The East Carolinian, August 27, 1981






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. 2
Thursday, August 27,1981
Greenville. North Carolina
16 Pages
Campus Construction
Provides New Facelift
i
By KAREN WENDT
News fr dllor
Some areas of campus may look
distinctly different from last fall,
and the people responsible for the
changes are for the most part pleas-
ed with the changes but rather dissa-
pointed with their progress.
The completion of the Messick
Theatre Arts Center is the most pro-
minent change but though it looks
finished on the outside, there are
many interior details which have not
been completed.
Dedication of the building was
scheduled for August and has now
been postponed until January.
In the interim the drama depart-
ment has been housed in what is
known as the "old mortuary"
which is located on South Evans
Street across from Margaux's. A
spokesperson said that the drama
department expects to be back in its
offices bv October.
Another noticable addition is the
construction of a bus shelter at
Mendenhall Student Center.
The shelter, which has seating
shaped in the letters ECU, was to
have been completed in July, but the
roof still has not been completed.
The shelter, which cost an
estimated $20,000 was financed in
part by the classes of 1979 and 1980.
Reasons for building the shelter
were eliminating traffic on rainy
days in the student center and allow-
ing the buses a more direct route
around the center.
The infirmiry has also undergone
some interior cosmetic changes,
though they too are incomplete at
this time. The renovations were
scheduled to be completed on Fri-
day, Aug. 21. but at the present time
there is still a lot of work being
done.
Kay Van Nortwick, assistant
director of the infirmiry, said that
she expects renovations to be finish-
ed in two weeks.
Van Nortwick said that the
emergency room and the pharmacy
have been completed, but other
work will not be completed for
about two weeks. Van Nortwick
said that the building will not look
finished until new furniture has ar-
rived but that the renovations will
not affect the overall operations of
the infirmiry. "We're embarassed
because it looks so messy said
Van Nortwick.
She also said that the infirmiry is
operating with out some things such
as an interview room and a public
address system but said that this
poses no real problem.
Smoke alarms, which have been
added to some dorms, will eventual-
ly be installed in all residence halls.
The alarms are scheduled to be in-
stalled in all dorms before the end of
the semester.
Students have expressed some
concern over the sensitivity of the
alarms and whether or not they can
be triggered by cooking in the rooms
and by smoking in the hall, but their
exact sensitivity is as yet unknown.
Installation of the alarms began in
July-
Extensive landscaping has also
been done to some areas of campus,
most noticably the area in front of
the old library building where paths
and plants have been added.
Work has also begun on Wright
Auditorium. The auditorium has
been blocked off, much to the
chagrin of those who regularly sit on
the wall outside the building. The
work has caused some temporary
changes in the placement of the
Students Supply Store.
Photo By CHAP GURLEY
Co�,n,caoooBlh,b�rM
Navy Craft
By GEORGE A. THREEW1TTS
HI NrasBurrau
GREENVILLE �The 56 foot ex-
Navy landing craft which had been
remodeled as a research vessel for
underwater archaeologists, shud-
dered gently as a gasoline powered
air compressor roared to life. In the
water, 15 yards away, a dark brown
slush blows skyward from the end
of what looks like a half submerged
piece of stovepipe.
The device was giving scuba
divers a chance to inspect the re-
mains of a large 18th Century
bngantine, believed to be of French
origin, that had once sailed into the
harbor at Edenton, N.C. with arms
and ammunition destined for the ar-
my of Gen. George Washington.
The wreck ws found by par-
ticipants in a specialized field school
in maritime history and underwater
archaeology sponsored by the N.C.
Division of Archives and History.
Conducted in Edenton in the sum-
mer of 1980, in Bath in 1979, and
most recently in New Bern, the
school enables students to search for
artifacts in the muddy bottoms of
some of this country's most historic
waterways.
According to Dr. William Still, a
maritime historian at ECU and a
director for the field school, the
program teaches more than just how
to discover shipwrecks.
"Students are taught how to ex-
amine and identify the ships and
how to preserve parts if it is deter-
mined that the parts are worth
preserving he said.
For instance the. students work
with sophisticated equipment such
as a magnetometer that detects ab-
normalities on the bottom by
measuring the earth's magnetic sur-
face. They also use sine scan sonar,
a piece of equipment that will detect
a shipwreck or other obstacle on the
bottom through the use of sound
waves.
"We let them work with this
equipment, let them go down on
shipwrecks and to actually measure
shipwrecks and get an idea of what
kind of ships they were and
ultimately to identify them says
Still.
Only college students certified as
divers are eligible for the program.
In past summers enrollment has
been limited to 12 students.
The Underwater Archaeological
Field School and other marine
related programs at ECU have led to
the development of a program of
courses leading to a master's degree
in maritime history and underwater
research. Approved recently by the
University of North Carolina
General Administration, the pro-
gram when implemented will permit
ECU to offer one of two such pro-
grams in underwater research cur-
rently available in the United States.
The ECU curriculum will concen-
trate primarily on research in the
Western Hemisphere. A somewhat
similar program ai Texas A & M is
directed at underwater study in the
MEditerranean area.
One of the objectives for the new
program is to develop the resources
and expertise to tackle a wide range
of underwater search projects.
"Ultimately, I'd like to go
wherever there are significant
wrecks and wherever there is sup-
port says Still.
"It could be in the state or outside
the state or even be outside the
country within the Western
Hemispere. I prefer that we remain
as flexible as possible in this direc-
tion he said.
In North Carolina waters alone
there are approximately 3,000 ship-
wrecks. According to historians, the
state's "Graveyard of the Atlantic"
of the Outer Banks may contain
more shipwrecks than any other
state in the Nation.
