The East Carolinian, September 3, 1981






She �aHt (Earnltntan
at. �
.
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 4
Thursday,September 3, 1981 Greenville, North Carolina
12 Page
First ECU Kidney Transplant Successful
B GEORGETTE F. HEDRICK
Kl MrdKalWfiler
Stuart Jackson looks like any nor-
mal, healthy 16-year-old boy, but
there's something special about this
WinterviUe native whose hobbies in-
clude skateboarding and riding
motorcycles.
In May Stuart received the first
kidney transplant performed in
Eastern North Carolina by surgeons
and a team of health professionals
at the East Carolina University
School of Medicine and Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
Stuart's 30-year-old brother. Ken-
neth, is also a special person. Ken-
neth provided the kidney that gave
the youngest member of his family a
chance to continue with a normal
life
"1 feel like 1 can do a million
things I couldn't do before said
Stuart during an interview at home.
"The only problem is that the doc-
tors sa I have to take it easy for a
while and protect this new kidney.
And that means no skateboarding
It also means watching his diet
and taking medication to make sure
that his body's immune system does
not reject the left kidnev his brother
gave him during a three-hour
operative procedure at Pitt
Memorial.
Since transplanting Stuart's
kidnev. the ECU renal transplanta-
tion team has successfully perform-
ed two more kidney grafts. Ten
ECU, UNC
Share The
Housing Blues
B MIKK HUGHES
stall Wnlrt
Believe it or not. East Carolina
I niversity and the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill do
share at least one thing in common.
Aside from the eternal increases
in fees, tuition and other expenses,
the two schools face a recurrent
ising shortage. Each year, hun-
ls of si dents are forced to look
tor off-campus housing or are put
on campus residence waiting lists.
Still, though the problems are
similar, the extent varies much bet-
ween the schools. ECU, with over
13,(XX) students, has residence halls
which accomodate 5,166 students,
leaving many non-commuting
students with only off-campus hous-
ing opportunities.
At UNC over 13,000 students live
off campus, many by choice, many
not by choice, and the off-campus
situation is considerably worse in
Chapel Hill than in Greenville.
Apartments are ostensibly always
full, and waiting lists seem miles
long.
These housing shortages are the
result of several factors, most
notably the steady increases in
enrollment and subsequent campus
housing demand and the fact that
current state legislation requires that
university housing be self-
supporting. Thus, state funds can-
not be used toward dormitory con-
struction.
With the rising costs of construc-
tion, materials and maintenance,
new residence halls may be out of
the question at present. However,
both schools are currently discuss-
ing alternate plans to combat the
problems.
During the spring semester 1981
at ECU, administrative officials an-
nounced tentative proposals for
converting Fletcher and Jones halls
to co-ed status. Belk and Jarvis halls
were converted as of the beginning
of this school year. Granted, these
conversions will not create more
housing, but they will provide
See HOUSING Page 5
On The Inside
Announcements2
Opinions4
Features6
Sports9
other patients with kidney failure
are being evaluated and prepared
for transplantation within the next
few months.
Last October Stuart Jackson was
enjoying his freshman year at D. H.
Coniey High School when he
became sick.
"He started complaining about
nausea said his mother, Eloise
Jackson. "I'd pick him up at school
and bring him home, and an hour
later he'd feel fine. I thought he was
bluffing
But a few weeks later when Ms.
Jackson went in to wake the
youngest of her five sons for school,
she discove ed that Stuart had been
vomiting throughout the night and
was having seizures.
A team of physicians at Pitt
Memorial suspected renal failure,
and Dr. Alfred Ferguson, Stuart's
neprologist, made the diagnosis:
mesangioproliferative
glomerulonephritis. a disease which
caused Stuart's antibodies to attack
the tissues of his own kidneys.
In January Stuart went on dialysis
to remove toxic waste from his
blood, and physicians began
discussing the possibility of a
transplant.
Tissue matching, drug therapy
and immunologieal monitoring
determine a patient's chances of
successfully accepting a new kidnev.
Surgeons say grafts from living
related donors have fewer complica-
tions and a higher rate of acceptance
than those transplanted from
cadavers.
After testing Stuart's four
brothers to see which one had the
closest match of a kidney, doctors
picked Kenneth.
From that time on the Jackson
family was in almost daily contact
with Ferguson, medical coordinator
Sandra Bullock, surgical coor-
dinator Dennis Blessing, transplant
surgeon Frank Thomas and a long
list of medical specialists, techni-
cians and nurses.
"We had a whole new family
said Ms. Jackson. "Everyone was
wonderful, especially all the nurses.
They made us so at home we could
almost forget we had an illness
Stuart and Kenneth agree with
their mother's comments about the
physicians and staff. Stuart stayed
in the hospital three weeks and spent
two weeks in Pitt Memorial's am-
bulatory unit at the Greenville Holi-
day Inn.
After a seven-day hospital stay,
Kenneth recuperated at home for a
few weeks before returning to his
job at the Pitt County school bus
garage where he says everyone has
been "really thoughtful and con-
siderate about the surgery
Although doctors call the kidney
donor the real hero in transplanta-
tion, Kenneth declines any special
attention. "Stuart is the hero he
says. "All 1 had was an operation
that hurt a few days. It wasn't such
a big deal
Stuart continues to see Ferguson
for follow-up once a week and visits
his office for laboratory work three
times a week. Careful analysis of
certain cells in Stuart's blood
enables the transplant team to ad-
just the drug dosages that help his
body accept the new kidnev.
In the fall Stuart looks forward to
returning to school and enrolling in
driver education to get the license he
missed receiving because of his il-
lness
Other members of the ECU
transplantation team are Dr. Wayne
Kendrick, Thomas E. Burkart and
W. Joseph Newman, clinical pro-
fessors of medicine who serve as
nephrology consultants with
Ferguson and ECl physician
Richard Merrill. Drs Emmett J.
Walsh Jr J. Richard Gavigan and
Edward (). Janosko, clinical pro-
fessors of surgery, share responsibli-
ty for the removal of kidneys from
donors.
Dr. Robert Hanrahan, assistant
professor of pathology, performs
donor testing and tissue matching,
and Dr. Judith Thomas, associate
professor surgery, directs im-
munologieal monitoring. Dr. Irvin
Blose is psychiatric consultant.
ECU surgeons Walter J. Pones,
Charles Rob and Edward G.
Flichinger and nurse practitioner
Diane Meelheirn also participate in
the transplant program.

Canned
a student enjoys herself at ednesday's celebration on the
mall, tor story and more photos, see page 6.
Don't Move Out Yet!
Clause Saves Students
Coeds seek escape from overcrowded dorms.
By DEBORAH HOI 'A I INC
Mat! W nit-r
In an interview with The last
Carolinian, Greenville's director of
city planning explained the city's
new zoning laws which were discuss-
ed at a city council meeting in
August.
According to Bobby Roberson,
main ECU students were under the
impression that the new zoning laws
would force people living in room-
ing houses with more than four oc-
cupants to move out. This is not
correct, he said.
"People really don't understand
what's going on. We don't really
have a good touch with the people
that are affected by these
rulesStudents will not have to
move out of a house they are now
living in, the house is protected by
the Grandfather Clause. Even if the
owner sells the house, that property
is still covered by the Grandfather
Clause
Sally Brett, an ECU English pro-
fessor, was present at that city coun-
cil meeting and is a member of a
neighborhood association.
"I'm sorry the students got the
wrong ideaNo one is trying to
evict them. It's not retroactive.
Those already living in the houses
are not going to be affected by
this
So why all of the confusion9
Marvin Braxton. SGA vice presi-
dent was also present at the meeting
and explained, "The only problem
was the timing. Students were not
hereIt was a public hearing, and
the students were not here to present
their views. And the timing was
suspectIt was brought up at city-
council alter second session summer
school ended and before fall
semester started. I was the only stu-
dent present to defend our side
Roberson claims that some of the
concerns from the neighborhood
association dealt with the abuse of
some of the neighborhoods. 'We
had a lot of complaints about
noiseSomeone even had a tape
recording of a beer blast going on
down the street from them. This
zoning would limit that kind of ac-
tivity. And Greenville has probably
the most liberal enforcement
(police) of any city 1'vebeenin. The
compromise on the situation was a
maximum number of four unrelated
people per house in an R-6 zoning
class
The definition of an "R-6" class
is a minimum number of 6,000
square feet per lot. There must be a
certain number of feet in the right of
way in the rear and front yard (25 ft.
from front of right of way line set
back off from street and 15 feet in
the back yard). There must also be
a minimum of two parking spaces of
off-street parking per family. In a
rooming house situation, there must
be a space provided for eachboarder
in off-stret parking.
"These limitations will affect the
whole city, not just certain
neighborhoods Roberson explain-
ed of this new "family zoning"
See ZONING,Page 5
Senators' Visits Spark Student Protests
Tobacco Supports, Welfare Cuts Disputed
By TOM HAI.I.
Newt Milor
When Sen. Jesse Helms arrived in
Greenville Tuesday morning, he was
met by a loud and enthusiastic
crowd- and a small group of pro-
testers.
Helms was 45 minutes late for his
scheduled speech at the Raynor-
Forbes and Clark tobacco
warehouse on U.S. 264.
The senator's vehicle entered a
different driveway than the one
where five or six people were carry-
ing signs showing their disapproval
of his efforts to cut social program
funds.
"I did not go to Washington to
preside over the demise of the tobac-
co program Helms told a gather-
ing of area farmers from the back of
a pickup truck. "It is going to be
preserved as is
The protesters did not come in-
side the building and by the time
Helm's speech was over 15 minutes
later, the group has disappeared.
The senator praised former ECU
professor Sen. John East for his
"magnificent task" of explaining
the tobacco support program to
other senators, and said "no
reasonable senator" had opposed
the program once he and East had
"gotten the point across
The noisy crowd was hushed only
twice during the speech once when
a reporter asked Helms about
welfare cuts and once when
employees of the busy warehouse in-
advertently caused a sound similar
to exploding firecrackers.
"The people who are too busy to
get off their duffs" should not get
food stamps, Helms said while clen-
ching his fist. He was answered with
cheers of approval.
The senator also said The News
and Observer favored the quotes of
senators who opposed his programs
over his allies in the Senate.
Sen. Jesse Helms denounced welfare
recipients who won't "get off their
duffs
By TOM HALL
Nt� Kdilor
A group of ECU students and
campus ministers publicly protested
the actions of Senators Jesse Helms
and John East at the officials' re-
cent public appearances in Green-
ville.
Students Patrick O'Neill. Theresa
Dulski and Glenn Maughan carried
signs with Sister Helen Shondell and
Bob Clyde at a local tobacco
warehouse Tuesdsay. O'Neill,
Dulski and several other ECU
students attended East's conference
Wednesday at the Ramada Inn.
Sister Shondell is the Newman
Society campus minister. Clyde is
the Baptis. minister on campus.
O'Neill called proposed cuts from
welfare funds "budget transfers" to
other spending programs such as
those for national defense. Figures
show that "only 12 percent" of
welfare funds are going to able-
bodied people, he added.
"We have a situation here where
welfare cheating gets a big blowup
in the press O'Neill said. People
aren't getting angry at tax ripoffs at
a higher level
East saw the protestors after the
conference and shook their hands,
O'Neill said. However, the senator
didn't have time to talk to them, the
student added.
"East is opposed to abortion, but
he goes against the grain in other
issues Dulski said. "As a
humanitarian it doesn't make
sense
Signs carried outside the
warehouse where Helms spoke read,
�HUMAN NEEDS: EDUCA-
TION, CHILD NUTRITION,
FOOD STAMPS - CUT" and "IF
WE CAN SUPPORT TOBACCO,
WE CAN SUPPORT HUMAN
NEEDS
"Political leaders have unlimited
access to the press " O'Neill said.
"For a group of students to get
coverage, we have to hold up
See STUDENTS,Page 3





