The East Carolinian, September 8, 1981






She ttaat Gtarolintan
Vol. 56 No. 5
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday, September 8, 1981 Greenville. N.C.
12 Pages
First Financial Aid Cuts Hit Hard
(CPS) � Mary, about to start her
first year of law school at Vander-
bilt University in Nashville, says
she'll have to "take it step by step. I
csan't make it through three years
without (financial) aid
If she can't get enough aid. Mary
(not her real name) will "either drop
out of school, or wait to go, or just
forget about it
Mary is not alone. Like millions
of undergraduate and graduate
students this fall, she's feeling the
first effects of President Reagan's
cuts in federal student aid pro-
grams.
Financial aid officials around the
country seem to agree that while this
year's cuts wil hurt students, the
worst effects are probably a year
away.
"The full impact of the changes
won't start to be felt until next spr-
ing and summer predicts Dallas
Martin, executive director of the
National Association of Student
Financial Aid Administrators.
Former U.S. Secretary of Educa-
tion Shirley Hufstedler confirms
they'll "hit in full and evil flower
next year The impact them will be
"shattering
The relative scarcity of federal
student aid "will literally foreclose
the opportunity to go to school" for
some students, Martin says.
For others, the cuts "will cause
students to maybe delay enrolling"
while they hold a job, and "will
most likely cause a shift in enroll-
ment patterns from more expensive
private schools to public colleges
he adds.
Indeed, some are predicting a
rapid disappearance of all but the
strongest private colleges. To meet
higher tuitions, a greater percentage
of private college students uses
federal aid money, according to a
February 1981 study by the National
Center on Educational Statistics.
So "when the axe falls, it might
be the end of many small, private
colleges specultes Carol Skribel,
aid administator at private Case
Western Reserve University in
Cleveland. "We depend on strong
financial aid to attract students
At traditionally black colleges,
where it is not unusual to find 100
percent of the student body using
some sort of federal aid, the cuts are
expected to hit especially hard.
Most public college aid officials
were reluctant to predict just how
many of their students won't be able
to re-enroll because of the cuts. One
� Jerome Sullivan of Iowa State �
at one point speculated ISU could
lose 20 percent of its students, but
that they could be replaced by
transfers from private colleges.
"We expect a large number of
students will be affected says
George Brooks, aid director at the
University of Missouri-Columbia.
"We don't know how many yet.
We're certainly not going to be able
to fund every student who needs it,
which has been our commitment
since the mid-sixties
At Texas, "we don't know how it
will translate into the number of
students lost to the institution
says Michael Novak, the universi-
ty's aid director. "But the quality of
the students' experience will be af-
fected he predicts.
The immediate impact will pro-
bably be on the poorest students, of-
ficials say.
David K. Smith, Vanderbilt's stu-
dent aid director, worries about "a
return to the old days when Vander-
bilt was known as a rich man's
school
He worries the school might even-
tually be forced to admit students
"in the bottom five percent of our
applicant pool" according not to
their academic abilities, but to their
ability to pay their own way without
aid.
"That would be destroying what
we've always worked for � a
diverse student body with a good
sprinkling of minority students and
lower income students Smith
mourns.
Missouri "hasn't discussed going
back to ability-to-pay (admissions)
yet Brooks says, "but I can see it
coming up. Everything's going
down the drain on this thing
Confusion over congressional in-
tent and an administration delay in
processing aid applications last spr-
ing have caused the most trouble for
this fall's students, aid directors say.
Most of the changes in aid awards
go into effect October 1, but aid ad-
ministrators didn't know that until
well past June, when most aid
"packages" are usually completed
and announced.
Vanderbilt's Smith complains of
trying to arrange aid for students in
the face of "confusion and conflic-
ting directives" during the summer.
Two weeks before school started,
"we still do not have an official
notification of a payment schedule"
on which to compute awards.
Brooks tried to reach his students
well before the new August 23rd
deadline for Guaranteed Student
Loans (GSLs), but doesn't know
how successful he was.
"A lot of people are going to be
awfully surprised when they come
back this year, and find they won't
be able to get as much money as last
year Brooks frets.
"You're going to see some terri-
ble anxiety (among students this
fall) Martin suggests. Many
"students just aren't aware of the
changes
There are other immediate ef-
fects, "many of them invisible for
now Martin says. He recalls talk-
ing to a textbook publisher who
complained that bookstore
managers, unsure of what to expect,
are "ordering books conservative-
ly" until they .an more accurately
gauge demand.
Other observers foresee tem-
porary lapses in services like campus
food operations, whose directors
may have withheld ordering for the
school year until they saw how
many students had to drop out
because of an inability to pay.
Smith estimates that 175 of the
500 students in Vanderbilt's nursing
See AID, Page Five
Publication Without Editor
Ebony Herald Returns
Photo By ROCHEL ROLAND
Ron Maxwell, ECU Media Board chairman, plans lo hire an editor for The
Ebonv Herald soon. He calls the newspaper's staff "enthusiastic
ByCHADBLFFKIN
Slmff W ritrr
The Ebony Herald, East Carolina
University's minority newspaper,
may be coming back to life,
although the publication has no per-
manent editor.
The Herald, defunct since 1978, is
the only medium on the ECU cam-
pus that is oriented toward the
coverage of news events concerning
minorities.
Lamont Byrd, the editor selected
for the 1981-82 year, will be away
during, the fall semester serving as a
cooperative education intern.
Ron Maxwell, chairman of the
ECU Media Board, said that several
people have considered applying for
the position of editor, but at this
time the position is still vacant. "I
hope :he media board will schedule
a meeting soon and hire a replace-
ment for Byrd Maxwell added.
He also stated that he had talked
with several members of The Ebony
Herald statf and that all of them
N. C. Tuition Triples In Decade
By MIKE HUGHES
Staff Wriltr
Wouldn't it be nice to pay less
than S220 a year for college tuition?
No, there is no proposal before
the state board of governors pro-
viding for cuts to that extent, but
believe it or not, in 1971 when in-
state students paid $73 per academic
quarter, to attend ECU, the annual
bill totalled only $219.
However, if a student wished to
attend either the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill or
North Carolina State University, the
yearly cost soared to $225.
Needless to say, those figures are
gone today. In fact, annual rates for
tuition and fees at the state's three
largest schools have tripled in those
ten years.
In-state residents now pay $664
per year at ECU for full-time tuition
and fees. At UNC, state residents
pay $693.50 annually. NC State
rounds out the trio with yearly costs
to students of $670.
Students paving out-of-state tui-
tion in 1971 were billed for $1,300 at
all three universities, but ten years
later the average cost of tuition and
fees for full-time students is $2454
at ECU, $2,517 at UNC and ap-
proximately $2,470 at NC State.
Dormitory room rent has increas-
ed sharply as well. In 1971, ECU
students paid $270 per year to live
on campus. Today, a residence hall
room rents for $756 annually, ex-
cluding the air conditioned Jarvis
Hall, which currently costs an addi-
tional $50 per semester.
At UNC and NC State, female
residence hall rooms were
characteristically more expensive
than rooms for males 10 years ago.
At Chapel Hill, for instance, some
female rooms cost as much as $630
per year, whereas male students
paid between $312 and $462.
See N.C Page 5
Today's Students
More Self-Centered
(CPS) � The 1981 American stu-
dent body is either more conser-
vative than students of the past, no
less liberal, or both � according to
two recent studies of political and
social values.
A Rutgers Univeresity survey of
205 campuses concluded students
today are as politically active as
ever.
"The only major difference bet-
ween now and the sixties is that
there was a central issue with Viet-
nam that drew a great amount of
media coverage contends Michele
Lamoal, one of the Ruters resear-
chers who oversaw the survey.
The study found that the number
of demonstrations on campuses has
decreased by only 11 percent over
the last two years.
A University of Florida study, on
the other hand, "seems to show that
students mostly care about
themselves summarizes Phyllis
Meek, UF's associate dean of stu-
dent affairs, who helped poll the
student body.
Florida students preferred alcohol
to marijuana at parties by a three-
to-one margin. Their most pressing
concerns are grades, inflation and
unemployment, all of which Meek
characterized as personal concerns.
When it comes to labelling stu-
dent beliefs, contradictory studies
like Rutger' and Florida's are
typical.
The annual UCLA-American
Council on Education survey has
shown a steadily-declining number
of students who call themselves
"liberal while the percentage
subscribing to "moderate" and
"conservative" labels increased.
A February, 1981 study
discovered that 68 percent of the
students at Stanford agreed that
"preparing myself for a career will
be at least as important to me as ac-
quiring a general education
Yet 84 percent of American
students believe student demonstra-
tions "have a place on college cam-
puses today according to a
153-campus poll conducted by the
Emhart Corp Inc.
The same survey found students
not only optimistic (83 percent ex-
pected to be happy during the
eighties), but sharing many of the
anti-big business attitudes that
marked the hey-day of campus
liberalism.
Business Today magazine un-
covered similar anti-business, pro-
environment attitudes in a survey of
202 schools released in June.
The magazine asserts the results
of its study mean that students are
noless liberal than in the past.
MM�� By 0AY PATTaatON
Is Ben waiting for a run-off?
were enthusiastic about the paper
coming out again this year.
According to Edward Nesbitt, the
associate editor of The Ebony
Herald who is apparently holding
the reins, the tentative publication
date for the first issue of the paper is
September 23.
Nesbitt also indicated that some
controversy had arisen over whether
to keep the name Ebony Herald.
"Just for the sake of tradition" he
said, "we decided to keep the old
name
"The old Ebony Herald was a
productive paper during its prime
years the associate editor con-
tinued, "but it didn't cover the total
scope of minorities on campus
"Our goal is to inform our
readers of minority events not just
on campus but around the world
he added.
"We want to bridge the gap
Nesbitt said in a soft but firm voice
as he gazed out the window of his
dingy, sparceiy-furnished office in
the Old South Building, "hopefully
creating a better understanding bet-
ween the minority and the majority
on campus
Nesbitt also stated that he was
grateful for the cooperation and
assistance that the staff had received
from the media board and the ad-
ministration in their efforts to revive
the Herald.
Reagan Snubbed At
Labor Day March
NEW YORK (UPD- Snubbing
President Reagan and paying
homage to the striking air con-
trollers he fired, thousands of
workers marched up Fifth Avenue
today in a salute to the 100th an-
niversary of the American labor
movement.
The marchers included a host of
striking air traffic controllers who
were fired by Reagan.
AFL-CIO President Lane
Kirkland, the parade's grand mar-
shal in honor of the giant union's
100th anniversary, was at the head
of the column of workers as the
parade began under heavily overcast
skies at 10:50 a.m.
Carpenters, electricians, laborers,
plumbers, steam fitters and others
marched amid a sea of buttons, ban-
ners, flags and multi-colored
balloons to celebrate the first such
parade in New York in 13 years.
Reagan was not invited to par-
ticipate and Kirkland scoffed at the
president's recent pledge to generate
"jobs, jobs and more jobs
"His actions speak a lot louder
than his words Kirkland said. He
said the federal budget already was
aimed at eliminating 1.25 million
jobs.
Harry Van Arsdale, president of
New York City's Central Labor
Council, played down the fact
Reagan was not invited to attend the
parade, even though the president
was to be in New York to present
Mayor Edward Koch with a sym-
bolic $85 million check for the city's
Westway superhighway project.
"This is not a political parade
Van Arsdale insisted.
But in a direct reference to
Reagan's firing of 12,000 air con-
trollers who struck in defiance of
federal law, Van Arsdale appealed
to the president's good will in urging
him to reinstate the controllers.
'?It's true that if your children
make a mistake, you want to punish
them, you don't want to destroy
them the 76-year-old labor leader
said. He said Reagan's action in the
strike was "a terrible mistake" and
"enough punishment for those peo-
ple
Standing near Van Arsdale when
the parade began was Robert Poli,
president of the Professional Air
Traffic Controllers Organization,
who cheered several thousand of his
union members who made the trip
to New York to participate in the
Labor Day celebration.
The PATCO marchers were deck-
ed out in blue and white caps and
blue T-shirts with white lettering
that read, "Leading the nation with
striking results
"It's a message to everyone in this
country, including the administra-
tion, of our resolve and solidarity
Poli said of the parade.
"As far as 1 know Poli said,
"there's a strong indication that the
issue is coming to the forefront.
This nation's air system can't
operate without 12,000 air traffic
controllers
"Come as you work urged the
invitations for the festivities, and
organizers expected 200,000
workers to march � from plumbers
shouldering plungers like drill rifles,
to printers in regulation aprons and
folded paper hats.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Opinions4
Features6
Sports9
Classifieds
t
-1 ij
UpMtf N4NN