In terms of significant finds. Still
says the 1980 field school in Eden-
ton uncovered the most valuable ar-
tifacts. Among them was the brigan-
tine, an unusually large vessel for
the state's inland waters. It was
previously believed that only small
See NAVY, Page 5
Have An Affair
if
Entertainment
By SAFARI MATHENGE
Staff Writer
The Student Residence Associa-
tion is helping organize what they
call 'Student Life Celebrates an
annual event scheduled for Wednes-
day, September 2nd. The affair will
be held on the mall adjucent to the
Joyner Library. All students will be
admitted free.
"There will be many interesting
events" declared Rebecca Martin,
West Campus Area Coordinator
and a member of the board organiz-
ing the occasion. Last year, the
event drew many students and af-
six
CORRECTIONS
There were two errors in Tues-
day's East Carolinian.
The Board of Trustees swore in
new members during their
meeting on Monday. They were
Katie Morgan, Thomas Blunt, Ray
Flood, John Maynard, Clifton
Moore and John Minges.
Also there was an error in the
story concerning the proposed
Mendenhall addition. SGA presi-
Ident Lester Nail told The East
Carolinian that the addition would
mean a student fee increase of $37
per student per semester. According
to Rudolph Alexander the addition
would only mean an increase of $37
per student per year.
We regret the errors.
On The Inside
Announcements2 'SJ�$$!WSr " v fe
Opinions. . . 4 e0gg0 rr . -� - �
Campus Forum 4 Enjoying The Affair
Futures J h residence hall students at last years "Affair On
Lecture Series
Sports12 The Mall
forded them events that included
watermelon spitting contests,
frisbee hoop toss, volleyball tour-
naments, and much musical enter-
tainment.
This year's event is expected to be
even more entertaining. Local
businesses have donated gifts to be
given free to participating students.
"There will be free food, drinks and
many gifts to be won says Martin,
"But the emphasis is not competi-
tion as much as participation
The biggest competitive events
will include beer keg stacking con-
tests, where members of a group oe
dormitory will compete against aone
another. There also will be a pizza
eating contest and a mellow yellow
chugging contest. One does not have
to win to recieve a present, all par-
ticipants will be given a ticket that
will carry their personal number.
After the particular event is over, a
drawing will then be made, and the
luckyy numbers will entitle the par-
ticipant a designed award.
"It is important that students
know what is done with the six
dollar SRA fee that they pay" says
Martin. Half of the sum goes
towards a particular dorm activities
fund, another two dollar is allocated
to the area residence council and the
last dollar is deposited towards the
general SRA fund.
In this manner, SRA is able to af-
ford such events as last springs
'Battle of the Bands and the in-
tended live band entertainment
scheduled to liven the affair on the
mall this coming Wednesday. No
decision had been reached yesterday
concernig which specific band will
play.
Keg Stacking
Administrator Resigns Due To
His 'Persistent Harassment'
By SAFARI MATHENGE
Sun Writer
Thomas W. Willis, a long time
administrator at East Carolina,
resigned his position late last month
due to what he termed "persistent
harassment" by an ECU vice
chancellor.
Willis, who was the director of
the ECU Regional Development In-
stitute since it was established in
1964, submitted his resignation in a
memo to Donald L. Lemish, vice
chancellor of institutional advance-
ment and planning.
In the resignation memorandum,
Willis complained of "interference
in the day-to-day management of
the Regional Development In-
stitute In effect, Willis said
Lemish's actions had caused
"constant stress" which "has
adversely affected" his health.
"You have constantly called me
negative and a prophet of 'gloom
and doom' wherever I did not agree
with you or the administration the
memo continued. "My record of
public service and accomplishment
is well known and will be
acknowledged by my people, I am
sure said Willis. In a telephone in-
terview Willis declined any further
comments.
In an interview last week, Lemish
said that Willis had made
"tremendous contributions and
that he had been surprised by Willis'
resignation, but declined any fur-
ther comments on the allegations,
saying that the resignation was a
"personal matter
R. Timothy Brinn, a senior staff
member of ECU's Regional
Development Institute since 1970,
has been named director of the in-
stitute, effective immediately, to
succeed Willis. Efforts to contact
Brinn last week were unsuccessful.
I
t





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, 1981
A
Tenure Explained
By SAFARI MATHENGE
Staff WriMt
At present an educator pursuing
teaching as a career must consider in
addition to what salary they will
receive, the question of tenure. An
ambitious educator who continues
to add to his academic and profes-
sional resources needs to be award-
ed tenure as protection against per-
sons who may wish to jeopardize
their career.
The modern school system has
become so complex that teaching
can no longer be regarded as a mis-
sionary enterprise similar to that of
the ministry. Our educators today
are reasonably awarded. Consider
other rewards that a teacher recieves
from society: respect, a minimum
degree of professional risk, long
vacations and professional and
emotional stimulations that are uni-
quely found in teaching, to name a
few.
Moreover, teachers, and educa-
tion in general, are now major
public components which have in re-
cent years proved to exert un-
diminishing force over politicians
and critical political issues. Thus
teachers and education differ in no
significant depth from other in-
dividuals or enterprises in our pre-
sent society. Therefore the question
is not only that of assurance for
teachers' tenure, but also that of the
assurance of teachers adequacy and
competency in public instruction.
Linda Ingles, a research assistant
to the dean of academic affairs, and
also a teachers' tenure procedural
processor at E.C.U, defined tenure
as 'a professional protection to
enable the educator to teach the
truth as he knows it
There are two procedural types of
tenure �the 'existence of contract
tenure' which is awarded annually
and can be revoked at the end of a
professors contract, and the
'permanent tenure' which is
gradually earned in a specified
length of time.