t
?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 3.1981
Announcements
�MAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test (CMAT) will be of
fered at East Carlina University
on Saturday. October 24, '9�i Ap
plication blank; are to be com
pieted and mailed to GMAT,
Educational Testing Service, Box
966 R, Princeton. NJ 0540 Ap
plications must be postmarked no
later than September 21, 19tl. Ap
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center.
Room 105, Speight Building
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina
lion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
October 17. mi. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service. Box 966-R. Princeton. NJ
01540 Applications must be
postmarked no later than
September 17, I9ti. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center. Room 1 OS. Speight
Building
BINGO
Get ready for bingo and ice
cream on Tuesday, Sept. e at 7
p.m. in the MendenhaM multi
purpose room. Prizes will be given
to bingo winners and ice cream
will be given to all atMendenhali's
Monthly BingoIce Cream Party.
It's free to everyone so come loin
the fun � you just can't losel
TWIG
The Bible is more than just
another "nice" philosophy; it is
the key to power for abundant liv-
ing. Without being born again, and
without understanding what God
has done for you. you will not be
totally free in your heart and mind
to live the best life We teach the
Bible, which sets forth the prin
ciples for the best life. Monday,
Rm 242, MendenhaM Student
Center, 7 Sept 1981
CARTOONS
Want to see Uncle Sam get a pie
in the face? Stop by MendenhaM
Student Center, from Sept. 6
through the 13th, to see the exhibit
of editorial cartoons by John
Weyler. Displayed in the lower
gallery (1st floor), the cartoons
appeared in the East Carolinian
from January lv�o to the present.
Subject matter includes campus
crapola. international idiocy and
predatory Presidents.
MATH PRETEST
For all new students who took
the Math Pre Test on Mon. Aug 24
and have not picked up their
cards, please come by Whichard
210 and do so.
PRESBYTERIANS
Presbyterians meet on
Tuesdays at 5.30 p.m. for program
at 306 East Ninth Street and go out
for dinner We meet on Thursdays
for lunch at noon in the
MendenhaM snack bar at the round
tables. Our campus minister can
be contacted by phone at 752 7240
LANGUAGE
PLACEMENT
University students arc remind
ed that, in accordance with
University regulations, before
they enroll for the first time in a
foreign language that they studied
in high school, they must take a
placement, examination in that
language.
The only date on which foreign
language placement tests may be
taken before Preregistration and
Registration for Spring. 1982. is
Thursday. October l Tests will be
given at 3 30 p.m as follows
GMAT
The Graduate Management Ad
mission Test (GMAT) will be of
fered at East Carlina University
on Saturday, October 24, ifsi. Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pieted and mailed to GMAT.
Educational Testing Service. Box
966- R. Princeton, NJ 00540. Ap
plications must be postmarked no
later than September 21, 1901. Ap
plications may be obtained from
the ECU Testing Center,
Room 105, Speight Building.
GRE
The Graduate Record Examina
tion will be offered at East
Carolina University on Saturday,
October 17, 1981. Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to Educational Testing
Service, Box 966-R, Princeton. NJ
08540 Applications must be
postmarked no later than
September 17, 1981. Applications
may be obtained from the ECU
Testing Center, Room 105, Speight
Building.
PRESBYTERIANS
Presbyterians meet on
Tuesdays at S:30 p.m. for program
�r 306 East North Street and go out
for lunch at oon in the MendenhaM
Snack Bar at the round tables
Our campus minister can be con
tected by phone 7S2-7240.
PSICHI
Psi Chi, the national honor socie-
ty for psychology, will hold Its first
meeting for fall semester on Tues
day. Sept I at 7:15 pm In Speight
I at. All members and interested
others ere urged to attend
INTERNSHIP
PROGRAMS
The Newspaper Fund will offer
college juniors and minority
graduate students and seniors pre
arranged paid summer intern
ships, a pre internship training
program, and scholarships for the
1981 83 school year.
The two programs offered for
1902 ere the Editing internship
Program (for juniors) and the
Minority internship Program (for
seniors and graduate students).
The applications for these pro-
grams can be obtained by writing
the Fund at P.O. Box 300,
Princeton, NJ 00540.
The deadline for applications is
Thanksgiving Day. and all
students will be selected before
the end of January, Itta.
The internships are on maior
American dailies and wire ser-
vices, and ere paid positions. The
Editing Internship Program car
ries a J700 scholarship for each
recipient, and the Minority Intern
ship Program involves a 81.000
grant. The pre-internship training
program is paid for under a
Newspaper Fund grant.
LANGUAGEROOM
FrenchBC301
GermanBC302
LatinBC303
SpanishBC306
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Want to put a little excitement
into your life? Play women's
rugby! The first semester meeting
is Wednesday. September 9, in
Memorial Gym, room 102 at 4:00.
No experience is necessary! if you
cannot attend but would like to
participate, call Kim at 752 6388 or
Trecey at 752 8638
Students intending to take a
language placement test on Oc
tober 1 must register for it in the
Foreign Language departmental
office. Brewsler A431. on or before
Wednesday, September 30.
Language placement tests will
not be given on registration day or
during the drop add period during
Spring semester 1982.
Students not properly enrolled in
a foreign language course will
have to withdraw from the course
�����!� ii i iiiiii immnwimmmiiiiimniiiiimiiiiii
CASH PAID FOR ?
DIAMONDS AND GOLD
FLOYD G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
407 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
MIKE ROBINSON
VALERIE HARRIS
BUSINESS (919)758-2452
INDEPENDENT
JEWELERS
jiiHKHHiiiiaaniuiiifluiuiiiuiii
GAMMA
BETA
PHI
6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall 221
Sept. 3
We will be looking for
all members
to be there.
Tar Landing Seafood;
Restaurant

Shrimp Cocktail
Appetizers
2.96 Ckm Chowder
Seafood
t

Bob Hearing � Manager
Phone 758 0327
t
.96
6.96
Seeiood PUttex
Hit, Shrimp, Ojntert. SctUept, OrrU Cnb
Lejge Cosabijutioa 6.26
(MM aa � i Sesfoedj TUi. Shrimp, Oyiun. Sctikps. SsvU Cnb)
Sauil Combination 6.26
CaslM at Its 3 Saitodi (Tlae, Shrimp, Ojreten. Scallops. Derii Cnb)
10 DOVIXJI BAJOOS 01 WXKIATI0I3
Flounder
Trout
Shrimp
OytUrt
DtrilCnb
Scallops
Boiled Shrimp
Xaitai Bitter. Crackers, luce
Att mvnu iuvid wn
SmallLara
4.26646
3.964.96
4266.26
4.256.26
3.504.26
4.766.76
Om Sin 6.76
Beverages
Pepel, 2ft D�w. Sprite. Diet ftp
lc�4 Tea
Coffee
Hot Tea
MUk
Dessert
Lemon Pie
Apple Re Hot
.40
JO
X
JO
.40
.70
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react run. ecu suw an wmsrvma
Broiled flounder6.5C
Broiled Trout6.60
Broiled Shrimp Broiled Scallop Staffed Flounder6.76 5.50 6.60
RiblyeSteek Chopped Sirlcds 3SAVID WIIH nuorcs raas 0 ussd pot arc an cout suw6.96 4.76
Children (unotarU) Fiah Plate your choice) Hamburger Plate with fmch Fries246 1J6
fmicji nus, con staw aid iuiafuwob
Free Fish Plu for Children 6 end under
With Battler Ouar, 9w Ckak ef nek
� an. rrne cw jure au avaaanu
roaraiaVooTouni�
"Be sure to come by
before or after
the game
CO-OP
A representative from the Na
tional institutes ot Health Normal
Volunteer Program in Bethesda,
MO will be on campus Sept. 2e and
29 to interview students lor Spring
19S2 placement Anyone interested
in any aspect of the health care
field or in research would find this
experience valuable. For more in
formation contact the Coop Of
flee. 313 Rawl or telephone
757 479. 6375 today!
MATH PRETEST
For all new students who took
the Math Pre-Test on Monday
August 245 and have not picked up
their cards, please come by
Whichard 210 and do so.
ARTIST
Attention alt senior communica
tion arts majors! Opportunity of a
lifetime. Apply now for the Stu
dent Union artist position and get
work experience with pay while
still in school. Active in all phases
of production: Designing, submit
ting roughs for approval, prepar
ing mechanicals, setting type,
coordinating projects with com
merical printers. Responsibilities
include designing, calendar,
brochures, newspaper ads ard
posters. Pick up application and
ob description at Student union,
room 234, Mendenhall Student
Center by Monday. Sept 14.
BIOLOGY
The ECU Biology Club is pleas
ed to announce its office hours
The office will be open Monday
through Friday from 10 until 2 and
is in the lobby of the Biology
building, room 102. Please come
by if we can help you
NCSL
The first meeting for the N.C.
Student Legislature will be Tues
day September 8, at Mendenhall
Room 212 at 7 p.m. All returning
members please attend. Any ques
tions. call Gary Williams at
752 2093.
ART
The Community Arts Manage
ment Majors will meet Sept. 8.
1� in Mendenhall room 221 from
4:09 to 500 p.m Please make
plans to attend.
METHODIST
Yo�i are invited to our open
house reception at the Methodist
Student Center at 501 East Fifth
Street (across from Garrett
Dorm) Entertainment and
refreshments will be provided
Please stop by for a good time and
a chance to meet some campus
friends.
Ear0limatt
j2He iEaat (Earnlfman
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Telephone (
RATE: $20 per year.
ATTIC
South
Rock Nightclub
THURS
BADGE
FRI.
EAZE