J��EASTCAROUNIAN M-ITEMBER1, 11
ANNOUNCEMENTS
�t you or your organization
would tike to have an item printed
in the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
brie as possible) typed and
ctoubte spaced to The East Caroli
nian in care of the news editor
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
limited
The deadline for announcement
are Spm Friday for the Tuesdsay
paper and Spir Tuesday for the
Thrusdasy paper
The space is availaole to all
campus organuations ana depart
ments
YOGA
A physical approach to inner
serenity available through
practice of yoga will be offered
by the ECU Division of Continuing
Education on Wednesday even
ings Ocf 28 Dee 2
According to instructor Lucy
Mauger the class will feature a
series of controlled postures and
breattvnq enercises to help relieve
anxiety and tension stimulate the
circulation, improve stamina and
increase muscle tone and booy
suppleness
Participants can improve their
health, vigor and peace of mmrt
without becoming rontort,onists
she noted
Loose, comfortable clothing (or
leotard and t.gnts) a larqe towel
or exercise mat and bare feet are
recommended
Further information about this
and other fall evening and
weekend classes is available from
the Ohice of Non Credit Pro
grams. Division of Continuing
Education. ECU Greenville. N C
telephone 757 6143
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Want to out a little excitement
into your lite Play WOT
rugby The tir�t semrs'er meet rtg
is Wednesday Sept o. in
Memofni Gym -oom 102 �
Noexper-enos nessv
cannot attend but would
participate call Kim si s; �
Tracev al 752 (�
PSI CHI
Psi Chi the na'ona. honot s.x �
ty tor psychology will h ia its lit s1
meet.n for fa'i semester on Tues
day Sept 8 a' 7 IS p m in S)
179 All members and interrs'e.i
ithers are urged to attend
CARTOONS
'Ann! to see Un
in the face Stop ov Met �
Student Center from Stpt �
throjgh the 13' g s0 tr extl
ol editor.al cartoons b. .John
Wevier Displayed in the lowet
gallery Ms- floor the cartoons
appeared in The East Carolinian
from January 1980 Ic 'he pr
Subiect matter includes car
crapoia international idio � ana
predatory PTStders
COOP
A representative trom the Kia
tional Institutes ol Health Normal
Volunteer Prouram .n Bethesaa
WD will be on , ampos Sepl 28and
79 to interview stcdents for Sor.no
198? placement Anyone into
in any aspect of the heaith an-
field or in researi h would find Ih
experience valuable Por more .r
tor-nation contact tne Co Op Ot
fice. J l J Rawi or viephon
75' �979 6075 today'
LEARNING
A new program for Increasing
Learning Efficiency w i be ol
fered by Dr Georcje Ac ganti
beginning September 9 There W"1
be two groups One will meet on
Monday and Wednesday at 1 00
p m and 'he other group wnl mee'
on Tuesoasy and Thursdasr a'
1 00 p m in room 305 Wr.gh; Ar
nex The class is available 'o all
s'uoents Attendance is voiunir,
no formal registration is re
Quired
SUTRAVEL
The East Carolina Student
Union Travel Committee will njje
a meeting on September 9 a' 4
B m in MenovnnaH room 233 AH
members are urged to attend
PPHA
The Pi-epro'essionai Hea "��
Alliance PPHA) will hold its first
regular bi weekly meeting on
Thursdasy. Sept 10. '981 This
mee'ing will be held at 6 00 p m at
The Alro American Cu'turai
Center New plans lor the coming
year will be discussed All
members and any other interested
parties are urged to attend
FELLOWSHIP
There will be a meeting of the
King Youth Fellowship on We I
Sep' 8 m room 221 Mendem
The meeting will consist ot bible
study, fellowship, and sharino
LSAT
The Law School Aom.ssion Test
will be offered at East Carolina
Universit, n Saturday. October 3
1981 Apphcaton blanks are to oe
completed and mailed lo Educa
tional Testing Service, Box 966 R
Pr.nceton Nj 0854C Registration
postmarked after this date must
be accompanied Dy a 115, non
returnable ate registration fee
DAT
The Dental Aptitude Test will be
offered at East Carolina universi
ly on Saturday October 3, 1981
Application blanks are to be mail
ed in time to be received by Rw
Division of Educational
Measurements, American Dental
Association, 2"il Eas' Chicago
Ave Chicago. Illinois 6001) by
September 7. 1981 Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center. Speight Building.
Room 105
v
TUTORIAL
ASSISTANCE
If you ar pursuing a degree in
allied health, nursing, pre
medicine, pre dentistry or
medicine you may quality tor free
tutorial assistance through the
Center for Student Opportunities
(CSO). School of Medicine in ad
dilton, eligible students can par
ticipate in individualized or group
learning skills sessions H you
would like to be considered for
participation in any of the COST
FREE services, contact Dr Frye.
Center for Student Opportunities.
217 Whichard Annex, or call for an
appointment at 757 6122, 6075, or
601
Announcements
IIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllinilllllllllllllllllllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIB
I ROCK OUT 1
HOUSING
For ECU students needing help
with non university housing Hie
Oft Campus Housing Office
publishes a listing ot available
rooms apar tments. houses and
mobile homes m the Greenville
� "aterialsari updated
uaiiy students should come by the
Off ce n person 'or the most cur
rent information Listings tor
Greenville apartment complexes.
tor stuck nts seeking roommates,
ano a telephone fen placing local
calls are aisc provided The I
serves faculty and statl as well .is
students
POETS
Ttv Amei . � Poets
a
� atlOns IS sponsoring N
tional Poel
i98i n
1
�� itions, P O Bo
4jsi; . s Angeles C .i �iXU4
SKIING
Ol fCK SOOn lo sirt thinking
snow lot skiing at SnowShoe Wes'
V ii Din .i ,ii C ht 1st mas and during
spring break Contact Ms Jo
Saunders at ,Ts' 6000 v.
Gvm Room 70S tor information
Limited registration
FITNESS
�. �
. n Wedrti
Septem bei 9 i; 00
v � a � � R n 108

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Da � . �
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MINI COURSES
6 'daylor a I
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be �
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are avatta

NAACP
.
r Chapl I tl
� nil
� �
CITY COUNCIL
The Greenville City Council will
onduct a regular monthly agenda
workshop meeting on Tuesday,
Sept 8. at 8 a m in the lirst Moor
conference room ot the Municipal
Building
The regular monthly City Coun
I meeting will be held on Thurs
eta Sept 10, at 8 p m m the City
Council Chambers, third floor ot
the Muni ipal Building. 201 West
Fifth Street
NTE
.nis completing teacher
preparation programs and ad
vanced degree candidates in
spet tic fields may take the Na
tional Teacher Examinations on
NOV 14. 1981. Feb 70, 1982. and
Apr,I 17. 1983 ,it lest cent s
tghout the united States
Prospective registrants should
itacl the school districts in
which they seek employment
' ite agenc ies m which they seek
. ii t.tication or licensing, their i ol
leqes or the appropriate educa
tional assix iahon lor advice about
whuh examinations to lake and
w hen '0 take them
The NTE Bulletin ot Informa
tion contains a list ot test centers
and genei al information about the
� �filiations, as well as a
registration torm Copioes may be
obtained trom inllege placement
H .('is school personnel depart
ments. or directly trom National
Teachei E nominations. Box 9)1.
Educational Testing Servu e
Princeton New Jersey 08541
FRISBEE
�'� Mill tie an orqani2ational
ling ot the Frisbee Club this
rhui sdav pi 10. 1 00 p.m m
VHlonhali Anyone in
�� ested hi playng or learning
' �� Ic . iy is welcome to iom us
the I98i 198; school
reai will tx elected and prefects
' � . � � semester will be
SURFERS
ill .s i 't n ii � �
��t � � -it 7 p m in
� 'os planning
� attend the sun oft on Sunday
� not freshmen,
please � � � I jf Stanley m
� room 114, next
omi � iom aii new
"end
COUNSELING

� ' � eg fe a reasonable
college students? The
sei ing i
'at) b g a
ies on How to
C oltege and Have Fun
a � ��. d Test Am
� - . irtif cte in any
ions TTh sssion on How
' � 11 � ge ano Have fun
bt conducted Wednesday,
en . r 9 from 3 00 p m 4 00
Room 305 Wright Annex
�� a � a �oid Test
� ��� � conducted on
Thorsoav . Ii -ber 10. trom
300pm 400pm m Room 305
. ih? Al
�is are available to all
stuck � �harge interested
'he University
ntei ?57 6661. for
' Registration
� red
UTILITIES
The board ol commfjiglMwes ol
the Greenville irtmes Commis
sion will meet in regular session at
7 30 p m Tuesdasy Sept 8 m me
Board Room of the Utilities
Building
EPISCOPAL
A Student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesdasy evening
September 8, in the chapel ol St
Pauls Episcopal Church. 406 4th
Street (one block from Garrett
Dormi The service will be al 5 30
p m with the Episcopal Chaplain
the Rev Bill Madden, celebrating
THE WAY
We are looking tor you if ill
You believe in God (21 You believe
the Bible is truth (3) You desire to
know more about both If you mi i '
this criterion, you need to be at our
fellowships at MendenhaH Student
Center on September 10. Thursday
morning, II 00 a m in room 717
and Thursday night 7 30 p m in
room 242
CADP
The Campus Alcohol and Drug
Abuse Program will hold its first
meeting lor the fall semester on
Thursday Sept 10 at 3 30 p m in
the conference room on the second
floor ot Erwm Buildmq Members
and interested students are
welcome to attend
SCEC
Come iom the Student Council
for Exceptional Children for out
first meeting on Monday
September 21. m Speight Building.
Room 129 We will be plannmq tor
this exciting new year
CIRCLE K
Circle K will hoid another open
meeting this Tuesday, Sept 8. at
6 30 m room 221 at MendenhaH
Student Center After the meeting
the clufo will go roller skating The
cost will only be SI 25 Al 5 00
there will be a board meeting at
STuffy's lor all board members
and interested club memtx��
you at 6 30
IVCF
interval
Fellowships a
iht at 7 30
Methodist Student Center David
Watts will begin oc it
study on the book ot
very on is we
CSO
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities ,CSO). School ot
Medicine, is currently seeking
highly qualified under .
and graduate students � . .
part time as tutors
students with expertisi n i H
chemistry, anatomy, pbysuMOSy.
biology, math, physics. English,
or SLAP are encouraged to apply
Other academic areas ,ir(
considered Competitive wagi-
Contact Dr Frye. Center for S'u
dent Opportunities 217 Whichard
Annex, or call for an ap;
at 757 6122, 6075. or 6081
BOWLING
MSt Mixed Doubles bowling
leagues are now being formed for
fall semester Students interested
in bowling un a Monday or Tues
day evening league may sign up at
the ground lloor bulletin board at
Mendenhal! Student Center The
league organizational meeting will
be held Monday. September 14 at 6
p m Bring some friends and sign
up today
BINGO
Get ready for bingo and it �
cream on Tuesday. Sept 8 at 7
p m in the MendenhaH mult,
purpose room Prizes will be given
to bingo winners and ice cream
will be given to all at MendenhaH s
Monthly Bingo lie Cream Party
It's tree lo evei one so come join
the tun you iust can't lose!
KISWAHILI
Kiswahili is the most commonly
spoken language in Africa,
seconded by F rent h and Aratm
its territorial dominance extends
trom all along the east Atman
coastlands of Kenya. Uganda and
Tanzania and embraces the cen
tral African countries of Congo.
Zaire. Central African Republic
Ru.inda and Burundi Kiswahih
has also penetrated the western
hemisphere only to rank fifth after
English. French German and
Spanish as the most spoki
language in the world This yeai
ECU students will be given an op
portunity to study an African
language for the tirsl time
Kiswahih will be taught as a non
t interested pit
contact Safari Mathpnge a'
752 8736 or the Off ice Of Contn
Education 757 6321
SIGN LANGUAGE
East Carolina University
The Program for Hearing
impaired Students will oni e aga n
sponsor the ECU Sign
Club lor siudents and men '� i
the Greenville community wl
would like to meet ano pra I
their communication skills Trie
organizational meeting few
1981 81 school year will be held
Surv . - 13 at 7 p n the
Mendi nha I iter Mull
- �m
� . � ngi ire open 1
and hearing students and
Students The Sign Language
is the perfect opportunity ' i II
nguaot
A II
SIGN LANGUAGE
� , � � (ran � � ��
'
sponsor the ECU -
Out- � embers ol
� ' eenville con
wou d like to
thiei commui
etmg I

Sunn � . �
Menck ler Mull
Pursose Room on th � a '
?JUS
Meeting in pi
and hearing students and non
' II ut)
is th. pei leet opporl r for I
' n Sign lai
� ii
th deaf peopi. lerpreti
Sign lanci . nts
BIOLOGY
The i CU Biology Club is pleas
ed to announce its office hours
i he offici will be open Monday
'i "i 10 unto 1
by ot the Biology
g. room 102 Please ime
by 'I We i an help you
NCSL
The first meeting lor the N C
Student i egislature will be Tues
lay. Si 8. al MendenhaH
712 at 7 i All returning
tend Any ques
lions i all � I W'liiams at
7 57 7093
LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT
University students ar- remind
ed that, in accordance with
University regulations, before
th. nroll for the firs' time in a
foreign language thai they studied
in high si nooi they must lake a
� �� on Pn that
language
T he only date on wf
language p a I nay be
!ration and
Spring 1982. is
Thursday Oi tobei
liven al p.n v. follows
Room
I r. rx h BC 301
in BC 30?
SO
CAM
i
Thursday, Sept. 10
Happy Hours �7:00-9:30 p.m.
Sponsored by the ECU Geology Club
Adm 50C Canned Bev 70C
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966 R 18540 Ap
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Imarkeo
REPUBLICANS
� C " COfl -mns
' on a I
� �� ' ' rtt i 30 p m n
'�.�. ����.�.
.
Mitchell's Hair Styling
Special for all Students
Haircuts � reg. 6.50
special price �"V
otter expires Sept. 14
Located at
Pitt Plaza
756-2950
or
756-4042