At East Carolina, a professor
eligible for teachers tenure must
first be recommended to the dean of
his department by the department
chairman. The recommendation
must be reviewed by the vice
chancellor, the board of trustees
and finally by the University of
North Carolina System's board of
trustees.
Every university in the U.N.C.
system establishes its own tenure
policy, and tenure is not
transferable. E.C.U. requires an
assistant professor to fulfill a tenure
tract appointment for a period of
seven (7) years before they can be
awarded permanent tenure. Persons
holding the position of associate, or
full professor require only five (5)
years.
"Once an educator has attained
permanent tenuresays Inglles,it
is difficult for him to be firedIs
tenure then, the teachers' ultimate
salvation?
According to Inglles, an educator
with tenure can only be fired for
cornmiting a "serious sanction
�some type of act that would have
dentrimental effect to a students
life" says Inglles.
There is protection for students
under this policy. The E.C.U. ad-
ministration provides leverage bet-
ween the student and the professor.
The administration thoroughly
evaluates a professor's teaching
ability,their research background,
and their services to the university
and the community around the
university before tenure can be
awarded.
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1074
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all aBS at a reasonable oost
The Fleming Center
Cag 781-8380 in Raldfrh
we're here when you need u&
aijjluae,
� :i
rt.MI
USED BOOKS
SAVE
USED BOOKS
USED BOOKS
USED BOOKS
USED BOOKS
USED BOOKS
The East Carolinian
Strvmt iht campus commumly
I92S.
PvbMeJied �vary Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dor
inp the turn mar.
The East Carolinian is the oi
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and
by me students of East Carolina
University.
Greenville M.C.
The Cast CareiMMe eMicM
are lecated la Mat OM Sevth
aulldina en the catpai ef ECU.
Greenville. N.C.
Telephone 7S7-4Me. U7 4Mf
Subscription Rate: SM yearly
Second class postage paid at
Plaza Shell
610 Greenville Blvd.
Phone 756-3023
Hrs.
Mon Sat 7-10
Sun. 10-10
A Complete Auto Repair Shop
(Foreign & Domestic)
Full and Self Service Gas at Competitive
Prices
Road and Wrecker Service
-SHELL
Discounts On Repairs With I.D. N
FUQUA'S CARPETS
Welcome Back Students
WITH THIS COUPON
Two 18" x 24" Bonded Doormats - $1.00
And Receive 10 off ony Remnant
Prices Start at $5.00
756-5821
LIMIT ONE COUPON
INTERIORS, INC.
New Location �West End Shopping Center
Open Saturday till 2 o'clock
ANNOl
If you
would like
in the
brief as
Tetrr

hauled
Tk fekdhd
p.ia Friday l
1 pa T.
pepw
Tt tpacr
im nanuai o�
CENTRAL
NEWS
CARD SHOP
321 Evans St. Mall
752-3333
Psssst . . .
Book Lovers
Full line of hardbacks, paper
backs & magazines. Local & out
of town newspapers.
Greeting Cards
For All
Occasions!
CENTRAL
BOOK
&NEWS
Greenville Sq. Shopping Ctr.
756-7177
Books, Books
& More
BOOKS
BOTH STORES OPEN
ALL DAY
7DAYSAWEEK
AFTERNOON
DELIGHT
at the
ATTIC
Friday Aug. 28
4Q0-7:Q0p.m.
Admission 25c
Canned beverages
only GOC
Urlta tgma $hi iFralprmly
Featuring

V
EAfilY
CMAI
FEE
AUGl
Mr Jorm
T�fino
became o�
Hen oi o�n
testing
Cen�e� t
Miter Ana
Irorp rh pr
admin �iki
effective w
Fa� T�'nr
The
turn tie
Medicine
highly quel
ana aredu
part-time
tuder.t� mi
themi�tr�
o-olog.
or SLAP �r
Other at I
coh�Kterec.
Contact O.I
oent Opporj
Anr�e� M c
a' 757 n
The Amer
AMhOIOSl
Public eT'C
t.oriai Pae
teai The
For more
trnetlor.�
4ej7 io� l
,
142
A-
W;
Before you comb other areas for these used
books, try Student Supply Store, Wright
Building. We have the largest inventory of new
and used books in this area, and we can help
you save money on your book purchases. Give
us a try. We will do our best to give you the
quality of service you deserve.
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by East Carolina University
Student Supply Store is
all your one-stop shopping
center for:
Calculators
Pirate Souvenirs
Gift Items
Medical Supplies
Official Class Rings
Art Supplies
Imprinted Wearing Apparel
Photo Finishing
Study Guides
Magazine Subscriptions
Greeting Cards
Typewriter Rental
School Supplies
Leisure Reading Books
Special Order Books
Visa and Mastercard
Charges
ft
i
m
m
m
m
&.
!





THF EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, 1981
1
If r
Mil
ANNOUNCEMENTS
�' V�u or your ormMittkm
would like to have on item prUMod
�� announcement cotuenn
pteaee aend Mo announcement (m
brkrt m poastbie) typed and
oouMe-aggced o rv �� Cart
"a� a can of e)w am askaf.