SAT.
EAZE
SUN.
EAZE
LADIES'
LOCK OUT
11�� ANNIVERSARY PARTY
wCHOICE
TUE. SEPT. 8 ALL NIGHT LONG
50C ADMISSION 50C BEVERAGE
TH
11� ANNIVERSARY
CONCERT1
NANTCJCKET & CHOICE
WED. SEPT. 9 8
HASTINGS FORD
TUNE-UPS -
4 cylinder �
6 cylinder �
8 cylinder �
19.40
23.60
27.85
includes labor, plugs, and all necessary adjustments
for electrical ignition engines only.
Oil Change & Filter Special - 11.05
includes 5 qts. of oil and filter.
Prices are for Ford vehicles � other makes prices may vary.
24 hr. towing service
excluding illegally
parked cars.
Day - 758-0114
Night - 753-1541
Corner of 10th & 264 Hwy.
J
KAPPA ALPHA ORDER
GAMMA RHO
500 EAST Uth
P.O. BOX 2515
CHAPTER
STREET
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GREENVILLE, N.C. 278.M
To All Incoming Freshmen and Transfersi
After arriving at East Carolina this fall, you have no doubt
begun to notice the many fraternities on campus. They"will place
posters, banners, and signs throughout all of the dorms and
buildings on campus inviting you to visit their house and consider
pledging their fraternity. Some fraternities will send a couple
of guys over to your dorm room, trying to form a friendship with
you, so you will want to pledge their fraternity before even see-
ing the others.
This practice is as old as the fraternity system itself and
is an ideal way for a hard working fraternity to expand it's num-
bers. The only problem with this system is that, East Carolina,
like many big schools, has a big fraternity system. And each fra-
ternityin their eagerness to get you to pledge at their house,
is going to treat you like a king for a few days so you won't even
want to visit the other fraternities.
The result is that guys end up joining a fraternity without
going around to check on all the others. The bottom line on the
whole thing is that all fraternities seem great compared to the
type of life most people had in high school. The parties, the good
looking girls, and fast talking fraternity guys can't help but
impress you(but only because you may not be used to it). If you're
gonna join a fraternity, you need to look a lot closer than just
the parties and girls.
Try to talk to or look at all the guys in the fraternity. Are
they the kind of people you want to spend your college yearswith?
'Vould you carry them home to meet your parents, without any hesi-
tation? Look at the accomplishments of the fraternity. Are they
successful in athletics? And last but not least, what does their
house look like? Vould you be ashamed to take your parents there?
Is it close to campus?
All of these things and more are very important if you are
interested in pledging a fraternity at ECU this fall. But the most
important is for you not to be fooled into joining a fraternity
because two or three guys out of a whole group treat you pretty
good for a few days. You need to be able to say that you'd treat
any and all as you would your own brother or best friend.
The Brothers of
Kappa Alpha Order
East Carolina University
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I HF EAST CAROL IMAN
SLPTERBER3, 1981
Two-Month-Old Lost Over Niagara Falls
Photo by GABY PATTERSON
ECU students enjoy watermelon at Wednesday's Affair on the Mall.
MSC Offers Crafts
(UPl) � Friends say
Dunia Sayegh loved her
third child so much she
never she never put the
boy down. Now she is
charged with murder-
ing 2 month old
Hesham by dropping
him into the churning
waters of Niagara
Falls.
Mrs. Sayegh was ar-
rested Tuesdasy three
days after Niagara
Regional Police say the
27 year old woman, hr
husband Rafik, the
baby and the Toronto
couple's two other
children visited the
Canadian side of the
falls.
While Sayegh went
to buy film the rest of
the family stood along
a railing 12 feet
upstream from where
the Niagara River roars
over the falls and
plunges 162 feet into
space.
Police said the baby
suddenly tumbled over
the railing into the
river. As dozens of
tourists screamed
helplessly the child was
swept over the falls and
vanished into the swirl-
ing whirlpool below.
The body has not
been recovered and
police said it might
never be found because
of the rocks and power -
ful undercurrents
beneath the falls.
Police said at the
time Mrs. Sayegh ap-
parently had suffered a
dizzy spell and dropped
the infant. Following
the incident Mrs.
Sayegh became
hysterical and was
taken to a nearby
hospital to be sedasted.
But Tuesday two
detectives arrived at the
Sayeths' north Toronto
home, arrested Mrs.
Sayegh and took her
back to Niagara Falls
where she was charged
with second degree
murder. She could oe
sentenced to life im-
prisonment if con-
victed.
neighbors said Mrs.
Sayegh and her hus-
band had wanted a
third child and were
delighted when the boy
was born.
"She had waited
Relatives
long for him
friend of the
who declined
identified.
so
said a
family
to be
"She
and wouldn't even go to a
movie and leave him
alone. She always held
him and never put him
down
Hesham was born
with a mild respiratory
defect and Mrs. Sayegh
was so concerned about
his condition "the doc-
tor gave her pills to
relax her the friend
said.
Students Protest
Continued From
Page One
placards
O'Neill complained
that the memory of
Vietnam is forgotten in
the campus communi-
ty. "If you argue about
the military buildup,
you're labeled a com-
munist, a pinko o: anti-
American He also ex-
pressed concern over "
blind support" at the
university for the
Reagan administration.
Crafts workshops are
now available at the
Crafts Center in
Mendenhall. Pottery,
darkroom techniques.
floor loom weaving,
photograph).
Christmas patchwork,
handbuilt Christmas
ceramics, beginning
jewelrv. silk screening,
and woodworking are
the workshops which
are available.
All ECl students.
student dependents, as
well as faculty, staff
and their dependents
who are MSC
members, are eligible to
participate. Everyone
must register for the
workshops at the
Crafts Center no later
than the Saturday prior
to the first meeting of a
workshop. Workshop
schedules are available
at the Crafts Center
and the MSC Informa-
tion Center. The first
workshop begins Mon-
dav. September 14,
1981.
Crafts Center hours
are 3:00 p.m. until
10:00 p.m Monday-
through Friday, and
12:00 noon until 5:00
p.m Saturday.
For further informa-
tion call the Crafts
Center or Tana Nobles
at 757-6611.
The East Carolinian
Vm�l the campus communn
unc I92f
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published tor and
by the students ot East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate S70 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Green tie. N.C.
The East Carolinian offices
are loca'ed in The Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N.C
Telephone: TO-am, 37. 6304
Application to mail at second
class postage rates is pending at
Greenville, NC
Classifieds
FOR SALE
For sate 6 6 Caster Twin Fin
turboard. make otter Also
Pioneer Kp 373 40 7i� J254
King Sue waterbed tor sale Com
plate SIM. Call 5a aaaJ
W6TSUITS pullover top ILl 1
lontjiohniL! S�0 apiece or SI00 lor
both Call Dirk at 757 6��7 or
75 �354
MOVING SALE King Sue bed
m th sheets blanket bedspreads
pillows headboard and nights
�ana S300 Small office desk and
chau. ideal for student New S9S
Modern aming room table and 4
chairs S�5 Black vinyl chair MO
Days 757 400 ask lor Anne After
S 752 7827
Small refrigerator Sanyo e�
ceHent condition used only one
tear Why rent when you can buy
74 Yamaha Rd 350 chrome and
custom tenders, helmet Racing
ferrmg. Bates gloves 45 mpg
SS0O 57 352
9 bv 10 caricatures by John
Weyier cartoonist tor The East
Carolinian and the Greenville
Times former Carowinds portrait
artist t!0 for b and w. SIS for col
or Call 7S2 S77S
WCU football game ticket lone)
Ask for Eddie 75772 752i71�
after 3 p m
FOR RENT
ROOMMATE needed to share 2
bedroom apt at Village Green
Pay half rent and utilities Call
752 '047
Two mobile homes for rent Both
are furnished, one is �0 X 12 the
other is 55 X 12. Located about 3
miles from ECU campus Phone
758 1976 alter 5 00
FEMALE roommate wanted to
share 2 bedroom l� bath partially
furnished townhouse located
beside Eastbrook You have to
share large master bedroom and
bring bedroom furniture Total
rent �2�5 plus utilities. Your share
one third of both (no deposit) Call
anytime 7S s�0� (no smokers
please)
FEMALE roommate wanted in
house on Charles St 1 block from
campus SlOO per month (utilities
included) Phone 7ST7010.
ROOM for rent immediately
Great location one block from
ECU and downtown. S7S. Call
752 259
FEMALE roommate needed to
share � expenses For more mfor
mation call 355 2153 (Greenville).
PERSONAL
"CLIP JOINT' has moved to 119
Garrett Call Marlena at 75 M32.
PART TIME work on campus,
stapling posters to bulletin boards
Chose your own schedule. 4 15
hours weekly No selling, your pay
is based on the amount of material
distributed Our position requires
the ability to work without super
vision. For information, contact
Jeanne Swenson. 500 Third Ave
W. Seattle, Washington 91119.
(704) 212 1111
FOUND a gold ring in Austin
Building Call Bender at 754 5771
of Cathat 752 9381.
FEMALE resident counselor
must take training and internship
payment in kind (free room,
utilities, phone and house
privileges) Excellant opportunity
for students in human services
Call 754 HELP
IfpiNG Sandwich
�ELICATESSEN
2729 E. 10th Street
t
THE BEST
SAND WICH SELECTION
IN TO WN!
WE CA TER TO
THE COLLEGE CROWD
(Colonial Heights
Shopping Center)
OPEN: MONSAT.
11 A.M8 P.M.
HOUSE SPECIALS:
Cheese Steak
King Club
Reuben
Cheese Hoagie
& many, many more
CALL AHEAD FOR TAKE-OUTS � 752-4297
I Bring this coupon in for
752-4297
i
FREE pitcher of your favorite
beverage with purchase of a
I meal.
al
m
Good thru September 10th
5P.M8P.M.
I
I
�!�:�:�:�:?:�:�:�
VSA
S3�
I
I
I
I
II
LLAR
OFF.
Buy one meal and
get $1.00 off the
second one.
With this coupon, when you buy
one meal at the regular price, you
can get a second meal of the same
value for a dollar less.
Must be used at time of purchase.
Does not include sandwiches,
unlimited salad bar, or specials.
Offer good through
August 31. 1981
JACKS!
LOCATED BEHIND
THK ELBO ROOM
RUSH
PHI KAPPA
TAU
CATCH
THE
bus
AND
PARTY
"Y
CALL
FOR A
RIDE
752-4379
jr-
I WANT YOU
mm
TO BE A
TUES. - 9:00-UNTIL - WE'RE HAVING A WILD WEST PARTY
WED. - 4:00-6:30 - Beat Carolina Pep Rally with ECU
Cheerleaders, ECU Pep Band, and Coach Ed Emory
9:00-UNTIL ROCK & ROLL PARTY WITH D.J.
THURS. - 9:00-UNTIL - SMOKER





