The East Carolinian, September 1, 1981






�hc SaBt (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 56 No. 3
Tuesday, September 1,1981
12 Pages
Brewer Denies
W.Va. Offer
By TOM HALL
Ne�s Milor
Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer
denied Monday that he was seeking
the presidency of West Virginia
University.
"1 haven't been asked to visit and
they haven't contacted me about the
job Brewer said.
In a news release issued Saturday,
the chancellor said that "a little cor-
respondence" had been exchanged
between him and the Morgantown,
W.V. university. have never been
informed by West Virginia that 1
was being seriously considered,
much less a finalist
"My time, energies, and talents
continue to be dedicated to serving
East Carolina University the
memo continued.
The Sunday edition of The Sews
and Observer quoted C. Ralph
Kinsey Jr vice chairmn of the ECU
board of trustees, as saying
Brewer's commitment to the univer-
sity was "questionable The article
also said Board Chairman Ashley B.
Futrell had "suggested that Brewer
might be better off on another cam-
pus
When contacted Monday, Futrell
said he felt he was misinterpreted in
the article. "What I said was, 'If he
can better himself, he ought to
move. It (the WVU presidency)
would be a promotion for him
Futrell added that he had called
Brewer after reading the article.
Brewer responded to the board
members' comments in the article,
"Anything 1 have to say to the
board, I'll say it the board, and if
the board has anything to say to me,
they'll say it to me
A WVU spokesman said a com-
mittee is narrowing down a list of
124 applicants. No list of finalists
has been released to the press. The
earliest a list of three to five finalists
can be announced is in October,
when the committee submits the
names to the West Virginia board of
regents for approval.
Tuition And
Fees Increase
Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer
By DIANE ANDERSON
AabtaiM Nf�i Milor
The University of North Carolina
board of governors has approved
the budget for the school years 1981
through 1983, causing a raise in tui-
tion and fees for all 16 universities
in the UNC system.
The budget provides approx-
imately $12.5 million for the two-
year period, with $6.2 million for
the 1981-82 school year, and $6.3
million for the 1982-83 year, accor-
ding to Col. Charles R. Blake,
Assistant to the Chancellor. Ap-
proximately 10 percent of this
overall increase is allocated for
ECU.
To determine whether or not
there will be an increase in tuition,
the president of the UNC system
compiles the requested budget from
each of the 16 campuses. He then
sets up an overall budget for the
slate system. This is submitted to
the General Assembly of North
Carolina which meets on a regular
basis every two years to review
budgets for the entire state. The
General Assembly cuts out any ex-
penditures it deems unnecessary,
and returns its version of the budget
to the board.
Some funds are tagged by the
General Assembly, which means
that the University is required to use
them in a certain area. For example,
a certain percentage of the budget
for ECU this year is to be used to
provide a radiation center for the
medical school.
The actual increase effecting ECU
students is 20 percent or $62 for
residents of North Carolina, and
12.3 percent or $130 for non-
resident students.
See ECU, Page Five
New Distribution System To Benefit Students
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Mitor
A restructuring plan for Ficklen
Stadium was announced last spring
by East Carolina athletic director
Ken Karr. Included in the plan is a
system in which students will pick
up tickets (free of charge) prior to
each home game.
Apparently, there has been a lack
of communication on campus as to
how the new plan will work. ECU
Assistant Athletic Director for
Public Relations Ken Smith said
Monday that his office had received
several calls from students who are
confused about the way they are to
get into home football games this
fall.
Following is a complete listing of
the steps that must be taken in the
new student ticket pick-up plan.
1. Students will sit in sections
21-26. This area will be divided into
two different sections � a Reserved
Seating section and a Reserved Sec-
tion.
Tickets to the Reserved Seating
section will put the students in a par-
ticular seat. These seats include all
of section and half of section 25.
These seats run from the 30-50-yard
line. Tickets to this section will be
distributed on a first-come, first-
served basis.
Tickets to the Reserved Section
will seat students in any seat they
desire from the goaline to the
30-vard line.
Shortens Lines At Gametime
2. Students may pick up their tickets
from Tuesday through Thursday
during the week of a Saturday home
game at the Minges Coliseum ticket
office or at the Central Ticket Of-
fice at Mendenhall Center by show-
ing their ID and activity card.
The Mendenhall ticket office is
open from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on-
ly. The Minges office is open from 8
a.m5 p.m. on Tuesday and
Wednesday, and from 8 a.m6 p.m.
on Thursday.
Students MAY NOT pick up
�t.�tc on Fridays but will be allow-
ed to make laie pick-ups of the
tickets remaining (after sales and
earlier pick-ups) at a special student
window at Minges prior to the game
on Saturday. These tickets will be
for the Reserved Section only.
The ticket office will close the
Saturday game-day pick-ups two
hours before the contest begins. For
the season opener against Western
Carolina, the office will be open
from 8 a.m5 p.m. on Saturday,
Sept. 5.
3. Each student will be allowed to
pick up their own ticket and one for
one other person by presenting the
ID and activity card of both in-
dividuals on pick-up days.
4. Each student will be allowed to
purchase one student guest ticket
per activity card for $4.50. (In the
past there was no reduced rate for
student guests.) After purchasing
the one guest ticket the student may
buy as many other tickets as desired
at $9 each.
Assistant AD Smith warned Mon-
day that students should take part in
the Tuesday-Thursday pickups to
avoid a late rush on Saturday.
"I certainly hope we don't see
hundreds of students waiting in line
at gametime he said. "This entire
plan is designed to avoid that pro-
blem
The key factor to consider about
the last-minute rush is that the
Minges ticket office closes to
students two hours before
gametime, meaning that students
who show up minutes before the
game without a ticket will not be
able to gain admission to the
stadium without paying.
Smith added that students will not
be allowed to bring coolers or large
containers in the stadium. Those
students that do get such containers
into the stadium become subject to
having them confiscated.
Affair on the Mall
'Sky Band' Featured
By KAREN WENDT
Maff Wnlfr
The Mickey Sky Band will be the
featured band at "Affair on the
Mall sponsored by the division of
Student Life which will begin on
Wednesday.
The "Affair" is an annual event
sponsored by the department of In-
tramural and Recreational Services,
Residence Life, Mendenhall Student
Center, the Students Residence
Association and the Student Union.
A variety of games and competi-
tions will be featured including
fnsbee tosses, watermelon seed spit-
ting contests, pizza eating contests,
Mello Yello chugging contest and
volleyball tournaments.
Two of the more popular events
are expected to be the beer keg and
case stacking contests and a dunking
booth featuring ECU ad-
ministrators.
The beer keg and case stacking
events will be team efforts by teams
made up from members of various
organizations around campus.
The "Affair" is free to all ECU
students. Local businesses have
donated prizes, such as dinners for
two and movie tickets for people
who participate in the events.
The emphasis is not on winning
but on participation. Winning is not
a prerequisite for getting a prize.
Each participant in the events will
be given a ticket and at the end of
the competition drawings will be
held to determine who will receive
the prizes.
The days events are produced
through a group effort on the parts
of the various departments.
Mendenhall Student Center is spon-
soring the Band and the Intramural
Department is setting up the games.
Hot Dogs and Hamburgers will
be available for a small fee (50-75')
through most of the day (they will
not be free as was previuosly
reported.)
PHoto By GARY PATTERSON
Students participate in Mello Yello chugging contest at last year's 'Affair on the Mall'
WZMB General Manager Sam Barwick
Gives 'Guarantee' Of Station's Success
Photo by CHAP GURLEY
WZMB's Sam Barwick
broadcasts to begin this semester
"I guarantee you we will be on
the air this year were the en-
couraging words of WZMB General
Manager Sam Barwick.
The radio station which has been
met with numerous problems in the
past few years may go on the air in
the fall, if Barwick has his way.
In July, the ECU Media Board
approved a bid for equipment for
the station, and according to Bar-
wick, the equipment should arrive
within 90 to 120 days of that date,
making the arrival date before
Christmas.
I still don't have a dafe said
Barwick, referring to an exact on-
the-air date for the station, but said
that it should be "sometime this
fall
The station should be on the air
about 18 hours a day, Barwick said,
with a format that is primarily
album-oriented rock and jazz. Bar-
wick added that the station will also
probably run some classical and a
requisite amount of public service
broadcasting.
Barwick said that he expects that
he will need between 20 and 25 peo-
ple to staff the station. According to
Barwick, the disc jockey's will work
in two-hour shifts throughout the
day.
Barwick expects that the ration of
the music will be about 70 percent
rock and 30 percent jazz on a
regular programming day.
The station has been plagued with
problems stemming from the FCC
to the Media Board.
When the station first tried to
renovate, a change in FCC regula-
tions said that there would have to
be a distinct difference in overall
wattage of the station. (When the
station was originally on the air, it
ran through campus electrical units
and was only available on campus.)
Thisfmeant a change was needed in
equipment and space requirements.
At that time John Jeter was the
station manager. Jeter fought for
the station for three years but was
unsuccessful in getting it on the air.
Jeter was replaced by Glenda Kill-
ingsworth, and again controversy
arose. Jeter was named advisor to
the station and was eventually ac-
cused by Killingsworth of going
about his authority and signing cer-
tain requisitions of which he had no
right to sign. In the end, Jeter
resigned his position.
Killingsworth made little progress
in getting the station back on its
feet. And at the end of last year,
Barwick was named to the post.
Barwick has progressed the farthest
of the three in actually getting the
equipment ordered. If everything
goes according to schedule, the sta-
tion could be on the air by the end
of the semester.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Co-op Program3
Opinions4
Werewolves6
Bomb Threats7
ECU Depth Chart9
AC. Goes National10

f&





if
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1, 1981
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
It you or your organization
would like to have an item printed
In the announcements column
please send the announcement (as
briet as possible) typed and
double spaced to The Kast Caroli-
nian in care of the news ednoi
There is no charge for an-
nouncements, but space is often
limited
The deadline lor announcements is J
p m Fndav for the 1 uesdas paper and
5 p.m. Tuesdas toi the Thursday
paper
The space is available 10 all campus
organisations and departments
HOUSING
For ECU students needing help
with non university housing, the
Otf Campus Housing Oftice
publishes a listing ot available
rooms apartments, houses and
mobile homes m the Greenville
area Since materials are updated
daily students should come by the
oftice m person tor the most cur
rent information Listings for
Greenville apartment complexes,
lor students seeking roommates,
and a telephone for placing local
calls are also provided The offices
serves faculty and staff as well as
students
POETS
The American Collegiate Poets
Anthology and International
Publications is sponsoring a Na
tional Poetry Contest in the fall ot
1981 The deadline is October 31
For more information write to In
ternational Publications, P O Box
44�?7. los Angers, Ca 90044
MASS
Each Sunday fhe'e is a Roman
Catholic Mass at the Biology
Building in the lecture hall at 1
p m All Catholics and any other
Interested students are welcome
Each Weonesaay at 5 p m at the
Newman Center on 953 E Tenth
St there is a Mass followed by a
meeting and a meal Donations
are acceptea fo' trie meal
Students help to prepare the meal
All are welcome to come and learn
about the activities which are
available enioy the tellowsh:p ana
make use of the center
HOMECOMING
Plans have already begun in
preparation for ECU s Homecom
ing 1981 Homecoming weekend is
scheduled for November 6, 7, 8
with a footbai' clash against the
East Tennessee State University
Buccanneers on the 7th This
years ttv�me is Paint the Town
Purple aiO Gold
WELCOME BACK
The Inter Fraternity Council
and the Student Government
Association will present a
"Welcome Back Party' for ail
ECU students on Saturday. Sept. 5
from 1 p m to 4 p m. at the bottom
of College Hill Thirty kegs and
music wiH be provided free with
an ECU student activity card and
I D See ya there1
JEWISH STUDENTS
Hillel welcomes all Jewish
students to ECU Forthcoming
Meetings will be announced Best
FELLOWSHIP
Do you want to live the best lite
possible The only way to do that is
to believe and understand and live
the principles in the Bible. Come
to our fellowship where we teach
the Bible and have a good time.
