of,
the album's first single,
"Fly Away
"MARAUDER"
represents the fruition
of Blackfoot's musical
ideal. With the
MedlockeSpires
songwriting team pro-
ducing ten of their most
dynamic and accessible
songs yet, Blackfoot
displays a maturity and
artistic polish that only
serve to enhance their
hard-racing style. On
such tunes as
Rattlesnake
Rock'n'Roller" (which
features a by-now-
traditional appearance
by Shorty Medlocke)
and the blues-oriented
ballad "Diary of a
, Workingman the
band has managed to
deftly side-step brutual-
ly all the standard hard
rock cliches while
creating a style that
with high-
excitement.
bristles
energy
With
"MARAUDER
Blackfoot has recorded
an album that seems
destined to rocket them
longest time on our
career just to make sure
we got everything soun-
ding just the way e
wanted it to-
'MARAUDER' has got
the power
Em
into a permanent place 'STRIKES' and the ac-
in the rock'n'roll cessibihty
stratosphere.
"We worked long
and hard to get this
record just right
Medlocke says. "I can
honestly say that it's
the best thing we've
ever done. We stayed
off the road for the
TOMCATTIN 1
guess you could say
that with this album
Blackfoot shows
everybody how to
rock'n'roll
Yes, Blackfoot is a
rock'n'roll band.
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Attic
FRIDAY,
SEPT. 11
4:00-7:00 p.m.
Admission
25
Canned Beverages
only6(K
Sponsored by Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
Tlie price
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has just come
clown!
SILADICTT
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SILADIUM rings produce the
brilliant lustre of a fine jeweler's
stainless.
Men's and women's Siladium
rings are on sale this week
only through your
ArtCarved representative.
A visit to the ArtCarved
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the chance to see the full
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But hurrv on over this sale
runs for a limited
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.CLASS RINGS. INC
DATE: Sept. 10th and 11th
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
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Deposit required MasterCharse or Visa accepted
�1961 ArtCarved Class Ring
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HU FASTCAROIINIAN
Sports
SI Ml MHl K 10, IS�H1 I'agf 9
Emory Denies All Charges
Crum Accuses Pirates Of Spying
from si�(( tmt Wlrr Krports
North Carolina athletic officials
shed a ray of controversy Wednes-
daj night ovei this weekend's UNC-
i asi Carolina football game, accus-
ing wo Pirate coaches of spying on
ihe 14th-ranked Tar Heels pre-game
practice preparations.
The UNC officials said two men
they believe are last Carolina
. hts uatched the practice from
UNC law school building. One
ol the men was confronted by UNC
a school Dean Kenneth Brojjn,
bul left after Buuin arrived.
Broun said that the man bore "a
ai resemblance" to a picture of
C assistant Charlie Elmquist. A
who made the first report of
spying said that the second man
appeared to be Pirate assistant
. h darr hast
"1 don't think theie's much ques-
about those people being
there said UNC coach Dick
um "When the dean of the law
school says to me they were the peo-
ple and they were up there taking
down what we were doing in prac-
tice; I think the dean of the law
school is a pretty reliable person
East Carolina head coach Ed
Emory flatly denied Crum's accusa-
tions.
"My staff has been in Greenville
all day. either in individual group
meetings or squad meetings
Emory said. "They have not been
out of my sight. 1 don't know
anything about what the Carolina
people are talking about.
"It looks to me like they are try-
ing to get something pumped up for
the ball game Saturday with the
great Carolina press Emory add-
ed. "I'm very concerned they
haven't had the courtesy to call me
or my athletic director. I'm very
upset the dean of the law school
would accuse me without concrete
facts
Emory said that the Pirates had to
move their Wednesday practice
Crum
from the afternoon to the evening
due to "a lot of unknown faces" at
Tuesday's practice, including five
people who were asked to leave.
When security police went to con-
front the five, Emory said, three left
in cars and two others said they were
Emory
salesmen from out of town but
refused to provide identification.
"Because of all that Emory
said, "we were forced to move our
practice to (Ficklen) Stadium, where
we could get some assured securi-
ty
Emory said that he cautioned his
team Wednesday nighl against let
ting the pre game "controversy"
prey on their minds
"I told them not to let this inter
rupt their concentration lor Satur
day's game. We cannot lei tin
fabrication affect our pla come
Saturday afternoon
In Chapel Hill, Crum said there
was no time to make major changes
in his game plan for Saturday.
"We're prepared to play and
that's where it is. They've seen the
total preparation. he certainly
know what we're doing
The two men who were claimed to
be ECU coaches were observed wal
ching the Tar Heel practice from the
Law School librarv, which
overlooks the UNC practice field.
An injured player. Ken Say lor s,
had been assigned to study in the
library and report if anyone paid
undue attention to football pra
tices.
Saylors said he saw a young man
whom he later said resembled
pictures of last � in the library
Tuesday paying more attention to
the Tar Heels than law books but
did not report the incident because
"I didn't want to accuse anybody
a rongly
But when Saylors returned
Wednesday he saw the young man
immediately and then noticed a se-
cond balding man with him. Saylors
went to the field to notify Crum,
who contacted Broun and asked him
to find out who the two men were.
"When he entered the library
Broun said he confronted a man
who "had on his desk what ap-
peared to be play diagrams. He im-
mediate! v coered them with a law
book.
"1 asked him if there were plays
under there Broun said, "and he
said he didn't have an answer to
that The law school dean said the
man refused to identify himself and
left a short time later.