Tmert it ao charge for aa-
Announcements
CRAFTS
Crafto work�nog ere now
��M ot me Cram Cantor in
fmotogropny. Chrtatmaa pas
tRvrarfc. howdouHt cttriatma
bui
space it oflca tn worho� which art
TV daadkac for aoaouaccaKata � j
p � Friday for ike Taeaday paper aad
�y for the Tkunaay
5 p.� T
AH ECU atwdonta, twdant
oo woH oo faculty,
The space u evmiatbir to ail c
imai�ni and ocean menu
�pu
CHANGE IN MAT
FEE -EFFECTIVE
AUGUST 2a, Itll
Mr. John Childar Director of
Taallno, ECU. reports that,
bacausa ot tne continuing tacata
tlon ot coata peaaed down from the
letting companies, tha Taating
Cantar it obliged to Incraaae the
Millar Analogies Taat (MAT) tea
from tha present $� to 143 per test
adminiatarad. TK new faa will be
effective with tha beginning ot
Fall Term. August U. fl
cso
Tha Canter tor Student Oppor
tunitlea (CSO). School of
Medicine, ia currently seeking
highly qualified undergraduate
and graduate students to work
part rime aa tutors. Interested
students with expertise in either
chemistry. anatomy, physiology,
twotogv math, physics. English,
or SLAP are encouraged to apply.
Other academic areas ere also
considered Competitive wage.
Contact Or. Fry. Center tor Stu
dent Opportunities. 217 Whlchard
Annan, or call for an appointment
a� 7S7-elM. 6075 or 601
POETS
The American Collegiate Poets
Anthology and International
Publications is sponsoring a Na-
tional Poetry Contest in tha fall of
taai The deadline is Octobert 31
For more Information write to In
ternationai Publications, P.O. Box
4437. Lot Angeles Ca. W044
MSC member arc eiigibte to par
Rctgla. Everyone mutt raajMar
far the warkahagi at tha Crafta
Canter no later thaw tha Saturday
prior la tha first meeting of a
wodtanop. Workshop schedules
are available at tha Crafta Cantar
and tha MSC Intormattan cantor
Tha first workshop begins Mon-
day, September 14, mi
Crafta Cantar hours are 3 p.nv
until W p.m Monday through Frl
day, and �J noon until 5pm Satur
day.
For further Information call the
Crafta Cantar or Tana Nobles at
MMCtl.
BICYCLE
Oo you have a Mcyct but wish
�ftar, safer ways to gat
1 you want to got wOuio you
lit aajajjfJfaa aa you explore tha
area? Are there changes you'd
ilka to see in taw affecting bicycle
riders? if sc you waufd be m-
taraatad in tha Tar River Mcycta
Club. Tha group ajnwaan bake
rides every SaJurday faawajaj ot
varying degree of difficulty. Aug
I wiii be a 2 to 40 mile trip. Sept
i will be a shorter krip of about J�
raitoa- Sept. M wiii be a beginners'
or family trip of about 45 minuses
or ah hour around town. Sap, tf
and a� will be linger trips. Uk
that of Aug. if. in addlfian, a
aWefleJas maottng is schadusad far
Sept u at 7:J� p.m at tag cam
munity bu�oing aa tie comer of
Groan and Fourth Street. All
ridaa leave from the Elm atroar
Gymnasium at t a jm. am Saturday
WOCVlBflg. ror
can;
KISWANILI
Kiswehili it the moat commonly
spoken language In Africa,
seconded by French and Arabid.
It territorial dominance latona
trom oil along the east African
coaitiand of Kenya. Uganda and
Tanzania and embrace the cen-
tral Aftrican countries of Ciage,
Zaire, Central African Republic.
Ruanda and Burundi. Klawahiil
has also penetrated the western
hem (sphere onty to rank f if) after
English. French. German and
Spanish as the moat spoken
language m the world. That year.
ECU students will be given an op-
portunity to study an African
language for the first time.
Kiswehili will be taught aa a non-
credit course. If interested, pleat
contact Safari Mathenge at
7 S3 8736 or the Office Of Continuing
Education, 757321.
BINGO
Oat ready for bingo and ice
cream on Tuesday, Sept. I at 7
p.m. in the Mendanhetl mutti
purge room. Prizaa will be given
to bingo winners and ice cream
will be given to all at Mandenhail's
Monthly Bingoice Cream Party.
It's free to everyone so come loin
the fun � you loot can't tosel
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Epiecopal service of Ho-
ly Communion will be celebrated
Tueedavevaning, September I, in
the chapel of St. Pour Epiacopia
Church, 40a 4th Street (one block
from Garrett Orom). The service
will be et 5:30 p.m. with the
Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev. Bill
Hedden. celebrating. Supper will
be served totowing the service
ERA WALK
Tha mtmum c-tT ��
raWataA-
day, Aug. If. The event is part at
the final year's campaign to ratify
w
weekly
MINI-COURSES
far ai
aajeaaj la clogging. CPR
training, popular dance, er
calligraphy
by
fh walk by Vwttviduefci or
panlea who neve pledged a con-
tributlon to NOW ERA ratlfica
tlan fund. The ton mit wet
should tab thre hours to cam-
Cr4t. All ��������lla PRRgwl ���
chltdren mr mvftad to participate
aa weaker or spa ween. For more
intormettan. contact Lit Simmon.
Oreanville NOW pr�ldnt, at
753 4440 or Phyllis Conner at
752 440 after 5; 30 p.m.
HOUSING
for ECU Student needing help
with non university homing, the
Off-Campus Housing Office
pubuahes a liating of avaHafX
room, apartment, hem and
in the GreonviM
BILLIARDS
"� � ioinaag a .
mmf AMbihtord ptarar.