Menaenhall Student Center, rm.
242, Thursday at 7 JOp m Sept 3
FITNESS
Classes for Faculty and Staff
Fitness will begin Wednesdsay.
September 9, 12.00 noon, in
Memorial Gym, Room lot
Classes will meet on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. Aerobics
Dancer .ie Slenderize Contact
Mrs Jo Saunders. Memorial Gym,
Room 205, 757 6000, for more infor
mation There is no charge for this
class
FELLOWSHIP
There will be a meeting of the
King Youth Fellowship on Wed
Sept 8 in room 221 Mendenhall
The meeting will consist of bible
study, fellowship, and sharing
SOFTBALL
There will be a meeting of all
girls interested in trying out tor
the ECU Softball Team on Toes
day. September 1 Meet in Minges
at 7 00 p m Bring a copy of your
class schedule and your Student
Activity Card. If you cannot attend
contact Coach Martartan al
757 6161
BIBLE
Do you believe in God, or do you
iust go to church for looks? Do you
want to know God? If so, then you
need o understand God's Word,
the Bible That is what we teach,
because we believe it is the tex
tbook to the best lite, a life you en
ioy instead ot being constantly
bummed out like some Christians
you may know Come by
Mendenhall. Rm 212, Thursday,
Sept 3 from 11.30 to 1 30
tanytime) if you want to know
more
SKIING
If s not too soon to start thinking
snow for skiing at Snowshoe, West
Virginia at Christmas and during
spring break Contact Ms. Jo
Saunoers at 757 6000 Memorial
Gym, Room 205 for information
Limited registration
PHI KAPPATAU
LITTLE SISTERS
A meeting will be held Monday
Sept 7 at the fraternity house
Anyone interested in becoming a
little sister should call Keith at
756 5756
BICYCLE
Do you have a bicycle but wish
you knew better, safer ways to get
where you want to go? Would you
like company as ou explore the
area? Are there changes you'd
like to see in laws affecting bicycle
riders? If so. you would be in
terested m the Tar River Bicycle
Club The group sponsors bike
rides every Saturday morning of
varying degrees of difficulty All
rides leave from the Elm Street
Gymnasium at 8 am on Saturday
morning For more information
call 758 9928
CSO
The Center for Student Oppor
tunities (CSO), School of
Medicine, is currently seeking
highly qualified undergraduate
and graduate students fo work
part-time as tutors. Interested
students with expertise in either
chemistry, anatomy, physiology,
biology, math, physics, English,
or SLAP are encouraged to apply.
Other academic areas art also
considered. Competitive wage.
Contact Dr. Frye, Center for Stu
dent Opportunities. 217 Whichard
Annex, or call for an appointment
at 757 6122, 6075. or 6081
MINI-COURSES
Register today for a non-credit
mini course in cloggirg, CPR
training, popular dance, or
calligraphy These courses are
now being offered by Mendenhall
Student Center and are available
to all ECU students, faculty and
staff MSC members and their
guests.
For further information contact
the Central Ticket Office or Tana
Nobles at 757 6611 Also, course
schedules and detailed intorma
tion are available at the MSC In-
formation Center.
CRAFTS
Crafts workshops are now
available at the Crafts Center in
Mendenhall Pottery, darkroom
techniques, floor loom weaving,
photography, Christmas pat
chwork, handbuilt Christmas
ceramics, beginning jewelry, silk
screening, and woodworking are
the workshops which are
available.
For further information call the
Crafts Center or Tana Nobles at
7S7 6611
JVCHEERLEADERS
The first meeting for those In-
terested in Junior Varsity
Cheerieading will be held at S p.m.
on Tuesday. Sept. t at the stadium
end of Minges Coliseum. The
schedule ot practice sessions for
the tryouts on Thursday, Sept. 10,
will be discussed.
KARATE
All members of the Karate
Club: There will be an important
meeting Thursday, Sept. 3 at the
Memorial Ooio. Please be there at
7:30. sharp If you plan on com
peting this year, you must attend
this meeting. Attendance will be
taken. Come prepared for a
workout. Please have physicals
completed and proof of insurance.
SIGN LANGUAGE
East Carolina University and
The Program for Hearing
Impaired Students will once again
sponsor the ECU Sign Language
Club for students and members of
the Greenville community who
would like to meet and practice
their communication skills. The
organizational meeting for the
1981 82 school year will be held
Sunday, Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Student Center Multi
Purpose Room on the East
Carolina University campus.
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Ho-
ly Communion will be celebrated
Tuesday evening, September I, in
the chapel of St. Paul's Episcopal
Church, 406 4th Street (one block
from Garrett Dorm). The service
will be at 5:30 p.m. with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev. Bill
Hadden, celebrating. Supper will
be served following the service.
WOMEN'S TRACK
Can you RUN. JUMP, THROW
or HURDLE?? Join the 1981 82
Lady Pirate Track and Field
Team. Contact Coach Pat
McGuigan at 151 Minges Coliseum
(phone: 757 6441) or come to a
meeting on Thursday, Sept 2 at 4
p.m. in room 151 Minges Coliseum.
INTRAMURALS
All organizations that par
ticipete in Intramural Activities:
there will be an Intramural
Recreational Representatives'
meeting held Thursday, Sept. 3
This meeting will be at 4 p.m. in
Brewster B 102, make sure you
have your representative present!
SUPPER
We're having supper on Wednes
day nights at 5 30 at the Methodist
Student Center The cost is S2 00.
After supper there will be a short
program.
We have housing available for
one female student at Wesley
house due to a recent cancella
tion. Inquire at the office between
9 am and noon, or call 758 2030
SPAN
Student Planning Association
Network is having a "Welcome
Back Get Together" on Wednes
day. Sept 2 at 7 p.m. A $3 00
membership dues must be paid on
Tuesday afternoon from 1 toap.m
in Brewster C 205. All planning
majors and minors are welcome
For more information call 752 7978
or 752 7914.
BAPTIST
Baptist Student Union is having
Open House, Thursday evening at
5:30. Open House will begin with a
cook-out. a brief overview of ac
tivities, and a square dance called
by Nelson Jarvis The B.S.U. is
located next to Wendy's at 511 E.
10th St. Any interested student is
invited.
l
t Hudweiser beer We kno Qf n . -
T�he twer which costs so much to Tr iy?
be,Zl find,n"�W��� .
iir - T ,� u in n im r 1 � j
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1981 Pep Ralley
Thursday, Sept. 3 � 7:00-8:00
Ficklin Stadium
IN ATTENDANCE:
?Coach Ed Emory
ECU Football Team
ECU Marching Band
ECU Cheerleaders
Drawings will be held
for free prizes.
See You There
ANHEUSER BUSCH. INC -ST LOUIS
Distributed locally by J�Hr�y'� B�r A Win"
m
ADVERTISED
ITtM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available lor sale at or
I below the advertised price in each A4P Store encept as specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT SEPT. 5, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N. C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Highway 264 By-Pass
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
Barbecue Bonanza!
Get Sizzling Savings with Green P's For Labor Day!
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Sirloin
Steaks
Bone
In
lb.
Price Available Sun
Mon Tues. Only
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
Fresh
Whole Fryers
lb
2 in a bag
Limit 2 Bags
49
MENU MAKER
Ground
Beef Blend
31b. pkg.
25 Less Fat
Than Regular
Ground Beef
lb.
99�
Allgood
Hot Dogs
12 oz.
Pkg.
88
JANE PARKER
Hamburger Rolls
2 a 88c
w Savings .
A4P QUALITY
or
Hot Dog
Buns
TROPICANA
Charcoal Briquets
10 � 159
Orange Juice
Brewers
IceCream
229
Save
80
Ann Page Cola
2 liter
no return
bottle
79
ANN PAGE
Potato Chips
Regular
or
Rippled
8 oz.
twin
pack
79
A&PCOUPON
A SUPERB BLEND, RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES
Eight 0'Clock
Bean Coffee
5rOOD THRU SATURDAY. SEPT 5. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE. N C
LIMIT ONE
WITH THIS
COUPON
11b.
bag
ASSORTED
Hi Dri Towels
QO0
2
big
rolls
� �
A&P QUALITY
Liquid Bleach
59
e
4g�ti2&
GOLDEN YELLOW RIPE
FRESH WITH QUALITY
CAUFORNIA PLUMP SWEET & JUICY WHITE
Seedless
Grapes
NORTH CAROLINA
RadorGofcten
Dole Bananas ito Delicious Apples
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I HI I AS!M�)l INIAN SI�PTEMBER i 1981
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Cooperative Education Offers Many Opportunities
By MIKE DAVIS
staff Wrilrt
As the number of
graduates hitting the
job market increases,
man of them are faced
with the fact that they
have no real work ex-
perience. In order to
get an edge on the job
market, real work ex-
perience with a degree
from ECU can prove to
be very advantageous.
ECU's cooperative
education offers any
student the opportunity
to get on-the-job ex-
perience while going to
school Cooperative
education is the key to
a better start on the job
market after gradua-
tion.
The federal and state
governments and
private businesses work
with the co-op office in
placing applicants in a
job. These agencies and
businesses come to
ECU each semester to
recruit possible ap-
plicants. The co-op of-
fice gets job descrip-
tions from the
employers telling them
when the job will be
open, what the job en-
tails and the re-
quirements that must
be met in order to get
the job.
The job is usually set
up for three semesters,
alternating between
work and school every
other semester. If the
job should take a stu-
dent away from the
Greenville area, he or
she could possibly do
course work at another
university and have
those credit hours
transferred back to
ECU.
Co-op has another
plan called the parallel
program, in which any
student can be placed in
a job in Greenville or in
eastern North
Carolina, but does not
receive college credit.
These programs help
to place many students
each semester. Some
students find a perma-
nent job with the co-op
agency that they work-
ed with upon gradua-
tion.
The director of the
ECU cooperative
education program is
Dr. Betsy Harper. She
says that the Co-op of-
fice tries to place
students in the Green-
ville area, but most are
placed outside the
Greenville. The office
is staffed by: Harrizene
Keyes, Ray Hudson,
Jane Maier and Lor-
raine Bortz.
For the summer of
1981, the co-op office
was able to place about
150 to 175 students.
These students
represented 27 fields of
study such as accoun-
ting, communication
arts, industrial
technology, biology,
computer science, en-
vironmental health,
political science, and
ppsychology.
Co-op students can
be placed in the Green-
ville vicinity, within the
state, the continental
United States or even
international placement
in Paris, France.