Pirates Worried About
Pirates, Not Tar Heels
Bv( HARLES CHANDLER
sport r dilxr
- arohna head football coach
rv -aid at his weekly press
:e ednesda that he was
re concerned about his
m the Uth-ranked North
far Heels, ECU's oppo-
irdav afternoon.
Carolina does not really
� ia' North Carolina does
aid. "We've been busy wor-
a- last Carolina does We
ring on improving
Emory said that he expected the
ECU Secondary Play Vital
Crum Says
ECU Has
Advantage
CHAPEl Hill U PI) � North
Carolina coach Dick Crum says
Carolina may have a slight ad-
vantakje when they take on his Tar
Heels Saturday because they have
already played and won one game.
"We will have to be totally
prepared to play them Crum said
at a news conference Tuesday.
'They will come in here with a very
solid football team. 1 expect it to be
a very tight and tough football
eame
The Tar Heels, the preseason
favorite in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference, have not played yet this
season, but East Carolina opened
last weekend with a solid 42-6
thrashing of Western Carolina.
Pirate quarterback Carlton
Nelson was "quite impressive" in
the win, Crum said.
"It is an accomplishment when
you have four touchdown drives in
excess of 80 yards as they did he
said.
Because East Carolina has
already played and the lopsided
margin allowed the Pirates to use
more of their game plan, Crum said
they should have a slight advantage
Saturday.
But Crum's staff was able to
scout East Carolina, which "might
come in a little blind about us
North Carolina holds a 5-1-1
record in the series, but East
Carolina is being dropped after this
vear.
"This is a big game for hast
Carolina Crum said. "It has
Tar Heels to be just as strong as a
year ago, when the club went 11-1.
But, he said, too much emphasis has
been put on certain sidelines of the
game.
"People say we should beat
Carolina because its the last game of
the series with them the second-
year Pirate coach said. "We want to
beat Carolina simply because we
don't ever go on the field intending
to lose
Emory said that he had talked
with some supporters who asked
him "what it was like to play in
Kenan Stadium
"1 told them I suppose it's just
like playing in Ficklen Stadium.
They're both football fields that are
100 yards long where you line it up
and play
Turning more to the specifics of
the game, Emory said that his
Pirates should be a much improved
one over a year ago, when the club
lost a 31-3 decision to the then
seventh-ranked Heels.
"We have a lot more chemistry
and togetherness than we had a year
ago Emory said. "But it's very,
very important that we go up there
and do what East Carolina can do
� protect the football, move the
down markers and play aggressive
defense
Emory said the fact that the
Pirates have a more well-rounded
offensive attack should prove to be
a help Saturday.
"We're not going to try to be a
conservative football team. We will
try to throw the football. We feel
like we will not move the football
unless we make them defend our
passing game
The Pirates were impressive
through the airways in their season-
opening, 42-6, win over Western
Carolina last Saturday. Emory says
there is a reason for his team's
marked improvement in the passing
game.
"The passing game starts with
protection he claimed. "You can
never have a great passing game
without protection. We didn't have
that last year, but our offensive line
is much bigger and stronger this
year
Emory said that he expected an
impressive show from the Tar
Heels, who are listed as 19-20 point
favorites by oddsmakers.
"I think their offense will be bet-
ter than a year ago he said. "They
lost some good people up front and,
of course, Amos Lawrence out of
the back field. But they have some
quality people moving up. And
On The Move
The East Carolina offense, led by quarter-
back Carlton Nelson (6), was impressive
in win last week over Western Carolina.
Nelson and his cohorts hope for success
this weekend against the nationally-
ranked North Carolina Tar Heels. (Photo
B C hap (iurle.y)
Kelvin Bryant is a great back.
"I don't know how much they
have changed things since Famous
Amos is gone the ECU coach add-
ed. "With an established quarter-
back like Rod Elkins I feel like
they'll do something different. If
anything, they'll probably throw the
football more. I also expect them to
run Bryant on the sweep a lot
Emory admitted that the Heels
will miss some quality players who
graduated on defense, like M I
draftees Donnell Thompson am!
Lawrence Taylor, but added that
plenty of talent remains
"God bless the coaches who've
got great linebackers. They've got
them at Carolina. All o them
(Darrell) Nicholson, (Calvin)
Daniels and (lee) Shaffei are
super. Great linebackers can make a
line look good
The third-vear Buc mentoi ddd
that last year's backups for the likes
of 1 hompson and Taylor should
become good starters this year.
"When you play behind the likes
ot those people you have a tendencv
to be much bttter when they
graduate. When you play behind the
best, you discover what it takes to
make it big
The game will be the first of the
season for the Tar Heels. Kickoff
time at Kenan Stadium is 1 p.m.
Booters Take Opener
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Vwtslsat Sports Kdltor
There's nothing quite like the first
time � at least for coach Brad
Smith and his East Carolina Pirates.
The Pirates got their soccer
season off on the right foot Tuesday
afternoon by defeating tradtional
power Atlantic Christian College
before a home crowd, 4 2.
The victory marked the first time
ever that East Carolina has beaten
Atlantic Christian in a regular-seson
match. Mark Hardy, competing in
his first collegiate match, scored two
goals and added another assist.
Four Students Take
The 'Carolina Ram'
The Pirates and Heels will mix it up for
the last time Saturday
always been a tight game with the
exception of last year when they
came in with a lot of injuries.