�orming a ieague to r
may sign up at tha
fWbfaraa ciaC�: � �CU
ttaaal meoWnp will be held Tues ' $c
day. Sept. I5 .t 7 �- Tg �
Bthlard canter LaSZ. Tr.Tr. individuals must register in per
aa at tha MndnhH CantraJ
Ticket Office between to hour of
Tra�gi -lerin t 4S.WI- 4f�f 4 p.t tflAkMCitSy
'ai TT tfraugh Friday. Reatoti iMm win
� bai
OAT
The Dental Apptitude Test v. ill be
oHered at ECU on Sat. Oct 3, 1981
Applications blanks art to be mail
ed in time to be recieved by the
Division of Educational
Measurements, American Dental
Association, 311 East Chicago
Ave , Chicago. Ill 60011 by Sept 7.
1981 Applications must be obtain
ed from the ECU Testing Center,
Speight Building, Room 105
to the first ciaa meeting The first
course bag Monday. Sag. U.
For further information contact
the Central Ticket Office or Tana
SKIING NaaUi at 7S7-ill. ajo.
'� not too �oon to start thiaAing schedule and detail
�now for suing �t Snewyahoa, waat ,ta" �r ��"�� at the MSC in-
Virglaia at Chrutmaa and durlno formation Cantar.
aprtog break Contact Ms io
2 2Pm- Mamoiief
OROPAOO
WrlgM Auditor htm, drap-add
be held In Memorial Gym, it
net be head m �rs�tr aa it
on
LSAT
The law school Admission Test
will be offered at ECU on Sat Oct
3.1981 Application blanks are to be
completed and mailed to Educa
tional Testing Service, Box 966 R,
Princeton, N J 08540 Deadline is
Sept 3, 1981 Registration pro
stmarked after this date must be
accompanied by a S15, non
refundable late registration fee
JVCHEERLEADERS
toreatod in Junior Varsity
CharHadtng will be held at f p.m
on Tuaaday. Sag. 1 at tha atadluni
and of Ming Cetlaaum. The
acnedule of practice am far
the tryauts an Thuradav. I
�all
METHODIST
You art invited to our open house
reception at the Methodist Student
Center at 501 East Fifth Street
(acroos from Garret Dorm)
Entertainment end Refreshments
will be provided. Please stop by
for a good time and a chnece to
meet some campus friends.
SPAN
Student Planning Association Net
work is having a "Welcome B�ck
Get Together on Wed . Sept 2,
1981 at 7 00 p m in Brewster C 305
All Planning Majors and Minors
are welcome For more informa
hon call 752 7978 or 752 7914
daily, ctudeat ahoutd cam by the
office in parson for tha most cur
rent Information. Listing for
Greenville aagj Imenl
and a tolphon tar placing local
calls are etao provided. Tha offices
serve faculty and staff as wet! as
NUTSHELL
A milage of currant campus
trend in education, entertain
ment, and apart H covered in this
year's taaajRat aMjt, Umlsiuiil
by the ECU ��!
Don I ajOPB. Director of
aaki the lsskts
�4H be availMf- ant Mnnifkil S�u
deal Center, fa emraac to fa Stadeet
Sepaty Sum tad the A.J. FkMcher
Muk nR0a atl oa Friday. Amj.
28.
Traffic
The Greenville Traffic Commit
tion will meat at 4 p.m. m the ut
floor conference room at City Haft
on Thursday August 17.
BAPTIST
The Baptist Student Unions is hav
mg open house, Thursday evening
at 5 30 Open House will begin with
a cookout, a brief series of ac
livities and a square dance called
by Nelson Jarvis The B.S.U. ia
located next to Wendy's at 511 E
10th Street Any interested student
is invited
CHOIR
OPENINGS
All choral groups in the School of
Music have openings tor singers in
the tall One credit is oHered for
participation m each ensemble.
No experience is nece"rv All
singers are welcome The v-horal
grouDS are
ECU Concert Choir
Mend's Glee Club
University Chorale
Women's Chorus
Women's Glee Club
Call the School ot Music (757 6331)
lor more information
EVERY MONDAY IS
SADIE HAWKINS DAY
GROGS
LADIES � BUY ONE � GET
ONE FREE
Applications for membership
START TUES SEPT. 1st
BOWLINB
MSC Mixed Double bawling
fad
in bowling on a Monday or Tuaa-
dey evening league may sign up at
toe ground Hoor bulletin board at
Madintioll Student Cantor The
league organUattonai maottng gdj
be hetd Monday, September U ai
p.m. Brbi
up today.
EVANS SEAFOOD
MKT.
203 W. 9th St. 752-2332
'Variety of Fresh & Frozen Seafood
'Lobster Tails 'King Crab Legs
'Clams Crab Meat
'Hard Crabs
�VE ALSO SELL ffC
USED TIRES MO00
�fW p
k
Bock to School Special
GOODYEAR TIRE CENTER
WEST END STORE ONLY
3-DAY
COUPON SPECIALS
Friday
Saturday
Monday
-USE. OIL CHANGE
Prmtum Oil
rilt
ii 88
CALL FOR
PPOINTMENT IRONT END ALIGNMENT
756-9371
Prolong Tit Life. Boott MPG
Most Cars
GOODYEAR
ECU DINING SERVICES
MEAL PLANS ON SALE
IN
JONES CAFETERIA
(Remodeling Now Underway)
9:00 A.M6.00 P.M.
Our 2020 Meal Plan $
offers "all you can eat" for only
meal
Wtl End
IShoppIr; Center
H
TIRE CENTER
Servomation � E.C.U.
P. O. Box 3375
Greenville, N. C. 27834
� 4,1
Phon 756-S371
a e a e e e e i
w
1
i
i
i
.���
.v
m
HOLLOWELL'S
DRUG STORES
Old Fashioned
W Orangeades and Lentonades
dftJV small33C
J large48C
Fountain Coke and Pepsi
smalL24C
large38C
Banana Splitil.50
JMllWHCJM.tMM�.�t���t.MM�.��. ItIV
Float
smalL42C
large62C
Milkshakes
Weic the
,s SPECIALS
Mon-Fri 4 AM to 11:30 AM
Student Special�2 pancakes J
2 eggs, meat, coffee�$1.75

�:�:�:�
62C
tl(Jl LJUgb���Z for I.UU
We are open every day of the year to serve you.