One such co-op stu-
dent is Tondea
Jackson. Miss Jackson
is a political science
major who has a co-op
position with Seymore
Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro,
NC. "Before I began
work under the co-
operative education
program, I did not real-
ly know what I wanted
to do after gradua-
tion she says. "like
so many college
students, I had very lit-
tle work experience.
Through co-op I have
been receiving on-the-
job training in the per-
sonnel field
"My experience in a
government personnel
agency has allowed me
to learn a great deal
about people and wink
in general, she adds.
Some of my duties
are processing new hue
government employees,
setting up interviews,
preparing necessary
paper work, and resear-
ching regulations ap
plicable to the hiring
process
Miss Jackson says
the prospects look good
'on her being hired' for
a civil service job after
she graduates. "I feel
that the work ex-
perience that I have
received will be a
valuable asset in any
tuture career prospect
that I may have she
says. "I would strong-
ly recommend co-op to
any student that wants
to relate their college
education to real work
situation. Experience is
the key to the working
world
The co-op staff will
be very glad to answer
any questions from any
student concerning the
opportunities offered
to the students of EC I
mm
mm
Classifieds
FOR SALE Honda CB HOT 176
Street bike Good condition Good
deal �00 752 052
FOR SALE New Men s TEN
speed for il2S ?S8 " between
4 JO and 5 00 weekdays
ROOMATE NEEDED to share 2
oedroom trailer Rent tjo
.1.1,ties Can Ross ?SJ S884
FOR SALE 10�l
s� 85�:
Gold Rug $50
FEMALE ROOMATE wantad to
snare 3 oedroom duplex 5 blocks
I'Om camus S7 per month plus
one third utilities Call 754 5057
FOR SALE Natural Art 7 Surf
3tard SiOO neq US 5057
Kathy Hall! If you're still m Flet
cher I'll see you soon Welcome
Back Steve McQueen
FOR SALE King sue waterbed
Complete $150 Call '58 4483
FEMALE ROOMATE non
smoker semi studious Need bed
only Come by Apt 204 E Seventh
Street Georgetown Univ Apt one
block from Campus leave note if
no one's home See Theresa
FEMALE ROOMATE Wanted
192 per month, utilities included
Call Kim at '58 338
FOR SALE 4 8 cubic toot
refrigerator used one semester
Call David at 75 58
TYPING for Students, Pro
tessors. Etc Kempie Dunn 1019 E
Wright Road Greenville NC 27834
752 733
ROOMATE WANTED niceapart
ment; good stereo system Air
conditioned cable TV, built in
bar. fenced in backyard and patio
etc Must be silling to pull her or
his own share ol
houseworkPossibly tree meals
arrangementTo see apartment
call 752 2855
"CLIP JOINT" has moved to 119
Garretl Call Marlena at 758 8832
PART TIME WORK on campus
stapling posters to bulletin boards
Choose your own schedule, 4 15
hours weekly. No selling your
pay is based on the amount of
material distributed Our average
campus rep earns S4 17 per hour
This position requires the ability
to work without supervision For
information, contact Jeanne
Swenson. 500 3rd Ave W , Seattle,
Washington 98119. (204, 282 8111
ROOM FOR RENT Great loca
tion, one block from campus and
downtown ITS. Call 752 2459
CARICATURES DRAWN: by
John Weyler cartoonist for The
East Carolinian and Greenville
Timesa, former Carowinds por
trait artist.S10 for black and white.
115 for color. A unique gift idea
Call 752 S77S.
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed
to share ' expenses For more in
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(Greonville).
CAMPER Sleeps 4 I closet, 1
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FOR SALE '74 Yamaha RD 350
chrome and custom tenders,
helmet, racing fernng, batesa
gloves. 45 m p g SS00 757 3529
HELP WANTED Full or part
time Apply Hattras Hammocks
11th and Clark
FOR SALE one WCU football
game ticket Ask tor Eddie
757 4729
FOR SAtE- 14
refrigerator Dark
woodgram door, $50
cubic foot
brown with
Call 754 3379
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OF GREENVILLE
VIP MLMBKRSH1P
1) Lifetime membership.
2) Check cashing up to $25.
3) First guest free � 50t a guest after
4) 10�o off on all gifts
REGLLAR MEMBERSHIP
1) One year membership.
2) Check cashing up to S10.
3) First guest free � SI.00 a guest after
4) 10S off on all gifts
ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OFFER
ROOMATE NEEDED for 3 bi
house m nice neighbor hood, 5 mm
from EC by car $84 plus one
third utilities. 754 3394
Plaza Shell
610 Greenville Blvd.
Phone 756-3023
Hrs.
Mon-Sat. 7-10
Sun. 10-10
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
(Foreign & Domestic)
Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
Prices
Road and Wrecker Service
7
tSHELti
Discounts On Repairs With I .D. w �&
At Last A Bank That
Treats College Students
Like They Have Money.
, � "
MONTUES. Available for
private parties � Papa Katz
will cater any party or func-
tion. We also have a mobile
DJ. for public use.
WED. � "ORIGINAL
LADIES' LOCKOUT" �
8:30-10:00- LADIES' ON-
LY � GENTS IN AFTER
10:00.
THURS. � "SUPER
COLLEGE NIGHT"
Sponsored by the Sig
Ep's � Doors open at
8:30 � One cover at door
� free beverage all night
long.
FRI. � "SPECIALS
DAY" � with a pig
pickin' once a month
starting Sept. II from 3
until closing � 45C for
your favorite beverage �
no cover all day.
SAT. � "A NIGHT TO
REMEMBER" After a
meal on the town � come
enjoy your favorite dance
music � hors d'oeurves
'til 11:00 � ladies free all
night.
SUN. � "KOPY KAT" �
Ladies' Lockout till 10:00
� gents in at 11:00 with
no cover all night long.
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
AH members will be entitled to 3 guests
per evening Neat dress and proper iden
tif.cafion will be required of all members
and guests
�brng application & dues '0 the door and
m (Our membership card that night
I. � � � MEMBERSHIP ��-�
Introductory
Membership - $1.00
for month of Sept.
River Bluff R(L
Behind Putt Putt
758-7912
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you can use the BB&T Tillie
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7 days a week
I
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Nobody works harder for your money.
BB&T
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I SMMATUM
L
i
T





QUie last (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
PAULCOLLINS. tduormch�j
Chuck Foster. m�) .ir.iuirbriu, Jimmy Dupree. mm��� ��w
Chris Lichok. ��,�� �� Charles Chandler, sporu &,�
Alison Bartel, nianifnrftmi Tom Hall, stwsEdiw
Steve Moore, a w��wr Steve Bachner, ��� ��
September I. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Elections
Constitution A Pandora's Box
Another school year is now upon
us and with that comes the in-
evitable: the election of represen-
tatives for the 1981-82 Student
Government Association.
Or does it?
Hypothetical questions usually
start with "what if such as "what
if Napoleon had had the nuetron
bomb?" This case is no different.
What if Lester Nail, SGA presi-
dent, decided he didn't have time to
oversee election of the legislature?
Undoubtedly there will be elections;
we're all too unfortunate to miss
this annual gala. But again, "what
if
The natural reaction would be:
impeach the president.
Good idea, huh?
Well, impeachment of the SGA
president at East Carolina Universi-
ty requires a two-thirds vote of �
you guessed it � the legislature.
Not much chance of a non-existant
organization doing any impeaching.
The summer legislature could im-
peach the president with only two
votes. You see, the summer
legislature consists of the president,
vice president and treasurer.
The potential danger in this ar-
rangement is that any two ex-
ecutives could impeach the third for
any reason they may have.
Neither of these situations has
ever occurred before, but it's in-
credible that the possibility exists.
The election of a governing body
which distributes more than
$100,000 of student fees depends on
the action (beyond that of written
mandate) of one individual.
Welcome to the wonderful world
of politics at East Carolina Univer-
sity.
Summertime Tuition Increase
Leaves Students In The Dark
As students are by now well
aware, tuition has been increased
considerably from last year's levels
for both in-state and out-of-state
students. The increase for North
Carolina residents was a whopping
20 percent or $62 a year. Non-
residents, while hit with a smaller
percentage increase, will be forced
to cough up an additional $130. But
despite the added expense these in-
creases are disturbing for another
reason: The manner in which they
were approved.
The UNC board of governors,
final arbiters on such questions, ap-
proved the hikes in July while the
majority of students were at home
and had no way of knowing that
their tuition was being increased. In
other words, students were basically
kept in the dark. Their first indica-
tion that they would have to fork
over extra bucks was when they
received their bills for fall semester
in the mail.
DOONESBURY
All this would not be so upset-
ting, however, if it weren't for the
fact that bills including the tuition
increase were sent out before the
board of governors officially
okayed the move. C.G. Moore, vice
chancellor for business affairs, at
ECU said that this was done in
order to allow students to mail
payments on time and avoid a $10
late fee. "We were just trying to
save students some money he
said.
Perhaps, but the real issue here is
the unnerving confidence the ad-
ministration had that tuition would
indeed be increased. Administrators
obviously considered the increase a
foregone conclusion.
From this it would be logical to
conclude that no real debate takes
place at board of governor's mee-
ings, that all real issues are settled
beforehand� perhaps in those pro-
verbial smoke-filled rooms.
by Garry Trudeau
THANKS F0rXSPRJN6lr46
M�,HONEY. IlAlfiSBe-
6INNIN6r0GOAUTJl�
STIR-CFATfIN7WFB.

ITS A UVIN6 HELL,
JAILMUST H0NBX A STINKJNS
d�R0U6H, MOFfNHJtmTY
sir. which only the
siron6 survive.
GOSH
ITSOUNPS
AWFUL
SOHOUJLONd
HAVZYODBUH
HiTHOUTA
MMAN,SIR?
SINCE FRIDAY.
JUST PROP MB
OFFATimBUS
SWWN.BUPDY.

R
VESSUP, yOUkE CRATf .THINKING THAT PEOPLE CAN REGRESS ANO ACT LIKE APES f �
Campus Forum
Non-Academic Fees Criticized
As a part-time student I want to pro-
test not only the increase in all fees but
also the requirement for part-time
graduate students to pay a health ser-
vices fee and other non-academic fees.
While I understand that an increase in
fees is necessary to keep pace with infla-
tion, I am astonished at the 116 percent
increase for taking one three-hour
course. Surely graduate programs at
ECU will suffer reduced enrollments
since an increase of this porportion
places advanced degrees out of the reach
of many part-time graduate students.
Furthermore, to saddle us with a
health service fee and other fees puts an
unfair burden on us since we are being
charged with services many of us neither
want or need.
I ask that the board of trustees in-
vestigate the matter of fees and recon-
sider charging the part-time graduate
student with this unreasonable increase
and with fees which provide us with no
services. Not to consider the needs of the
part-time students is tantamount to
economic discrimination; many of us
will be forced to forego graduate school
at ECU altogether or transfer our credits
to another institution.(For example, at
N.C. State University a three-hour
course only costs only $95 compared
with $166 at ECU; there fees increased
only 6 percent over last year's costs.)
I am urging all part-time graduate
students to exploitative increase; and I'd
like to hear from university officials the
reasons that these students are being
made to bear the brunt of the costs of
the university's expansion.