"It is always tough for us to get
ready for them. They come in here
highly motivated he said, but felt
the Tar Hels will be ready for their
first game.
Quarterback Rod Elkins, who
stepped into the starting lineup last
season as a sophomore should be
better after a year's experience,
Crum said.
"We certainly have more ex-
perience with the guy who has to
make it go going into this season. If
you're asking whether we will throw
the ball more, I would have to say
yes he said.
The two big questions about the
Tar Heels will be the defensive line
and the depth on offense, he said.
North Carolina lost four of its
front five from last season's 11-1
squad.
The replacements are "good
playersbut they are very inex-
perienced Crum said.
I
Four East Carolina students
took off for Chapel Hill
Wednesday and came home
with one of the University of
North Carolina's most prized
possessions.
The students, who chose to
remain anonymous for ob-
vious reasons, returned to
Greenville late Wednesday
night with Ramseus VI, the of-
ficial UNC mascot.
"We were on a mission
from God one of the
students told The East Caroli-
nian after they returned.
The student said the group
did not plan to harm Ramseus,
but did have some interesting
plans for the "Carolina ram
"We are taking good care of
him said the student. "We
want to do this classy. We will
paint his horns purple and
gold and put an ECU banner
over it. Then we hope to get it
on the field at Kenan Stadium
just before the game starts
The group's spokesman said
that the four tried once to cap
ture the ram and failed, then
tame away with it on a second
try.
"Someone saw us the hist
time the student said. "We
ran away and met to discuss
everything. After a pep talk,
we decided we'd get the ram or
get caught. There was no in-
between
Aside from being "on a mis
sion from God" the students
said they took the ram to have
something to remember in
future years.
"We took it because this is
supposed to be the last game
between ECU and Carolina
one of the group members
claimed. "We wanted
something to remember this
last one by
Brad Winchell also scored two goals
in the Pirate victory.
The Pirates took a 3-0 lead early
in the match only to see Atlantic
Christian rally to cut the margin to
one with two second-period goals.
The Pirates added another goal in
the final period to assure the team
o its first victory in the first attempt
o the season.
"In the first half we played as
well as we've ever played said
coach Brad Smith. "We had a let-
down in our defense (in the final
period) which let them score and
also fired them up for their second
goal
The East Carolina coach was
pleased with the play of Hardy and
goalie Steve Brown. "Steve had
some excellent saves. Mike Swann
also came off the bench and played
well
Junior college transfer Tom
Lawrence also played well, adding
an assist, as did Winchell and his
brother, Bryan.
The East Carolina defense was
tough throughout the afternoon as
Atlantic Christian fired 13 shots on
goal compared to 14 by the Pirates.
The win over the Bulldogs, usual-
ly one of the toughest clubs on the
Pirate schedule, was important in
that Atlantic Christian captured the
Governor's Cup in the Club League
last spring.
The Pirates are at home again this
Saturday against nationally-ranked
George Mason. "If we get by
George Mason says Smith,
"we've got a good chance of going
into the N.C. State match
undefeated
Gametime is 2 p.m.
"





(Btje tast Ularoltntan
SEPTEMBER 10, 1981
Sports
Special Report: The End Of An Era
Swofford Rules Out Series Renewal
B CHARLES CHANDLER
sports tdilor
An era is set to end in Kenan
Stadium this Saturday afternoon
when North Carolina and East
Carolina get together for what is
probably the last game in a college
football series that has developed in-
to a bitter rivalry.
The ECU-UNC series, which
began in 1972, is coming to a close
a a result of a policy adopted by the
UNC athletic department a few
years back which states that Tar
Heel football and basketball teams
can play no in-state schools other
than the ones in the Atlantic Coast
Conference (Duke. N.C. State and
Wake Forest).
The decision, which takes effect
for the Pirates after Saturday's
eighth meeting on the gridiron bet-
ween the two schools, has not been
taken lightly in the many parts of
the state. Still, UNC officials stand
firm by the policy.
"The athletic council endorsed it
about four years ago said L'NC
athletic director John Swofford,
"and the athletic department ac-
cepts it and will obey it. It is in the
best interest of our program that we
do so, not meaning any disrespect to
East Carolina.
"This has been the policy in
basketball for a long time Swof-
ford added. "It was felt that it
would be best to apply it to football
as well
Swofford said that the decision
was not directed at ECU, but admit-
ted admitted that East Carolina had
its part in the council's decision,
more so than any other non-ACC
school in the state.
"The fact that we played East
Carolina every year became very at-
tractive to some other schools in the
state he said. "I guess they felt if
we could play East Carolina we
could play them too. It became dif-
ficult for us to say no to those peo-
ple and keep saying yes to East
Carolina
The fact that the Pirates fill
Carolina's Kenan Stadjum annually
does not create a reason to recon-
sider the decision, Swofford said,
because the Heels do not have a pro-
blem getting capacity crowds
"We're fortunate in that we've
been sold out for every nome game
the past five years he said. "We
hope that will continue
ECU athletic director Ken Karr
naturally feels that the series should
continue, and that it is good for
both institutions.
"We feel it's very unfortunate
that such good competition should,
be ended after such a short run
Karr said. "While we can appreciate
the university's (UNC) decision, we
feel there were many positive
aspects to this competition that were
lot considered when the scheduling
policy was established
The policy was established, Swof-
ford said, so that the Heels could
play a better national schedule.