-V i

The Designer
Diamond Collection
from ArtCarved.
Beautiful, fashionable.
And Surprisingly Affordable
A rtCarved proudly
introduces its exclusive Designer
Diamond Collection. A choice
of college rings in three
graceful styles, all with genuine
diamonds. And each available
in I OK and 14 K yellow or
white gold.
The beautiful, yet affordable
Designer Diamond
Collection. A vailable only
from ArtCarved.
(Atl ring styles are also
available in the elegant
diamond substitute, Cubic
Zirconia.) v
i. �
w�
n
rrnii
N
Wmdmsh
Radiance
M
H
(irttiiinu
RJQIRVED
V ii �,
September 8-1 ECU Student Supply Store Lobby
'V'ini u)firii �Mivi,Mr,l' in Visa accepted.
CJ981 ArtCannxi Cte� Ritivs. hu
Xi.
ATiTIC ATTIC ATTITt
SOUTHS
NO. 6
ROCK CLUB
10th
,w ANNIVERSARY
PARTY
wCHOICE
TUES SEPT 8
50 ADMISSION
ALL NIGHT LONG
50C BEVERAGE
ANNIVERSARY
CONCERT NO. 1
10T"
NANTUCKET
&CHOICE
WED SEPT. 9
(
-i�f I'fc
L
Thurs Sept. 10th
Sat Sept. 12th
Fri Sept. 11th
DAZZLE
WHKA
4:00-7:00
Sun. Sept. 13th
M
Wl
LAI
8 3
ly
lonj
F
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P'C
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unt
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Floyd Strengthens; Emily Fades
MIAMI (UPI) Hur-
ricane Floyd aimed its
95 mile-an-hour winds
at Bermuda Monday
and U.S. forecasters
warned residents of the
British resort the storm
could get stronger
before its center hit the
inland early Tuesday.
Meanwhile, Emily
was downgraded from
a hurricane to a
tropical storm as it
began breaking up over,
cold Atlantic waters
�out h of New-
foundland and two new
tropical weather threats
loomed on the horizon.
A weather recon-
naissance plane from
the National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration (NOAA)
round Hurricane Floyd
gradually turning
toward a northeast
path that would carry
the violent storm's
center over or near Ber-
muda early Tuesday.
"All interests on the
island should take the
appropriate action to
protect life and proper-
ty warned Dr. Neil
Frank, director of the
U.S. Hurricane Center
at Miami.
"Gales (ranging 100
miles to the east and 50
miles to the west of the
center) could spread
across the island
Frank's advisory said.
At noon EDT Mon-
day, Floyd was
centered about 300
miles southwest of Ber-
muda, near latitude
29.2 north, longitude
68.3 west. It was mov-
ing towards the north-
northeast at 10 mph,
but turning gradually
toward a northeast
path.
Bermuda, a rocky
promentory rising high
above the sea, has had
many brushes with hur-
ricanes in past years
without sustaining ma-
jor damage but Floyd
could give residents
there a rough time. The
hurricane's projected
path would put the
island on the strong
side the northeast
quadrant of the
storm.
The other threat to
land is a tropical
depression roughly
centered at noon EDT
about 200 miles east of
the Caribbean island of
Martinique. Although
an Air Force
"hurricane hunter"
plane found highest
winds of only 35 mph
in late morning,
forecasters said con-
ditions were favorable
for it to become
"Gert the seventh
tropical storm of the
season with sustained
winds of 39 mph or
higher.
The depression was
on a westward course at
about 15 mph. Satellite
pictures and air recon-
naissance showed the
disturbance was pack-
ing heavy rains and
forecasters warned the
northern Windward
and Leeward islands fr-
inging the eastern
Caribbean against flash
floods.
Pictures from the
weather satellite also
showed another
tropical disturbance
developing Monday
about 1,000 miles west-
Nixon A llegedly Offered Bribe
PANAMA CITY,
Panama (UPI)� The
late Panamanian
strongman Omar Torri-
jos was offered a $1
million bribe by former
President Richard Nix-
on to cancel a United
Nations meeting called
to oppose U.S. control
of the Panama Canal, a
new book alleges.
Tor r i i os: No
American Colony
written by Torrijos'
political adviser
Romulo Escobar
Bethancourt, says the
bribe was offered in
1973 just prior to a
Security Council ses-
sion on the canal.
"Nixon sent severe
threats to Gen. Omar
rorrijos, above all
through the
Nuaraguan dictator
Anastasio Somoza
�Unaiort; attempting to
bribe the Panamanian
leader, wrote Escobar
Bethancourt.
The book quotes
Torrijos as responding,
"If I fall, they will tilt
the flag, give it a kiss
and continue for-
ward meaning the
Panamanian people
would not give up their
struggle to wrest the
canal from U.S. con-
trol.
Escobar Bethancourt
wrote that a Nixon en-
voy, whom he did not
identify, flew to
Panama to offer the $1
million bribe to Torri-
jos, then head of
government and Na-
tional Guard
commander-in-chief.
Escobar Bethancourt
gave few details on how
the money was to be
paid or how he knew
Nixon was behind the
attempted bribe, but
said Torrijos sent the
envoy back to
Washington "with his
tail between his legs
The Security Council
meeting proceeded as
scheduled and, after
hearing Torrijos im-
passioned plea, voted
to back Panama's
demands for the return
of the 51-mile-long
waterway and the
U.Scontrolled Canal
Zone.
itt Plaza Barber Shop
Walk Ins &
Appointments
All Cuts
5.00
756-1760
t SAAD'S
'V; SHOE
r � REPAIR
113 Grande Ave
7 MO 228
Quality
Repair
m
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you &nce 1974.
providing private, understanding health care
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
The Fleming Center
Call 781-B8B0 in Rmimigh any
we're here when you need us.
gnu,
i
LrTMl
h n o y u j ;
southwest of the Cape
Verde Islands. The
system was moving
westward at 15 mph but
did not show any signs
of storm development
at midday.
The noon advisory
that downgraded Emily
to a tropical storm
estimated highest winds
at 70 mph centered
about 415 miles south-
southwest of St. Johns,
Newfoundland, near
latitude 42.0 north,
longitude 55.0 west. It
was moving toward the
east-northeat at 10
mph.
" 1 he ' storm con-
tinues to move over col-
der water and is
gradually losing its
tropical
characteristics the
lyisory said.
The East Carolinian
Sening the campus itimmumiv
since W5
Publ.ihed every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
tear and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the ot
Mcial newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: $20 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville. N.C.
The East Carolinian offices
art located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville. N.C
Telephone: �3� 437, �JOT
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, N.C.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 8, 1981 3
Bus ScheduleGOLD SCHEDULE" (7:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.)
PURPLE SCHEDULEPlaceDeparts
(7:30-5:30)10th College Hill25 after hr.
PlaceDepartsCollege Hill26 after hr.
Speighton half hr.Mingcson half hr.
Univ. Cond.25 till hrStratford Arms28 till hr.
Eastbrook23 ill hrAllied health27 till hr.
River Bluff21 till hrGreenville Square25 till hr.
Kings Row18 till hrPitt Plaza24 till hr.
Village Greene15 till hrOakmont21 till hr.
Memorial Gym10 till hrMendenhall16 till hr.
Mendenhall7 till hr10th College Hill5 till hr.
Speighton the hr.College Hill4 till hr.
Univ.Cond5 after hr.Mingeson the hr.
Eastbrook7 after hr.Stratford Arms2 after hr.
River Bluff9 after hr.Allied Health3 after hr.
Kings Row15 after hr.Greenville Square5 after hr.
Village Greene18 after hr.Pitt Plaza6 after hr.
Memorial Gym20 after hr.Oakmont9 after hr.
Mendenhall23 after hr.Mendenhall14 after hr
ABORTIONS UP TO
12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 1 U
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
SI8S 00 Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
83? 0535 (Toll Free Number
BOO ??1 2S68! between 9AM
and 5PM Weekdays
RAlEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
97 Wes Morgan St
Raieigh, N C
flttfo
OPEN TO THE
(soon to
be private)
PUBLIC
Application for membership
are now being accepted.
DON'T MISS OUT!
Grttnrilk,HC
TONITE
ALLAN HANDELMANS ROCK N
ROLL SHOW
WED.NITE
LADIES' N1TE
758-0711 209 E. 5th St.
Located behind the Elbo Room
Back to
School
Eyeglass
Special
For all ECU Students,
Faculty & Staff
Offer Good Through
Sept. 30, 1981
Located across Dr. Park
7521446
LJeot- (Jan
OPTICIANS
opticians
anoabon
of amBncB
9 5:30
Mon.
Fri.
Where to Go
When You're in a Rush
Pi Kappa Phi
Fastest Growing Fraternity
on Campus
Tonight: Island Paradise Night
a mixer with the natives
and their women
Wed. � Sept. 9th � Cheers with
the Pi Kapps an evening
with the ECU Cheerleaders
Thurs. � Sept. 10th � Grand Finale Night
"See You There"
TnicholsI
Greenville Blvd. (264)
()
14th St
r
t
r
t
T
About 3 Miles
nl
J JPM
w CO
ONE
OMP
DOR
Q
a
a
Pi Kappa Phi
803 Hooker Rd.
For Rides or Info
Call 756-3540

i'