�lie lEaat GJaroltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. td��incj
Chuck Foster, 0,� .4 Jimmy Dupree, �.��, fo,
Chris Lichok, a rn m Charles Chandler, �,� ��-
Alison Bartel, production Manager Tom Hall, NtsEior
Steve Moore, nuiwn vami�r Steve Bachner. -��,� Ed�o,
September 3, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Duke Library
Nixon Addition Debated
The purpose, the ultimate aim, of
any university is to provide its
students with the best education it
possibly can. Traditionally colleges
have achieved this through their
curriculum, their faculty and their
research facilities. Whenever possi-
ble, most universities also try to give
studens intimate, first-hand
knowledge of whatever subject they
are studying. What university would
pass up the opportunity to send an-
thropology students on an ar-
chaeological dig, or turn Henry
Kissinger away as a visiting pro-
fessor or forego the chance of hous-
ing a library with the papers of one
of the most important men of the
20th century? What university
would pass up any such unique op-
portunity?
Well, Duke University, for one,
might. Duke is now tottering on the
brink of turning down a chance for
a library on its campus housing
former President Richard Nixon's
papers. University President Terry
Sanford has discussed the possibili-
ty of the library with Nixon, and
both are in favor of building it on
the Durham campus where Nixon
attended law school in the '30s. San-
ford will put the matter to the
school's board of trustees this Fri-
day but already he has been faced
with a vocal, indignant opposition.
At a Monday meeting of the Duke
Academic Council about one-fourth
of the teachers on the 80-member
faculty senate voiced opposition to
the library. The reasons for oppos-
ing the library were rather obvious
and centered on a reluctance to con-
struct a "memorial" to Nixon.
"How could a university commit-
ted to the unfettered pursuit of
knowledge justify an edifice
dedicated to converting dishonor
and notoriety into celebrity being
built on its campus?" Richard Fox,
chairman of the anthropology
department, asked at the meeting.
But Mr. Fox and others who
agree with him are missing a fun-
damental point. That point is that
the purpose of such a library, even
if it included a museum with Nixon
memorabilia, would not and should
not be to memorialize Nixon. The
purpose of the library would be to
allow scholars, students and the
general public the chance to study
the papers of Richard Nixon, which
are an integral part of American
history.
The question here is not whether
or not Nixon was a good president
or a bad president or even if he
disgraced the office or not but
rather whether or not his papers can
serve as important public
documents. And the answer to that
question is an unequivocal yes.
Athletic Ticket System
Improves Over The Years
If you're wandering around with
the notion of attending Saturday
night's football game against
Western Carolina and getting in just
by showing you ID and activity card
at the student gate, think again.
With the procedure implemented
this season, students must pick up
tickets at the athletic ticket office in
Minges Coliseum or the central of-
fice at Mendenhall Student Center
before closing time today or wait
until Saturday. The Minges office
will be open until two hours prior to
game time.
Many students have voiced
dissenting opinions to this method,
but it is a vast improvement over
prior procedures. Humans of the
DOONESBURY
20th Century are naturally resistant
to change, so anything new is con-
noted as bad. Four years from now
students will wonder how there
could ever have been another way to
get in.
The new ticket method not only
provides reserved seating which
many student groups have attemp-
ted to impose in the past, but also a
more reasonable system for ac-
curately calculating total and paid
attendence at games.
And for those who always think
the grass is greener on the other
side, think of the faithful students
of Florida State and other institu-
tions who pay to see their favorite
team play.
by Garry Trudeau
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THE BrtST CAROLINIAN
Questions Still Remain About Pot
by Garry Trudeau
By SAFARI MATHENGE
Many years ago George Wheelock
Grover, a medical doctor of practical
mind, professed upon sampling mari-
juana, to see the dinner table "set with
golden plates. . . the waiters dressed in
velvet costumes. . . nd hundreds of canary
birds. . . singing in gilded cages
Today, you will be faced by students
who 'toke' a joint or inhale marijuana
fumes from a 'bong' to escape the
boredom they say is caused by school en-
vironment, or inan attempt to achieve a
'high'�abstract manner or of thinking ac-
companied by a sensational feeling, claim-
ed to alter perception � (Some-one I knew
claimed to have envisioned that his brains
were being cooked in a frying pan full of
boiling oil!
On the other hand, claims have been
voiced by supporters, that marijuana
sharpens there senses and that upon ex-
perimenting the weed, they become more
inquisitive, curious, but 'laid-back hence
displaying in their minds, a better outlook
on things!
But the question here is whether or not
marijuana really merits either the stigma
given it by opponents or the support of its
advocates?
It has been charged, not infrequently by
no means with unanimous aproval, that
the crug increases accident chances,
perpetuates violence, generates
degenerative behavior and causes addic-
tion to heavier drugs - Charges that led
congress to declare its mere possession a
criminal offense in the US in 1937.
But has official disapproval of this
substance caused any noticeable reduction
in its usage? Or has its restrictions glorified
its utility, thus becoming 'the thing to do'
just because it is rare and therefore
something one can relax and enjoy doing?
The Kiplinger Magazine, 'Changing
Times' reports that "Some 43,000,000
Americans confess to having smoked mari-
juna at least once, and current users exceed
16,000,000 the magazine continues to
emphasis that "one-fourth of all current
users are under the age of 17
Can we then view this weed called 'pot'
as an occas;onal recreational substance?
And that although illegal, marijuana is
widely available, usually at expensive but
affordable prices. Therefore can we then
comfortably label the act oi t-lawing mari-
juana an "ineffective anachronism"? Is it
not logical to deduce that this law only
benefits the smuggler who pays little
amounts of money, say in Mexico or some
other South American or African state for
a ton of marijuana, only to reap fortunes
for it as soon as it enters a sea port in the
U.S. waters?
Although I cannot even begin to guess
what the consequences upon which this
country would be thrown in case mari-
juana was legalized, 1 dare say that, that
trick may as well stand as much a chance
of reducing marijuana consumption as the
la v out-lawing it does. Maybe if it wasn't
illegal, just maybe, at least our youngsters
in junior high schools would see no adven-
ture in it and that way stay away from it.
Finally, I would like to pose only one
more question: Marijuana gained
popularity in the US among protest groups
in 1960's. Till this day it continues to be
the drug for young adults and the middle
aged, and research indicate that male users
substantially out number females - data
does not indicate a drop in consumption.
Are laws such as those governing
paraphenelia then going to discourage
Americans from using 'pot'?
Although 1 had intended only to pose a
little quiery about Cannabis Sativa. which
is the scientific name of the Indian hemp
plant, it is interesting to ponder about
plant itself and what it does.
It grows in many parts of the world, in-
cluding the U.S. Although it flourishes
better in hotter climates. Its leaves and
flowering tops can all be dried and crushed
into forms for smoking, drinking and
eating - It is customery of older people in
some Islamic communities to spice their
foods with some thinly ground 'Eanji' or
hashish powder to whet their appc;
The potency of a 'joint' or a 'bong-hit'
depends not only on where the plant is
grown, but also on the parts of it that are
being used and the amount present of the
main intoxicant - a chemical called delta-9-
tetrahydrocannabinol. or THC for shorr
Indeed marijuana is not 'he fctffy pro-
duct of the cannabis plant. The other is
hashish, a brown resin extracted rom the
peak of the plant. Moroccean hashish
packs five to ten times the hit of mari-
juana.
Of-course not everyone using marijuana
sees a table set with gold or envisions that
their brains were being fried. In-fact most
smokers that I have talked to, describe the
experience as pleasurable. Like alcohol,
weed loosens the tongue and, if the dose is
moderate, creates a feeling of well being
and as I mentioned eailier, some users in-
sist that it makes them more sensitive to
sound (especially music), colour and taste.
All these questions that I have ventured
to ask remain unanswered in m� mind. 1
had hoped that an answer would
miraculously pop-up in my mind as I
wrote. Nevertheless I considered hem, and
an idea although far-fetched and remote,
has germinated in my minds-eye
Ridiculous Complaints Misdirected
By DIANE ANDERSON
It's amazing how much time students
can find to complain about the most
ridiculous things. The increase in student
fees is one good example. It's not only
logical that inflation and increased costs
would effect the activity and housing fees
paid to the university. But students seem to
think that ECU is immune to rising costs.
The health fee is probably the most com-
plained about, especially by graduate, part
time and older students, who may be
covered by some other health plan by their
employers.
If they thought for a moment, they
might realize that no employee health plan
could cover, for the minimal cost of the
health fee, the services that the student
health center affords them. Everything
from aspirin to blood tests is available to
students. A free referral service to the doc-
tors in the area is also provided.
Sickness is unpredictable, therefore, it is
ridiculous for anyone to complain about
such an inexpensive service, especially
when the possibility of an emergency is
considered.
The housing fee is also subject to a great
deal of grumbling by students who live in
the dorms. Although on-campus housing is
provided at a much lower cost tham most
off-campus housing, students still gripe
when the prices go up to afford them such
things as a new, more efficient phone
system, better maintenance services, and
energy conservation programs, which, by
the way, are designed to save them money
in the long run.
The athletic and transit fees also are at-
tacked by students who feel that, since they
either do not use the bus service, or do not
go to football games, they should not be
required to pay for them. Maybe these in-
dividuals would prefer to do away with the
athletic fee, and then everyone would have
to pay regular price for tickets to athletic
events.
How could the administration possibly
determine who would and would not at-
tend the ball games, or use the transit
system, and exclude these fees from their
payments? Attendance at these functions
and use of the transit system are privileges
afforded by student fees, and it is up to
each individual to decide whether or not he
or she will take advantage of these
privileges.
If students want to make valid com-
plaints, why don't they gripe about the
crowded entrances to Brewster between
classes? That's a problem that nay have a
feasible solution.
It's understandable why no one has got-
ten outraged over this situation, however,
since wading through the crowds to get in-
to Brewster is a good time to socialize.
After all, arriving late to a class because
of the daily traffic jam certainly isn't as
earth-shattering a situation as having to
use beer money to pay for the ncrease in
student fees.
r Campus Forum
Future Student
Requests Letters
I'm in prison here at McCain, but will
be released in little over six months. I
was busted for possession of marijuana
with intent to sell. I ws born in Green-
ville and plan to attend ECU after my
release from prison. I'm going to have
credits transferred from another school.
Please put this letter in The East Caroli-
nian so that a fun-loving girl will see it
and write to me. The ratio here is
definitely uneven. ECU has some pretty
girls. They're in a class by themselves.
JOSEPH E. BEAMAN
P.O. Box 58
McCain, N.C. 28361
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner L ibrary.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs) Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
'
Student
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Ma
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 3. I9hl
Zoning Laws Would Exclude Students
Student enrollments are growing faster than university housing
Housing Problems
Continued from Page One
students who wish to lie on campus
with a greater variety of housing op
portunities.
At UNC. several plans hae been
proposed last spring, the UNC
Board o Trustees decided against
plans tor the construction of student
apartments, after initially showing
some interest in that proposal. But.
according to John Temple, UNC
vice chancellor for business and
finance, several plans for a new
housing complex are currently being
reviewed.
But with each new pian for expan-
Coin Print Clue
sion comes another fee increase, or
so it seems. The construction of the
proposed dormitory, which would
house some 500 students, could
mean an increase in UNC student
rent of up to $100 per year, accor-
ding Temple, and the average stu-
dent already pays $700 per year for
housing on campus.
Knowing the extent ot the hous
ing shortage at Chapel Hill is.
perhaps, little or no consolation for
the ECU students sleeping three to a
room, but it is often comforting to
know that one is not alone.
Continued from Page One
policy. "The definition
of family is three
unrelated or any
number that is related
by blood, marriage or
adoption. Now, if you
have a house and you
want to rent out two
rooms, you can rent
out two rooms to two
people. That's it
Roberson also
pointed out that enroll-
merf is up at East
Carolina University.
Housing has always
been a problem at ECU
and many students
count on living in a
large house near cam-
pus with several other
students in order to cut
down on rent.
However, in many
situations, the students
end up paying rent for
a home which has sub-
standard conditions.
Shroud Might Be
The Real Thing
CHICAGO (LPI)-
A misspelling on a rare
PontiuN Pilate coin
helped convince resear-
chers human imprints
on the Shroud of
Turin, believed to be
the burial cloth of Jesus
Christ, are genuine and
date back to the 1st
century.
Magnifications of
the rare coin believed
widely used around
Palestine until A.D. 70,
to coer the eyes of the
dead showed the same
misspelling found in
the shroud imprint, a
Loola University
theologian said Tues
day.
The Rev. Francis I
Fila.s said the matching
misspellings prove the
shroud originated
around the same time
and place Christ was
crucified durine
Pilate's reign.
The shroud believed
to be Christ's burial
cloth has been preserv-
ed since 1578 in the
.athedral of Turin. Ita
ly.
Photograhic plates
made in 1898 indicated
a human body of a
crucified man was im-
printed on the shroud.
The shroud's authen-
ticity, however, has
been a matter of con-
troversy because resear-
chers had been unable
to trace its history fur-
ther than the mid-14th
century.
Filas said his
discover) is the
strongest evidence yet
the shroud is authentic.
"Imprints of a
misspelled Pontius
Pilate coin now in ex-
istence are the same as
imprints of an apparent
come in
every size,
shape
and speed
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530 Cotanche Street Greenville
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coin on the right eye o
the crucified man's
figure on the Shroud of
Turin said Filas, a
professor of theology
at I oyola.
"This discovery pro-
ves the authenticity, the
place of origin, and the
approximate dating of
the Shroud of Turin
beyond reasonable
doubt
Initially it had been
believed the imprints
on the shroud had been
painted.
"Now the coin pro-
vides concrete " proof
the misspelling did exist
in the past as it exists
today Filas said.
"What makes the
discovery so definitive
is the fact a maverick
and extremely rare
misspelling from the
Greek words for
'Tiberius Caesar' oc
FOSDICK'S
1890 SEAFOOD
CLOSED ON
LABOR DAY
2311 S. Evans
756 2011
NOW OPEN MONDAYS
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
SHRIMP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Clam Chowder & Salad Bar
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FEATURING MANY REGULAR
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ZZ
r fsv??
HOURS
LUNCH �
SUN. FRI
11-2:30
DINNER �
SUN. THURS. 4:30-9
FRI. A SAT. 4:30-10
They have no choice
because they need a
place to live. "The
university has a com-
mitment to provide
housing for university
studentsIt's a two
way street. Our street
(for the city) is-we'H
enforce the regulatins.
We have thre inspectors
and 36,00 people to
serve. Rent goes up
when we put up a
substandard
noticeit's called be-
ing in the private
market Roberson ex-
plained.
"There is no protec-
tion from this practice
at this time Brett
said. "1 would like to
see a landlord-tenant
act to oversee the
kind of housing offered
and how tenants are
treated. Right now
some landlords are
allowed to charge high
rent for a house which
really isn't worth it.
There just isn't any
protection
"The housing stock
in Greenville can not
adequately house the
students coming
inand enrollment's
up The housing
market is high. We just
don't have it Rober-
son explained. "We're
between a rock and a
hard placeGNA
( G r e e n v i I e
Neighborhood Associa-
tion), landlords bring-
ing up houses to stan-
dard levels We're do-
ing the best we can
So what if the
students do have a
legitimalge complaint
concerning their hous-
ing situation? Such as
sub-standard housing
for the amount of rent
they are paying?
Roberson said, " If
they've got a health
problem, or a problem
with the lease, we can
go over there on re-
quest. We can handle it
two ways. Number
one, we'd rather work
through Dr. Meyer's
office and he can call it
in, or number two, they
can come directl
But if a sub-standard
notice goes up, I can
guarantee you, so will
the rent. That's just
the way it it
The bottom line is,
those students already
renting in a house
which contains more
than four unrelated
persons are protected
by the Grandfatgher
Clause; they will not
I hose homeonwers
who choose to rent out
rooms in the future,
however, or choose to
open a whole house to
boarders, will have to
follow the R-6 zoning
policy.
Would-be landlords
will now have to apply
for a special use permit
in order to secure boar-
ding house privileges.
They must go to the
board of adjustments
in order to apply.
curs on both the shroud
pattern and on the
coin. Up to now, the 'u
cai' could only be
theorized as a misspell-
i: g of a 'c' for a 'k in
'Tiberiou Kaisaros
The coin, Filas said,
also provided the
earliest and most ac-
curate dating of the
shroud.
"Pontius Pilate
issued coins of this type
no earlier than A.D. 29
and perhaps through
A.D. 32 at the latest
Filas said.
"It completely ex-
cludes the possibility of
any forgery of the
shroud imprints No
one can reasonably
deny this coin
originated in Palestine.
This confirms more
than ever the man of
the shroud was a
crucified lew
Inn
CORNER OF 4th AND GREENE ST.
Is Bringing Something New and Different to Greenville
It's Bills Famous Super Delicious
Hot Dog Chili Sauce
Jusl ic ou c�n i� Iktm
� In nut �� o dl
itwm (I � irn special
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di �mi Wr4ne�da; oaly
31
for
We will still have
our regular menu of
Fried Chicken,
Biscuits and Hamburgers.
OPEN MOW. THRU SAT. 7 A.M. TIL 5 P.M.
1 P.M. TIL 3 A.M. � 2 BLOCKS FROM THE ATTI
CALL IN ANDOROER A
BAG FULL TODAY � 752 3595
ECU
Inter-Fraternity Council
?(�
30 30
Student
Government Association
KEGS
KEGS
present
a
f3rW fflatJ; fflutoti
Saturday, Sept. 5
1:00-4:00
w
At the Bottom of Col lege Hill
Sponsored By:
Alpha Sigma Phi
Beta Theta Pi
Delta Sigma Phi
Kappa Alpha
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Phi Kappa Tau
Pi Kappa Phi
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Sigma Tau Gamma