"We are locked in for seven con-
ference games a year he explain-
ed. "That leaves us only four non-
conference ames to play with. We
want to play, from a geographic-
standpoint, a schedule that is as na-
tionally reputable as possible. That
does not mean that East Carolina is
not nationally reputable. It's the
geography that makes the dif-
ference
Swofford added that the Heels'
"uture scheduling has all but ruled
Mil any chance that the two schools
;an meet on the playing field again,
saying that the Carolina schedule is
set through 1994.
ECU's Karr has yet to give up
hope, though, and says that enough
public demand for the continuation
of the series could make a dif-
ference.
"In light of this existing schedui
ing policy of the Universitv o! V
Carolina-Chapel Hill he said.
would appear that this excel
competition in football between
fine universities is at an end unles
the friends, fans and alumni o both
North Carolina and last Carolina
band together and demand that it
return
Swofford said that Karr has been
in contact with him about continu-
ing the series and added that he did
not expect the ECU athletic dire
to sit still on the matter.
"If I were in his shoes I would
want the series to continue t
Swofford said. "I certainlv re :
him and his position
Charles
Chandler
History Of A College Football Rivalry
UNC Policy
Will Hurt
Both Sides
As it has been well-documented,
this Saturday's ECU-North
Carolina football game appears to
be the last ever between the two
schools.
UNC athletic director John Swof-
ford verified that Tuesday in a
phone conversation, saying that the
Heels' scheduling policy states that
no in-state schools, other than ACC
teams, can be scheduled.
Swofford added that the Tar Heel
schedules are set through 1994.
Why did the UNC athletic council
make the decision it did some four
ears ago? You can bet the East
( arolma Pirates had a great deal to
do with the decision. In fact, the
Bucs were probably the driving
force behind the move.
After all. what does the Universi-
tv of North Carolina have to gain
from playing East Carolina Univer-
sitv every year in football. The
Heels are usually nationally ranked
and the Pirates are not, yet the game
.ally ends up a tough one for the
Chapel Hill boys.
seven Tar Heel-Pirate contests
have been played to date. Carolina
ha five wins. ECU one, with the
other game ending in a tie.
Three of the five UNC wins did
not come easy, though. In fact, they
were all-out battles until the very
end.
Three of the series' seven games
to date have been mismatches, UNC
winning the series opener in 1972 by
a 42-19 margin, the Pirates getting a
big 38-17 victory in 1975 and the
highly-ranked Heels powering their
wav to a 31-3 win last season.
The other four games went as
follows � UNC coming back for a
28-27 win in 1973 after trailing 21-7
at the half; UNC winning without a
touchdown in 1976, 12-10; the Heels
easing out a 14-10 win in 1978 after
ECU fumbled the ball on the
Carolina 16-yard line late in the
fourth quarter; and the two teams
battling to a 24-24 tie in 1979.
Those are some pretty tough
games for the big boys up in Chapel
Hill. Therein probably lies the main
reason for the UNC council's deci-
sion.
What does North Carolina have
to gain by playing East Carolina?
Don't the Pirates have it all to gain
and the Tar Heels it all to lose.
The answer is a resounding NO.
The ECU program is definitely on
the move upward, and has been for
over a decade. Credit the UNC
board for being able to see that.
What the UNC board does not
need is another game in which their
boys must play against a so-called
"arch-rival After all, it is com-
mon knowledge that all of the
ACC's other N.C. schools � N.C.
State, Duke and Wake � look upon
the Carolina game as they do no
other. In fact, the rest of the ACC
has, in recent years, put the UNC
game at the top of priority lists. A
game with the upset-minded Pirates
only adds another contest in which
the Heels are at a certain
psychological disadvantage.
There is no doubt in the mind of
this columnist that the UNC board
is running away from playing East
Carolina. The new scheduling policy
and its effect on the ECU-UNC
series is both unfortunate and sad
for fans, students and alumni of
both of these fine institutions.
With the final game of the
ECU-North Carolina series set
for this Saturday, The East
Carolinian thought it might be
worthwhile to take a look at what
has transpired over the past
decade in Tar Heel-Pirate games,
what has occurred as a rivalry
grew to bigger and bigger heights.
Following are summaries of
each game between the two
schools. It should be noted that
while three of the contests have
been one-sided, four have been
real "barn-burners
Trampling On The 'I it tie Guy'
1972 �UNC 42, ECl 19
The first game of the UNC
series did not go so well for the
Pirates. FCU's season finale
turned out to be an embarassing
loss, dropping the team's record
to 9-2 on the season.
The Tar Heels fashioned a 21-7
halftime lead and rolled to vic-
tory behind Ike Oglesby's. three
touchdowns.
UNC quarterback Nick Vid-
novic hit five of isx passes in the
first period while the running trio
of Sammy Johnson, Tommy
Bradley and Oglesby combined
for 137 yards on the ground in
the opening quarter.
Halfback Carlester Crumpler
was about the only bright spot
for the Pirates, scoring twice �
from 13 and 45 yards out.
Despite being down 21-7 at the
half, the ECU team felt it had a
chance to make a comeback �
until a big blow befell the club in
the third quarter.
Starting quarterback Carl
Summerell suffered a broken
right collarbone and had to leave
the game. The Bucs were not able
to pass the ball after that.
Leander Green fumbles
late in 1978 game
The Most Incredible Game Tver?
1973 UNC 28, ECU 27
It was another beautiful after-
noon in Kenan Stadium on the
University of North campus.