2Ul iEaat (Earaltnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Coll ins, smmimcm
Chuck Foster, o,w���, ifilTi, Jimmy Dupree. ia�ul�tmw
Chris Lichok. ���,� uunr Charles Chandler, spot �(w
Alison Bartel, nnn��nm Tom Hall. srwSEd,ior
Steve Moore, cmwm un� Steve Bachner. ���� ��,
September 8, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Reaganomics
Return Greeted With Maladies
When President Reagan returned
to Washington last week after a
month's absence, he must have felt
like the man who comes home from
his vacation to find that his house
has been ransacked. When he left
for his August recess, Reagan had
every reason to feel confident about
the continued success of his
economic program. Passage of the
program's major elements in Con-
gress was the major accomplish-
ment during his first six months in
office. In that time the administra-
tion scored major victories against
the Democrats in battles to trim the
budget, increase defense spending
and reduce taxes. Part one of
Reaganomics was successfully com-
pleted, and the president seemed
confident that part two would fall
into place just as surely.
Somehow though, the economy
has not cooperated, now Reagan's
plan is collapsing all about him. His
return to Washington was greeted
by high interest rates, falling stock
prices and increasing budget
deficits. Why all this happened is a
question that economists may
debate forever and never answer
satisfactorily.
But there is no question about
what all this means politically: The
promises Reagan made about the
economy during the campaign have
lost their plausibility and substantial
changes will be needed to save the
Reagan economic program.
The primary problem with the
program is one that opponents have
been pointing out all along: That it
is difficult, if not impossible, to
lower taxes while also raising
defense spending considerably.
Such a policy of raising military
spending and cutting taxes at the
same time now seems bound to push
federal budget deficits out of sight.
In a front-page story last week, The
Wall Street Journal reported that a
number of private forcasters have
indicated that federal budget
deficits may reach $100 billion in
the near future if such a policy is
pursued.
The administration is now re-
evaluating the feasibility of an
unlimited arms build-up. Once that
evaluation is complete, the only
logical conclusion the administra-
tion can reach is that defense spen-
ding is the only area left that can be
cut. Other programs have been cut
to the bone and can be cut no fur-
ther. In other words, defense spen-
ding must be cut. To decide other-
wise would be irresponsible and un-
thinking.
Increase Of Auto Traffic
Causes Perilous Situations
When fall semester begins at East
Carolina, automobile traffic in
Greenville and on the ECU campus
increases tremendously.
As vehicle traffic increases so do
the chances of auto accidents.
Many of the high-traffic areas
close by and on campus have receiv-
ed extra attention. The lanes are
clearly marked, the areas are well
lighted at night and in some places
caution lights have been installed.
Still there are a number of high-
traffic areas left that are not nearly
as safe as they could be.
One such area is the intersection
of Tenth Street and College Hill
Drive, in front of Brewster
Building. If you're on Tenth Street
waiting to turn left onto College
Hill Drive, it is impossible to see the
oncoming traffic because of the car
facing you and waiting to turn left
onto the campus. The driver of this
car can't see to turn left because
your car is blocking his view.
The only way to successfully turn
left from either direction is to pull
DOONESBURY
up as far as you dare (forcing the
flow of pedesiiians out of the
designated crosswalk) and pray that
the light doesn't change before the
traffic clears.
It is dangerous enough for vehicle
traffic at this intersection, but for
the hundreds of students who are
forced to dodge through this maze
every day, it is like playing Russian
roulette.
A simple way to eliminate the left
turn problem would be to install a
traffic light with a left-turn in-
dicator. The traffic would then be
safely regulated and the chances of
an accident occurring would be cut
drastically.
Fall semester has been in session
for only a few weeks and more ac-
cidents have already occurred at this
intersection. As usual, pedestrian
and car traffic in the area were
heavy. Fortunately, no one was in-
jured.
Next time, we may not be so
lucky.
by Garry Trudeau
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OHPAMPE
1 TODAYS GUEST
ISMR HUES
POTASH, AUTHOR
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ALMASOOUST
WELCOME BACK.
MILES i
1HANK
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NO RUNNING
BUTTHAVS
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WAY TO
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ItTTH MARATHON PVNNE
RULES POTASH, AUTHOR OF
THE BEST-SELLING"THE
I COMPLETE KBOF PAIN'
MILES. YOU ARGUE IN YOUR
BOOt. THAT PAIN THROUGH
RUNHN6 IS NOT ONLY GOOD
F0RTHE80PY. ITSGOOO
FOR THE MINV. TOO RIGHT7
THATS BJGHT,
ZONKBt. YOU
JUSTCAN7SAY
ENOUGH ABOUT
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THERE'S A THATSRJGHK
THRESHOLD. ZONKER. YOU
! A BREAK- MSTCAtfTSAr
ING POINT' ENOUGH ABOUT
WE CHANGED THE TEAM'S NAME
TO KEEP UP MITH CERTAIN TRENDS
In Accordance With Parents9 Wishes
I will give no deadly medicine to anyone
if asked, nor suggest any such counsel, fur-
thermore, I will not give to a woman an in-
strument to produce abortion.
�from The Hippocratic Oath
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Four months ago Robert and Pamela
Mueller were about to become parents for
the first time � to twins. Robert, a physi-
cian, stood by his wife's side in the
operating room at Lakeview Medical
Cener in Danville, Illinois.
A few days later the Muellers, along
with the case obstetrician, were charged
with attempted murder.
Pamela indeed had twins, but the boys
were a horrible mistake of nature � sadly
referred to as Siamese. They were joined at
the waist and shared one leg, genitals and
part of the circulatory system.
The obstetrician reportedly said "Don't
resuscitate" when recognizing the twins'
condition, to which the father was said to
have agreed. A message was placed on the
twins' chart in the nursery: "Do not feed,
in accordance with parents' wishes
Some nurses could not let the twins die.
One fed them a sugar solution intravenous-
ly, and another told authorities about the
case. A prosecutor, ridiculously, charged
the Muellers and the obstretician with at-
tempted murder, but the charges were later
dropped because of a lack of evidence.
The question remains, however, who
"plays God" in a case such as this? The
doctor? Hardly, when considering many
break a once-sacred oath they have sworn
by.
The final decision should be left with the
parents. They are the ones who have to
care and provide for the child. The
parents, not the doctor, are familiar with
the environment the child would be sur-
rounded by.
The Mueller twins now lie in the
intensive-care unit of Chicago's Children's
Memorial Hospital with no hope of life as
individuals because an operation would
result in death. A hearing will soon be held
to determine their future. The agony they
now share would have never been if only
their parents' request had been obeyed.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes Inters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purpi ses of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. AII let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by 'He
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
Iran's Self-Destruction Imminent
By PAUL COLLINS
Ever since the Shah was exiled in
1979, the government of Iran has been
on the verge of total collapse but
somehow has managed to struggle
through. Until now.
The revolutionary government, head-
ed by the Ayatollah Khomeini, has sur-
vived the hostage situation, a deposed
president, mass executions, war with
neighboring Iraq and innumerable other
crises.
Now the country seems to have finally
reached the breaking point. The peoples'
tempers have begun to boil over; chaos
has become the rule rather than the ex-
ception. Mass hysteria has become the
status quo in Iran.
Since late June, a violent terrorist
campaign has claimed the lives of Iran's
president, prime minister, prosecutor
general, Supreme Court chief and four
cabinet ministers, as well as dozens of
other officials.
Prosecutor General Ayatollah Ali
Qodussi, killed Saturday, is the latest
victim of this violent purge. His death is
particularly ironic in light of the fact
that he prosecuted many of the more
than 600 people that have been executed
by the government since June 22 when
President Abol Hassan Bani-Sadr was
dismissed by Islamic fundamentalists.
So while the government executes its
opponents, the opponents retaliate by
bombing government officials to death.
Iran seems to be steadily annihilating
itself.
Most Americans are likely to react to
this news by declaring their satisfaction
that Iran is finally getting what it
deserves.
Let them blow themselves to
smithereens for all we care after the way
they treated the United States. Right?
Wrong. While the natural human
tendency would be to glory in Iran's
downfall, the United States can by no
measure afford to sit by and let Iran
crumble.
For years� through six presidential
administrations in fact� the United
States cultivated the Shah because of the
strategic importance of his country.
Today the importance of Iran is even
more pronounced: It is a major cil-
producing nation and is located at the
center of the Middle East, one of the
world's political hotspots.
And quite simply the United States
needs as many allies in the Middle East
as it can get. To abandon Iran now is to
leave it to the Russians, that is if Iran is
not already permanently aligned agahst
the United States.
That, however, is unlikely, especially
since Iran is destined to inherit a new
government in the near future.
The basis of American foreign policy
has always been pragmatism. And now
the pragmatic thing to do is to offer Iran
our friendship.We need them, and they
need us. It may not be a marriage made
in heaven, but after all politics makes
strange bedfellows.
Cooperation Benefited Shah, U.S.
By DIANE ANDERSON
Throughout history, it has been the
policy of the United States when dealing
with a country with which good relations
prove to be profitable, to look the other
way when the rulers of such a country
are discovered to be infringing upon the
inalienable rights that we as Americans
hold to be granted to every human by
virtue of his being created equal.
Such was the case during the reign of
the late Shah of Iran, and is now also the
case with the present government of the
Ayatollah Khomeini. Many years were
devoted to the building of favorable
relations between the U.S. and Iran,
especially since Iran has been a leading
producer of oil is the Middle East.
Because of the crimes the Shah was
committ ng against the people of Iran,
Khomeini followers dissolved the Shah's
administration and took over the
government.
Years of cooperation between the
Shah and several U.S. administrations
strengthened the bonds between the two
countries. The Ayatollah's regime con-
sidered these efforts crimes against the
people of Iran because the support of
the deposed leader made the United
States almost as much of an enemy to
the people of Iran as the Shah himself.
In an act of retaliation on Nov. 4,
1979, the American embassy in Tehran
was overtaken by militants of the new
government, and 52 Americans were
held hostage for more than a year.
This action taken against the U.S.
resulted from political chaos in a coun-
try where the dictator had been over-
thrown because of crimes committed
against his people.
So, what kind of position will the
United States now take towards a coun-
try whose factions seem to be
systematically killing each other off?
It's certainly time for the U.S. to stop
looking the other way when dealing with
the Iranians and start dealing with the
Ayatollah as the unreasoning md
hypocrital dictator that he is. Khomeini
is now committing the same horrible
crimes against the people of his country
for which he condemned the Shah.
The aborted rescue mission for the
hostages pointed out the strategic value
of the allegiance built between the Shah
and the U.S. Iran was utilized as the
closest military ally of the United States
in the Persian Gulf region. Current
defense department plans call for the ex-
pansion of the Rapid Deployment
Force; a force which would have benefit-
ted greatly from a close relationship with
Iran.
For the United States to ignore what
has transpired under Khomeini would be
to turn our backs on the ideals which we
as a nationhave espoused for so long.
Se
SAN
(UPI, -
nia Suprei
considering
p'ea thai r)
overnight
from his g
Convict
mgs, 46,
a life term
asked the
allow, s
prisoners'
children, t
privilege.
The
because
who is mai
visit
g i r 1 f r i e r.
fe�ani
friend
anothe-
Bui
I
s riend,
I
was sent
j
ing
prisor
restr
1

Donald
I �
-
N.
In
( ontinuedl
Steady
room rei
sears havi
1981-8:
NC State
imate;
averavge
student at
Costs
indeed, mj
creased.
K 12.480


�mi mmmt

I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS. 1981
k
k
u
vi
:���'
I'm
as
held
ie
and
'Tiber
:iers
at-
the
f ?0
ted
the
en
3il-
5 he
iall
neu
oncv
now
Iran
they
nade
lakes
g with
th the
and
memi
rrible
untry
pr the
value
Shah
las the
States
(urrent
the ex-
,ment
;nefit-
lp with
what
ild be
;h we
ng.
Sexual Jail Visits Considered
SAN FRANCISCO
(UPI) - The Califor-
nia Supreme Court is
considering a convict's
plea that he be allowed
overnight sexual visits
from his girlfriend.
Convict Ray Cumm-
ings, 46, who is serving
a life term for murder,
asked the state, which
allows visits by
prisoners' wives and
children, to extend the
privilege.
The issue is confused
because Cummings,
who is married, wants a
visit from his
girlfriend�not his
wife�and his girl
friend is married to
another man.
But, said Cummings,
he lived with his
girlfriend, now 28, for
seven years before he
was sent to San Quen-
tin.
"The state is impos-
ing its own morality on
prisoners when it
restricts such visits only
to married couples
Cummings attorney,
Donald Spector, said
Friday during
arguments.
The issue brought a
flurry of questions
from the bench. Chief
Justice Rose Bird asked
whether the court
should sanction
"adultery" in prison.
Justice Stanley Mosk
inquired "How about
visits for hire" and
Justice Frank Richard-
son wondered "how
about multiple part-
ners?"
Spector said the only
real issue was prison
security. Problems of
adultery and prostitu-
tion are already
covered by state law, he
said.
Justice Mathew
Tobriner speculated
that overnight visits
might promote a
calmer atmosphere
because inmates are
"mostly young men
who are at the height of
their sexual needs
But Deputy Attorney
General Karl Mayer
said the state law is
clear. It specifically
makes wives, blood
relatives and adopted
children eligible for
42-hour visits in private
apartments and trailers
inside the prison.
Last year 12,000 such
visits occurred. Mayer
said extenstion of the
privilege would jeopar-
dize the whole pro-
gram, intended to
strengthen family ties,
because appropriate
housing is limited.
But Spector said the
case involves common-
law relationships in
which two people live
together and "hold
themselves out as a
couple
Mayer said the state
should not be forced to
pick and choose in
deciding which rela-
tionships meet that
standard. California
law does not recognize
common-law marriage.
The court will rule on
the case at a later date.
Aid Drops
Continued From Page 1
school would have to
drop out if "we hadn't
made it up with about
$100,000 in institu-
tional funds
But "I don't know
what we're going to do
next year" if Congress
doesn't re-fund a nurs-
ing loan and other aid
programs, Smith says.
change of heart is
unlikely. Most
Washingtonians pro-
mise even deeper cuts
next year.
"Anyone who
believes that Stockman
is content with this
year's cuts in
(Guaranteed Student
Loans) is as loony as
David Stockman
himself says Jerry
Roschwalb of the Na-
tional Association of
State Universities and
Land-Grant Colleges.
N. C. University Costs Soar
In Tuition, Housing, Fees
Continued From Page 1
Steady increases in
room rent over the
vears have brought the
1981-82 bills to $710 at
NC State and approx-
imately $700 for the
averavge on-campus
student at UNC.
Costs have soared,
indeed, much the same
mm? enrollment has in-
creased. Approximate-
ly 12,480 more students
fill the three campuses
today. Enrollment at
ECU jumped from
slightly over 10,000
students to more than
13,200. In the same 10
years, UNC added
nearly as many, climb-
ing from 18,000 to
21,000. And NC State
showed a 68 percent in-
crease during the
decade, with enroll-
ment reaching 19,597 in
1980.
The three schools
now make up 20 per-
cent of North
Carolina's total college
enrollment, including
private institutions.
Statistics show that
272,000 people are
enrolled in the state's
colleges, universities
and technical schools.
Despite the
similarities that ensue
from the mere size of
the universities, such as
lines stretching far as
the eye can see, student
life differs considerably
from school to school.
Each has its finer and
lesser points and its
reputations to protect
in the academic,
athletic and social
realms, and each cer-
��ainly costs more to at-
tend than it did 10 years
ago.
REGISTER TO WIN A FREE
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Fast Fare is giving away, to some lucky person, a
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How To Win
Register to win at any Fast Fare in Greenville as
often as you wish through Wednesday, Sep-
tember 30,1981. The drawing will be held on Sat-
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You must be 18 years of age or older to register
and a full time resident of North Carolina. No pur-
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While you're registering, be sure to check out
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9 � Kid Shaleen � Ladies' Night
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25 � Fantastic Shakers
26 � Catalinas
30 � Staircase � Ladies' Night
Oct. 2 � Chairmen of the Board
Bands Subject to Change Without Notice
Memberships Required
Annual Memberships � $10 Special
Price for ECU Students wID's
$5.00 � Available Sept. & Oct. Only
All ABC Permits Phone 523-2449
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I WANT YOU
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TUES. - 9:00-UNTIL - WE'RE HAVING A WILD WEST PARTY)
WED. - 4:00-6:30 - Beat Carolina Pep Rally with ECU
Cheerleaders, ECU Pep Band, and Coach Ed Emory
9:00-UNTIL ROCK & ROLL PARTY WITH D.J.
THURS - 900-UNTIL - SMOKER