Tau Kappa Epsilon
Everything is FREE with an E.C.U. Student
Activity Card and I.D. (Required)
$
r





i pri sun k �. imi
Features
0 Students Enjoy
Casual Affair
Mall Event Successful
Miller Beer lialltun
H kHK VrMM
W , won, man. we �on!
rtii- hum common words al the
Affaii on the Mall" thai w is held
rda i! is unknown how manx
pie parti ipated in the ev eni. bui
ose �ho wei e I tere the
� num �! "
1 h al I an, sponsored bx the
di part menl of I nit amui al and
K reational Services, R ' nee
1 ife, Mendi nhall Studententei.
the Students Rersidence Association
and the Student I 'num, broi
i vanetx �
and acti itu � w hit h included
frisl tsses, Dominoes Vw
i eating contests, Mello ello
hugging Contests, Millei Keg
stacking contests, Budweisei Keg
Rol mtests. Watermelon Seed
Spttl ng contest volleyball and
( age Ball Voll
Social events included Fam isy, �
i langu ij
� � �tbal! tickei M kev Sk
Band and a ' Ofl
sponsot 'd bx Mello ell
1 �. � k e I
Dew and N
led Hot Doj
1 ei ' : i nomin il
I , din pan
ihe - ha i ' � w mm i
event a
i 'IK
froi I
Bu; I

lhc M
a as on
traction
ministrai
i i Bi �
Did

Mever,

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a ai ds, 1 u
Na : S I'
�. �
i -

1 Pizza Fatingonti
V
Blackfoot's Medlock Has Musical History
� �; i Hi . tes a lync oI
gers, his favorite rock
? Free, now of Bad
le m
B il Bla kfoot and Medlocke have
He as horn, in Jackson
Fla wh
Hs
dtai



1
-
� 1

.
'�, � � n
I le Aroie " rrain, I rain"
" i ox t have" and
Shak t Rock ' Roller" and
Blackl n them, as
f the group's
v albums
M ' I � 1 listen to his
tnds rehearsing and
decided he wanted to
. . � rung some das
ner Jak son Spires
� known each other since the
I yeai and basis! dreg I
Walker, who hed down the street
et them a'r I i year
�.�� � met guitarist Charlie
tt aboul me thex finish-
v i kei Hargrett and Medlocke
i group in Jacksonville. The
ird playei let Spires was in a
� ich lost a guitarist. The
zed At first there
bu! one left, leaving the
�sent lineup of Blackfoot. In
September, they'll mark 12 vears.
Medlocke's grandmother bought
his first two guitars, m a suap
p He learned some tunings from
ither and "spent almost
a iking hour plaving those
H ills, "They took me when
Preslex came to lacksonville in
n the king was reallv the
Monkees w
be the A ;
� -
real

Al
Blackfoot
one of three acts appt , s ptembei I
me
�'� St v
a as
Hendrix's
nave it
Medi
king 1 hex goi � hio seats in the
baseball park, 25 yards oi less from
the si age. 1 can remember seeing
him pull up in a pink Cadillac with
his gup at. dressed in a pink suit.
white shoes and shin All the people
were going crax ovet this man like
ii was World Wa- Hi That's what I
w anted to do
" lerrx 1 ee I ewis and Pat B one
w ere in that show
"At
Budd; i1 il- I
When Buddx died, an era died. Elvis
went into sen ice All of a �
everxthine seen a hah
e w �'e sho ked, as kids
' I hen H atlemania stai ted n
�� 1 Mv favorite bands were the
Kink Beau Brummels andream
1 tlipped oui totallx foi v ream 1
knew hricC lapton's guitar playing
1
Medlcoek sax s Instt
her, 1
other work
"Iynyrd Skvnv
plaxed drums, u 1 sa I
vears i practiced and went w
them " The group cut an album.
i


m-trom his hca:
Student's Dialect Subject Of
Anthropologist's Lectures
M
IX
I
ap i
, � begin t
" t ;ii fl the wall
illy think ol ilect as
. raphical, bu' there ate
iltural dialects You'll find
impus dialect here similar to
I ikei U othei schools
pan oi aourse on the interac
language and ulture, Di
Mian earlier had his students
npile a list of almost s0 ex
ol .ampus dialed I h �
terms and definition � ai c
a par! of that list
�Airhead Someone with no comon
sense.
�All nightet Staving up all night to
study or w rite a paper.
�Bama A person behind in the
�Spate cadet: Absent-minded or
lacking in common sense
� Blow chow T hrow up
�Break bad: To act tough
�Brewski Beer or brew
�Catch mv drift. To understand
mf prol -it the University uhat 1 am saying,
a w Greensboro
an
.�� �
oi ' i .
Relat ind you

jargon, it's a
)� oleman, an
�Crash- do to bed
� Dip oi Dorl A 11pi 1. unat!
live r -n
� I )i uble-pai ked ih rwil
7jne A spa ex p. i n with no
mon ense
�Cool out I IX I .i I ��!��. � 'L
� )
� lammin So i1
�Eat someone's face To kis
� Ciiubbing in publ Kis ang
publi c
�HDK "Heavy, deep and i
heart to heart talk
�Invest in someone To tak nm to
reallv get to know someone
�Juicer: A person who drinks i
great deal of beer.
� Mainstay: A problem, as in
" bar's youi mainstax?"
�Off the vsaU A weird pers n;
something thai doesn't make seris(
�PDA Public display of affection
�I'aitv Hearty: Exclamation mean
ing to have a wondcttul time
See I 4NGUAGE, Page 8
Drey fuss And Irving 'Compete'
r(might at 7 p m and this Kridav and Satnrdav nights at 5. 7:30, and 10 p m the Student I nion lilms
( nmmiliti v� dl present Richard Drev fuss and Ann Irving in "The Competition The film i an insightful
tira into ihe litile known orld of modern classical musk competition accented b a matnr. captivating
romantic lo�e storx. Richard Drevfuss delivers a tender, infectious performance as an aging pianisi
distraught over his perpetual second place performances in classical piano recital competitions whost en
� ranee into a prestigious San Francisco dorr-die recital competition brings him face-to face wnh thr
rigorous!) trained and beautiful Heidi I m living) Their immediate attraction to one another ami subs
quent love affair is soon shattered as thev both become finalists in the competition and most choose bet
�een loving and losing One of the best films of the vear - ndrew Sarris. illage on �� Admission is
h student II) and activity cards or Ms( membership.
I
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1
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1
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KI INI A
I I'll MHI K �, IS!
Features
�� 11� i 111 ip
'0 Students Enjoy
Casual Affair
Mall Event Successful
The I filler Beer Balloon
Rv K KIN HMM
r�iurr Hi
"We won, man we won wei
the most common v ords at
"Affair on the Mall" that was held
yesterdav. it is unknown how many
people participated in the event hul
' those who were there t he
num hei w as "a lot
1 he affair, vpon on I the
d p irtment ol Intt amural and
k �� ttional Services. R lence
Life, Mendenhall Student Center.
the Students Rersidence Association
lent I Inton. broi
togethet a variety ol tudents I
m md activtt nel
11 isbee es, Dominoe's Pi
�a eat ing i ont( sts, Mello N ello
. hugging Contests, Millei k
king contests, Budweisei Keg
Rolling contests. Watermelon Seed
Spitting ntest. volleyball and
( age Ball Voll
tl events im luded I �
ige gr ' � ���
tbail ;iAc! the Mickey skv
Ban Chug Ofl
by Mello Veil
I
Dew and N
I Hot Dog

nominal '�
who pai
the v ha i he a w innei I
lime I
'
from!
But I '�
i
.id
min ' pa Par
tit ipatin
R i
aid -
Mevei, teeI
I ife. R
� fe. A ayne
a ar ds. Di t
1 Pizza Fatingom

�W Bat
� md ilenn Reel
Marvin Bra Vice I

����� . :
' . if
a&E
i
Blackfoot's Medlock Has Musical Historv

- � He quotes a lyric of
eers, his favorite rock
d Free, now of Bad
! ivc tor the mu-
Bu Blackl ot and Medlocke have
- He was born, in Jackson
: . was very
. andpai. i adopted
indfa Sh rty
; lues ba
'e " I rain. 1 ra
Fox Ci and
- - � Roller" and
Blackl as
ip's
lb u n
Mod loci '
hears ng and
: he decided he wanted to
rung some Ja
Irummer lak ;on Spires
ach other � n; �. 'hev
basis' Greg I.
Walker, who lived down the street
hem, met them about a year
rhev met guitarist Charlie
Hargrett ab ut the I me The finish-
�ol
Walker. Hargrett and Medlocke
i coup in Jacksonville The
player left. Spires was in a
ip hich lost a guitarist. The
nips merged At first there
one left, leaving the
lineup ot Black foot. In
�ember, thev'U mark 12 years
Mi - i mdmother bought
-t two guitars, in a swap
He learned some tunings from
md "spent almost
� � - hour piaving those
H � 1 hev � hen
is P � ksonv ille in
? ns -sas real! �

-
-
Monkees w .
be tl � nerican Bea
did i Red Ho

the f
The w
i
.
' 1
Blackfool
one of three acts tembei 17.
kine 1 I box seats m the
Med
baseball park, 2 - yards oi l
the stage i can remember set
him pull up in a pink v adillat with
his . . ssed in a pu �
white shoes and shir' All
weie going era this man
it w � VA ii Id War III I h it '�ar I
ro do
lerrv l ee 1 ew P it B
io w
" v � � is a big, fanativ
Budd; Holly. I
an era died Elvis
went into service Ml of a sudden
a hall
ked. as kids
I hen Beatlema
My favorite bands were the
B a Brummels andream
i Hipped, o tally forream i
knew Iris Clapton's guitar playing
'Ins
i
gave
B � �
Med Lock

"I
play
years I pra
them ' The group ,u . in
t rom h
Student's Dialect Subject Of
Anthropologist's Lectures
tav, I
11

a mm my
� gin ti
the wal
n !
or stay up all
mgi tn-
begin t
Ige a ords.
'It's not slang oi jargon, it's a
dialect said fr oleman, an
assistant profesv at the I niversity
of North Carolina H Greensboro.
We generally think ol i dialect as
being geographical, but there are
oi ultural dialer's You'll find
campus dialect her- similar to
�poken at othei schools
A � part ol aourse on the inter,i
� language and culture, I)i
oleman earlier had his students
ompile a list of almost 500 ex
amples of campus dialect Ih'
following terms and definitions ate
,i pan of that list:
�Airhead Someone with no comon
sense
�All-nighter: Staying up all night to
study or write a paper.
�Bama: A person behind in the
ivies
�Space cadet Absent minded or
lacking in common sense.
�Blow how Throw up.
�Break bad Io act tough.
�Brewski: Beer or brew.
� atch my drift: To understand
w hat I am saving.
�( rash (,o to bed
� I )ip oi Dori A � tinatti
live pei �n
�Double-parked in rh rwili
Zone A spa ev pei v'lh no
mon sense.
�( o 'I oul lay ba k, rel x, lal
� lammin Soundii
. � i
ro ki
K is ine
�Eal someone's fa f
�Grubbing in publi
public.
�HDR "Heavy. deep and i
heart to heart talk.
�Invest in someone: ro tak timi to
reallv get to know someone
�Juicer A person who drinks i
great deal of beer.
�Mai nst av A problem, as
" v hat's youi mainstay ?"
�Ott the wall A weird person;
something thai doesn't make sens
�PDA Public displav of affection
�Party Hearty: Exclamation mean
mg to have a wonderful time
See LANGUAGE, Page 8
Drey fuss And frying 'Compete'
lonight at 7 p m and this Friday and Saturdav nights at 5. 7:30. and 10 p.m . the Student I n �n
( iinimiltf. � ill present Richard Drev fuss and m lring in "The Competition I"he film i an insit�h
foray into the little known world of modern classical music competition accented h a matin, captiv i
romantic loc story. Richard Drevfuss delivers a tender, infectious performance as an ating pia
distraught over his perpetual second place performances in classical piano recital competitions �host
irance into a prestigious San Francisco door-die recital competition brings him face-to tact with
rigorously trained and beautiful Heidi Amy Irvingi 1 heir immediate attraction to one another and sul
quent low affair is soon shattered as they both become finalists m the competition and musi � ho��st
ween loving and losing "One of the best films of the vear! ndrt w Sams. illage oice Vdmissii
h student ID and activity cards or Mst membership.
ilms
tful
tins
nisi
en
th,
t-st
he I
n is
L-