More than 41,000 fans had
gathered to watch the highly-
favored Tar Heels square off
against the underdog Pirates.
Oddsmakers had the Heels as
much as three touchdown
favorites and certainly not one
UNC fan would believe that ECU
could stay in the game with their
1972 Sun Bowl champions.
The game turned out to be
quite a battle for the Tar Heels.
In fact, only a miracle finish
prevented Coach Sonny Randle's
ECU team from winning.
The Pirates jumped to an im-
pressive 21-7 halftime lead.
Carlester Crumpler and Carl
Summerell both had TD plunges
in the first half for ECU.
What began the Tar Heel com-
eback was a third quarter fumble
recovery. ECU was still ahead
21-7 and had driven to the Tar
Heel 19-yard line before Sum-
merell had the ball knocked away
from him. UNC's Ted Elkins got
the recovery and the comeback
had begun.
From there. UNC's offense
scored on each of its next three
possessions.
Freshman tailback Mike
Voight had a big 20-yard gainer
after the fumble, setting up a
seven-yard score by Ted
Lerenen? The ECU lead was
now 21-14.
The Bucs were forced to punt
on their next possession. UNC's
Jimmv DeRatt returned the punt
to the UNC 48. Four plays later,
the game was tied. Sammy
Johnson got the touchdown,
rambling 32 yards for the tying
score.
The Pirates bounced back,
though, driving 72 yards in 11
plays to recapture the lead.
Crumpler went over from one-
vard out to give ECU a 27-21
lead. UNC's Gary Cowan burst
through the Buc line to block
ECU's extra point attempt in
what was one of the key plays.in
the game.
The game's biggest play,
though, came on the winning
Carolina drive. A pass in-
terference call on ECU's Reggie
Pickney at the Tar Heel eight set
up the game-winning score. The
final TD of the game came on a
pass from Billy Paschall to Dick
Oliver. Ellis Alexander connected
on an all-important extra point
and the game belonged to the Tar
Heels.
Many still call it the most in-
credible contest in ECU football
history.
A Fitting Memoriam
1975-ECU 38, UNC 17
The stunning upset by the
Pirates of the Tar Heels came one
day after the death of ECU
athletic director Clarence
Stasovich, the man who is deem-
ed responsible for the school's
rise to NCAA Division 1 status.
The team dedicated the game
to the memory of Stasovich and
did his memory well, simply
destroying the Tar Heels in
Coach Pat Dye's first game
against the bovs from Chapel
Hill.
Kenny Strayhorn scored two
touchdowns for the inspired
Pirates. Eddie Hicks rambled 53
yards for another six-pointer,
while Willie Hawkins and Clay
Burnett scored the team's other
two touchdowns.
The only bright spot for the
Heels was the play of tailback
Mike Voight, who rushed for 209
yards on 42 carries, while scoring
both UNC touchdowns.
The 42,000 fans in attendance,
the large majority of them Tar
Heel fans, began to file out of
Kenan Stadium in hords as the
final period began.
Stasovich would have love to
have seen it.
ECU's Reggie Pickney (30) was
in a crucial situation in the 1973
called for pass interference
game.
The No-Touchdown Win
1976 � UNC 12, ECU 10
ECU went into the game
unbeaten, at 6-0, and ranked 20th
in the nation. The club nearly
kept that record intact. Instead,
the Pirates fell prey to their own
mistakes.
ECU got the game's only
touchdown and outgained the
Tar Heels, 321 yards to 259.
Pirate halfback Eddie Hicks was
the game's leading rusher with
129 yards.
Nevertheless, the Pirates lost,
fumbling three times. Two of
those times Carolina turned the
mistakes into field goals.
A fumble by ECU's Willie
Haw kins set up the first field goal
by Carolina's Tom Biddle in the
second quarter. Another fumble,
just seconds later, provided the
Heels with another big break.
This one was by quarterback
Mike Weaver at the ECU 17. The
Buc defense held, though, as
UNC settled for another Biddle
field goal.
The Pirates went in at the half
down by that 6-0 margin. In the
third quarter, the Heels drove
downfield and came away with
Biddle's third field goal of the
game, giving them a 9-0 advan-
tage.
ECU began to come back in
the fourth quarter, though. The
Pirates recovered a UNC fumble
on their own 46 and moved 54
yards to paydirt.
Weaver made up for his earlier
fumble, scoring on a 15-yard run.
Pete Conaty's extra point cut the
UNC lead to 9-7.
Midway through the final
period, the Bucs started a posses-
sion deep in their own territory,
at the 17. On the first play of the
series, Eddie Hicks burst off-
tackle and into the Tar Heel
secondary. A total of 75 yards
later, UNC's Russ Conley made a
saving tackle at the Tar Heel
eight-yard-line.
The Pirates could not score
what would might have been a
winning TD, though. Instead,
Conaty chipped in a 19-yard field
goal to put ECU up 10-9.
ECU took the ensuing kickoff
and drove downfield, setting Bid-
dle up for another three-point at-
tempt. The kicker made the winn-
ing field goal with 2:14 left in the
game.
Yet Another Disappointment
1978 UNC 14, ECU 10
The game was called by ECU
coach Pat Dye as the one in
which his team "arrived The
young Pirates obviously came of
age in battling favored North
Carolina to the end.
The Bucs were lucky in one
respect. None of the team's six
fumbles resulted in Carolina
scores. The credit for that went to
a strong ECU defense, which
finished the year as one of the
better defenses in the nation.