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
SH-II-MBER8. 1981 Page 6
Van Zant Band
Has Six-Year
Rock History
Tickets are currently on sale for the
September 17 Black foot concert
(with special guests The Johnny t an
ant Hand and Def l.eppard)
scheduled for Minges Coliseum.
Student tickets can be purchased at
the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center, bet-
ween the hours of 10 a.m. and 4
p.m Monday through Friday.
Public tickets can be purchased at
the student center as well as all area
ticket outlets. Prices are $6 for
students in advance and $8 for the
public, ill tickets will be S8 the
night of the concert. The concert is
sponsored by the Student I nion
Major Attractions Committee.
Brother of the late Ronnie, who
fronted the renowned Lynyrd
Skynyrd, and Donnie, who heads
.38 Special, young Johnny Van Zant
inherits his legendary family's rock
'n' roll tradition with a very special
intensity on Round Two, the
eagerly-awaited follow-up to last
year's acclaimed No More Dirty
Deals. Accompanied by the blister-
ing twin lead guitars of fellow band
members Eric Leif-Lundgren and
Robbie Gay, the steadfast bass of
Danny Clausman, and the pro-
pulsive drumming of youthful Rob-
bie Morris, Johnny Van Zant's
soulful vocals are given the full-tilt
backing they deserve, recalling his
two seminal forebears � Bad Com-
pany's Paul Rodgers and, of course,
his brother Ronnie.
Round Two finds Johnny Van
Zant and company taking up where
they left off on their
PoIydorPolyGram Records debut.
The rockers ring out with dueling
guitars and compassion on such
originals as "Keep Our Love
Alive "Right & Wrong" and
"Standing In The Falling Rain
The group shows its versatility on
cover material like Orleans' "Let
There Be Music" and LennonMc-
Cartney's "Drive My Car while
evoking painful sentiments on
"Yesterday's Gone "Shot
Down" and "Cold Hearted
Woman Produced by Kevin
(Journey) Elson, who engineered
I ynyrd Skynyrd's live shows as well
as their last album, Street Survivors,
See VAN ZANT, Page 7
The Johnny Van Zant Band Appearing In September 17 Concert
The Johnny Van Zant Band will appear in concert, along with headliners
Blackfoot and Def Leppard, on September 17 at 8 p.m. in Minges Col-
iseum. The group consists of lead guitarists Eric Leif-Lundgren and Rob-
bie Gay, bassist Danny Clausman, drummer Robbie Morris, and lead
vocalist Johnny Van Zant. Brother of the late Ronnie of Lynyrd Skynyrd
and Donnie of .38 Special, Johnny began his band six years ago as the
Austin Nickels. The current line-up recently released its second album en-
titled Round Two, follow-up to last year's No More Dirty Deals. Songs
from the new release include "Keep Our Love Alive "Right and
Wrong "Standing in the Falling Rain Orleans' "Let There Be
Music LennonMcCartney's "Drive My Car "Yesterday's Gone
"Shot Down and "Cold Hearted Woman Tickets for the concert are
still on sale at the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall student Center
and all area ticket outlets including Apple Records and both Record Bar
locations. The concert is being sponsored by the ECU Student I nion Ma-
jor Attractions Committee.
Germany's The Tin Drum' Shows Wednesday
Tomorrow evening at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre, the Student Union
Films Committee will present the
highly acclaimed motion picture
The Tin Drum.
Following the film, there will be a
short, informal discussion in room
221 of the student center.
Refreshments will be served, and all
interested students, faculty and staff
are welcome to attend.
Director Volker Schlondorff's
(The lost Honor of Katharine
Blum) superb adaptation of Gunter
Grass' celebrated novel won an
Academy Award as Best Foreign
Film and shared Grand Prize at
Cannes with Apocalypse Now.
A brilliantly imaginative allegory.
it is the story of Oskar, a young
Polish boy of extraordinary will;
confused and terrified by the adult
world of sex, violence and Hitler's
rising Nazism, he refuses to grow
after the age of three.
But Oskar's mind and emotions
continue to develop inside his
stunted body and he shrewdly
observes the world around him.
Twelve-year-old David Bennent is
eceHerrt as"Oskar: it is an excep-
tional performance � a difficult
role.
Schlondorff's masterful direction
perfectly illuminates Grass'
f righteningly realistic and darkly ab-
surd world in this stunning example
of New German Cinema.
The following is a recent review
of The Tin Drum:
"Volker Schlondorff's The Tin
Drum is one of the best cinematic
translations of a major novel ever
made. The film has caught the
rhythm of Grass's sensibility, a
sizzling ferment of myth, epic,
satire, political polemic, religious
symbolism, transmuted
autobiography and more. In this
respect, the screertolayj, by Schlon-
dorff, Jean-Claude Carriere and
Franz Seitz, working closely with
Grass himself, is remarkable.
"Not only have they included an
immense number of details from
Grass's gigantic novel, but the
details have been effectively placed
in an imaginative space that
resonates amazingly well with the
original. On this level the film is a
brilliant achievement. Schlondorff
and his superb cinematographer Ig-
or Luther have absorbed the sense
of place and time that's so impor-
tant in Grass's epic tale.
"The drum parodies a German
trait, the appeal of militarism and
regimentation, satirized hilarikously
when Oskar disrupts a Nazi rally by-
screwing up the band's rhythms
with his drumming so that everyone
winds up dancing to the 'Blue
Danube The film lives in details,
and Schlondorff makes them live by-
getting an astonishingly fine ensem-
See TIN, Page 7
Noted film
critic G e n e
Siskel of the
Chicago
Tribune calls
The Tin Drum
"quite shatter-
ing. It offers
for the first
time in film
history the
birth of a child
shot from the
point-of-view
of the child. It
makes for a
startling, dar-
ing, and amus-
ing image. The
Tm Drum of-
fers one strik-
ing image after
another. That
would be
enough to
make it a fine
film. What
makes it
memorable,
however,
comes later as
the child grows
older
Confused and terrified by the adult world of sex, violence and Hitler's rising Nazism,
young Oskar (twelve-year-old David Bennent) lets out a scream that can shatter glass
in this scene from Schlondorff's award winning "The Tin Drum The film win" be
shown tomorrow night at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre.
Fassbinder, Hitchcock.
� �
Cinema Society Offers International List
Top: Dirk Bogard and Andrea Ferreol in a scene from Fassbinder's
"Despair Bottom: Gerard Depardieu (left), Carol Laure and Patrick
Dewaere in Blier's "Get Out Your Handkerchiefs Both films will be
shown this fall by the Cinema Society of Greenville.
The Cinema Society of Greenville, in conjunc-
tion with Mendenhall Student Center, is presen-
ting a diverse line-up of seven Films for fall
semester ranging from Fassbinder's Despair to
Hitchcock's silent British effort The Lodger.
All Films will be shown in Hendrix Theatre,
Mendenhall Student Center, on Sunday evenings
at 7 p.m.
The six night series may be attended by
subscription only. Season subscriptions may be
obtained by sending $10 along with your name,
address and phone number to Karen Blansfield
or Glen Brewster Cinema Society of Greenville
English Department, ECU Greenville, N.C.
� 27834.
The following films will be shown on their
respective dates:
� Get Out Your Handkerchiefs (September 13),
FranceBelgium, directed by Bertrand Blier,
1978 � A love story and a buddy movie, a com-
edy of new morality with a classical charm,
Blier's Going Places) film "makes you feel
unreasonably happy said Pauline Kael of New
Yorker magazine. Raoul will do anything to
make his wife happy including finding a poten-
tial lover to lift her out of her depression. The
resulting confusion provides an unusual twist on
the Oedipal theme, and leads to a startling and
touching climax. The overwhelming hit of the
New York Film Festival.
� Despair (September 20), Germany England,
directed by Ramer Werner Fassbinder, 1977 �
"An insanely brilliant conspiracy of talent"
(Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times), the film was
directed by Fassbinder, perhaps the major figure
of the New German Cinema. The celebrated
English playwright Tom Stoppard wrote the
screenplay with the advice of Vladimir Nabokov,
from whose novel it is adapted. Dirk Bogarde
plays a Russian exile watching his chocolate fac-
tory go to ruin in the worldwide depression. Like
his earlier l.olita, Nabokov's story concerns a
mild little man driven to murder by his own delu-
sions. Fassbinder's use of color is particularly
sensitive, and the result is an incisive translation
of Nabokov's work.
� Cars That Hat People (October 4), Australia,
directed by Peter Weir, 1977 � A bizarre and
fascinating film, this picture is the first feature
project by Australian Weir, whose subsequent
Picnic at Hanging Rock and The Last Wave have
established him as a major cinematic talent. Cars
has an intellectual substance often lacking in
thrillers. The film is brilliantly constructed,
carefully developing its story to a harrowing con-
clusion. As Paris is destroyed by its own
marauding youth, Cars emerges as a deeply mov-
ing fable of corruption and evil, and as a
scathing satire on a society dominated by
automobiles.
� Lola Monies (November 15). France, directed
by Max Ophuls, 1955 � Called by Andrew Sar
ris "the greatest film of all time ole Monies
is a masterpiece of visual richness as we 1 as nar-
rative development. The story centers of the life
of the celebrated courtesan of the last century.
Yet she is so reduced that she plays out the
tableaux of her notorious love affairs (with
Franz Liszt, a Bavarian king, a student sne meets
fleeing a revolution) as the central focus of a
three-ring circus directed by ringmaster Peter
Ustinov. The circus within the film is ma:ehed by
Ophuls' visual circus of mammoth action, swirl-
ing colors, and brilliant decor, and by his cir-
cular tracking camera which underlines the
theme that "life is movement
� Double Feature (December 6): The Dentist.
U.S directed by Leslie Pearce from a
screenplay by W.C. Fields, 1932; The lodger.
Britain, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, 1926 -
Although the film is only twenty minutes long,
The Dentist is in two distinct parts. The Gold Se -
quence is lifted directly from one of Fields'
Ziegfield Follies acts, and stands quite by itself.
Perhaps funnier, however, are the sequences in
his dental office dealing with two female pa-
tients. Watching Fields pull teeth may keep v ou
away from your dentist forever.
See FILMS, Page 8
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J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 8, 1981J
t
vv Sar-
rtontes
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th
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HOlO VCL 4 ?OUfc
K��; Zafif Legacy Lives On
Continued Frci.m P, 6
Round Tho i s the se-
cond LP of vhat pro-
mises to be a long and
fruitful career for the
alented Jortnny Van
ant Band.
The grou' p itself has
been together for
almost six y ears. As the
ust in Nickels,
Johnny, Kobbie Gay
and Rob bie Morris
played t! ie Jackson-
ville. FL. , bar circuit,
taking tl ieir ages for
ar the local police
would shut the place
down, which they often
did. Following the sug-
gestion of brother Ron-
nie, the Nickels added
guitarist Eric Leif-
Lundgren and a veteran
from a bar band called
86 Proof, bassist Dan-
ny Clausman. The cur-
rent line-up was com-
pleted.
Eric was a former
East Coast surfing
champ whose in-
fluences ranged from
the Outlaws to the
Allman Brothers to
current PolyGram
stablemate Pat Travers.
Robbie Gay has been
influenced by British
rock, while drummer
Robbie Morris, only
19, is Johnny's
nephew. Considering
the youthfulness of
these skilled rockers,
the possibilities for
their future are
boundless.
For many years,
Johnny Van Zant
refused to use his own
name for the group
because he didn't want
people to get the wrong
idea. His father Lacy
and mother Marion
nurtured the band
themselves as they did
for their other two
sons, giving the boys a
practice house to get
the act together. And,
in addition, Ronnie
would tell anyone
who'd listen that his
kid brother would one
day challenge, if not
surpass, the elder Van
Zant.
With the release of
Round Two, Johnny
Hollywood's 'It9 Movies Were
Idiots-Only Screen Treatment
B JOHN WEYLER
Sl�n U rtter
c me From Outer Space (1953)
It C mquered The World (1956)
It seems that for some reason the word "it"
v Is a fascination for sci-fi fantasy filmmakers.
Bad Sci-Fi
i Mile in the 1920's, the heyday of Clara Bow,
The It Girl, the word meant a feeling of sexual at-
traction, later on "it" came to mean the
unknown, the feared.
This usage resulted in such film titles as It
(1967), Came From Beneath the Sea (1955),
Lives Again (1978) and It! The Terror From
Beyond Space (1958). Two of the worst "it"
movies ever made, as well as two of the worst
movies ever made of any type, are It Came From
Outer Space (1953) and It Conquered the World
(1956).
Both films are products of the climate of fear
present in the U.S. during the 1950s. The Cold
War, says John Broshan in Future Tense,
"produced an atmosphere of anxiety and
paranoia: anxiety mainly caused try the ever-
present possibility of atomic war between the two
super-powers and the resulting global destruc-
tion; paranoia caused by the fear of communist
subversion, an invasion from within by people
who looked like ordinary Americans but who wre
actually the pawns of an alien power.
See ITS Page 8
Van Zant is out from
under the long shadow
of his famous family,
emerging from his in-
fluences and personal
tragedies to create a
work taht would make
those who have in-
spired him proud.
Tin Drum
Touching
Continued From P. 6
ble performance from
his actors.
"Angela Winkler,
whjse magnificent face
seems to hold the entire
history of the German
film, is perfect as
Oskar's mother. That
sterling character actor
Mario Adorf plays
Oskar's father, an
eager recruit to the
Nazis with the perfect
book stupidity of the
lower-middle class that
was suckered by
Hitler's malignant
Disneyland.
"Olbrychski is splen-
did as Agnes's lover.
Fritz Hakl and Mariella
Oliveri are poignant
and elegant as the two
midgets whose troupe
Oskar joins. Charles
Aznavour is touching
�Jack Kroll,
N e H' s h' e e k

The price
of style
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down!
College Rings now only 8.95
SILADIUM rings produce the
brilliant lustre of a fine jeweler's
stainless.
Men's and women's Siladium
rings are on sale this week
only through your
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A visit to the ArtCarved
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the chance to see the full
collection of rings for the fall.
But hurry on over this sale
runs for a limited
time only.
CLASS RINGS,INC
DATE: Sept. 8-11
TIME: 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.
PLACE- ECU STUDENT SUPPLY STORE LOBBY
Deposit required MastetCharge or Visa accepted
� 1981 ArtCarved Class Rings
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each ol these �dv�ftt��d items i� required to be reedily avertable tor sale
I below the advertised price in each AtP Store eicept as specifically noted
in this ad
at or
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unices er�cTive THeu sat sept. n. at����ggwmx .c
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69"
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lb.
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PLUMP SWEET & JUICY
Seedless Grapes
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SUNNY SLOPE FROM S.C.
Fresh Peaches
SPECIAL
Wooden Box
For Storage
2&500





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 8, 1981
Films
International
List Planned
Continued From P. 6