We have been in Greenville for over 50 years.
This fountain special is offered only at
HolloweUs � 911 Dickinson Avenue
Hollowell's � 1700 West Sixth Street
We have 3 stores to serve you in Greenville
911 Dickinson Avenue 752-7105
1700 West Sixth Street 758-4104
315 Stantonsburg Road 757-1076
Specials Good for 2 days only
� a a �
I
MONDAY - FRIDAY
11 AM to 7:30PM
'r- Chicken Special
Ji with fries & slaw $1.50
Hamburger Plate
with lettuce & tomato
& fries $1.25
Plate Lunches
served with a choice of
two vegetables
RESTAURANT
CORNER 10th and CHARLES BLVD.
PHONE 758-2446
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
BREAKFAST SERVED
24 HOURS A DAY
Over 13 Years Serving Pirate Country
A Menu to Satisfy Every Hunger
X-tra" Large Gameroom
All ABC Permits
�:�:�:�:
SS?SS�2SSg338
OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY

I





QJije �aat (Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins. 20,10
Chuck Foster. w of 4w(OH Jimmy Dupree. m���, �w
Chris Lichok. ���� Maw Charles Chandler, � �"
Steve Moore. �.���. v�� Karen Wendt, &�
Alison Bartel, p�, �,�,� Steve Bachner. naiw� ����
August 27. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
ECU Services
Improvements Made To Facilities
Although some of the recent ex-
penditures here at the university
have been questionable as far as
their necessity and value to the stu-
dent body as a whole, ECU is pro-
viding some quality services to its
students as well. These are evidenc-
ed in many areas on campus.
The excellent selection of current
movies scheduled to be shown at
Hendrix Theatre this fall has spark-
ed a stir of enthusiasm among new
and returning students alike.
In addition, many of the dor-
mitories have been outfitted with
new phone and intercom systems.
No longer will a booming voice be
heard announcing the arrival of a
visitor no matter what the time of
day or night. The system has been
updated so that all a visitor has to
do is pick up a telephone in the lob-
by and dial directly to the student's
room. It's a great system and is cer-
tain to serve the needs of students
much more effectively than the old
paging system.
There is a good deal of construc-
tion going on at Wright Auditorium
to make it an attractive place to
hold concerts and provide other
entertainment for the ECU com-
munity. Performances in the past
have drawn raves about the ex-
cellent acoustics in the building,
which was constructed in the early
years of the university. The state-
funded renovations that are taking
place at the present time will im-
prove many aspects of the
auditorium. Additions include the
construction of a new balcony.
Unfortunately, the construction
has made it impossible for students
to sit on the "Wall" next to the stu-
dent store. This will certainly cramp
the style of girl and boy watchers
who normally perch there.
The old Wahl-Coates building,
which houses the drama depart-
ment, is also being renovated.
Among other improvements, the
renovations will provide better stag-
ing and props areas.
All of these improvements are
evidence that student funds, and
other funds as well, are being used
for the benefit of the entire ECU
community.
Reagan Continues To Serve
More Of Same Old Hash
The inflation rate has hit 15 per-
cent, rising at its fastest pace in the
past 16 months, and with this news
reality has begun to creep up on the
administration and its highly-touted
Reaganomics.
The Consumer Price Index
jumped by 1.2 percent last month,
and economists are forecasting that
this increase will lessen the chances
for an early decline in interest rates,
which is considered a key to the
president's economic plan.
This increase breaks a string of 15
consecutive months in which the
rate was the same as or lower than
the rate in the same month of the
previous year. Continued over a
12-month period, this would mean
an inflation rate of 15.2 percent for
the year.
Yet the administration remains
confident that its prediction of 9.9
percent inflation for 1981 will hold
up. It is quickly becoming evident,
however, that Reagan has no
economic panacea to offer America
and that we seem to be getting more
of the same old hash.
iw vM� t puws-fo'&e a ecu AWmW0f
fKIN6
DECK(TO
eNPTHE
PARKMG
5o Oa ujhiCH of the Following shovl.d over
V� 03,000,000 OF- STUDENTS' MONeV BE SPENT
dA
coworemeD
DROP-ADO
Sisren (to
CNP LON6
SHORTAGE)
�AHU6E
BALLROOM
RCCH
COHPLBX
(SO STupeNTS
CAN PARTY I
BUT IN TE)
r iii-wi gg d-r m� "I I
THE EAST CAROUNlANCfuQHiCK
r Campus Forum
Loan Processing A Nightmare
Processing a student loan to pay fees
is once again a nightmare at East
Carolina. The university employees
directing traffic in the Spillman building
obviously have no sense of direction at
all.
On Monday morning along with
countless other victims, I was sent on a
wild goose chase to process a loan. The
procedure would have been quite simple
if I were instructed roperly.
Not only did I waste my time and
energy, but we the students are paying
for these people's ignorance. How can
this university be run in such an ir-
responsible manner?
CLAUDIA MILLER
Senior, Marketing-Man.
'Locusts' Serve
As refreshing as it ws to read an East
Carolinian, the August �5th issue had a
some what misleading article. My frater-
nity is the most expensive one on cam-
pus. It cost $796.00 a year to live in, not
$900 to $1000 as David R. Bosnick said.