North Carolina had numerous
scoring opportunities in the first
half, but each time the ECU
defense held while highly-touted
UNC kicker Jeff Hayes aided the
Pitates with three missed field
goals, all within easy range.
On their third possession of the
game the Heels drove 62 yards in
13 plays for the game's first
touchdown. Halfback Terence
Burrell got the call and went over
on fourth and one. Hayes' extra
point put UNC up 7-0. The score
staved that wav until the second
half.
The Pirates quickly turned
things around in the second half,
moving methodically for 70 yards
in six plays to tie the game at
seven apiece. Reserve quarter-
back Steve Greer's 22-yard carry
around the right side set up a
touchdown run by fullback
Theofore Sutton.
The Heels' only drive of any
substance in the second half came
in the third quarter and resulted
in the game-winning score.
The drive ended with quarter-
back Matt Kupec hitting tight end
Bob I oomis on a 28-yard scoring
strike.
ECU's Bill Lamm narrowed
the UNC lead to 14-10 with a
38-yard field goal with 5:31 left in
the gain.
ECU regained possession at the
4:08 mark, taking over at its own
31. The Bucs moved quickly
downfield after Mike Hawkins
got the drive off on the right foot
with a 19-yard gainer.
On a first and ten situation at
the UNC 21, Pirate quarterback
Leander Green had split end
Terry Gallaher wide open on the
right side but overthrew him. On
the next play Anthony Collins
picked up five yards, moving the
ball to the 16.
With time running out Green
rolled out to his left side and was
spun around by UNC lineman
Bunn Rhames, who popped the
ball loose for teammate David
Simmons to recover.
A big drive ended in a big
disappointment.
The Game Nobody Won
1979 � ECU 24, UNC 24
"Nobody likes a tie
The words could be heard in
both locker rooms following the
game between two powerful
rivals.
The game ended that way when
Jeff Hayes booted a 47-yard field
goal with less than a minute re-
maining, which erased a 24 21
ECU lead.
The Pirates had to battle to get
the lead, though, com.ng back
from as much as an 11-point
deficit.
The 15th-ranked Heels jumped
to a quick 21-10 lead in the firs:
half as quarterback Matt Kupec
threw three touchdown passes.
What may have been the kc
score was Kupec's 18-yard scor-
ing strike to Jeff Grev with just
nine seconds left in the opening
half, making the UNC lead 21-10
instead of 14-10 at intermission.
The Pirates cut into that lead
on their second possesion of the
third quarter, driving from their
own 11 to the Tar Heel endone
The passing of Leander Green
got the Pirates to the UNC 21
From there Anthony Collins ran
untouched on the next play from
scrimmage into the endone, nar-
rowing the lead to 21-1"
In the fourth quarter, the
Pirates began a drive that wa
helped along by a face-mask
penalty. Theodore Sutton had a
22-yard run just before Green hit
split end Yern Davenport with a
12-yard pass and the go-ahead
score.
A UNC fumble gave the ball
back to the Pirates three plavs
after the kickoff. ECU could not
move, though, and turned the
ball over. The Heels then stalled,
giving ECU the ball again. ECl
could not run the clock out to
assure the victory and had to
punt to the Heels with 1:11 re-
maining in the game.
Kupec then engineered a drive
that resulted in Hayes' game-
tying field goal.
The Heels tried an onside kick
on the ensuing kickoff, but it wun
recovered by the Pirates. ECU
opted to go for a 57-yard field
goal attempt by Davenport. It fell
just short of the uprights.
An A wesome Showing
1980 �UNC 31, ECU 3
North Carolina came into the
game ranked seventh in the na-
tion and did little to hurt that
status, running past the overmat-
ched Pirates.
The UNC defense, which was
ranked first nationally in scoring
defense, not only held the ECl
wishbone attack to no
touchdowns but also allowed the
Pirates only 64 yards rushing.
The Carolina running game
was awesome, as two backs went
over the 100-yard barrier.
Tailbacks Amos Lawrence and
Kelvin Bryant combined for 245
yards and three touchdowns.
The young, injury-laden
Pirates were simply no match for
the powerful Heels.
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The scoreboard tells the story of '75 ECU win.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 10, 1981
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Im-Rec Dept.
Offers Football
Bicycle Race
The Intramural-Recreation Dept.
will hold its second annual "Bike
Race" on Thursday Sept. 10th at
4:00 pm. at Bunting Track. As many
of you may remember this event was
a tremendous success last year and
everyone involved had a great time.
The event is designed for teams of 4,
5, or 6 riders who must complete a
distance of 50 miles. There are both
men's and women's divisions and the
defending champs in each category
will be back. The IM-REC DEPT.
would like to welcome everyone to
come out and view the race. A good
time is guaranteed for all!
Flag Football
Well, it's that time again when
footballs fill the air. In keeping with
the fall tradition the ECU IM-REC
DEPT. beging their version of the
NFL with flag football starting on
the 14th of Sept. Last year's winners
were "Streak of Lightning" in the
men's division and "Alpha Delta Pi"
in the women's league. Everyone is
invited to come out and watch the
games which will be played on the In-
tramural Fields behind Ficklen
Stadium Mon. Through Thurs. from
4 pm until 10 pm. All teams should
remember that a TEAM CAP-
TAIN'S MEETING will be held on
Thurs. Sept. 10th at 7pm in Biology
Bldg. Rm 103. A representative from
each team must attend or the team
will be DROPPED!