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�rds,
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is sold.
and
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unders-
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THIS 0Ov.
4ctor Criticizes TV
3C
it�ir
in
NEW YORK (UPI)
Jason Robards has
done more television
than most. His credits
include 400 live perfor
mances during the
medium's "Golden
Age but he despairs
of the audience he finds
there now.
"We're a junk socie
ty he said in an inter-
view promoting his
latest dramatic outing.
"Most people will
watch anything that
English Opera To Be Performed
From 1 he
School Of Music
I he national Opera
i ompany and the ECU
svmphonv Orchestra
will appear together
Friday, September 4 at
8:00 p.m. in the pro-
duction of Donizetti's
lighthearted opera Don
Pasquale The public is
united to attend free of
.harge The perfor-
mance will be held in
the A . J . Fletcher
Keciial Hall on campus
and will be sung in
Endlush, using a recent
ansiation.
Don Pasquaie will be
esented bv the Na-
onal Opera Com-
panyh. a highly profes-
sional troupe, dcdicted
the prts n al ion oi
pera in the language
.t the audience They
heliee that, through
c torts, opera will
mee its rightful
popularuv in American
culture.
This amamg troupe
of voung singing artists
have been proving the
validity o this belief
once 194X in tours
overing some (36)
�tates Through color-
ful productions of well-
know n operas in
English, thev have, in
manv instances, created
audiences where none
previously existed. This
troupe believes that it is
noteworthy that in
European countries,
where opera has always
been an outstanding
popular art form, the
audiences demand taht
the operas be presented
in the vernacular. For
instance, the works of
Wagner (a German
composer) in German
in Germany. American
opera lovers are
delighted at the ease
with which they can
follow the subtleties of
the plot, the humor of
the comedies, and the
sadness of the tragedies
when they are exposed
to good English
translations. Familiar
anas such as "The
Toreador Song" from
C ARMEN and
"Fiearo's Aria" from
THE BARBER OF
SEVILLE reach new
heights of delight and
meaning when every
w or a can be
understood.
Other opera com-
panies, also recognie-
ing this needed
development. are
presenting more and
more of the standard
repertoire in English;
and, as a result, good
Fnglish translations are
more readily available.
Realizing the advantage
of opera in English,
television and radio sta-
tions are now program-
ming a good percentage
of their operatic selec-
tions in English. This
new interest in both old
favorites and new
works sung in the
language of the au-
dience has assured
American composers
that their work will be
heard, as the number of
opera workshops and
local opera groups con-
tinue to grow.
The famous Italian
composer, Donizetti,
drew the plot for Don
Pasquale from an an-
cient tradition: an old
man decides to take a
young wife who, in
turn, hopes to marry
the old bov's nephew
and heir. The elderlv
suitor is tricked into
believing he has mar-
ried a demure young
thing, but she is sud-
denly transformed into
a spendthrift shrew by
the act of affixing a
false name to an equlal-
ly false marriage con-
tract. Now, thoroughly
disillusioned, the old
dotard is only tooeager
to extricate himself
from this trap and turn
his "bride" over to his
waiting nephew. These
are time-tested comic
situations. and
Donizetti exploited
them to the fullest. The
crvstal clear line of ac-
tion and the wonderful
interaction of the
characters have kept
DON PASQUALE
very much alive for
more than a centurv.
DON PASQUALE is
a storehouse crammed
with beautiful melodies
which will be sung by a
spirited cast of young
professionals selected
from all over the
United Stales In this
delightful opera, you
can sample glittering
gold from the true com
ic vein of opera buffa.
"
Staff Photographe
Needed
ECU Photo Lab
Apply With Media
Board Secretary
Old South Building
r"
i
JUST
A RRIVED
J.D.
DAWSON
CO.
1982 GIFT
CATALOS
COME BY AND
PICK UP YOUR
J COMPLEMENTARY
COPY
I
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l
I
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l
l
l
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l
l
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The sour assessment
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however, include the
kind of television sup
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Robards, proclaimed
by many critics as one
of the finest actors on
the planet, said he
never could have done
Eugene O'Neill's
"Hughie" on commer-
cial network television
because there is no
room foi the one-act
masterpiece among the
common prime-time
herd ot sitcoms and
auto i hases.
He could and did to
it for Show lime which
soon will be showing it
to cable audiences na-
tionwide
Indeed, lo compare
Hughie and
Robards' role in it, to
the average commer-
cially profitable net-
work sitcom is to com-
pare Kruggeraftds to
bottL caps. A viewer
has to thi:ik about
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CAROLINA EAST CONVENIENCE CENTER,
RT. 11 IS. MEMORIAL DR.
1102 WEST 3RD STREET
GREENVILLE, NC





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 3, 1981
Language Of Students Studied
O L1 quite a few nickna
Continued From Page 6
Grog's, Greenville's Latest Bar
Grog 9s Interior Plush
B kvm WEYLER
i�ff U nlti
rablccloths! In a bar in
downtown Greenville! Will wonders
never cease11
Indeed, Greenville's new
downtown bar. Grog's, is quite a
wonder. Visitors to Grog's. former-
Is the Sunset, are liable to gape
openly at the bar's miraculous
transformation. Stucco walls, lat-
ticework, mirrors over the long.
plush bar. hanging plants, window
stats on a raised platform, refinish-
ed floors, and the aforementioned
da'k green tablecloths greet the eye
The visitor is bound to be impress-
ed, and that is precisely what Tom
Haines had in mind.
"We trv to combine both comfort
and classiness Haines. also owner
of trie Attic, said of his latest addi-
tion to the family of Greenville bars
Grog's was designed by Haines
and four others to be unique and
different � the type of bar that
would appeal mainlv to a slilghtly
older clientele. The decor, mention-
ed previously is a big part of Grog's
uniqueness Haine's personal (and
quite valuable) original cartoon col-
lection adorns the walls along with
murals and sculptures of cartoon
characters, fashioned by talented
local artists. Overall, the bar is sleek
and modern � but comfortable as
well.
Haines and his co-workers, in-
cluding manager Stephen Grice,
have certainly succeeded in giving
Greenville a breth of fresh air. You
won't find a raucous crowd at
Grog's but you can carry on a con-
versation in air-conditioned com
forts or enjoy the gimeroom in
relative peace. Beer is available
(sorry, no draft!) and, hopefully.
Grog's will be serving mixed drinks
about a week before Homecoming.
In order to have mixed drinks.
Grog's is becoming a private club.
Applications for membership will be
available September 1 at special in-
trocutory rates.
This writer could find only one
fault with Grog's. Ladies, the
powder room is elegant with well-lit,
full-length mirrors � but if you are
over five feet seven or weigh more
than 140, you can forget about us-
ing the, er, facilities unless kyou are
into acrobatics. It has been men-
tioned that entering the men's room
also poses certain difficulties. For
the record, the management has
been informed of this problem so
perhaps some corrective steps will
be taken
�The Pits: A very low
emotiona state; a bor-
ing event.
�Snaking or Scoping.
Looking at members of
the opposite sex.
5�Spend the night with
Jack. To spend late
hours studying at
UNC-G's Jackson
Library.
�Wired: To be zombie-
like; under the in
fluence of drugs.
�Z-out: To fall asleep.
"One of the primary
purposes of that course
is to look at the interac-
tion of Janguage and
culture said Dr. Col
eman, who has made a
study of sociol-
inguistics.
"The campus con-
stitutes a community
where students interact
on different levers-
shared values, ideas,
especially attitudes
and, in particular,
language patterns he
said. "Social class
tends to disappear in
campus dialects
because the main com-
monality is that they're
all college students
sharing similar ex-
periences
As painful as this
campus dialect may be
to some people's ears.
Dr. Coleman says it
can't be stopped and
it's only one of many
such dialects in every
society.
"There are even pro-
fessional dialects. In
the medical field, for
instance, there's a
dialect of its own. And
I'd say part of becom
ing a medical profes-
sional is learning to use
the language pattern in
that particular social
setting he added.
"There's nothing
wrong with that
I anguage is not static;
! t' s dynamic
Everything about life is
dynamic. So it's going
to change and no one's
going to stop it, not
even Edwin Newman
(journalist and author
of popular books on
language)
As people become
adults and grow older,
they tend to resist the
continuous changing of
the language around
them, Dr. Coleman
said.
"The change is
always picked up in the
younger generation.
So, you find grand
mothers and grand-
fathers talking to their
grandchildren, saving,
'1 don't understand
what they're saying
But neither do the
grandchildren know
what their grand
parents are saying.
They have different
language patterns he
added
The campus dialect
vocabulary list will
change from year to
year as some words
drop out and others are
added Dr Coleman
admits that many of the
words on the list he had
never heard before.
College faculty
members, however,
tend to understand
more of the words than
the geneial public simp
1 because they're
around the students
more often
Included in the
almost 500 words that
his students compiml
quite a few nicknames
for faculty members.
"I didn't divulge any
faculty members'
names he said with a
laugh "But I've got
them on cards "
SuDDort the
March of
limes
�SIM
0O4CTS
KXJNOAION

SAAD'S
SHOE
REPAIR
113Gr�ntt Avt
�utility
RtfMir
Tbcy broke tt cmdhiil
nrteof tbe
they felite love
IK
COMPETITION
�two armjim �. -um Meunotr wr
MlotKKHLAMS tjNUMlTID
TMB WEEK'S STUDENT
SKOAL - WI.D.
IRREGULAR POLO SPORT
SHIRT so1o
WYOUR MONOGRAM Z2
It a B Monogrammtd
Wt Cm Do Hit
Phone 75"i55 M2Tat
After �pw. 7SA6207
'mi
Weekdays
11:30-11:00
Fri. & Sat.
11:30-12:00
300 E. 10th St.
758-6121
The Best Pizza in Town! (Honest)
Fast Service!
Game
Machines
Big
Screen TV
Drive Up
Window For
To Go Orders
PIZZA & SPAGHETTI BUFFET
$2.79
$2.69
All you can eat Spaghetti -5:30-8:00 $2.69
Thurs � Lasagna � One Reg. Price.Second One
$1.00
Mon. & Thurs. 5:30-8:00. .
Mon. thru Fri. 11:30-2:00
Wed.
Where To Go
When You're In A Rush
Pi Kappa Tau
Fastest Growing Fraternity
On Campus

Mon Sept. 7th - Party by the Lake
Tues Sept. 8th - Island Paradise Night
Wed Sept. 9th - Cheers with the P. Kopps
a night with the E.C.U. Cheerleaders
Thurs Sept. 10th � Grand Finale Night
Pi Kappa Phi
803 Hooker Rd.
Greenville, N. C.
For Rides or info Please Call
756-3540
ustteUus A
at you want.
Your ArtCarved representative will be on campus soon to show you the
latest in ciass ring designs. With dozens of styles to choose from, you'll be proud to select
your one-of-a-kind design Just tell us what you want And be on the
lookout for posters on campus to get you where you want
Date. Sept. 8-11 - 9.00 a.m. to 400 p.m.
Location ECU Student Supply Store Lobby
Each
is required
sate m each Kroger
caii noted in this ad if e do run
fer you your choice of a comparable ite-n
the same savings or a raincheck which Mill entitle v
tised item at the advertised price within 30 da�s
AD HE
ot these advert
to be readily a
Savon except
out of an item
when available
ou to purchase
M POLICY
ised items
a labie 'or
ati spec '
we twill o
reflecting
the adver
items and Prices
Effective Thurs Sept 3
thro Sat Sept b 19b1
Pop Quiz
Basic Economics
Q. What store helps ECU Students save
both time and money on everything you
need for home, school or that party
after the Big Game?
A. Kroger Sav-on, Your One-Stop
Shopping Store all year long!
See References below.
Copyright 1961
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None sold to dealers
SHARP WALLET SIZE 8 DIGIT
LCD PERCENT SQUARE ROOT
KEYS 4 KEY MEMORY
AUTOMATIC POWER OFF
FEATURE EL 315
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m m m �
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Budweiser
DIET PEPSI. MT DEW.
SUNKIST ORANGE OR
Pepsi-Cota $ii
s-io9a
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Btl
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3
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99
COSMETICS & "
FRAGRANCES
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BAGGED
fr-T
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"S� OPEN 8 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031
BII
I

Fo
Re

M
the
ba
reveah
Bl
Coi
Fr
I
.
pis
in
bui
tht
v
�"� ' rl





THEl ASTt AROl IN1AN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 1981
Page 9