� The Lodger, one
of Hitchcock's earliest,
introduces many of the
themes and cinematic
devices the Master of
Suspense would
become celebrated for
later. Another Jack the
Ripper, one who preys
only on blondes, is
loose in London, and is
played by Ivor Novello,
an immensely popular
and mysterious matinee
idol of the 20s. Hit-
chcock acknowledged
his visual debt to the
German Expressionistic
cinema; nighttime Lon-
don, all mists and fogg-
ed lamplight, is ex-
ploited with wonderful
visual effects and the
mood of apprehensive
fear is beautifully sus-
tained in some of Hit;
chcock's most
memorable sequences,
including a shot of the
lodger's feet visible
through a ceiling.
� Down and Dirty
(December 13), Italy,
directed by El tore
Scola, 1975 � Nino
Manfredi, acclaimed
for his performance in
Bread and Chocolate,
reveals another side of
his talent in his por-
trayal of the beleagured
patriarch of a large and
lusty extended family
living in cramped
squalor on the outskirts
of Rome. This
delightful comedy is
full of ribald humor
and Italian bravado,
but beneath the surface
lies a poignant, bit-
tersweet study of life in
the grip of oppressive
poverty.
Coffee and
refreshments will be
served from 6:30-7
p.m. in the Multi-
purpose Room of
Mendenhall on each
film evening except
September 13.
For additional infor-
mation about the
series, call 757-6041,
756-2315 or 758-4519.
Luboff Choir Coming To Campus
The Norman I uboff Choir will appear in Hendrix Theatre on November 19 as part of the MSC Ar-
tists Series. The artistic range of the group has been called -unparalleled in all of vocal music.
Where else can one hear a Bach Chorale and a Beatles tune sung in the same program with equal ar-
tistic master)
The 'Its' Had It
Continued From Page 7
Another factor in the climate of paranoia that
existed in America during the late 1940s and the
1950s was the 'flying saucer' scare that began in
1947 and continued for well over a decade.
Whether this w as a genuine cause of the paranoia
or merely a psychological side-effect of the Cold
War is still a matter for debate
Both of these movies were created to cash in on
their audiences' uncertainty. Regarding It Came
From Outer Space, its director, Jack Arnold,
once said, "The film started because Universal
had bought a story from Ray Bradbury and they
thought it could be successfully adapted to make
a 3D picture
Unfortunately, even the 3D gimmick couldn't
enliven what was basically low-budget, low-key
"scare fare" about alien invaders. The extra-
terrestia! trespassers are travellers standed on
Earth by the crash-landing of their space ship.
The alien's real appearances are unseen by the
audience: in order to obtain materials needed to
repair their ship, they leave their Arizona deseri
site and enter the nearby small town disquised as
normal citizens.
At the end of the film we get a brief glimpse of
how the creatures really look: unbelievable and
ridiculous, somewhat resembling the bilge beast
in Godzilla Vs. The Smog Monster. The overall
qualitiy of the picture may be easily guessed at by
the presence of one of its stars, Russell Johnson.
This fellow is best known as the Professor on
Gilligan's Island and also appeared in the clasic
Attack of the Crab Monsters (1957).
An accurate assessment of It Conquered the
World may also be made by reading the cast list:
Peter Graves, who once led the Mission Im-
possibleieam and whose career now seems to
consist entirely of doing commercials for
Carolina Telephone; Beverly Garland, who is
best known as Fred MacMurray's wife on My
Three Sons and appeared in Swamp Women
(1955) and Airport 1975, both of which are in-
cluded in the book The Fifty Worst Films Of All
Time, and Lee Van Cleef, who is most (in)
famous for a long series of Grade-C spaghetti
westerns. �
The "It" of the title is an alien monstrosity,
resembling an inverted ice cream cone wearing a
child's Halloween mask, that deceives scientist
Cleef into aiding its sinister scheme, which con-
sists mostly of sending out small bat-like things
to attack humans. The script, direction, acting
and special eftects are among the most excreble
ever seen onscreen. �
It Conquered The World has the dubious
distinction of being the inspiration for a satiric
song by Frank Zappa, appropriately entitled
"Cheepnis
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,ed(
s
A
LEARN
TO SAIL
(or just relax)
aboard the
sailing yacht
Celesity"
a
one day of sailing � ttt
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Pomlico
Soiling
School
75
0203
MonThurs.
Seafood Plate
(Fish, shrimp, oysters)4.50
Ocean Perch2.50
Crab Cakes1.85
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East 10th St. � Extension past Hastings Ford
Phone 752-3172 � 4:30-9:00 Mon Sat.
At Last. A BankThat
Treats College Students
LikeThey Have Money.
���
BB&T gives full H" o�lies?
students no senio- charge
checking So rfs. ands cr but
With a Tilbe Altome TeUercard.
you can use the BB&T Tillie
machine at our Arlington
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7daysaweek
Nobody works hardertoryour �����.
BB&T
P
B( H
Q iariei
rushed
111 more
big 42 (
this pa
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formanc
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 8, 1981
Page 9
Pirates Impressive In Opening Romp
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Spom t diior
Quarterback Carlton Nelson
rushed for 118 yards and passed for
111 more to lead East Carolina to a
big 42-6 romp of Western Carolina
this past Saturday.
The ECU offense looked sharp in
all phases, amassing 499 total yards
in what appeared to be easy fashion.
Halfback Harold Blue also had a
big night, rushing for 88 yards and
scoring two touchdowns.
Defensively, cornerback Gerald
Sykes was the standout, intercepting
three Western passes to tie a school
record for single game pick-offs.
Following the game, ECU coach
Ed Emory was overjoyed at his
team's performance.
"This is a great, great thrill he
said. "But it's not how you start,
but how you finish that counts
The Buc coach was most happy at
his team's offensive performance.
"I'm very pleased with the way
we moved the down markers he
said. "Carlton Nelson did a
beautiful job directing the offense.
But we are concerned about a lot of
areas where we stopped ourselves
The Pirates seemed to move the
pigskin better than Emory gave
them credit, gaining yardage almost
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at will , the backs following a
wall of offensive linemen that did a
real number on the Western defen-
sive front.
ECU wasted little time getting on
the board, taking its first possession
of the game 97 yards in 14 plays for
the game's first score.
Catamount punter Eddie McGill
executed a perfect coffin corner
punt after his team failed to move
the ball on its first possession, pinn-
ing the Pirates on theii own three.
A 27-yard run by Nelson on the
drive's first set of downs got things
going. A third-down pass from
back-up quarterback Greg Stewart
to split end Larry O'Roark later
went for 14 yards and the Bucs were
on their way.
Blue culminated the drive with a
12-yard dash into the endzone.
Kicker Chuck Bushbeck made it 7-0
with an extra point.
Western bounced right back,
marching to the ECU 10-yard-line
before settling for a 31-yard field
goal from Dean Biassucci.
The Pirates took the ensuing
kickoff and pulled a repeat of their
first drive, going 80 yards for a
score. Nelson carried the ball only
twice in the series for 56 yards. The
last carry was a 24-yard TD scamper
at the i0:44 mark of the second
quarter.
Western got its last points of the
game mid-way through the second
period, Biassucci connecting from
45-yards out to trim the ECU lead to
14-6.
ECU asserted its dominance once
again, though, taking another drive
80 yards to paydirt before the half
ended. This time it was the Buc
passing game that did most of the
damage.
Nelson hit tight end Norwood
Vann for a 21-yard gainer on the se-
cond play of the drive and later con-
nected with freshman split end
Ricky Nichols on a 14-yarder.
Greg Stewart spelled Nelson for
the remainder of the drive and came
up with a big third-and-13 play,
connecting with tight end Vann on a
17-yard pass.
Halfback Leon Lawson
culminated the drive with a three-
yard touchdown dive. Bushbeck's
extra point made it 21-6 at the half.
The Pirates began the second half
with the kind of dominance that
they displayed in the first half, driv-
ing from their own 20 to the
Western 22 in only six plays. A fum-
ble by fullback Roy Wiley at the
Catamount 19-yard-line ended the
club's hopes of scoring, though.
After the Pirate defense held
Western at bay, the ECU offense
took over at its own ten and went
back to work. Halfback Earnest
Byner began the drive with a
16-yard from scrimmage. A big pass
play ended it, Nelson hitting Ricky
Nichols in the end zone from 34
yards out to put the Bucs up 28-6.
Western took the ensuing kickoff
and marched to the ECU 43 before
Sykes ended the drive with the last
of his three interceptions. ECU then
marched to the Western 35 before
Nelson was intercepted by Walter
Smith just after the beginning of the
game's final period.
Later in the quarter. Nelson got
one last chance to direct a drive
before being spelled by reserves. He
took full advantage of the oppor-
tunity, moving the club 54 yards for
in ten plays for a TD.
On a third-and-seven situation in
the drive's first set of downs, Nelson
hit Byner with a big 19-yard pass.
Blue later crossed the goal line at
almost exactly the halfway point of
the fourth quarter, putting ECU up
35-6.
The Pirate reserves also got a
chance to show their wares, scoring
a TD late in the fourth period. A
hard hit by defensive back Chuck
Bishop resulted in a Western fum-
ble, which was recovered by Buc
linebacker Chris Skeeter on the
WCU 35.
Two plays later reserve quarter-
back Kevin Ingram, a transfer from
Villanova, combined with split end
Carlton Frazier for a 36-yard pass
play. Freshman halfback Stefon
Adams got the call on the next play
and made it 42-6, going over from
four yards out on his first carry as a
Pirate.
The game was a frustrating one
for the Catamounts, who suffered
their seventh straight defeat at the
hands of the Buc �� ���, tW"
Following the contest WCU
coach Bob Waters termed the game
"a total loss
About the only bright spot in the
A Blue Day
ECU halfback Harold Blue rolls over the
goal line in the Pirates' 42-6 win over
Western Carolina Saturday. The score
was one of two in the game for the Blue,
who also rushed for 88 yards. (Photo By
Jon Jordan)
game for the Catamounts was the
play of halfback Melvin Dorsey, a
transfer from Georgia. Dorsey rush-
ed for 105 yards on 20 carries.
Dorsey and Western quarterback
Ronnie Mixon seemed to find a few
weak spots in the ECU defense,
especially in the first half. Still, the
v,JPiratejdefenders finished the game
: allowing only 232 total yards and no
touchdowns.
"Our quickness on defense was a
real key Emory said. "We kept
bending but did not break. 1 was
concerned about the way we did on
third down situations, though
A troubled spot in the 1980 ECU
attack could turn out to be a big
plus in '81 if the Western game is
any indication, Emory said.
"Our offensive line did a super
job he claimed. "Our pass protec-
tion was excellent. I felt like the line
should do well with the size we had
and the size they had. We must get
better for next week, though.
because those people are a lot bigger
and better than what we saw
tonight
Next week the Pirates travel to
Chapel Hill to face 12th-ranked
North Carolina. Emory had high
praises for the Tar Heels.
"They might be ranked in the top
ten in the country he said, "but
talent-wise they might be in the top
five. We have to get lots better this
week before we're ready to play
those people
QB Paces ECU Victory
Nelson's Return Successful
'iia�5t
Photo By Jon Jordan
Carlton Nelson Slips Between Two WCU Defenders
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports 1 diior
Members of the media had little
trouble deciding who should be
voted the "King of the Gridiron"
after East Carolina's 42-6 thrashing
of Western Carolina last Saturday
night.
The decision was almost a
unanimous one. No, the honor did
not go to cornerback Gerald Sykes,
whose three interceptions tied a
school record. Instead, quarter-
back Carlton Nelson walked away
with the award, his play over-
shadowing even Sykes' great perfor-
mance. All the Portsmouth, Va.
native did was rush for 118 yards
and pass for 111.
What made Nelson's perfor-
mance even more impressive was the
fact that the game was his first after
recovering from a neck operation
that threatened to end his career.
Even after he recovered from the
surgery, Nelson was not sure that he
wanted to play football again.
"I really didn't decide to play un-
til it came time for fall practice
Nelson said. "I just didn't know.
The doctor told me after the opera-
tion that my neck would be 100 per-
cent. Still, 1 wasn't sure
Nelson's decision to play definite-
ly was the right one if the Western
game is used as any sort of measure-
ment.
His 118 yards rushing came on
Waters: Game 'A Total Loss'
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Aatutaal Sport MMat
Before Saturday night's kickoff,
Western Carolina coach Bob Waters
was optimistic about his team's
chances against the Pirates of East
Carolina.
How quickly emotions can
change, especially after the Cata-
mounts were trounced by the
Pirates, 42-6, in the season's opener
for both teams.
"We were just awful said the
personable coach, who enters his
13th year at the Catamount helm.
"There's net a whole to say. We
just played poorly, but the defense
was particularly bad. We were just
overwhelmed
The Western Carolina defense
was porous, allowing 25 first downs
and 321 yards rushing. The secon-
dary allowed another 178 yards
through the air, as the Pirates piled
up 499 yards in total offense.
Even though the Catamount
defense returned only three starters
from the 1980 team. Waters saw
that as no excuse for his team's per-
formance, giving credit to Coach Ed
Emory's Pirates. "We were just
beaten by a more physical team
said Waters, who saw his career
record drop to 71-50-4.
"East Carolina was far better
than we were. They did so many
things well. I think we let them get
to us. They have so many good
athletes
Waters agrees that one game does
not make a season and did see a cou-
ple of bright spots in a game he
labeled "a total loss
One glimmer of hope was running
back Melvin Dorsey, a transfer
from the University of Georgia,
who picked up 105 yards on 20 car-
ries. "We have alot of potential at
the running back position Waters
added.
The other bright spot, Waters
said, was at the quarterbacking
position, where quarterback Ronnie
Mixon threw for 117 yards. Waters
feels Mixon "will be a good quarter-
back
Western Carolina travels to VMI
this Saturday to face a team Waters
says is "always physical but doesn't
have as many athletes as East
Carolina
Photo By Chap Gurkty
Western Coach Bob Waters reluctantly watches ECU split
end Larry O'Roark haul in a pass.
only 12 carries. Time after time he
turned the corner and faked out
Western safety men and
linebackers.
Nelson's passing was impressive
as well. He connected on six of 12
attempts, throwing one touchdown
and one interception.
"I was pretty pleased with the
way that I threw the ball tonight
Nelson claimed. "You know. I've
heard that some people don't think 1
can pass.
"But he added, "I don't really
listen to what people say. I can't let
that bother me from doing the job
that 1 need to do
Perhaps Nelson's most impressive
pass was his 34-yard touchdown toss
to freshman split end Ricky Nichols
in the third quarter. Nichols was lin-
ed up on the left side and ran a deep
sideline pattern. Nelson spotted him
and released the ball with full con-
fidence that the pass would go for
six points.
"1 knew that was a touchdown
when the ball left my hand Nelson
said. "Ricky's really quick and
when I saw him in the spot I just
knew we had it
Nelson's play overshadowed the
fact that two other ECU quarter-
backs got substantial playing time
and had good moments as well.
Greg Stewart, who took over as
the starter last year when Nelson
went down with the neck injury in
mid-season, directed a TD drive, as
did Villanova transfer Kevin In-
gram. The competition and support
that the two quality reserves supply-
does not bother Nelson.
"I think it's great he said.
"That's good help when you can
come out and not have to worry
about anything. When I'm out I
know that Greg and Kevin can get
the job done. It's also nice to know
that they're there when I'm in the
game, to not have to worry about
that little stuff
Nelson also had kind words for
the people that made sure he had
room to roam � the offensive line.
"1 thought those guys did a great
job he said. "The protection was
just super. I couldn't have asked for
any better
Even though he called the
Western contest "the best game I've
played since I've been here Nelson
was critical of his play in some
areas. He especially did not like the
play in in the fourth quarter on
which he overthrew Nichols on what
probably would have been a sure
touchdown.
"1 didn't have too many
mistakes he said. "But I
shouldn't have overthrown Ricky or
thrown the interception. Also, I
missed a few reads on the line that
could have been big gainers
Sound like Nelson is hard on
himself? He says he is.
"I hate to make mistakes he
said. "Sometimes I get down on
myself when I mess up. Most of the
time, though, I just try that much
harder
The junior signal-caller says that
he has not felt any pressure to per-
form well after coming back from
the surgery � at least not from out-
siders.
"I had to prove myself to
myself he said. "I don't try to
prove myself to anyone else. My ac-
tions will speak for me if I do like I
should
Now that the Western game is
entered into the win column, Nelson
is looking forward to his team's
game this weekend with nationally-
ranked North Carolina, the team's
arch-rival.
Nelson has extra incentive to want
to defeat the heavily-favored Tar
Heels. It was against Carolina last
year that he went down with the in-
jury that sidelined him for the
season. The team went on to lose
that game by a substantial 31-3
margin. The Pirate quarterback says
things should be different this year.
"I think we have an excellent
chance this year. We gained a lot of
experience from last season. Now
we know what to do. We've improv-
ed at least 110 percent. I think we'll
give them a good game.
"Yep Nelson added, "this is
the one 1 want. The Carolina game
is definitely special to me
mmmtmmmmmmm
1