Entry Dates
Note that all entries must be in
the IM Office by Sept. 15th for both
Co-Rec. Softball and Team Putt-
Putt. Further information can by
received through the IM Office at
Memorial Gym, Fm. 204 or EExt.
6387.
The Final
Sorority Rush
Registration
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One Carolina ticket lor tale. Con-
tact Jett at 7S1-42W.
So you both brought your stereos
Rent one to me. Price negotiable
Al (Jarvis) 751-M7).
FOR RENT
FEMALE roommate wanted in
house on Charles St 1 block from
campus. l00 per month (utilities
included) Phone 75 7010.
ROOM tor rent immediately.
Great location one block from
ECU and downtown. S7S. Call
753 2�5�.
Female roommate wanted to
share 3-bedroom mobile home
located 5 mms. from campus on
the North end of Greenville 7S a
month plus one-Halt utilities Call
7SI-7973.
Duplex to share tour blocks from
campus, partially furnished. 10 S.
Woodiawn St si 25 per month.
7M-74M.
ROOMMATES wanted to share a
partially furnished 3 bedroom
house in Lake Ellsworth-
Greenville. tUO per month-
utilities included. Call 7J4-4JM
after 5 p.�.
Female roommate needed to
share 2 bedroom apt. at
GreeneWay Hi2.SO per month
rent plus � utiuUes. Call 355-47U.
Female roommate needed to
share 3 bedroom apt. at
Eastbrook. M7 plus one-third
utilities. Can ShoHa at 7sa-2Sd.
Female roommate needed- will
consider male. J3 Oakmont So,
pis. 7S�32. �7 per month rent
plus one-third. Pool, cabie TV, bus
service. Need bad.
Furnished, private efficiency
apartment lor rent, across from
college, utilities furnished.
7S 255.
Personal
Typing for students, professors.
etc. Kempie Dunn 101 E. Wright
Rd. Greenville, NC 2734. Call
7S247U alter I p.m.
Notary Public: convenient and in
expensive Cally Amy at 757-3734.
Female resident counselor; must
take training and internship Pay-
ment in-kind (free room, utilities,
phone and house privileges). Ex
ceUent opportunity lor students in
human services. Calal 75 HELP.
Help wanted: Positions open for 2
males at Tar Landing Seafood
Restaurant. Come by for applica-
tions.
"Clip Joint" has moved to lit Gar
reft Call Martena at WMW.
Ride needed: To Charletlesvilie.
Va. Sept. 11-13, will pay all ex-
penses. Contact Jeanne at
752143.
Faculty, students, staff- looking
tor extra income Part time job.
with unlimited future. Minimal m
vestment. Free framing Interna
tional orsanuation. Send name,
address, phone number, where
you can be reached and a brief
resume to FUTURE, PO Box 47,
Greenville, NC 2734. You will be
promptly contacted.
Thursday, 10th
from 6:30-7:30
before Convocation
Mendenhall Theater
CAROLINA EAST
GOES WEST-ERN
SEPTEMBER 11-12
-T's
A i
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
Located at 218 Arlington Blvd.
Two Stores To Serve You
Welcome to Greenville
H L HODGES
COMPANY
LOCATED AT 210 EAST FIFTH STREET
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
?Marshal Desten's Wild West Shows � Friday 7:00 & 7:45 P.M.
?Greengrass Cloggers & The Home Town Boys �
Saturday 6:30-9:00 P.M.
?Register to win authentic CBS �'Dallas" script
autographed by the stars, during both performances
?Mechanical bull demonstrations by Carolina Opry House
EAST
20 OFF ON SHOE PURCHASE
ii
STCRRY TOP STOER
Lw.
and Carolina East Centre
264 By-pass on Hwy It, Greenville
Fraternity and Sorority
Jerseys
Just Arrived.
ECU Sweatshirts
& Jackets
HODGESBOND'S SHOE CLUB
E. SMl St. � 218 Arlinoton Blvd.
M
i





Fearless 1 CHARLES CHANDLER7ootbai WILLIAM YELVERTON11 Foj JIMMY DuPREE'ecast CHRIS HOLLOMANCHUCK FOSTER (10-2)
(12-0)(12-0)(10-2)(10-2)
ECU AT UNC (Score)ECU 26-24ECU 28-27ECU 24-21ECU 21-20ECU 24-10
DUKE AT OHIO STATEOhio StateOhio StateOhio StateOhio StateOhio State
N.C. STATE AT WAKE FORESTN.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. StateN.C. Slate
CLEMSON AT TULANEClemsonClemsonClemsonTulaneClemson
CALIFORNIA AT GEORGIAGeorgiaGeorgiaGeorgiaGeorgiaGeorgia
WEST VA. AT VIRGINIAWest Va.VirginiaVirginiaVirginiaVirginia
N.TEXAS ST. ATSMUSMUSMUSMUSMUSMU
TENNESSEE AT SOUTHERN CALSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern CalSouthern Cal
MISSISSIPPI AT S. CAROLINAS. CarolinaS. CarolinaS. CarolinaS. CarolinaS. Carolina
LSU AT NOTRE DAMENotre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre DameNotre Dame
RICHMOND AT VA. TECHVa. TechVa. TechVa. TechVa. TechVa. Tech
STANFORD AT PURDUEPurdueStanfordStanfordStanfordStanford
VFLORIDA AT MIAMI (Fla.)