ELIZABETH M. MEADOR
Graduate Student
'Delightful Stab'
Kathy Weyler's article ("Preppie
Look 27 August) was a delightful stab
at the lightweight mentality constantly
seeking security through an ability to in-
stantly index individuals according to
their appearance. Sadly, neither this
mentality nor the pack-thinking preppie
will gain anything more stimulaiing
from this parody than media recogni
tion.
LEWIS HOLMN
Senior, x
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone numlvr
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pagts.
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All Ut-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by ihe
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
Teachers Provide Reasons To Drop
By MICHAEL HIGHSMITH
Well, here we are at the beginning of
another semester. I hope everyone is mak-
ing a smooth transition into a whole new
set of classes, professors, labs, and seating
charts. Breaking in a new semester for
some people can be difficult and tedious,
but I've always found it to be a new
challenge. On the first day of class I
always pause at the door before I find a
seat and look around the room for friends
I might want to sit by. If I don't recognize
anybody then I look to see if my favorite
corner spot is unoccupied, it's the back
right corner by the window. No matter
where I choose to sit, by the end of the
semester I have become friends with
everyone who sits around me.
This is the time of the semester when
everybody is intently scoping out their pro-
fessors and trying to determine which ones
they will not get along with. Sometimes
you can tell just by looking at them that
you are going to wind up dropping their
class. This attitude is brought on mostly
by a conflict of personalities � when the
chemistry just isn't right. I had one class
where a third of the students asked for
their card after the professor handed out
the infamous syllabus the First day. The
strictness of a syllabus is one of the aspects
a student considers when deciding whether
to keep or drop a class. After all, how
many people can go through an entire
semester of 8 a.m. classes and not miss
more than the three cut maximum their
professors set forth?
Some professors seem like they are as
nice as they can be until the deadline to
drop classes has passed. After the deadline
they can act any way they please (without
the fear of losing most of their students).
Other professors use scare tactics like tell-
ing the students that the class won't be
easy, there will be plenty of homework,
and they had better bust a- if they want to
pass. Sometimes this is the technique they
use in order to keep only those students
that are serious about the class in the first
place. I have had my share of this type of
professor over the years, and believe me
most of them mean what they say when
they lay down the rules. These are the
classes you should put the most effort into.
Other professors seem nice enough until
you get their first test. I have had too
many professors in this category.
Sometimes what is on their test has ab-
solutely no bearing on what they said in
class. You take a hundred pages of notes
from their lectures only to find that those
notes are rendered totally useless because
the test comes straight from the book. I
had one of these professors recently whose
lectures consisted of telling us which pages
answer the questions at the end of the
chapter, then the rest of the class period he
spent reminiscing about the past. In my
notes I've got the man's life history.
Have you ever had a professor from a
foreign country whose accent was such
that you could only understand about half
of what he said? It may be interesting for a
while, but these professors are just as
serious as the others when test time rolls
around. These professors exist in virtually
every department on campus. I have
nothing against them; it's just hard to
learn from them if you can't understand
what they are saying. I've even had
American professors that I couldn't
understand.
My favorite type of professor is the kind
that is constantly cracking jokes in class.
The jokes don't necessarily have to be fun-
ny, but their attitude shows that they are at
least trying to relate to the class instead of
just lecturing because it is their job. I have
found that I try harder and learn more
when the professor tries to make the class
an enjoyable learning experience. On the
other end of the spectrum lie those pro-
fessors who refuse to even answer ques-
tions. These people usually answer your
questions by telling you to find it in the
book. This is a case where 1 usually drop
the professor instead of the class.
Some professors also like to evaluate
their students at the beginning of the
semester to see just what type of people
they will be dealing with for the next few
months. In one class every student had to
stand up and give his name, major,
hometown and why they were taking the
class; it sort of took me back to my grade
school days. During all this I noticed the
professor taking notes � probably for
future reference.
A friend of mine was so dissatisfied with
his classes last year he dropped from a full
schedule to just nine hours. He did this
after the last day to add classes, so he end-
ed up almost being a part time student. At
that rate it would take eight yejjs to
graduate. That is something to consider in
the future when you are deciding whether
or not to drop a class. Remember the
alternative: the notorious lines of drop-
add.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Michael Highsmith is a
senior marketing management major from
Fayetteville.
Opinions
Solicited
In addition to the "Campus Foium'
section of the Opinion page, The East
Carolinian has begun to feature various
students and faculty members as guest
columnists. The staff of the newspaper
is proud to introduce this innovative ef-
fort to better serve our readers and pro-
vide yet another outlet for opinions.
The columns are restricted in content
only with regard to rules of grammar
and decency. Persons submitting col-
umns must be willing to accept "bline"
credit for their efforts, as no entrys from
"ghost writers" will be published.
Michael Highsmith, a senior
marketing management major from
Fayettville, was the first ECU student to
be featured under this system.
Numerous other students have indicated
interest in the column.
Persons interested in participating or
desiring further information may con-
tact Jimmy DuPree, managing edi tor of
The East Carolinian, at 757-6366, 6367
or 6309 or by visiting the newspaer of-
fice on the second floor of the Publica-
tions Building.
Bobbj
his colleaf
Gol d s bo i
squad ere
the popular i
show "Da
the telephone r
a call for a
heart ana. �
"We had be
same revs
heart a
before sid Br
10-year vet
rescue squad. '
t i me
EC
( ontinuel
I he
dei
crea
Jen I

tran
studem
board, Mei
student ur
den-
Put

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t






r Ht l ASIAROI INIAN
SIJ'M MHI H I. JVK1
�?l�
mis
ppie
AN
r1
agey
at-
�. the
I
I P I
At
ars to
.der in
whether
Remember the
t drop-
? Highsmith is a
tent major from
1
w
impus Forum"
age. The East
feature various
fmbers as guest
the newspaper
s innovative ef-
:aders and pro-
or opinions.
:ted in content
It f grammar
submitting col-
iccept "byline"
no entrys from
ished.
h, a senior
It major from
ECU student to
this system.
i have indicated
f articipating or
jation may con-
naging editor of
757-6366, 6367
e newspaper of-
of the Publica-
Rescue Squad Training Goal Of Med School
Bobb Brasweil and
his colleagues on the
G o1d sbo r o res cue
squad were watching
the populai television
shou " Dallas' when
the telephone rang with
a call foi a possible
heart attack victim.
"We had been to the
same residence on a
heart a 11 a c k call
before std Brasweil, a
10-yeai veteran ol the
rescue squad. "But tins
time ue were better
prepared because we
were able to offer ad-
vanced life support ser-
vices
Training more
emergency medical
techniciains in advanc-
ed life support is the
goal of a program that
started at the ECU
School of Medicine
three years ago, accor-
ding to Dr. E. Jackson
Allison Jr chairman
of emergency medicine.
Today, Allison says.
the advanced training
provides the basis for
the development of an
emergency medical ser-
vices system for the
region, a project sup-
ported by a $500,000
grant from the Depart-
ment of Health and
Human Services and
local matching funds
from 29 county govern-
metns in Eastern North
Carolina.
"Appropriate train-
ing is just one compo-
ECU Fees Increase
i ontinut'd From Page One
The increase in student tees,
however, is not tied to the Board's
decision. The figures for the tee in-
creases come from the office ot Stu-
dent lite. These increases are
broken down into athletics, in-
tramurals, and recreational sen ices,
student activities and the media
board. Mendenhall Student Center,
student union programs, and stri-
dent housing
The largest increase in fees was
made in the student housing area,
with approximately one third of the
increase used to provide for a new
phone and paging svstem in the dor-
mitories. Dr. Timer E. Meyer, Vice
(. hancellor for Student Life, ex-
plained that the increases resulted
from "mostly inflation, salary in-
creases, and utility costs
Dr. Meyer also suggested that any
increases in housing next year would
run be nearly as large as this year's
increase.
nent of a complete
emergency system
said Allison during an
interview in his office
at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
"The region needs a
complete network oT
trained personnel,
facilities and equip-
ment to effectively res-
pond to any emergency
� from a traffic acci-
dent or cardiac arrest to
mass victims of a fire,
explosion, or hur-
ricane
Allison serves as
medical director for the
Eastern Carolina
Emergency Medical
Services Systems, the
private, non-profit cor-
poration based in
Washington, N.C
that developed the
grant application for
the project. Governed
by a 30-member board
of directors, the agency
is responsible for im-
nlementing the com-
prehensive plan to im-
prove not only the skills
of emergency personnel
but also the com-
munication systems
and equipment with
which they work.
In 1978 the medical
school began offering
the classroom instruc-
tion required for cer-
tification in advanced
life support, a level of
care in which emergen-
cy personnel in the field
receive and respond to
medical ordrs from
hospital-based
emergency department
physiciains.
Fourteen members of
the Goldsboro rescue
squad started the 120
hours of instruction in
September 1980 and
completed the course in
April. On May 1, the
first day the advanced
services were offered,
the squad received the
call about the heart at-
tack victim and put
their skills Jo work.
"We started basic
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sun
life support on the pa-
tient said Brasweil.
"and then 1 called the
emergency department
doctor (Dr. Bryson
Bateman) at Wayne
Memorial Hospital to
request advanced life
support.
"The patient made it
through just fine. In
many cases, having ad-
vanced life support and
the contact with a
physician will really
make a difference
What may also make
the difference between
life and death is the
availability of ap-
propriate equipment
and a dependable com-
munication system,
said Allison, who noted
that the grant will par-
tially fund the purchase
of essential life-support
equipment requested by
rescue squads and
hospital emergency
departments in the
area. �
.For example, the
grant will pay half the
cost of a pediatric trac-
tion splint for Per-
quimans County, an
ambulance stretcher for
Wilson County and
anti-shock trousers for
Onslow County.
Hospitals in
Chowan, Dare and
Wilson counties will
receive mobile radios
purchased with grant
funds.
The project will also
provide 11 community
colleges in the region
with audiovisual and
teaching equipment to
supplement the instruc-
tion offered in basic life
support.
According to
Allison, the advanced
life support training
started at ECU in 1978
will continue to receive
emphasis as part of the
regional system.
Squads in Chowan,
Nash, Pitt, Wayne and
Wilson counties have
already completed the
course, and a squad in
Beaufort County is in
training now
"The creation of an
emergency medical ser-
vices system is a corn
plex and long-term
goal said Allison
ABORTIONS UP TO
� 12th WEEK OF
PREGNANCY
ABORTIONS FROM 13 16
WEEKS
AT FURTHER EXPENSE
tigs 00 Pregnancy Tet Birth
Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling For
further information call
832 0535 (Toll Free Number
800 271 25681 between � A M
and 5PM Weekdays
KALElGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 West Morgan St
Raleigh. N C
Back to
School
Eyeglass
Special
For all ECU Students,
Faculty & Staff
Offer Good Through
Sept. 30, 1981
Located across Dr. Park
752-1446
OPTICIANS
opticians
association
of amenca
9-5:30
AAon.
Fri.
THE HIGH COST
0FA COLLEGE
EDUCATION JUST
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
SEPTEMBER 1, 1981 Page6
The Hollywood
Werewolf Hunt
On Once Again
The ad campaign for vco Embassy's "The Howling The embodiment of an age-old Hollywood product.
By JOHN WEYLER
and KATHY WEYLER
"Even a man who is pure at heart,
And says his prayers by night,
May become a wolf when the
wolfbane blooms,
And the Autumn moon is bright. "
Who's afraid of the big bad wolf?