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 8. 1981

t
Karr Says
Attendance
Is The Answer
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Spam Editor
"We need to get more people in the stands.
Everything else is tied to that
East Carolina athletic director Ken Karr is very
specific about what it will take to put Pirate
sports where he wants them. Without question,
money is the key.
Karr says that filling Ficklen Stadium for foot-
ball games on Saturdays and filling Minges Col-
iseum during basketball season will go a long
ways toward meeting the financial needs of the
school.
When Karr arrived on campus over a year ago,
taking over for the resigned Bill Cain, he said that
improved scheduling and getting the men's
basketball team in a conference were two of his
big goals.
To a degree, both of those goals have been met.
ECU now has future football dates with such
powers as Missouri, Florida State and West
Virginia. Karr says he will continue to attempt to
upgrade the schedule further.
Late in August it was announced that ECU had
been admitted to the Eastern College Athletic
Conference (ECAC), South division. The con-
ference has a post-season tournament, whose
winner goes to the NCAA championship tourney.
"This is a very positive thing for East Carolina
University Karr said. "The best thing, of
course, is that it provides access to the NCAA
tournament as early as this season
Now that the second-year AD has for the most
part reached two of his big goals, his attention
has now turned to increasing the department's
financial standing so that further capital im-
provements can be made.
"We would like someday to have a new athletic
facility that would meet the increased needs of
our major sports Karr explained. "This facility
would catch us up for the most pan with some of
the major schools across the nation.
"Also Karr added, "we have to continue to
Ken Karr
explore ways to get a 10-12,000 seat coliseum to
showcase our basketball program and other
winter sports
Karr said that he liked a great deal the often-
heard proposal of a community civic center.
"If we got those things (facility and civic
center) Karr said, "we would be in a solid posi-
tion. We'd have the tools. But before we can
make those plans we have to market our sporting
events now. After we do that, then we can begin
making these moves
Questions are often asked of Karr concerning
ECU'S financial standing. The athletic director
says the footing is not unstable, but is not yet
solid.
"You're never satisfied he said of the current
athletic budget. "We've had to restrict our
budget because we've not shown the ability in the
past to sell enough tickets to our football and
basketball games. Those are our revenue-
producing sports and the success of them reflects
on the budget
ihe number of intercollegiate teams at ECU is
down from a year ago as a result of the AD's
dropping of several non-revenue sports. Karr says
this does not mean that there is excess money
abounding.
"In terms of money he said, "we have exact-
ly what we did last year � approximately $2.2
million. We're trying to produce better teams on
basically the same dollars. Yes, there are fewer
sports, but when you consider what inflation
does, the money saved is more than consumed
with basic increases
Talented Heels Await Bucs
In Last ECU-UNC Game?
Now that the ECU
Pirates have properly
disposed of Western
Carolina, winning 42-6
Saturday in their
season opener, they can
turn their attention to
this weekend's big con-
test against North
Carolina.
You can bet that the
Bucs are fired up for
this one, especially
since its stands as the
last game between the
two rivals in the
scheduling books.
The Tar Heels are
ranked 12th and 14th in
the two national polls,
and were listed at
number ten in the an-
nual Sports Illustrated
pre-season poll.
The game will be the
first for the Heels and,
of course the Pirates'
second contest.
Carolina has been
made the odds-on
choice to repeat as the
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference champion. The
Heels won going away-
last year, finishing at
11-1 on the season, in-
cluding a win over
Texas in The Bluebon-
net Bowl.
Coach Dick Crum's
team suffered a number
of major losses to
Charles
Chandler
graduation. Six defen-
sive and four offensive
starters from 1980 are
now gone. The word is
that there are quality
replacements.
Still, some of the
losses have got to hurt.
It is simply impossible
to lose players such as
Lawrence Taylor, Don-
nell Thompson, Harry
Stanback, Steve
Streater, Ron Wooten,
Rick Donnalley, Billy
Johnson and Amos
Lawrence without feel-
ing the hurt.
"They've got great
players coming up,
though ECU head
coach Ed Emory says.
"They may be ranked
in the top ten in the
country, but their
talent may be in the top
five
Taylor was called the
most important defen-
sive player a year ago.
His value was definitely
shown when he was
chosen by the New
York Giants as the se-
cond pick in the entire
NFL draft.
Amos Lawrence Scores In '80 Contest
ECU Fall Schedules
1981 ECU
VOLLEYBALL
SCHEDULE
(Home Matcies In Caps)
Sept. 18 � at Duke, 19 �
at Appalachian State, 25-26
� at N.C. State Inviational,
29 � NORTH CAROLINA.
Oct. 2-3 � at Univ. of
South Carolina Tourney, 8
� N.C. STATE. 9-10 �
ECU INVITATIONAL, 13
� at North Carolina, 16 �
APPALACHIAN STATE,
22 � at William and Mary,
23-24 � at Univ. of
Maryland Tourney, 27 �
DUKE.
Nov. 4 � at N.C. State,
13-14 � NCAIAW State
Tourney.
1981 ECU
FALL GOLF SCHEDULE
Sept. 24-25 � at Campbell
Univ. Invitational.
Oct. 2-4 � at James
Madison Univ. Invitational,
22-24 � at Iron Duke
Tourney, Duke Univ 26-27
� at William and Mary In-
vitational.
1981 ECU
WOMEN'S TENNIS
SCHEDULE
(Home Matches In Caps)
Sept. 16 � at N.C. State,
19 � at Appalachian State.
Oct. 3 � at Duke Racquet
Club, 11 � High Point Col-
lege, 25 � DUKE RAC-
QUET CLUB.
Nov. 13 �
CULMINATING EVENTS
(Men's and women's singles;
mixed doubles).
1981 ECU
MEN'S TENNIS
SCHEDULE
(Home Matches In Caps)
24
at Elon Col-
Sept.
lege.
Oct. 2-3 � at James
Madison, 15 � CAMP-
BELL. 29 � Atlantic Chris-
tian.
TBA � at UNC-Wilmington
Fall Invitational
TBA � at High Point Col-
lege
Still, the loss of
tackles Thompson and
Stanback and backup
John Brugos figure to
create the team's big-
gest void. There is plen-
ty of talent, but no ex-
perience with which to
replace the trio.
Of the team's front
five defensive players
from a year ago, only
linebacker Calvin
Daniels returns.
Linebacking will be a
strength, though, with
Darrell Nicholson and
Lee Shaffer returning.
The UNC offense led
the ACC in scoring,
total offense and
rushing a year ago. The
offense figures to be
strong once again,
especially if quarter-
back Rod Elkins and
tailback Kelvin Bryant
have matured as they
were expected to.
Elkins took over at
the signal-calling posi-
tion last year when an
injury sidelined Chuck
Sharpe. Elkins did a
fine job as the Tar Heel
starter, completing 81
of 160 passes, throwing
12 of them for
touchdowns.
Talented targets like
Victor Harrison and
Jon Richardson return
for Elkins to throw to,
making his job that
much easier.
The return of the
multi-talented Bryant
makes the loss of
Lawrence seem small.
Bryant went over the
1,000 mark a year ago
and, if he develops,
may prove to be Amos'
superior.
The Heels always
seem to have quality
back-ups at the tailback
position. Reserve help
this year must come
from some highly-
recruited, multi-
talented, yet very inex-
perienced backs.
Coming out of spring
practice, Tyrone An-
thony, a sophomore
from Winson-Salem,
was Bryant's back-up.
Anthony performed as
a jayvee a year ago.
A pair of talented
freshman should get
some playing time as
well. Eddison Bramble
of Garden City Park,
N.Y. and Eddie Colson
of Jacksonville were
very highly recruited
and rate as future stars.
As a whole, the Tar
Heels are both definite
and questionable. They
are definitely talented,
yet the losses and the
inexperience that must
take over create many
questions.
All of that makes this
Saturday's contest with
the Pirates a most in-
teresting one. The fact
that it is, at least for
now, the last ECU-
Carolina game adds to
the game's attraction.
PIRA TES
in the pros
ratti
Collins' Season
Debut Is A Smash
Former East Carolina star running back An-
thony "Tony" Collins made his regular season
debut in the National Football League Sunday
and was a smashing success.
Collins learned late last week that he would be
starting at halfback for the New England Patriots
when they took the field for their regular season
opener against the Baltimore Colts on Sunday.
Collins, who was the talk of the Patriots' pre-
season camp, was a bright spot in a disappointing
afternoon for New England. The Pats lost a
heartbreaker to the Colts, 29-28.
The former Pirate did it all, though, finishing
the afternoon with a total offensive output of 194
yards (includes rushing, receiving and returning
yardage).
Collins led the team in rushing, gaining 81
yards on 15 carries for a 5.4 average. He pulled in
three receptions, second best on the squad, for 48
yards. A 19-yard rush and a 22-yard pass recep-
tion were the two longest plays of the day from
scrimmage for the Penn Yan, N.Y. native.
Kickoff returns were something that Collins
specialized in at ECU. The Patriots took advan-
tage of that also on Sunday. Collins returned
three for 65 yards.
Collins' 81 yards rushing put him among the
NFL's top ten after Sunday's games, with onlv
Monday night's game between Cleveland and San
Diego not on the record books.
Collins was tied for the tenth position with
Chicago superstar Walter Payton, who gained 81
yards on 19 carries against Green Bay Sunday.