Social dies are only $40.00 a month
and not $70-$80 a month as Mr. Bosnick
said. Further some of the fellows have
their own private rooms. We all enjoy
central air and brand new wall to wall
carpet.
Those "Goddamn locust" that
Bosnick called Greeks serve in nearly
502 of campus leadership positions. We
constitute about one-half of the popula-
tion at ECU.
Ask the red cross where the vast ma-
jority of Blood comes from at the cam-
pus blood drive.
Further more EZU is an outdated
term. This school will make you work.
My point is that new students should not
take Bcsnick's words to heart. Also, it is
only right to inform the public of the
truth and not what you want them to
hear.
KENT BRYSON
Sophomore, Indus. Tech
Attitude Damage
I am writing in reply to David
Bosnick's article Some Words of
Wisdom For a New Student which ap-
peared in the Aug. 25, 1981 edition of
the East Carolinian. 1 am certainly glad 1
am not a "new student" at ECU because
your "words of wisdom" would have
given me a horrible attitude towards my
university.
First, many people enjoy morning
classes very much. An energetic, happy-
with-life person likes nothing better than
to start the day early and engage his
mind in studies and learning. After all, is
that not why we are here? This universi-
ty is an institution of higher learning,
and; I see no truth to your description of
the individual who chooses to take early
morning classes. By the way, why must
you criticize education majors?
So, now student interest groups and
companies are handing out garbage?
And petitions are Useless? Evidently you
do not understand the reasoning behind
promotion and the purpose of petition.
"Useless" is an awfully big word to
classify a petition by. Petitions have
been the reason many things are done
and changed.
On to another section of the arti-
cleMy dear Mr. Bosnick, I am afraid
you have put your foot into your mouth
concerning the Greek system at ECU.
You do not know at all what you are
talking about. Your holier-than-thou at-
titude has made you write something
totally wrong.
First of all, the word 'goddamn" is
offensive to many people. I have not us-
ed that word since I was in the fifth
grade trying to impress my peers. 1 am
an Alpha Xi Delta here at ECU, and I
guess I need to fill you in a little about
Greek life, since you obviously know
very little.
Sororities and fraternities are not ex-
actly alike in structure and most certain-
ly not even similar in philosophy. If you
ever stopped to listen to what Greeks are
saying, you would understand this. The
one thing all Greek organizations have
in common, though, is a sense of loyalty
to ECU. We (1 am proud to refer to
myself as a Greek) promote ECU and
are working to advance our university.
My sorority monthly dues, my friend,
are not $70-580, far from it. As a
matter-of-fact, my bills are rarely more
than S25. My rent at my sorority house,
which 1 proudly call home, is $10 less a
semester than the rent of the dorms on
campus. And if you are not good at
math, this is $700 a year, not
$900-$l,100.
1 am personally insulted by your
remark that only those outside of the
organization are people with goodness,
intelligence and responsiveness. Many
good, intelligent, responsive individuals
are in the Greek system. If there were
not, it would not be the success that it is.
Look in the records and see the com-
munity and campus improvement pro-
grams that Greeks have contributed to
the city of Greenville. There are many,
including blood donations, greenery and
working with the handicapped. Look
around you and see how we have helped
your university and made it a better
place to be. We never asked to be thank-
ed, just appreciated.
In closing, 1 would like to say one
thing. I agree with your last sentence,
David. The "EZU" concept is an at-
titude. Take note of your own "words
of wisdom Your atitude is an overall
negative one, and I wish you luck
throughout life, because until you enjoy
your surroundings and realize you are
lucky to be a member of such a fine
university, you will be a very unhappy
person indeed.
HOPE A. ROOT
Sophomore, Gen. Col.
Administrators, Forms Waste Time
By PAUL COLLINS
Welcome back students.
Welcome back to the bureaucratic red
tape of East Carolina. Every year the first
week of school is filled with standing in
line, filling out forms, waiting to sec ad-
ministrators and generally wasting a lot of
time.
Each year, along with thousands of
other students, I am forced to wade
through mounds of bureaucratic B.S but
this year I think 1 reached my personal pin-
nacle.
When I returned to Greenville on Aug.
16 I dutifully checked in at the financial
aid office to determine progress on my ap-
plication. "You're application hasn't been
processed yet I was informed.
"Can you tell me when it will be process-
ed
"Probably some time after school
starts
Great. What was I to do in the mean
time since I count on financial aid to pay
my tuition and fees?
"You can come back and apply for an
emergency loan Friday
So I came back Friday, waited my turn
in line, filled out all the proper forms and
was then informed that I could only get
$400, not nearly enough to pay my $1,200
biU.
"Oh, you need to see Mr. Vainright in
the business office about a deferment
Mr. Vainright's secretary informed me
that he would not be in until Monday and
that I should come back then. Monday I
waited an hour to see Vainright. Finally, I
got into his office, the inner sanctuary, and
thought my trials were coming to an end.
"A deferment Vainright told me.
"You need to see Mr. Boudreaux in finan-
cial aid
"But I just saw Mr. Boudreaux, and he
told me to see you
"Oh, 1 see. Well let's see what I can do
for you
Not much, as it turned out. Something
about my not having collateral or a
guarantee. Thoroughly pissed off and
completely frustrated, I walked out in a
huff. I was at the end of my rope and
would have hanged myself if I'd had
enough slack.
Not knowing what else to do, I appealed
to Vice Chancellor Elmer Meyer, and he
intervened on my behalf and got me my
deferment.
But that was Wednesday. The
Registrar's Office had canceled all
schedules that were not picked up by Tues-
day at 4 p.m.
I can't do anything for you Gilbert
Moore, the registrar, told me about
retrieving my lost schedule.