We all are, and that's why
Hollywood has recently released no
fewer than three films concerning
the curse of lyconthropy: "An
American Werewolf in London
"The Howling" and "Wolfen
The war between man and wolf
has gone on for ages. We've almost
wiped them out today, which is a
part of the theme of "Wolfen" �
the near extinction of the beasts has
left only the strongest and smartest
to survive, and the resulting
"super-wolves" invade our cities.
Our apprehension of Canis Lupus
and kin is understandable. A hun-
ting animal, the wolf was a com-
petitor with and possible predator
of early man. This fear impressed
itself on humanity's imagination,
creating werewolves, literally mean-
ing "man-wolves
These ferocious, furry folks, peo-
ple who turned into wolves or wolf-
like beings due to forces as diverse
as the light of the full moon or
drinking water from a wolf's paw
print, were actually believed to exist
� a fact to which the writings ol
Pliny, Plato, and Petronius attest.
All three refer to lycanthropy, the
pseudo-science of werewolfism
Lycanthropic legends circulated
through superstition and storytell
ing (some scholars think the big ;
wolves in "Little Red Riding
Hood" and similar stories
originally werewolves),and wer
passed down through histor
thrive in today's folklore: film.
While "The Werewolf" appeared
on screen in 1913, the first significant
cinema shocker in the vein was
"Werewolf of London"(1936)
Henry Hull starred as a scier-
studying the mariphasa 1 upino
lumino, a rare fiowe- that bloon
the moon and acts as an amide
"lycanthrobia His research
almost nipped in the bud, for, w
bitten in Tibet by a werewolf, the
curse is transferred and Hull
becomes hairy and howling
The monarch of movie beasts
"The Wolf Man" (1941). Unluck
Larry Talbot (played by
Chaney Jr.), nipped by Beia the
werewolf, becomes one himsell
"when the Autumn moon is
bright Supposedly only silver
could kill him, but even that seemed
ineffective as he loped through five
See PEPPER Page 8
Australia's 'Breaker Morant' Here Tomorrow
By DOUG QUEEN
Staff Writer
This Wednesdsay, September 2, the Student Union
Films Committee will screen Breaker Morant in Hendrix
Theatre at 8 p.m. Following the film, in room 221 of the
student center, a short discussion of Breaker Morant
will be held. Coffee and doughnuts will be served and
any interested students, faculty or staff are invited to at-
tend.
Breaker Morant, directed and written by Bruce
Beresford, is an Australian film based on a factual even
which occurred during the Boer War.
Three Australian soldiers are unofficially ordered to
execute some Boer civilians suspected of terrorist ac-
tivities. Inadvertently, a German missionary witnesses
the execution prompting Morant to trucidate the mis-
sionary as well.
This act is perceived by world opinion as murder
which alarms the British high command as they fear that
the Germans may offer military solice to the embattled
Dutch colonists.
Lord Kitchener, who had ordered the murders, at-
tempts to pacify the ire of the German public and the
condemnation of world opinion toward the British war
effort by negating the military tribunal court that
ultimately finds "justice" in the execution ot Morant
and one of his feliow I he-third man is let off easy with
a life sentence.
What is interesting about Breaker Morant thematical-
ly is its parallel to another imperialistic adventure in our
own lifetime: the Viet Nam conflict. And more
specifically, the My Lai incident in which Lt. Willliam
Calley, allegedly under orders from higher up,
destroyed the village and its inhabitants for their "Viet
Cong sympathies
Like the analogv with Calley, Morant is served up to
the world as the responsible ass.wn and made to beasr
the brunt of the sins of imperialism. Beresford's film
presents us with a question: In war, who is responsible?
Breaker Morant is a court-room drama, although
Beresford's skillful directing relieves the stupor of the
court-room with plenty of flash-backs, which fills out
the characters giving them more than flesh, they come
off the screen with a spirit that good acting imparts.
Edward Woodward plays Breaker Morant, Breaker
because he breaks wild horses in Australia, in a style
that the late John Wayne use to call his own: a hard man
with a broad romantic streak. Soldier, poet and singer,
with a whimsically ironic acceptance of his fate, Breaker
approaches the dimensions of a Renaissance grunt.
Jack Thompson plays the defense attorney arguing
that it is both a miscarriage of justice and an act of
hypocrisy to single out these men for crimes no different
from those committed by half the British Expeditionary
Force and, the film implies, by soldiers on half the
battlefields and paddyfields ince.
Beresford's cinematographer, Don McAlpine,
deserves special credit. McAlpine, who did two other
Beresford films and My Brilliant Career, wields
camera with a lyricism and directness that should
recognized as world-class. From wide-panned angles
the quick close-up, McAlpine continually wrenchc
eyes to the moment most revealing to the audience
understanding of the subjecst.
It is remarkable that the Australian film indusm
attained world stature only within the last ten or
years. Films such as My Brilliant Career, Picnic V
Hanging Rock, The Shout, The Chant of Jimrm
Blacksmith, Walkabout and others have brought
siderable attention and acclaim to Aussie cinema.
With Breaker Morant, Bruce Beresford may no? add
any new twists to the court-room genre, but a finely
crafted film is always enjoyable.
Lugosi & Karloff
Stars Went Ape Over The B's
By JOHN WEYLER
Staff Writer
Apes have always been an unusual obsession of au-
diences and filmmakers alike. "Balaoo the Demon Ba-
boon" (1913), the classic "King Kong" (1933) and the
"Planet of the Apes" scenes (starting in 1968) may be
considered highlights in the history of cinematic si-
mians. Almost certainly the worst movie monkeyshines
ever seen were in "The Ape" (1940), with Bons Karloff,
nd "The Ape Man" (1943), with Bela Lugosi.
Karloff and Lugosi, claimants to the dubious title of
King of Movie Monsters, had very similar careers. Both
were unknown actors until their late forties when in the
same year, 1931, they appeared in two classic horror
films: "Frankenstein" and "Dracula
The outstanding success of these seminal shockers
made Karloff and Lugosi stars. Unfortunately, they
Bad Sci Fi
both quickly became typecast as "monster actors and
as the quality of horror movies plummetted, so did their
careers.
Both Boris and Bela spent the rest of their lives doing
low-budget, grade-C chillers for the smaller studios. In
"A Pictorial History of Horror Movies
Denis Gifford describes the films Karloff made for
cheapo Columbia studios:
"The Columbia Karloffs were so similar that they
became known in the trade as the Mad Doctor Series.
For no matter how outlandish a name they gave him,
how bizarre a line of research, or how grand a finale, by
the next 'B' picture Karloff was back in business, all
eyebrows and British Usp, raising the dead, tampering
with nature, injecting serums, switching switches, pull-
ing fatal levers, and generally meddling with that which
man should leave alone
Lugosis career uas even worse, hampered as he was
not only by typecasting, but b a heavy Hungarian ac-
cent, personal money problems, and drug addiction. He
died in a state institution in 1956. after appearing in
what is widely considered the uorst movie ever made:
"Plan 9 From Outer Space
All of which brings us to the two actor's ape antics,
which again point out the similarities (and sleaziness) of
their careers.
In "The Ape Karloff plays Dr. Adrian, a mad (at
least misguided) scientist searching for a cure for polio,
the disease that killed his wife and daughter. He thinks
he finds his cure in a serum containing fluid tapped
from the spinal columns of human beings. Karloff kills
an escaped circus ape, skins it, then hides in the hide to
attack people and extract their spinal fluid. At the films
long-awaited end, Dr. Adrian as The Ape is shot and
killed, but before dying the daft doctor realizes his
trange serum had indeed cured the pretty young polio
victim he was experimenting on. Science and spinal fluid
triumph again!
Three years later, audiences were assaulted with "The
Ape Man Lugosi plays James Brewster, who for
obscure scientific reasons had injected himself with
spinal fluid taken from a gorilla. This causes the poor
guy to go ape, growing hairy and generally acting
apishily.
He (it?) then goes about obtaining human bodies,
hoping that by injecting their spinal fluid into himself
he'll reverse his simian condition. Of course he dies
tragically at the end (I'm not sure why, I think from an
overdose of bananas.)
How could two such sickeningly similar movies exist
side by side? Thogh both were Monogram productions,
according to the credits no other connection exists bet-
ween them; supposedly "The Ape" and "The Ape
Man" were based on separate literary sources. What
most likely happened was that "The Ape Man" was in-
tended to be a sequel to "The Ape but the filmmakers
couldn't get a hold of Karloff so they reworked the
script a bit and handed the mess to unlucky Lugosi.
Even with the revisions they didn't improve the theme,
See BAD, Page 7
Exploring The French Riviera
The COTE d'AZUR from Robin Williams' Travel-Adventure Film "French Riveria The film will
be shown on Wednesday, October 14 in Hendrix Theatre as part of the MSC T-A Film Series.
T
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Int will
Threats Made
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER I. 1981
ITHACA, N.Y.
i, PS) Anonymous
callers accused seven
staff numbers of Cor-
nell University's humor
magazine, the I unatic,
of racism and threaten-
ed their safety after the
nagazine printed a
mock advertisement
depicting Ku Klux Klan
members surrounding a
flaming cross.
rwo weeks after the
id appeared on August
10. all seven people
eceived calls within a
ew hours of each
other. Some earned of
nibs or "broken
necks while other
allers were "more
easonablc according
Lunatic editorial
ard member Adam
( astro.
1 he tuning of the
hreals led staff
s mbers to believe the
callers "worked in con-
nection with each
uher he adds.
Castro says they were
surprised by the reac-
tion, noting the ad was
meant to "compare the
atrocities of Nazi Ger-
many to the actions of
the KKK
The ad suggested
Klan members who've
"had a long hard day
lynching niggers"
should relax with a
"Genocide Cream Ale,
imported from Ger-
many, of course
The ad "was not
meant to be taken at
face value Castro
asserts.
The day after the
staff received the warn-
ings, Castro placed a
letter in the Cornell
Daily Sun inviting
students to discuss the
ad "rationally but
warned "we stand by
what we print
The staff did publicly
apologize for the ad
after two students
"convincingly argued"
Bad Ape Films:
Below Grade B
( ontinued from P. 6
or production
values any; both films
are absolutely awful.
Unbelievably, the
success of "The Ape
Man" demanded a se-
qsuel son of � for
the erv next year saw
the release of "Return
the Ac Man Says
t iifford:
'This catch-penny
piece had nothing at all
Frank Moran from an
Arctic iceberg. He in-
serts John Carradine's
brain and the apeman
turns into George Zuc-
co ! The logic was
frightening if the film
was not
Why the filmic
fascination with apes?
Perhaps because
they're mankinds'
closest cousins, our
nearest evolutionary
ancestors. Apes repre-
sent our buried brutal
natures, a savagery
o do with the previous
It which surfaces at times
tied its title by be- in the form of inflicting
ing about the return of upon helpless audiences
an ape man. Lugosi as such agony as "The
Professor Dextger Ape" and "The Ape
prehistoric Man
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the ad "stirred up anti-
semitism in readers
even though it was
meant "in sympathy
for blacks
Claiming the apology
was a reaction to the
students' arguments,
not to the threats,
Castro says, "We
decided that because
none of us were black,
we couldn't understand
blacks' situation He
added that the majority
of Lunatic's staff
members are Jewish,
and that they'd
originally drawn
"many parallels bet-
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and the persecution of
blacks They later
decided the situations
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1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1981
4t
t
'Pepper' As Werewolf
Continued From Page 6
films, dying in each, but coming back for the
next, with each film getting progressively worse.