Off
SUGG
DETAIL
Doctors Give Bushbeck Okay To Play
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sport t-dilnr
Good news may be hard to come
hv these days, but for Chuck
Bushbeck and the East Carolina
football team, Wednesday brought
-omc oi the best news possible.
�fter hearing last week that he is
suffering from Hodgkin's disease, a
milignani cancer of the lymph
nodes, Bushbeck has been going
through a series of tests and
awaiting word on his playing status.
rhe word came from doctors
Wednesday thai tests show that the
disease is in its earlier stages, and
that the Villanova transfer will be
able to play this Saturday.
"I feel a lot better now
Bushbeck said following the an
nouncement of the good news.
o I'm more anxious than eer
to pla this season. It was a great
relief when I heard 1 could play
Bushbeck was operated on about
a week ago, having a knot removed
from his chest area. After it was
covered that he had Hodgkin's
disease he went through some oft-
times unpleasant tests to determine
what treatment would be needed to
hopefully cure the illness.
"The only problem that 1 see for
Saturday Bushbeck said, "is the
three stitches that are in each of my
feet. The trainers tell me they can fix
that up, though. Thev say it will not
present a problem for me when I'm
kicking
Bushbeck added, though, that the
cutting that had to be done on his
feet turned out to be a blessing.
"The one thing that 1 was most
worried about was a test where they
go inside your stomach he claim-
ed. "They didn't have to, though,
because some blue dye was injected
into m feet, which made it possible
for them to see mv lymph nodes
The senior All-America candidate
now has his mind set on playing a
full season at ECU � although that
is not a definite thing yet � and
holding his head high.
"The type of personalitv that 1
hae won't allow me to get down
The type of personality
that I have won't allow
me to get down. All
throughout my life wh?n
something happened and
I couldn't change it, I
didn't worry about it.
I've just applied that to
this situation.
� Chuck Bushbeck
Bushbeck said. "All throughout m
life when something happened and 1
couldn't change it, I didn't worry
about it. I've just applied that to
this situation
Bushbeck said that his teammates
and friends had been of great help
Forecast
Returning
The 1-earless Foe.ball Forecast
1 be featured again in The East
wolinian again this year for the
rth vear in a row.
� panel of five of the paper's
: members � Sports Editor
harles Chandler. Ass Sports
Editor William Yelverton, Manag-
Editor Jimmy DuPree. Staff
Holloman and Ad
Manager Chuck Foster � will pick
winners of a dozen college fot
. imes each week.
, � there will be a tally
:aling each of the picker's overall
The first forecast can be
12 of todav's paper.
Blue-Chipper
Comes Here
From Clemson
Greg Quick, an all-state football
last year, enrolled at East
-hna this week after leaving
mson University.
Quick, a 6-5, 275-pound offensive
�nan, was possibly the most
sought-after high school player in
the state last year. ECU head coach
Ed Emory recurited him heavily,
but lost out to Clemson's Danny
' d �
A misunderstanding over Quick s
school grades apparantly led to
the switching of schools. Atlantic
Coast Conference rules state that a
player must have a 2.0 average in
high school to be eligible to play
athletics at a member school.
Quick finished with a 1.997 at
1 aurinburg's Scotland County
High. Clemson reportedly just
recently discovered that Quick was
below the 2.0 mark. Rather than sit
out a vear or go to a prep school and
then return to the Tigers, Quick
opted to come to the school that had
been one of his top choices all along
ECU.
"Greg is a great college football
prospect said Pirate mentor
Emory. "He's very much in our
plans" for 1982. Because his high
school grades were below 2.0, he
must make a 2.0 here for 24 hours to
be eligible for next year. We are
confident that he will meet these re-
quirements. He can certainly mean a
great deal to East Carolina foot-
ball
Pep Rally Is
Set Tonight
A major pep rally will be held
tonight (Thursday) in preparation
for the East Carolina football
team's season opener at home on
Saturdav against Western Carolina.
The rally will start for students at
6 30 p m. at the bottom of College
Hill Drive. Plans are for a march to
Ficklen Stadium, where the rally of-
ficially gets underway at 7 p.m.
The Marching Pirate band and
the Ed' cheerleaders will be on
hand along with all the coaches and
plavers from the Buc squad.
SGA buses will pick up students
in front of Clement and Greene
dorms at approximately 6 p.m. The
buses will also ship students back to
their dorms following the rally.
The pep rally is being sponsored
bv Jeffrey's Beer and Wine. A
number of prizes will be awarded.
to him during the past couple of
weeks.
"At first, some of the guys on the
team didn't know how to react he
said. "They didn't know what to
say to me. But they've all been
grea They've told me that I can
beat this disease. They all seemed to
Emory
rally behind me and that has been a
big inspiration
The Pirate team obviously ha a
fondness for the courageous
Bushbeck. The kicker says he feels
likewise, adding that he has liked
the ECU community from the
beginning.
"After we dropped the program
at Villanova he said, "1 came
down here and fell in love with the
place. I knew this was where 1
wanted to go. I even called the othei
schools and told them that they
shouldn't waste their time, that 1
had made my decision
Other schools thai recruited
Bushbeck heavily were Maryland,
N.C. State, Louisiana Tech and
Connecticutt.
Since coming to ECU,
Bushbeck's life has taken some in
teresting turns. He has been looked
upon as a saviour at the placekick
ing slot from the beginning, coming
from Villanova with some most im-
pressive stats. Then, ol course,
came the surgery and the news oi
the d
No that he knows he can play,
Bushbei k says it is time to try to win
at two games
"All I wain to do is the best kind
oi job possible foi this football
team lie said 'I guess anything I
do 1 won't feel like is enough. Sure,
1 want to make everything and kick
ever) kickofl out of the endone
1 a t week in a scrimmage
Bushbeck did just that.
"1 think I can beat this disease
Bushbeck said, referring to the se-
cond "game" that is on his mind.
" 1 he doctor told me that there was
a 75 percent recovery rate if it is in
�tage one oi two and a 50 percent
recov ei y rate if the disease is in stage
three oi four. I am in stage 2-A.
"1 believe the biggest thing for me
right now he continued, "is being
able to have the right attitude. The
doctors tell me thai is half the bat-
tle "
It that's the case, then Chuck
Bushbeck is 50 percent recovered
ah cadv
Are
�iw. ;�&
Carlton Nelson Will Start At QB Saturday
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Mltor
East Carolina head football coach
Ed Emory says he is looking for-
ward to fielding the most prepared
team that he has ever been around
this Saturday against Western
Carolina.
"We're ready to play he said.
"We're tired of practicing, tired of
scrimmaging and tired of hitting
each other. I think we're ready for
this. We're as healthy as we have
been since I've been hwandI I'd
have-to m thaHSe arSe'lfest
prepared football team to play a
first game that I've ever been
associat d with
Emory did not stop at that,
though, choosing to point out some
negatives about the club as it
prepares for a 7 p.m. Saturday
kickoff in Ficklen Stadium. The
team hopes to start off on the right
foot in an attempt to make amends
for last season's disappointing 4-7
record.
"Like I've said all along, we are
very young and inexperienced he
claimed. "We've got a bunch of 17-
and 18-year olds that have been
pushed, coached, and drilled to
catch up with our veterans
Emory said he only hopes thai the
many newcomers in the Pirate i amp
will respond well on Saturday night
"Who knows? When thev take
the field Saturdav night thev might
go back to street fighting. Football
players are creatures oi habit. I just
hope we've drilled them enough so
that everything has become
habitual. You can onlv absorb so
much in practice, though. I hen you
must learn by game experience '
Emory feels the Cataoiowauare
not the best team for his cfuW
up against this early in the season
"From a defensive standpoint
he said, "they're not very good fo
us. They will be a great challenge to;
us. Western throws very well. 1 heir
short passing game puts you on you!
heels. Then they can come with
(Melvin) Dorsey (Georgia transfer)
and that puts you back on your toes.
"Dorsey certainly gives them a
new threat at running back
Emory continued. "I'd much rather
face a team that either runs or
passes well, not one that does both
well
Still, Emory was enthusiastic
about things, saying that his club
had had a superb pre-season.
"We achieved all the goals we set
foi the pre-season the second-year
l-( l mentor said. "One was to be
the best conditioned team possible.
The others were to be mentally
prepared and to develop team unity.
1 feel like we've done all those
things, although we must continue
to develop more team unity. The
next Z hours could be cruical in
that
It appear that only reserve
tujlback Maivm Cobb will miss
fSturd iv's game Halfbacks Harold
Blue and Milton Corsey, who were
doubtful earlier this week, appear
read) to go
Kickei Chuck Bushbeck, who is
suffering from Hodgkin's disease,
also got the okay from doctors to
play Saturday. It was found that the
disease is in its early stages and that
his chances for recovery will be
defined after further tests next
week.
Carlton Nelson will get the star-
ting nod at quarterback, although
Villanova transfer Kevin Ingram
and 1980 letterman Greg Stewart
should both get some playing time.
Doesn't Rule Out Upset
Waters
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports r dilor
"If they do their job and we do
ours, they should win
Western Carolina football coach
Bob Waters was very point-blank in
his prediction about his team's
season opener this weekend at East
Carolina.
"If you go by budgets and
scholarships he continued, "then
ECU should definitely win
All this is not to say that Waters is
not confident in his team's
possibilities of pulling off an upset.
"Oh. I'm not saving we won't
win Waters claimed. "We haven't
done very well against East Carolina
lately. I've told the team that ECU
really should win. Our guys won't
accept that, though. We plan to
make a game out of it
W aters is probably playing down
his ciub's chances. And why not?
The Catamounts have lost six
straight games in Ficklen Stadium,
the last of which was a 24-14 deci-
sion last season.
Western is expected to display one
of its most diverse offenses in years.
WCU quarterback Ronnie Mlxon will get his second
straight starting assignment in Ficklen Stadium.
Ronnie Mixon is returning as the
starting quarterback after throwing
for 1,275 yards a year ago.
The big talk around WCU this
year is the addition of halfback
Melvin Dorsey, a transfer from
Georgia. Dorsey was the Georgia
high school back of the year in 1978.
When the Bulldogs signed Ail-
American Herschel Walker last
year, though, Dorsey saw it best to
leave and joined the Catamounts.
"We're expecting big things from
Melvin Waters said. "He certain-
ly has the tools to be a mighty good
one. He's a big, strong kid with lots
of quickness. He has everybody here
excited. But, he has hasn't proven
anything yet. All we can say is that
he has the potential
The addition of Dorsey made it
possible for Waters to move last
year's starting tailback, Anthony
James, to the CATback position.
That spot had been manned for
three years by all-star Gerald Harp.
"We're very pleased with An-
thony's play at the Cat spot thus
far Waters said. "We just hope he
continues to improve. We will
definitely miss Harp, though
Waters said that the Catamounts'
traditional pass-oriented offense
should not change much.
"We always will throw the foot-
ball he said. "But I don't want to
throw 35 to 40 times a game like we
did sometime last year. We feel con-
fident in our running attack much
more so this year than last. I expect
us to throw about 25 times per game
his season
Defensively, the Catamounts will
be at somewhat of a disadvantage
come Saturday. The ECU offensive
line averages 251 pounds per man,
A Year Ago
Pictured above is action from last season's ECU-
Western Carolina, which ended up 24-14 in favor of the
Pirates. The two clubs will clash again this Saturday
night at 7 p.m. ECl' defensive back James Freer (20),
who has since graduated, brings down Western's An-
thony James. James returns Saturday after putting in a
great performance against ECU last year, rushing for
104 yards on ten carries.
while Western's front defenders
averages 232. ECU coaches expect
the Cats to stunt a lot up front.
"I'm not sure what we'll do
defensively Waters said. "We
definitely have to do better than we
have in the best. We'll scrap
around. I'do feel like we can be
more physical this year, though
Western is coming off a disap-
pointing 3-7-1 season, making this
first game one that Waters would
love to have.
"Coming off the kind of season
we have last year the 13th-car
WCU coach said, "the first game is
important. Of course, that first one
always is. 1 think our players are
looking forward to this one because
East Carolina is sort of a natural
rivalry for us
i