Swimmers Must Mature
To Succeed This Season
YELVER
Wiiiii: Sporu S-dilof
Coach Ray Scharf
and his East Carolina
swimmers are ready to
dive into competition
�- literally.
For the first time in
six years. East Carolina
will have a diving team.
Handling the team will
be Jon Rose, former
gymnastics coach at
ECU.
"I'm really glad
John's with us says
Sharf. (Gymnastics was
dropped from the
athletic program last
year.) "He's a super
coach, and he's going
to do a super job. We
gave away 14 points
each meet last season
(without diving). This
is going to help our
team a lot
One diver Scharf is
looking for help from
freshman Scott Eagel,
the N.C. State cham-
pion. "Diving is closer
ILLIAM to gymnastics
than
swimming says
Scharf, which explains
why some former East
Carolina gymnasts will
be on the diving team
this season.
Scharf says the
swimming-diving
schedule "looks pretty
good. It's the best
we've had in a long
time. It's a very
challenging schedule
for such a very young
team
Scheduled teams in-
clude N.C. State,
North Carolina, Navy,
James Madison, Old
Dominion, Duke and
Virginia Tech.
Scharf's squad con-
tains well over 30
freshmen and will
count on Doug
Nieman, Lance Tim-
mons, Sally Marberger
and Dordi Henrikeen
for leadership. The
women's team returns
six swimmers, five of
whom were All-
Amcricans. "We've got
some fairly outstanding
people Scharf says.
The men return four
swimmers who scored
in the Eastern
Regionals last year.
"We're a little thin
Scharf says.
"We want our kids
to try to win every
single meet he adds,
explaining the team's
goal for the upcoming
season which starts
Oct. 7 with the ECU
Pentathlon. "We're
hoping for seven vic-
tories for the men and
seven for the women.
It's hard to say because
we're such a young
team. I hope the men
can finish in the top
three or four in the
Eastern Regionals.
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intsrvtntio
24 HOUR SERVICE
7S8-MELP
1117 Evans Strut
Greanvilla.N.C. 27834
mmmm
� � l.
l
ThsFtalrigCanterh�been bare ftryousmoe 1Q?�
proridta private, uialarsta&Dtf health aare
towamenofaDailBg at a reasonable o�t
The Fleming Center we're here when
Pen 781
pep you i
Hei
Bang-Up Pep Rally
On Campus Tonight
IS THIS
WHAT YOUR
KISSES
TASTf LIKE?
Back to
School
Eyeglass
Special
For all ECU Students,
Faculty & Staff
Offer Good Through
Sept. 30. 1981
Located across Dr. Park
752-1446
OPTICIANS
There will be a "Beat
Carolina" pep rally
tonight at 7 behind
Garret dorm on the
East Carolina campus.
Head football coach Ed
Emory will recognize
seniors preparing for
their final game against
the Tar Heels.
This pep rally will be
a little different in that
a "Carolina car" will
be on hand for East
Carolina fans to pound
on, for 50 cents. Half
the proceeds will be go-
ing to local charity and
the other half to the
new Student Athletic
Board.
l
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
a&23h
GET HEAPING PORTIONS
AT A PRICE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
September 10. Thursday (QM
CHICKEN PAN PIE. 2 vegetable �"
September 11, Friday �VM
SALMON PATTY. 2 vegetable �"
September 12. Saturday t 1�q
VEAL PARMESAN. 2 vegetable E"
September 13, Sunday o�o
SMOTHERED CHICKEN V�
2 vegetable
September 14. Monday � am
MEAT LOAF A SPAGHETTI 'Z1
2 vegetables
September 15. Tuesday .a4
FRIED CHICKEN, 2 vegetables F
September 16. Wednesday aOno
STUFFED GREEN PEPPER. �"
2 vegetables
Everyday 112S
CHILD'S PLATE lw
A delicious choice of fried chicken, chopped steak, or a
specified entree plus 2 vegetables and a roll! For
children 12 and under with adult.
I
JUST
ARRIVED
J.D.
DAWSON
CO.
1982 GIFT
CATALOG
COME BY AND
PICKUPYOUR
COMPLEMENTARY
COPY
Many New Items with Extra
Savings Now Available
"The Place to
Wash"
The k
WASHT
HOUSE
111 E. 10th St. (Across from Krispy Kreme)
514 E. 14th St. (Across from Hot Dog City)

s
Also �
�Color TV �Attendant on Duty e
� Pinball -Lots of Washers & Dryers J
COUPON1
Good for one FREE WASH on Mm. or Thurt.
9 a.m4 p.m. - Offer expire Sept. 30
� wash house � wash house � wash house � wash house �
e
Already Low Prices
Starting Sept. 14th&
Running 'til Sept. 30th
Special Prices on 1982
Catalog Merchandise
I
Caroline Eaet Mali
Mon-Frt LUNCH 1 laat -115pm. SUPrtR
4:90pm 8pm (�30 Fri). Sat. ft Sun llaai - � coattauona � Sat)
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville, N.C.
7521600 27834
102 Main St.
Bel haven, N. C.
943-2121 27810
ortlj Carolina
�tadnt legislature
NCSL
WANTS
YOU
"It's time for the students who
talk about North Carolina's pro-
blems to join the students who
are doing something about
them
THE TIME IS NOW FOR NCSL
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING:
Monday, September 14,1981
Mendenhall 221 � 7:00 p.m
NCSL:
THE ULTIMATE
STIMULATION
t





Title
The East Carolinian, September 10, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 10, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.146
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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