Larry evidently finally met his fate in "Abbot
and Costello Meet Frankenstein"(1948) � he
was too embarassed to return.
As low-budget and ridiculous as the Chaney
and Hull flicks were, they served as the inspira-
tion for many other monstrous masterpieces.
One Chaney-like changeling is the character of
Waldemar Daninske, the Polish werewolf, por-
trayed in a series of Spanish horror films by Paul
Naschy, former champion weight lifter turned
actor. Naschy's classics, which include "La Mar-
ca del Hombre Lobo" and "Los Monstrous de
Terror are patterned after the Larry Talbot
pictures, though "La Furia del Hombre Lobo"
borrows from "Werewolf of London" as well.
Only hard-core fans of Oliver Reed and
Michael Landon probably recall that their heroes
were once victims of low-budget lycanthropy.
Landon appeared in a portrait of the werewolf
as a young man, entitled "I Was a Teenage
Werewolf"(1957). This companion piece to "I
Was a Teenage Frankenstein" was made for only
$150,000 and grossed $2.5 million.
Noted British actor Oliver Reed suffered "The
Curse of the Werewolf"(1961), one of the
classier examples of the genre.
Reed played a poor fellow cursed from birth,
being the son of a mute serving girl raped by an
almost inhuman, insane beggar. Exactly why
such a parentage makes a man go furry and foam
at the mouth during the full moon is left unclear.
Still, 'Curse a product of the uneven but
often excellent output of England's Hammer
horror film studio, is definitely one of the most
stylish and intelligent werewolf movies ever
made.
"Werewolf of London" and "The Wolf
Man" series were also influences on two of the
current hairy scarers. Joe Dante's "The Howl-
ing" has been described as "a new breed of hor-
ror film that is tasteful, tense, terror-filled and
intelligent, with a built-in sense of humor
which applies equally to John ("Animal House"
and "The Blues Brothers") Landis' "An
American Werewolf in London
Both of these movies are well-made modern
monstrosities, splattered with all the blood and
gore today's talented technicians can provide,
but at the same time are affectionate parodies of
the old lycanthrope flicks. "The Howling" is
especially insistent in its reverence of, and
references to, its animalistic ancestors, extending
to such esoterica as naming characters after the
directors of "The Wolf Man "Frankenstein
Meets the Wolf Man" and related movies.
In an interview in Fantastic Films magazine
(August, 1981), director Dante discussed his
filmic inferno: "I thought it would be fun to
make a werewolf picture. The last werewolf pic-
ture I could remember was 'The Boy Who Cried
Werewolf It was not an unqualified success.
The only other werewolf films that have been ex-
tant to the general public are those that have been
done for TV. Time has apparently passed these
kinds of films by. So 'The Howling' was a
challenge
What would the Wolf Man himself, Lon
Chaney, think about the people poking fun at
his old films?
David Naughton is stalked by the werewolf-
of-the-moors in this scene from "AWIL
"I used to enjoy horror movies when there was
thought and sympathy involved Chaney said in
Denis Gifford's A Pictorial History of Horror
Movies. "Then they became comedies. Abbot
and Costello ruined the horror field: they made
buffoons out of the monsters. Then the cheap
producers came along and made worse buffoons
of them because they killed for the sake of kill-
ing, there was blood for the sake of blood. There
was no thought, no true expression of acting, no
true expression of feeling. We used to make up
our minds before we started that this is a little
fantastic, but let's take it seriously. And they
were sold seriously. But all this foolishness to-
day, it isn't sold seriously. It's made as a joke, a
laugh, for the kids to go in and have a ball
Chaney was right � horror films today are often
a joke. But why the popularity of werewolf hor-
ror films? Perhaps it's only nostalgia. Perhaps
movies and movie-goers are getting well again.
After all, it simply seems more natural to be wat-
ching man versus wolf rather than man versus
man (seen in innumerable "mad killer" films like
"Halloween" and "Friday the 13th
Whatever the reason, at least the new werewolf
movies are better than many of their predecessors
such as "I Married a Werewolf" and "Werewolf
in a Girls' Dormitory
'An American
Werewolf In London'
The plot: man wanders on the English moors
at night, is attacked by a werewolf, survives the
attack, and thus becomes a werewolf himself.
Sound familiar? This is the foundation of
many a werewolf movie and all the same ingre-
dients are present in "An American Werewolf in
London now playing at Greenville's Buccaneer
Theatres.
However, as a sustained thriller, "An
American Werewolf in London" falls fiat on its
hairy face. Basically, the tone of the movie is a
little schizophrenic. One isn't sure whether it's
supposed to be a serious horror film or a parody
of one.
Despite many � actually too many � gory
close-ups, full moons, mist-covered moors and
English "film noir the picture isn't really very
scary. Only once do we hear anything like proper
spine-tingling horror movie music on a sound-
track that consists mainly of popular "moon
theme" music like Bobby Vinton's "Blue
Moon which probably never sent chills up
anybody's spine.
And yet, "An American Werewolf in Lon-
don" is a likeable little monster of a movie. No
doubt this is due, at least in part, to the excellent
cast, spearheaded by David Naughton of Dr.
Pepper-commercial fame and British actress Jen-
ny Agutter ("Equus").
Naughton portrays the young man traveling
abroad in northern England who, along with his
best friend, Jack, has the misfortune of being at-
tacked by a werewolf. Unlike Jack, he survives
the horror only to be faced with a greater one.
Jack's grisly ghost brings the news that he will
become a werewolf himself. Naughton, mean-
while, has fallen for pretty nurse Jenny Agutter,
who shares his feelings while he shares her apart-
ment. The rest is a fairly predictable series of
Werewolf attacts, police assaults and, yes, car
crashes.
The merit of "An American Werewolf in Lon-
don" is its novel approach to a rather typical
horror movie situation. Director John Landis, of
"Animal House" fame, shows us a typical young
man who becomes a werewolf, but he also con-
centrates on the emotional trauma involved. We
like David (the young manwerewolf) and we
don't want to see him undergo these terrible ex-
periences. We empathize with him. He is real to
us.
If it's a good, old-fashioned werewolf movie
you want to see, don't go to see "An American
Werewolf in London But if you enjoy films
about real people dealing with impossible situa-
tions, you just might like this movie.
A word of warning to the squeamish:
"American Werewolf" contains numerous
scenes of graphic violence and still more close-
ups of very realistic gore. Be prepared. Further-
more, those who are uncomfortable viewing fair-
ly graphic depictions of sex should also be
prepared to take a hike for popcorn about an
hour into the film.
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Sports
Lewis Says Huge ECU Line Has All The Tools
ECU assistant coach Terry Lewis makes a
few points to members of the Pirate of-
fensive line during last spring's pre-season
drills. Lewis and the other ECU coaches
believe the offensive front should be one
of the stronger areas of the 1981 team.
By JIMMY DuPREE
Mun�h� E�Nr
"There are four basic ingredients
of a great offensive line: size,
mobility, agility and the ability to
retain football knowledge. The
group of young men we have up
there this year have these qualities
This is a strong assessment for a
new assistant coach to make, but the
1981 Pirate offensive line Terry
Lewis speaks of is expected to raise
more than a few eyebrows.
"Barring injuries he moans,
"we have the potential to be a great
football team. The one thing we
have to overcome is a lack of prior
success; we have to learn to win
A year ago the offensive line was
riddled with injuries including a
career-ending knee injury to All
American guard Wayne Inman. The
young and inexperienced line drew a
great deal of criticism for the 4-7
premier campaign of head coach Ed
Emory, and Lewis was brought in to
alleviate the problem.
"I think too much blaim was
placed on the offensive line a year
ago says senior guard Bud
LaCock, who replaced Inman at
right guard. "It's hard to have a
winning season when you have as
many different people playing up
front as we had last year.
"We've come closer as a unit this
year he constinues. "We all work-
ed hard in the weight room this sum-
mer, so we're all stronger. That
helps us build confidence, but we've
got to credit a lot of our confidence
in ourselves to Coach Lewis
Lewis, on the other hand, has a
great deal of confidence in his
players.
"Right now we've got Tom
Carnes (6-5, 265) at left tackle,
Oscar Tyson (6-1, 220) at left guard,
Tony Hensley (6-0, 223) at center,
Bud LaCock (6-2, 243) at guard and
Tootie Robbins (6-5, 270) on the
right side of the line explains
Lewis. "That's one of the biggest
lines in the area. But the main thing
is they're not only big, they're agile
� they can get off the line quickly
to execute their blocks.
"At the same time, we have Terry
Long (6-0, 260) fighting Oscar
Tyson for a guard spot and Mindell
Tyson coming off an injury trying
to take back left tackle from
Carnes.
"From what I've seen and been
told, we have more depth than any
team they've had at East Carolina in
recent years
Emory and his staff are pushing
Robbins for All America accolades
this season, and a strong showing
against early-season rivals North
Carolina and N.C. State could help
his chances.
"If Tootie has one major short-
coming, it would have to be his
pass-protection Lewis offers.
"But even that is not his fault. You
get better by repetition and they just
weren't throwing the ball that
much. We are going to emphasize
that aspect of the game this year. I
feel we have the ability to give our
quarterbacks plenty of time to
throw
Senior Billy Parker (6-3, 227)
comes off knee surgery to challenge
for the center position Hensley held
throughout last season, while Rob-
bins will be spelled by sophomore
John Robertson (6-6, 240).
"If there's one positive thing to
come out of last season Lewis
reasons, "it's all the playing time
the younger players got.
"We can be great � there
shouldn't be anybody we fear
So Far Injuries
Few In Buc Camp
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports Editor
Knocking on wood.
The age old superstitious habit is
often done to prevent bad things
from occurring. East Carolina head
football coach Ed Emory gave it a
try Monday while talking about his
team's fortunes in this, tjie, final
week of pre-season practice.
Emory knocked his fist on his
desk before he prepared to talk
about something that haunts all
coaches, and especially this one �
injuries.
The 1980 season, Emory's first at
the Pirate helm, saw more than 50
ECL gridders go down to various
injuries, decimating any chance the
team had of success.
Things appear different this year,
though, as Emory and the Pirates
attempt to bounce back from a 4-7
mark a year ago, the team's first los-
ing record in nine campaigns.
"There's a world of difference so
far Emory said cautiously, and
only after giving his wood desk a
good knocking. "For example, last
year at this time our sports medicine
department had already spent
$14,000. This year we've only spent
$80Qrv-far. That's ?a big drop,
especially considering we've got
more kids on the team this year
Currently, only a handful of
regulars or top reserves are doubtful
for Saturday's game. Three of the
group are offensive backs.
Starting halfback Harold Blue
suffered a concussion last week but
is expected to be ready to go this
weekend. More doubtful are Marvin
Cobb (shoulder) and Milton Corsey
(hamstring), two second team
backs. The word on those two along
Not The Best Of Times
ECU head football coach Ed Emory is pictured during
one of the low points of the 1980 Pirate season, which
saw the club go 4-7 � the first losing season by the team
in nine years. The year was Emory's first at the ECU
helm. He hopes to hold his head much higher in 1981 as
the pre-season prospects of the team appear bright,
despite wide-spread youth.
with tackle Mindell Tyson (ankle)
will be known by mid-week.