10
THE EAST CAROl 1N1AN
SEPTEMBERS, 1981
Pam Holt
Relentless Worker For ECU Athletics and Students
Bv WILLIAM
YELVERTON
���. Sports Mtlor
From Pamela Will-
ingham Holt's office in
Minges Coliseum, one
gets a magnificent view
of Ficklen Stadium� a
view that didn't take
long for Pam to ap-
preciate.
"I remember the first
day 1 was here" the
new assistant athletic-
director for student life
recalled, "and 1 opened
the drapes and looked
out at that stadium. It's
just breath-taking to
me to have an oppor-
tunity to look at it. It
can be filled. There's
no question about
that
And there's also no
question that Pam Holt
loves East Carolina. A
Bloomfield, Iowa,
native, born and bred
on Big Ten football.
Holt has had a seven-
year love affair with
East Carolina.
"I was here (at ECU)
before, for seven years.
After 1 graduated from
college (Northeast
Missouri), 1 travelled
with my sorority for
two years. Virginia
Minges was in my
sorority and I had met
her while I was in col-
lege. So, when I applied
to different univer-
sities� 1 wanted a
position with
sororities� I wrote to
East Carolina because I
knew that Virginia was
here, and Dean Fulgum
wrote me back and said
at that time there was
nothing open with
sororities, but would 1
be interested in the
residence hall program.
"I wanted to be in
the South, so I worked
just in the residence
hall program my first
year here. Then, the se-
cond year, the
sororities were added to
our list of respon-
sibilities
Pam then had what
she labeled a
"brainstorm She
wanted to see what the
"other" world was like
"because I'd only been
involved with universi-
ty work She went to
Columbia, S.C and
accepted a marketing
position with a Burger
King restaurant. She
did, however, continue
her Pirate crusade: She
started a Columbia
chapter of the Pirate
Club, deep in the heart
of Gamecock country.
"Dr. Karr (Ken,
ECU athletic director)
came down when I
started the Pirate Club,
and he was talking
about this (her current)
position. He was down
there with Ed Emory,
Dave Odom and Hal
Baird.
"I was a Gamecock
while I was down
there� until they
played East Carolina (a
19-16 loss for the Pirates
in 1977). Everybody
there knew that I had
been associated with
East Carolina
SAe accepted the pos-
tion, saying that "Dr.
Karr approached me
about how we needed
some kind of student
involvement Pam
Holt had a challenge.
See HOLT, Page 11
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"I at!
worl
connn .
couple
thai I
because
(Arrants)
the ;
to ge-
ba �
first dav
she hanat
dent
(SAB
Indiana
ed
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bring c
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oth-
of-
sian.
Boara
of
lend l(
and et
moi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 3. 1981
11
Holt Prides Herself In East Carolina
ent
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1
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"1 actually started
work on July 1 she
continued, "and just a
couple of days before
(hat I came here
because Laurie
(Arrants) was leaving
the position. 1 wanted
to get a little
background in it. The
first day 1 was over here
she handed me a Stu-
dent Athletic Board
(SAB) brochure from
Indiana University. 1
looked at it, and that's
how I found out about
it
Pam Holt decided to
bring a program to
Greenville that had suc-
ceeded in only two
other schools she knews
of� Indiana and Lou-
siana State University.
The Student Athletic
Board will be made up
of students in order to
lend leadership, interest
and enthusiasm in pro-
moting Pirate sports.
Pep rallies and card
and cheering sections
are some of the early
projects.
"There are three
major things behind the
Student Athletic
Board she savs.
"First of all, we want
vtudent involvement in
athletics. Also, when it
gets so that it's full
urse down the road,
hopefully by next year.
it will make every
athlete that plays for
us, in whatever
capacity� nonrevenue
or revenue sports� feel
that they are ap-
preciated by the student
body. Take right now,
just as an example,
some classified minor
sports� these athletes
just don't get much
recognition. When we
have people on the SAB
to work on all these dif-
ferent areas, these
athletes will feel
special
Holt used examples
of children and
parent's day for every
sport at the Univeristv
of Indiana, one reason,
she says, has caused the
SAB to maintain its
strength after 25 years
there.
"My own personal
opinion is that 1 love
football she explains,
gazing out the window
at Ficklen Stadium.
"But I feel that
anybody who's an
athlete deserves sup-
port. 1 want to help
every team that I
possibly can. I'm a lit-
tle different� I've
never coached
anything. I try to work
with all of them
"It's a bad time to
get it (the SAB) started
- at the beginning of
football season the
former physical educa-
tion major continued.
"We've got a list of
probably 30 people. If I
hadn't had the
cheerleaders, I would
have never pulled it off
the ground. I think it
will keep going. Also,
because school is just
now starting, I need to
get in the residence
halls. I've worked with
the sororities here
before.
"There's 5600
students in those
residence halls, and
we're going to get peo-
ple from fraternities
and sororities because
they're very interested
in going to the games
One problem any
new organization en-
counters is where to get
the finances to support
it. This, Holt insists,
does not worry her.
"We don't have any
money� we weren't
appropriated anything.
And I don't want to
come under anybody if
at all possible. If you
do, then they control
you.
"We will get the
commission off the
program sales, which
will enter the SAB
budget she says. "It
depends upon how
much we hustle as to
how much money we'll
make. There's all kinds
of ways to make
money. I'm not wor-
ried about that
To make money,
Pam says, you have to
be creative. "A lot of
times you can have all
the money in the world
and you can still, by
just being creative, do
just as many things. 1
don't look at it as being
negative that we don't
have any money� 1
know we'll get it. I
always think positive
Holt says her depart-
ment position blends in
well with the duties of
the SAB. She handles
all schedule and game
contracts, as well as be-
ing working with the
athletes as an academic
counselor. "I also have
student-athlete hous-
ing, which is a big
responsibility she
says. "It doesn't sound
like much, but it is
when football is in
volved because we have
so many players.
The positive and
calm atmosphere at
East Carolina makes
her job somewhat
easier, she says. "When
I was down at Colum-
bia she recalls, "I
was very closely
associated with the
University of South
wmsam
Carolina, as I marketed ting to the athletes, say-
a lot of programs down ing, 'They're students?'
there. They have that They have everything
athletic residence hall,
and the student body's
sitting over there poin-
they could ever dream
of having. This was one
of the things that was
so appealing to these
kids who came from
Villanova (football
recruits Chuck
Bushbeck, Kevin In-
gram, Milton Cor-
o
c

o
o
e
t
Q
� asnoi IS0m � osnoij ijsdm � esnoi iSb � inou, ifSDM �
"The Ploce to
Wash"
I
The 4L
WASlF
HOUSE
111 E. 10th St. (Across from Krispy Kreme)
514 E. 14th St. (Across from Hot Dog City)
sey)� that they're con- an athlete a student
sidered students as well first, then an athlete,
as athletes. They can be That's what they're
a part of the student here for hopefully� to
body.
"I always consider tf
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
trM
o
Also
�Color TV �Attendant on Duty �
� Pinball �Lots of Washers & Dryers
COUPON1
Good for one FREE WASH on Mon. or Thurs. o
9 a.m4 p.m. � Offer expires Sept. 30
wash house � wash house � wash house � wash house �
BEAT CAROLINA KEG
RALLY
WED.
4:00-6:30
at PHI KAPPA TAU
HOUSE
FEATURING
CAROLINA RECORDING ARTISTS
THE NICKY HARRIS BAND
a
Back to
School
Eyeglass
Special
For all ECU Students,
Faculty & Staff
Offer Good Through
Sept. 30, 1981
Located across Dr. Park
7521446
JUoa LW
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September 3. Thursday tn.r
CHICKEN N DUMPLINGS
2 vegetables
September 4. Friday �OSQ
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September 5. Saturday tOiQ
CHOPPED SIRLOIN STEAKZ"
2 vegetables
September 6, Sunday t09Q
TURKEY & DRESSINGZ"
2 vegetables
September 7. Mondav tOiQ
COUNTRY STYLE STEAK ZV
2 vegetables
September 8. Tuesday ono
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2 vegetables
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THE ECU CHEER
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Hot& Cold Desserts

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Servomation � E.C.U.
P.O. Box 3375
Greenville, N. C. 27834
i
r





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 3. 1981
Fearless Football Forecast
WESTERN CAROLINA AT ECU
RICHMOND AT N.C. STATE
S. CAROLINA AT WAKE FOREST
SOUTWESTERN LA. AT SOUTHERN MISS
TCU AT AUBURN
LOUISVILLE AT FLORIDA STATE
N. TEXAS ST. AT KENTUCKY
ILLINOIS AT PITTSBURGH
CALIFORNIA AT TEXAS A&M
TENNESSEE AT GEORGIA
ALABAMA AT LSU
FLORIDA AT MIAMI (Fla.t
CHARLES CHANDLERJIMMY DuPREEWILLIAM YELVERTONCHRIS HOLLOMANCHUCK FOSTER
Sports EditorManaging EditorAsst. Sports EditorStaff WriterAdvertising Manager
ECU 27-10ECU 32-14ECU 28-7ECU 35-14ECU 28-7
StateStateStateStateState
S. CarolinaS. CarolinaS. CarolinaS. CarolinaS. Carolina
Southern MissSouthwesternSouthern MissSouthern MissSouthwestern
AuburnAuburnAuburnAuburnAuburn
Fla. StateFla. StateFla. StateLouisvilleFla. State
KentuckyNTSUKentuckyKentuckyKentucky
PittPittPittPittPitt
Texas A&MTexas A&MTexas A&MTexas A&MCalifornia
GeorgiaGeorgiaGeorgiaGeorgiaGeorgia
AlabamaAlabamaAlabamaAlabamaALbama
MiamiMiamiMiamiFloridaMiami

Sign Contest Sat.
SAAD'S SHOE
REPAIR
l 1 3 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Kepair
The Cheerleaders,
with the help of the
Fast Carolina StucVnt
Athletic Board, will be
sponsoring a poster
banner contest during
football season.
The poster banner
contest winner of each
home game will receive
a free keg provided by
the local Anheuser-
Busch distributor.
Points will be award-
ed in the following
categories: visibility,
theme and creativity.
To compete in the con-
test, each organization
must have its poster
placed in Ficklen
Stadium by 10:00 the
day of the contest.
Applications and
other information can
be picked up from the
Director of Athletic's
Office. Minges Col-
iseum. These must be
completed and returned
to the Director of
Athletic's Office by
noon on the Friday
before the game.
Organizations eligi-
ble for the contest in-
clude residence halls,
(either various floors or
the entire hall), Greek
or social organizations
and any other chartered
organization on cam-
pus.
The banners are to be
posted in a location
which does not block
the v ision of a spectator
or create a hazardous
situation.
The posters and ban-
ners will be judged by
prominent members of
the ECU community,
faculty, staff and
students. Judges will
evaluate each entry on
such criteria as creativi-
ty, theme, and visibili-
ty.
Gl Camouflaged Fatlques �nc i-
Shlrtsj. Sleeping Bags Backpacks
damping Equipment. Steel Toed
Shoes Dishes. And Over 700 Oit
lerent New And Used Items
Cowboy Boots J36 95
, ARMY-NAVY STORE
: 1501 S Evans Street
SAB To Create
Student Unity
Continued From Page 11
get an education.
Pam Holt operates
on pride. "I'm from a
Mate where the Univer-
sity of Iowa is located.
The University of Iowa
has been the pits of
football since the 1950s.
But the stadium is sold
out every game. You
get that feeling that I'm
from East Carolina,
and I'm proud
Holt also hopes that
the Student Athletic
Board will have a good
working relationship
with the Pirate Club.
"I'd like to have some
of our meetings over at
the Pirate Club she
says. "Some students
don't even know it's
there. I want them to
know we have one of
the best facilities in the
country. The SAB will
just be creating and
creating new things�
better things than In-
diana has ever done. It
will be a lot of run for
people� if they
become involved
Holt admitts that she
often sits daydreaming
in her office, actually
"seeing" Ficklen
Stadium packed to
capacity. She is sure
this dream will come
true.
"I feel like that we'll
get that stadium fill-
ed she says, becom-
ing more serious. "We
have to market eastern
North Carolina. This
university is their
university. We're a
regional university.
There's a lot of positive
things going on. Dr.
Karr, for instance. I
like how he thinks big-
time. He doesn't think,
'Well, they've done like
this for years. Let's
don't rock the boat I
like Dr. Brewer� he's
got excellent men
representing the dif-
ferent areas of campus.
1 think everything looks
positive.
"We must let the
people in this area
know that we need
them � that we care
about them. The people
are friendly � they
really support us. They
really care. And you
don't get that in a lot of
places.
The same as every
university doesn't have
a Pam Holt.
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
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MONDAY - $1 OO
CHOPPED STEAK � �
TUESDAY - $1 OO
BEEF TIPS I �
WEDNESDAY - $1 QO
CUBED STEAK I .07
THURSDAY - $i q
STEAK SANDWICH � .OT
FRIDAY - �? 7Q
U.S.D.A. RIB EYE�J.y
SATURDAY - $� qq
BARBEQUE RIBSX.TT
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STEAK ON A STICK I
All Meals are Complete
Including Baked Potato or
French Fries & Texas Toast
and
Free Tea ecu i.d.
Famous Salad Bar
Take Out Service � 2W3 E. 10th St. � 75� 2712
244 By-Pass � 754-0040 � Hours 11 a.m10 p.m. � MonThurs.
10a.m11 p.m. Fri. Sun.
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E. 5th St. � 218 Arlington Blvd.
t





Title
The East Carolinian, September 3, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 03, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.144
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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