Week jays
11:30-11:00
Frl. & Sat.
11:30-12:30
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town! (Honest)
Fast Service!
Game
Machines
Big
Screen TV
Drive Up
Window For
To Go Orders
PIZZA & SPAGHETTI BUFFET
AAon. & Thurs. 5:30-8:00$2.79
AAon. thru Fri. 11:30-2:00 $2.69
Wed. � All you can eat Spaghetti -5:30-8:00 $2.69
Thurs. � Lasagna � One Reg. Price.Second One
$1.00
Sports Writer
Needed
Person must
have avid interest
& experience in
Sports Journalism
Call 757-6366
or come by
East Carolinian
office.
; r,
it Lulling Swu'oodiC &
Etao Hmtviq � Monagar
ttm 75� 0327
IOOOOOCK
Introductory
Specials
Tuesday & Wednesday
Shrimp or
Flounder
includes French Fries, Cole Slaw,
and Hushpuppies
3.50
Combination Shrimp
and Flounder
includes French Fries, Cole
Slaw, and Hushpuppies
3.95
Cross Tar River bridge-
take left at light�
building located on left
cccoeoscoGccooooooooooooooooooocoooooeosoeco5�og�ocoO'
LET US JOIN
YOU
You are the future of North Carolina
We are the
North Carolina Student Legislature
THE TIME IS NOW FOR NCSL
ORGANIZATION MEETING:
SEPTEMBER 14, 1981
MENDENHALL 221 � 7:00 P.M.
NCSL: WE MAKE
A DIFFERENCE
By
you
gei
cleai
ball
Tl
junj
Gen
the
ting
feel 11
threl
Pir;
Wtrvi
Satul
Staui
grabJ
in tl
recoi
joins
ciudi
agairl
in 191
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just
ing i
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receil
on t
A ii
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
:00
it.
:no
k
Sykes Has Big Night Returning
From A Year On The Sidelines
SEPTEMBER 8, 1981
11
By JIMMY DuPREE
Maaatwg Ldilur
"When you see
you've got a chance to
get it, your head is
clear. All you see is the
ball coming at you
That's the way ECU
junior cornerback
Gerald Sykes desribes
the feeling of intercep-
ting errant passes � a
feeling he experienced
three times as the
Pirates downed
Western Carolina 42-6
Saturday at Ficklen
Stadium. His three
grabs earned him a spot
in the East Carolina
record books, as he
joins five others in-
cluding Jim Bolding
who performed the feat
against the Catamounts
in 1975.
"1 knew 1 had a
chance all three times
Sykes adds. "It was
just a matter of hang-
ing on
For a former
member of the Pirate
receiving corps hanging
on to the ball was no
problem. Just two
years ago Sykes saw ac-
tion as a wide receiver
in the Pat Dye version
of the wishbone.
Many questioned the
wisdom of switching
Sykes to defense, but
he now admits that the
move has proved
beneficial to his future
as well as the teams
Sykes sat out the 1980
campaign as a red-
shirt, and that move
gave him time to adjust
to his new-found home.
" Coach 4Ed) Emory
left the decisn (to be
red-shirted) to me � I
made the decision with
his guidance Sykes
explains. "He com-
municates with his
players very well. I en-
joyed playing split end,
but I realize now that I
am more valuable to
the team on defense
The Fayetteville
native not only in-
tercepted three Ronnie
Mixon tosses, but also
broke up another pair
to lead the team in that
category as well. Sykes
added three tackles to
his defensive totals.
"Gerald graded out
at 85 percent � pretty
good for a defensive
back praised defen-
sive secondary coach
Ricky Bustle. "All
three times (he in-
tercepted) we were in a
prevent defense. Gerald
was back deep in the
coverage.
"We just happened
to be in the right
defense at the right
time
Early in the contest
Mixon had little dif-
ficulty finding open
receivers, but both
Sykes and Bustle ad-
mitted adjustments to
the defense stiffled
later efforts.
"We were rushing
three people early in the
game; we thought that
was enough pressure on
their quarterback and
still enough to stop
their inside running
game said Bustle.
"Let there be no
mistake about it.
Western Carolina runs
very good routes.
"Twice earlier they
tried to get us in a jum-
ping match with their
6-6 tight end (Eddie
McGill), but Gerald
managed to get in front
and knock the ball
away
But according to
Bustle, it was not all
luck which enabled
Sykes to step into the
record book.
"Gerald is the most
natural back-peddler
I've ever coached
Bustle states. "The
main difference in
receiver and defensive
back is that the end is
running the pattern for-
ward and the defense
has to run it in reverse.
(Back-peddling) is
something you can't
really teach � you can
show somebody how,
but they have to have
the talent for it.
"He's got a super at-
titude toward the game.
He's had some habits
J
V
PRESBYTERIAN
CAMPUS
MINISTRY
East Carolina University
Greenville, N. C. 27834
Stewart LaNeave, Campus
Minister
104 Hardee Circle
,4 listening ear
A sounding board
A guiding spirit
752-7240 or 758-0145
PROGRAM
At the International House
306 East 9th Street
Tues. $2.00
5:30 Discussion & Dinner Out
Add Greenery
to your
Scenery
We have a thriving selection
of 5" hanging baskets on sale
now for $5.00. It's the natural
way to decorate your dorm
room or apartment. Stop by to-
day and make your selection.
Wed.
Noon
Faculty & Staff
Mendenhall Faculty Dining
A time of sharing and
discussion over meal.
Thurs.
Noon
Mendenhall Snack Bar
Student Fellowship Lunch
Join us with lunch.
r
1027 S.EVANS
CORNER 11th & EVANS 758-2774
Good Sept. 8 thru 19
Closed Wed.
WESTERN
SIZZUN'
Steakhouse
BAIL Y SPECIALS
MONDAY - $1 ��
CHOPPED STEAK . 1.99
TUESDAY
BEEF TIPS
WEDNESDAY -
CUBED STEAK
THURSDAY -
STEAK SANDWICH
FRIDAY -
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE
SATURDAY -
BARBEQUE RIBS
SUNDAY -
STEAK ON A STICK
n.99
1.89
1.69
3.79
2.99
1.99
All Meals are Complete
Including Baked Potato or
French Fries & Texas Toast
and
Free Tea
Famous Salad Bar
with ECU I.D.
Take Out Service � 203 E. 19th St. � 752712
244 By Pass � 750040 � Hours 11 a.mlOp.m. � Woo. Thurs.
10 a.m11 p.m. Fri. Sun.
Classifieds
Photo
' Chap Gurley
Sykes Dives For WCU's Melvin Dorsey
he's had to break, and
he's done everything
possible break them.
He's got more natural
skills for the corner-
back position than
anyone I've ever coach-
ed
WHile confident
concerning his own
skills and progress,
Sykes is most concern-
ed about those of the
entire Pirate football
squad.
"There are people
who didn't believe in
me he says, "but I
think I showed 1 have
all the tools to play
(cornerback).
"Overall, I think we
had one Hell of a game.
G! amcmiiagadatiqu�s Are f
Shtrtb Sle�pinyj Bags Baopao-
arncmy f juipm.nt Sleo' Ti&j
Sio- C.shes Aid OytH 700 Oft
rsienl Ne And L's�d items
o��r.w, feints iii "�'i
ARMY-NAVY STORE
We are way ahead of
where we were last
year
The Pirates must
now prepare to battle
the Tar Heels of North
Carolina Saturday in
Kenan Stadium. Sykes
indicates he's ready for
what is apparantly the
final ECU-UNC clash.
"I'll use (the
Western Carolina
game) for a stepping
stone he reasons. "I
think we all will.
"We've got a week
to get ready � it'll just
be a matter of who
wants it the most
FOR SALE
WATERBEDS Now students can
buy a waterbed (Queen o( King)
direct from mqt. You can save up
to ' retail Complete beds with IS
yr warranty mattress, 5 yr war
ranty. thermostat, heater, liner,
liner, frame, headboard, pedestal
for as low as 189 Queen 199 King
Call David. Delivery adv 7S8 7408
FOR SALE 6 Caster Twinlm
surfboard, make offer. Pioneer
KP 373 Casette underdash player
560 7S8 22S4
WETSUITS: I pullover top (L) I
longiohn (L), 140apiece or $100 for
both. Call Dirk at 7S7 699 or
7S8 6JS4
Small refrigerator. Sanyo, ex
cellent condition, used only one
year. Why rent when you can buy-
Call 757 3210.
8 by 10 caricatures by John
Weyler, cartoonist for The East
Carolinian and the Greenville
Times, former Carowinds portrail
artist. $10 for b and w, $1$ for col
or. Call 7S2 S77S
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE, wanted to share
two bedroom towntiouse in Green
ville Share of rent US plus share
of utilities Please call 7S8 7734 or
3SS 6717
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share Oakmont Sq Apts. Seimi
private room Bed needed $76 66
per month and one third ulilitui
and phone 1 baths, pool, laundry
room, bus sekrvice. cable TV
FEMALE roommate wanted to
share 5 bedroom 1' hath partially
furnished townhouse located
beside Eastbrook You have to
share.larqe master bedroom and
bring bedroom furniture Total
rent $?95 plus utilities Your share
one third of both I no deposit i Call
anytime 7S8 S809 (no smokers
please)
FEMALE roommate wanted in
house on Charles St I block Irom
campus $100 per month (utilities
included) Phone 7S8 7010
ROOM lor rent immediately
Great location one block Irom
ECU and downtown $7$ Call
7S2 26S9
PERSONAL
WANTED: Bass, lead and rhythm
guitar players lor rock'n'roll
band Serious minded musicianms
only, no egos Call 7S476I0 or
7S3 5182 Marc or Al
FEMALE RESIDENT
COUNSELOR: Musi take training
and internship. Payment in kind
(free room, utilities, phone and
house privileges) Excellent op
portunity for students in human
services Call 754 HELP
HELP WANTED Positions open
fro 2 males at Tar Landing
Seafood Restaurant Come by for
application
SPORT F'ers unite Wed at 10 69
pm All heads will meet at BB and
B's lor an evening of sewnous
sporting. This is a cobber remem
brance meeting and a welcome
back bread party! The column is
back YEA!
RIDE NEEDED To Chariot
tesville, va. Sept II 13. will pay
all expenses Contact Jeanne at
757 9143
CLIP JOINT' has moved to 119
Garrett Call Marlena at 7S� 183;
PART TIME work on campus,
stapling posters to bulletin boards
Chose your own schedule. 4 IS
hours weekly No selling, your pay
is based on the amount of material
distributed Our position lequires
the ability to work without super
vision For information, contact
Jeanne Swenson. $00 Third Ave
W Seattle, Washington 9SI19.
(206) 282 81II
. fk SAAD'S
SS SHOE
Km repair
.7 113 Grande Ave
&�kh 758m8
$ j Quality
Repair
Tuesday Is
Family Night
From 4 P.M. To 9 P.M
$
2.49
Reg.
2.99
WELCOME BACK,
STUDENTS
EVERY TUESDAY
IS COLLEGE NIGHT
with VALID I.D.
$1.00
104E.REDBANK5RD.
756-6000
Includes our No. 2 Ribeye Steak, Baked Potato
and Dinner Roll.
JACKS
500 W. Greenville Blvd
Greenville. N.C
Added Feature
Drawing
Each Week For FREE Dinners
Registertor FREE ECU Tickets!
No purciUM iwcnur; roo do not n��� to b� present to �nn
wiimmiii mim
JM 1
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
Located at 218 Arlington Blvd.
Two Stores To Serve You
Welcome to Greenville
H L HODGES
COMPANY
LOCATED AT 210 EAST FIFTH STREET
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
207o OFF ON SHOE PURCHASE
Coupon Good Onto Sept 15. Must fjggj With BCD P Call A
K-Swlss
SHERRY TOP SIDS&
Lw.
Fraternity and Sorority
Jerseys


Just Arrived.
ECU Sweatshirts
& Jackets
HODGESBOND'S SHOE CLUB
E. 51ft St. � 218 Arlington Blvd.





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 8, 1981
f
?
Soccer Team
Will Begin
Season Today
East Carolina soccer
coach Brad Smith feels
his team is prepared for
its 1981 season opener
today (Tuesday)
against Atlantic Chris-
tian College, a team the
Pirates have never
beaten in the regular
season.
"We're better
prepared and more
skilled than we've ever
been Smith said. "I
feel we're certainly able
to beat them if we play
to our potential
Smith warned,
though, that ACC
should be the same
strong team that the
Bucs have had trouble
with in the past.
"They won the
Governor's Cup last
spring in the club
league he said.
"They have two or
three kids that are truly
outstanding
Still, Smith says he
has a good feeling
about the season
opener, scheduled for 4
p.m. today on the
Minges soccer field.
"We'd always like to
have more time to get
ready he said. "But
we've got a good at-
titude. Everybody is
getting itchy to start.
That's always a good
sign
The Pirates will be
looking to a number of
seasoned veterans to
lead a strong con-
tingent of young, but
talented newcomers.
Offensively, Brad
Winchell returns after
leading the team in
scoring two of the past
three seasons. Before
the season ends he
should be the team's
all-time leading scorer
and assist man.
W i n c h e 11' s twin
brother, Brian, will
start on offense as well,
making for some exciti-
ment, Smith says.
"Brian will be up
front with Brad
Smith said. "They do a
lot of special things
together. They must
have some kind of
special instinct for what
the other is doing
Defensively veterans
Dennis Elweil, Dwayne
Degaetano and Steve
Brody are looked to for
early leadership.
"We've got to get
leadership from those
guys Smith proclaim-
ed. "They need to show
the way until we jell
Smith announced
Monday that a trio of
newcomers are will be
starting this afternoon.
One freshman, Mark
Hardy of Basking
Ridge, N.J will get a
starting call. Tom
Lawrence, a junior col-
lege transfer from
Montgomery JC in
Maryland, and Bill
Merwin, a transfer
from New England
College in New Hamp-
shire, also will begin
the game for the
Pirates.
1981 ECU
SOCCER SCHEDULE
(Home Games In Caps)
Sept. 8 � ATLANTIC
CHRISTIAN. 12 -
GEORGE MASON, 17 -
ELON COLLEGE. 20 �
COKER COLLEGE, 23 -
at Campbell. 26 � at
Guilford College, 30 � N.C.
STATE.
Oct. 4 � at Catawba, 7 �
UNC-G. 11 � at William
and Mary, 14 � at Pem-
broke State, 17 � at Rich-
mond. 18 � at Va.
Wesleyan. 21 � at UNC-W,
28 � OLD DOMINION, 31
� at Christopher Newport
Nov. 4 � at N.C. Wesleyan.
Support the
March of Dimes
mmmmwmu dchcts foundation �����
r
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J COMPLEMENTARY
j COPY
Many New Items with Extra
Savings Now Available
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville, N.C.
752-1600 27834
102 Main St.
Belhaven, N.C,
943-2121 27810
JUST
ARRIVED
J.D.
DAWSON
CO.
1982 GIFT
CATALOG
IZOD LACOSTE SHIRTS
M9.50
1 �u
ECU Goalie Steve Brown In Pre-Season Action
REG. $25 � NOW
"IF YOU ARE BUYING TWO OR MORE SHIRTS A
QUANTITY DISCOUNT IS AVAILABLE! WE HAVE
AN EXCELLENT SELECTION OF SKI APPAREL AND
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Gordon Fulp
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756-0504 OPEN 7 DAYS
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FALL SEMESTER
MEN'S ND WOMEN'S INTRAMURAL PROGRAMS
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Clark-Branch Realty
Realty World
Factory Direct Furniture
Coca-Cola of Greenville
The Crow's Nest
King Sandwich
Happy Store
Tree House
Etna No. 1
Kash & Karry No. 8
Pantana Bobs
U.B.E.
Mr. C. J. Pharo
Apple Records
Stereo Village
Bissette's of Greenville
Edgewater Motors
Home Builders Supply
Southern Pride Car Wash
Overton's Supermarket
Cliff's Seafood
Morgan Printers
Pipe Dreams
Dominoes Pizza
Taco Cid
Rafters
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 8, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 08, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.145
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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