Tyson had been the team's star-
ting left tackle before going down
with the injury. He is now listed as
the second teamer there behind
Miami transfer Tom Carnes.
Only two defensive players are
questionable. Safeties Marvin
4 Elliott and Smokay � Nwrris � -broth
have bruises but should be ready to
face Western Carolina's potent
passing game.
Of course, the most publicized
Pi.ate who is doubtful for Satur-
day's game is kicker Chuck
Bushbeck. Emory is still awaiting
word on the Villanova transfer's
availability not only for Saturday's
game but for the season. The word
is that something will be known by
this Wednesday.
Bushbeck continues to content
that he will play this season unless
he is strictly instructed not to by his
doctors.
The All-America candidate cer-
tainly looked impressive in Satur-
day's scrimmage, connecting on a
pair of 35-yard field goals and all of
his extra points, as well as booming
four kickoffs deep into the endzone.
Since injuries are not weighing on
his mind this year as much as last,
Emory is ever-cautious about bragg-
ing on the issue. He prefers to
preach that his team will be improv-
ed, despite a big influx of youth.
"We're definitely a very young
team he said. "Young teams
make mistakes and we've made our
share so far in pre-season. We have
cut down on our MA's (missed
assignments), though
Emory said enthusiasm was not a
problem with the 1981 Pirates, but
added that the enthusiasm often
caused other problems that need to
be remedied.
"We've got intensity, but that
sometimes gets us into trouble he
said. "We want that intensity and,
with it, control
The Pirates got together last
Saturday for a full-dress scrimmage
in Ficklen Stadium, the scene of
Saturday's season opener with
Western Carolina. The second-year
ECU mentor saw both things that he
liked and disliked.
The first- anb second-team offen-
sive units seemed to have some pro-
blem protecting the quarterback.
Other slipups also occurred by the
big boys against the scout team.
Emory was upset, but said that he
felt there were reasons for the often-
unimpressive Saturday play.
"I think we're getting edgy and
tight he said. "You'd always like
to have another week or two, but
we'll be ready. They can only take
so much practice and then you have
to test what you've been coaching
The coach said that he has been
impressed with the team's attitude
as the season draws nearer to begin-
ning.
"The guys have lived, slept and
eaten football for two weeks he
claimed. "Now we'll got to one-a-
days to let them get their legs back
ECU Depth Chart
As Of Monday, August 31
Position
First Team
Second Team
OFFENSE
Quarterback
Right Halfback
Left Halfback
Fullback
Split End
Tight End
Right Guard
Left Guard
Right Tackle
Left Tackle
Center
Carlton Nelson
Earnest Byner
Harold Blue
Roy Wiley
Larry O'Roark
Norwood Vann
Bud LaCock
Oscar Tyson
Tootie Robbins
Tom Carnes
Tony Hensley
Kevin Ingram, Greg Stewart
Stefon Adams, James Bunn
Leon Lawson, Jimmy Walden
Chip Simmons, Marvin Cobb
Ricky Nichols
Will Saunders, Daman Pope
Jeff Autry
Terry Long
Johnny Robertson
Mindell Tyson, Scott Totten
Billy Parker, Tim Mitchell
DEFENSE
Right Tackle
Left Tackle
Rush End
Defensive End
Nose Guard
Linebacker
Linebacker
Right Cornerback
Left Cornerback
Strong Safety
Free Safety
Placekicker
Punter
Returns
George Crump
Hal Stephens
Jody Schulz
Mike Davis
Wally Myers
Mike Grant
Glenn Morris
Freddie Jones
Gerald Sykes
Marvin Elliott
Clint Harris
Chuck Bushbeck
Tommy Barnhardt
Jimmy Walden
Mark Ervin, Steve Johnson
Steve Hamilton, Maury Banks
Chris Skeeter, Alvin Sparks
Jeff Pegues, Moe Bennett
Fee Griffin, Tony Smith
Donald Reid, P.J. Jordan
Amos Twitty, Ronald Reid
Kevin Walker
Chuck Bishop
Will Barrett
Smokey Norris
Kurt Larkins, Ted King
Jeff Bolch
Earnest Byner, Chuck Bishop
ECU halfback Harold Blue in 1980 action
Pep Rally Is
Scheduled For
This Saturday
A major pep rally to kickoff the
1981 ECU football season will be
held in Ficklen Stadium this Thurs-
day night from 7-8 p.m.
The Marching Pirate band and
the cheerleaders will be present, as
well as the ECU team players and
coaches.
The pep rally, which precedes the
team's season opener at home
Saturday against Western Carolina,
is being sponsored by Jeffrey's Beer
and Wine. All persons entering the
stadium will be given a number for
prize drawings throughout the even-
ing.
SGA buses will be in use, carrying
students to and from the pep rally.
The buses are scheduled to begin
trips from Clement and White
dorms at 6 p m. They are expected
to make several stops along the way,
picking up students at designated
bus stops.
�p i
!





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1. 1981

Collins Sparkles In
National TV Debut
Four former East Carolina football players re-
main on NFL rosters as the final roster-cutting
deadlines draw near. At least three of the four are
assured spots on the final 45-man rosters of their
respective teams.
A breakdown of the four and their perfor-
mances and situations follows:
ANTHONY COLLINS � The leading rusher
on the 1980 ECU team is now making a real name
for himself in the NFL. "A.C who is now call-
ed "Tony" by the Boston press, got his first taste
of national television exposure this past Sunday
when his New England Patriots took on the
Washington Redskins.
The game was covered by ABC-TV. Collins got
his bit of airtime early and continued to get it as
the afternoon wore on. After the Redskins scored
on the game's opening drive, Collins stood in the
endzone ready to receive the Washington kickoff.
ABC commentator Frank Gifford pointed out
at that time that Collins had been "a spectacular
surprise in pre-season The ABC cameras then
showed the nation a mug shot of the Collins face.
Collins made the most of his national exposure,
helping to lead the Pats to a 19-10 win over the
'Skins. In addition to some better-than-average
kickoff returning, Collins did quite a job at the
running back position.
The Penn Yan, N.Y. native rushed for 66 yards
on 17 carries, easily making him the club's
leading rusher for the game. Collins also caught
three passes for a total of 51 yards. All of this was
done in about two quarters of playing time.
One of Collins' catches was a crucial one in the
New England win. The team was trailing 10-9 in
the fourth period and faced a third down situa-
tion.
Patriot quarterback Matt Cavanaugh threw a
pass to Collins that went for 34 yards and a big
first down. New England scored the game's go-
ahead touchdown shortly after that. The im-
pressive thing about the play was that Collins ran
for 26 of the 34 yards.
The ABC broadcasting crew was obviously im-
pressed with this former Pirate. Not only is Col-
lins set for a spot on the Patriot roster, he is likely
to become one of the team's biggest weapons as
the season wears on.
ZACK VALENTINE � Despite the fact that
an injury probably cost Valentine the chance thai
he has waited over two years for, the former
Pirate appears assured of a spot on the Pittsburgh
Steelers' roster.
When long-time All-Pro Jack Ham went down
with a severe injury early in the pre-season camp,
Valentine was looked to as a possible starting
linebacker candidate. But, alas, Valentine was
soon injured himself and lost the job to veteran
l.oren Toews
Still, the Edenton native came back from the
injury in time to finish as the team's sixth leading
tackier for the pre-season, bringing down op-
ponents a total of 14 times.
Valentine also had a bit of national exposure
recently. In a nationally televised game with
Dallas, Valentine showed off his wares by sacking
Cowboy quarterback Danny White.
The Steelers have seven linebackers in camp,
not counting the injured Ham, and will keep six.
Valentine is expected to be one of the six.
REGGIE PICKNEY � The former ECU
defensive back has been somewhat of a
journeyman for the past several years in the NFL.
The Baltimore Colts appear to like him, though,
as Picknev looks set for making the team's final
cut.
The Colts have already cut down to 47 and
have two more remaining to make. A spokesman
for the team said Monday that "Reggie's position
PIRA TES
in the pros ).
looks good
SAM HARRELL � The Pirate in the NFL
with the most to worry about as today's
(Tuesday's) cuts come up appears to be running
back Sam Harrell, who is in cold Minnesota play-
ing with Bud Grant's Vikings.
Harrell's situation was not helped any over the
weekend when the Vikings acquired halfback
Tony Galbreath from the New Orleans Saints.
The former ECU star had his biggest pro mo-
ment just last week, scoring a touchdown in a loss
to the Los Angelas Rams. Harrell pulled in a
28-yard pass reception in the same game.
Perhaps offsetting the trade for Galbreath is
the fact that former UNC fullback and Greenville
native Doug Paschall is out with a knee injury.
A spokesman for the Vikings would not com-
ment on Harrell's status in a Monday afternoon
phone hookup with The East Carolinian. The
team will make its final cut today.
Soccer Team Wins
Saturday Scrimmage
Eastern Carolina
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New England's
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The East Carolina
soccer team looked im-
pressive this past Satur-
day in downing the
Budweiser team from
Havelock, 7-0, in a
scrimmage game.
"1 feel like we're a
very, very good club
team said Pirate
coach Brad Smith,
"and maybe in two
weeks a very, very good
varsity team
The Bucs begin their
regular season next
Tuesdav, September 8
with a home match
against Atlantic Chris-
tian. Before that the
team will take on the
Greenville Soccer Club
this Wednesday in a
final pre-season scrim-
mage. That scrimmage
begins at 6 p.m. at the
Minges soccer field.
In Saturday's scrim-
mage, a number of
freshman were most
impressive. First-year
players Mark Hardy
and Todd Engels both
scored two goals.
Freshmen Bill Merwin
and Danny Whelan
each had an assist.
Veteran Brad Win-
chell was the only other
Pirate to score two
goals, while brother
Brian Winchell added
the other ECU score.
All-star candidate at
goalie Steve Brown
played the first half and
had two saves.
Freshman Danny Cur-
tis had three saves in
the second half.
ECU outshot the
Havelock club 24-7.
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Oct. 2 � Chairmen of the Board
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i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 1.1981
11
h
ible
Job
tato
m
I
i
Duke's Wilson Optimistic
About Blue Devil Chances
By CHARLES
CHANDLER
Though he may not
be ready to declare
1981 "the year of the
Blue Devils Duke
head football coach
Red Wilson is op-
timistic about the com-
ing season.
Perhaps the biggest
reason is the fact that
19 starters return from
a year ago. Probably
the most important
among them is
sophomore quarter-
back Ben Bennett, the
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference rookie of the
year last season. All-
America candidate at
defensive back Dennis
Tabron is the top
defensive returnee.
"For the first time
since I've been here
said third-year mentor
Wilson, "we could
have lined up at the end
of spring practice and
been ready to play a
game, not counting on
any freshman help
Despite Wilson's
statement, many
observers feel early
contribution by some
freshman will be the
case in Durham.
The offensive
backfield is the area in
which frosh could be
most notable. Wilson
and his staff went out
looking for a
breakaway threat and
came home with two
blue-chippers � Julius
Grantham of Belleville,
111 and Mike Atkinson
of Princeton, N.C.
Atkinson was a first-
team all-state pick his
senior season and
finished his career with
over 6,000 yards
rushing and 99
touchdowns.
Grantham rushed for
over 1,400 yards his
senior season and was
an All-America selec-
tion.
Wilson plays down
possible contributions
of the two, saying they
"could help in spots
Recruiting experts
would disagree.
Quarterback Bennett
finished the '80 season
with a 52.7 completion
percentage. The Sun-
nyvale, Cal native
threw for 2,050 yards
and had a big
38-completion day
against Wake Forest.
"Ben is a natural
thrower and a tremen-
dous leader Wilson
said. "He has all the
confidence in the world
� sometimes maybe
too much. The kids
really rally behind him
too
Bennett is not
without receivers to
throw to either. Senior
wide receivers Ron
Frederick, Cedric Jones
and speedy Chris
Castor combined for 71
catches, 1,094 yards
and 12 touchdowns a
Forest.
Also returning on
defense are the team's
top three tacklers �
linebackers Jimmy
Tyson and Emmett
Tilley, along with
defensive tackle F.A.
Martin.
With practically
everybody back from
last year's 2-9 team that
Wilson said was "very
close to being much
better the Duke head
coach is expecting
strides forward in 1981.
"We have set some
high goals he said.
"We want to finish
high in the ACC and go
to a bowl game. That
means we're looking
forward to a winning
season � a good winn-
ing season not just a
barelv winning
season
Standing in the way
of Wilson's plans is a
tough schedule. Out-
side of such ACC
powers as North
Carolina, Clemson and
Maryland, the Devils
open at powerful Ohio
State on Sept. 12 and
go to South Carolina
on the 19th. Virginia
Tech, a 1980 bowl team
is also on the slate.
"Yes, we have a dif-
ficult schedule
Wilson said. "But I can
guarantee you we'll be
okay. We don't look
ahead of the game at
hand so I'll only say6
that we are very excited
about playing Ohio
State. We won't play
badly up there; I pro-
mise you that
SUie iEafit Carolinian
Our remarkable staff works around the clock
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FOR STUDENTS
Tuesday, September 1
5:30 p.m.
St. Paul's Episcopal Church Chapel
406 E. 4th St.
(1 block from Garrett Dorm)
SUPPER WILL FOLLOW
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TheFlemta Center has been here far you tooe 1974
provSng private, understanding neaitti oare
to womm. of an agas at a reasonable cost
needua.
Tfte Fleming Center we're here when
Pen 781-WO in r �
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FU5MING CENTER
20C
30C
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year ago.
Another strong point
in the Blue Devil offen-
sive attack should be its
kicking game. Senior
Scott McKinney is close
to setting the ACC
record for most con-
secutive point-after-
touchdown conver-
sions.
Defensive back
Tabron led the Blue
Devils defensively last
year, intercepting five
passes and earning All-
ACC honors. Perhaps
his biggest honor,
though, came when he
was named as the
Sports Illustrated na-
tional defensive player
of the week for his
game against Wake
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CALL
758-1427
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CALL
758-1427
CAROLINA
MARKETING &
TRADING
WE BUY, SELL & TRADE
Attention
For anyone who
wonts to writo for
The East Carolinian
- there will be a
meeting Tuesday at
5 p.m. in the
newspapers' offices.
Our office is
located directly
across from the
front of Joyner
Library in the
publications
building � on the
second floor.
204 E. 5th St. - Downtown
(Across from New by's Sub Shop)
ALL SMOKING
ACCESSORIES
� NO LONGER AVAILABLE AFTER OCT. 1
� BUY YOUR CHRISTMAS PRESENTS NOW!
� PAPERS BY THE CASE
SPECIALORDERS NOW BEING TAKEN ON
QUANTITY ORDERS OF ANYTHING!
�s I
0
a
jaVeC
o'
Dan Fogelburg � "Innocent Age"
ForeignorIV"
Rolling Stones � "Tatoo You"
Stevie Nicks � "Belladona"
Journey � "Escape"
� i- � �� � � ��� ��� �i
STUDENTS, HEBE IS YOUR
CHANCE TO SAVE MONEY
THIS FALL. It's good clean us-
ed merchandise at REAL LOW
PRICES. Any and ail stereo
equipment, guitars, cameras,
watches, car stereo equipment,
portable radios, small dorm ap-
pliances, sporting goods, TV's,
furniture, kerosene heaters,
wood stoves and much, much
more!
417 EVANS ST. MALL
OLD WACHOVIA BLDG.
GREENVILLE
PARKING ACROSS FROM ATTIC!
757-1237
r
Sigma N
and Schl
in cooperation with kash and karry
"BULL RUN '81"
would like to thank the following
sponsors for making this annual
event a tremendous success.
Please patronize
our friends at
Margaux's
The Mushroom Gift Shop
Todd's Stereo Center
Herman Hines of Roffler
Godfather Pizza
Papa Katz
The Wash House
The Flower Basket
University Book Exchange
The Happy Store
Craftsmanship Unlimited
Country City
Marsh's Surf & Sea
Famous Pizza
Marathon Restaurant
Elbo Room
Overton's Supermarket
Pizza Inn
Mitchell's Hair Styling
The Crow's Nest
Rafters
Flamingo Records
King Sandwich Shop
Pro Clean INT.
American Defender Life
Hignite � Melvin and Ass.
Sportsworld
Accucopy
Taylor Beverage Company
i
r





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1, 1981
Tuttle: ACC's Answer To Danger field
I ��� Pm iawraanoaal
CLEMSON, S.C. �
Clemson wide receiver
Perry Tuttle wasn't
named to the all-
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference pre-season
football team even
though he probably will
become the school's all-
time leading receiver.
No Coolers,
Containers
In Ficklen
The ECU athletic
department would like
to remind students that
coolers are large con-
tainers of any kind will
not be allowed into
home football games
this fall.
Persons who do hap-
pen to get such con-
tainers into the gates
subject themselves to
having those posses-
sions confiscated.
"It's just like
Rodney Dangerfield �
I can't get any
respect the 6-foot,
180-pounder said Mon-
day of the voting by
league's coaches that
omitted him from the
all-conference squad.
"We've just got a lot
of good receivers in this
league this year he
said. "It's OK. It gives
me something to shoot
at
The Winston-Salem,
N.C. senior gained 915
yards last season to
lead the conference and
break a single-season
record held by Jerry
Butler, an all-pro for
Buffalo and the NFL
Rookie of the Year two
years ago.
Tuttle goes into his
final season needing
only 572 yards to break
Butler's record of 2.223
yards.
The all-conference
receiving honors went
to North Carolina's
Mike Quick and Wake
Forest's Wayne
Baumgardner.
But the list of good
receivers includes Wake
Forest's Kenny
Duckett, Duke's Cedric
Jones and Ron
Frederick and
Virginia's Greg Taylor,
who will be moved to
flanker this year.
Tuttle's absence
from the pre-season all-
conference team clearly
shows the receiver posi-
tion may be the most
well-stocked with talent
in a conference general-
ly known best for its
running backs.
Tuttle said he's con-
stantly compared with
Butler. Coach Danny
Ford said he has the
potential to be "in

CASH PAID FOR
DIAMONDS AND GOLD
HAVE A PROBLEM?
NEED INFORMATION?
REAL Crisis Intervention
24 HOUR SERVICE
758-HELP
1117 Evans Street
Greenville, N.C. 27834
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Tax Landing Seafood;
ResUartat
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Bob Hearing � Manager
Phone 758-0327
Butler's class or better
than Butler
"We'll get the ball to
Tuttle in a lot of dif-
ferent ways Ford said
as the annual ACC
sportswriters tour made
its stop at Clemson.
Overall, Clemson has
the potential to mount
a strong challenge for
the ACC champion-
ship. The entire offense
returns intact, and a
State, UNC Tickets
Are Still Available
Tickets to East
Carolina's upcoming
football games with
North Carolina and
N.C. State are still on
sale at the Minges
Ticket Office.
The tickets are being
held until this Wednes-
day at 5 p.m. for ECU
students, staff and
faculty members. After
that time they will go
on sale to the general
public if any remain.
Tickets to the Sept.
12 game at UNC are
$10 each. Students may
purchase a maximum
of two. Tickets to the
Sept. 19 game at State
are $5 for the first and
$10 for the second.
Again, the maximum a
student can buy is two
tickets.
year s experience
should help overcome
some of the problems
that led to last year's
mistakes.
Clemson enters the
1981 season under the
cloud of an NCAA in-
vestigation into allega-
tions by two Knoxville,
Tenn. recruits who
charged the coaching
staff offered them
various inducements to
attend the university.
The Tigers apparently
don't think that will
matter, however.
4:00
4:00
IF YOU LIKE CONTACT SPORTS, LOADS OF
FUN AND WILD PARTIES AT PANTANA
BOB'S, THEN TO THE ALLIED HEALTH
FIELD ON TUES SEPT. 1st. COME OUT -
YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED.
yTutLaJiff
CAS
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I FLOYD G. 1
I ROBINSON I
I JEWELERS
I 407 EVANS MALL
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
1 MIKE ROBINSON j
VALERIE HARRIS
I BUSINESS (919)758-2452 I
! INDEPENDENT I
1 JEWELERS I
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RESTAURANT & LOUNGE
ATTITUDE ADJUSTMENT HOURS
5:00 - 6.30 AND AT 10 - 11PM
WE HAVE A NEW FORMAT,
A NEW MENU AND,
NEW AFFORDABLE PRICES.
TRY THE DINNER BUFFET
AT 5:30 PM EVERY TUESDAY
GIVE US A TRY E.C.U.
YOUR WALLET WILL LIKE US.
CLOSE TO THE ECU CAMPUS
LOCATED IN THE MINGES BUILDING
CORNER OF 3rd & EVANS ST DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
OPEN LUNCH AND DINNER MON-SAT.
WE PAY IMMEDIATE CASH
FOR:
CLASS RINGS
WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
Silver coins imtg
CHINA & CRYSTAL ISSiMl
FINE WATCHES MBm P
OF Y
401 S. EVANS ST.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH)
OPEN 9:30-5:30 MONsKt.
PHONE 752-3866
���yiJi.Uv'M'Mljn'HV.IHUgl
Pitt Plaza Barber Shop
Walk lns&
Appointments
All Cuts
5.00
756-1760
ntroductory
Specials
Tuesday & Wednesday
Shrimp or
Flounder
Includes French Fries, Cole Slow,
and Hushpuppies
3.50
M 1
A 1
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
Located at 218 Arlington Blvd.
Two Stores To Serve You
Welcome to Greenville
H L HODGES
COMPANY
LOCATED AT 210 EAST FIFTH STREET
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
Combination Shrimp and Flounder
includes French Fries, Cole Slow, and Hushpuppies
20 OFF ON SHOE PURCHASE
Coupon Good Dntfl 8upt 15. Mutt tgggj With ECU P Cant -
SPERRT TOP-SIDKfc
3.95
1
Crou Tar River bridge - take left at light
building located on left
Fraternity and Sorority
Jerseys
Just Arrived.
ECU Sweatshirts
& Jackets
HODGESBOND'S SHOE CLUB
E. 5th St. � 218 Arlington Blvd.







Title
The East Carolinian, September 1, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 01, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.143
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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