Fantastic. I was left with three choices:
Drop out, commit suicide or re-register. 1
chose the latter. As I stood in the drop-add
lines picking up five courses I'd gotten in
preregistration, I thought of all the time in
the spring I'd wasted signing up for the
courses.
Somehow though, that is little consola-
tion. One of life's little pleasures is waiting
around waiting endlessly in line to see
somebody or do something. And believe
me, spending half my week in this manner
gave me very little pleasure.
I kept thinking: There's got to be a bet-
ter way. Why is it that this sort of thing
happens every year. I'm not sure exactly
how much ECU's bureaucracy can be
streamlined, but the present system is ag-
gravation in the extreme.
Maybe there is little that can be done to
speed up these processes, but something
can certainly be done about rude ad-
ministrators. With the exception of Dr.
Meyer, every administrator I encountered
was patently rude and uniformly callous.
Nowhere was there a sympathetic ear to be
found; no one gave a damn whether or not
I got into school or not. I was just another
of 13,000 faces.
At a university as large as ECU it is
unavoidable that students will have to wait
to see administrators, to preregistcr, to pay
fees and perform other similar tasks.
What can be eliminated, however, is the
impersonal contempt with which students
are often treated.
Na
Continued
sailing si
North O
but hugel
notable exl
The vej
sidered tq
mains of
Heart of
France w
armament!
and Norj
during t
tionary
received
but the s
reported
Northal
dumped
when the
pay. TheI
�1
2 vpH
A.
me;
2vpc
FRII
STUl
l
CHIl
A del
spoilt!
4 ?ll�24
SsaH A
Shrii
Shr.rsil
Jnidl
Oysters
Houudd
Trout oj
Ground I
Class
Clia m
Urousil
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r
r
s
ex-
certain-
you
I he
:nd,
-V- a
el more
ase.
10 ie
on
d at
� not
b our
c f the
ess,
Many
:iduals
ere were
that it is.
om-
i to
re manv,
and
� e helped
a setter
ink-
sentence,
at-
1 "words
� ou luck
ou enjoy
ou are
ich a fine
unhappy
V ROOT
Ijen. Col.
me
:he drop-add
men in
11 the time in
I p for the
ttle consola-
:es is waiting
line to see
And believe
this manner
ft to be a bet-
' of thing
sure exactly
racy can be
a stem is ag-
in be done to
it something
kit rude ad-
)tion of Dr.
encountered
rmly callous.
letic ear to be
Whether or not
just another
is ECU it is
1 have to wait
�gister, to pay
ar tasks.
wever, is the
hhich students
Navy Ship Aids ECU
Continued From Page
sailing ships entered
North Carolina ports
but huge ship is a
notable exception.
The vessel is con-
sidered to be the re-
mains of the Holy
Heart of Jesus from
France which brought
armaments for Virginia
and North Carolina
during the Revolu-
tionary War. Virginia
received its shipment
but the ship's captain
reportedly ordered
North Carolina's cargo
dumped overboard
when the state did not
pay. The vessel sank
under mysterious cir-
cumstances around
1780.
A second vessel, a
coastal schooner of mid
19th Century vintage,
was found in Queen
Anne's Creek that
enters Edenton Bay.
The significance of that
discovery is that for
many years historians
have been trying to
determine whether or
not centerboard vessels
were built in the United
States including North
Carolina and approx-
imately when they were
built. This wreck was
determined to be a
centerboard schooner
and in time two addi-
tional centerboard
schoolers were found
suggesting that this
type of vessel was being
built and used in the
waters of the
Carolinas.
While many people
associate shipwrecks
with treasure, the ECU
divers have yet to find
gold doubloons or
pieces of eight.
However it's possible.
Bus Schedule
PURPLE SCHEDULE
(7:30-5:30)
Place
Speight
Univ. Cond.
Eastbrook
River Bluff
Kings Row
Village Greene
Memorial Gym
Mendenhall
Speight
Univ.Cond
Eastbrook
River Bluff
Kings Row
Village Greene
Memorial Gym
Mendenhall
Departs
on half hr.
25 till hr
23 ill hr
21 till hr
18 till hr
15 till hr
10 till hr
7 till hr
on the hr.
5 after hr.
7 after hr.
9 after hr.
15 after hr.
18 after hr.
20 after hr.
23 after hr.
GOLD SCHEDULE
(7:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.)
Place Departs,
10th College Hill 25 after hr.
College Hill
Minges
Stratford Arms
Allied health
Greenville Square
Pitt Plaza
Oakmont
Mendenhall
10th � College Hiil
College Hill
Minges
Stratford Arms
Allied Health
Greenville Square
Pitt Plaza
Oakmont
Mendenhall
26 after hr.
on half hr.
28 till hr.
27 till hr.
25 till hr.
24 till hr.
21 till hr.
16 till hr.
5 till hr.
4 till hr.
on the hr.
2 after hr.
3 after hr.
5 after hr.
6 after hr.
9 after hr.
14 after hr.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27. 1981
THE
GREAT AMERICAN
FAVORITES
ARE BACK!
GET HEAPING PORTIONS
AT A PRICE
ALL AMERICA CAN AFFORD!
August 27, Thursdas
CHICKEN PAN PIE. 2 g�tables $209
August 28. Fndav
SALMON PATTY. 2 vegetables $209
August 29, Saturdav
VEAL PARMESAN. 2 vegetables $259
August 30, Sundav
SMOTHERED CHICKEN $239
2 vegetables
August 31, Mondav
MEAT LOAF & SPAGHETTI $229
2 vegetables
September 1. Tuesdav
FRIED CHICKEN. 2 vegetables $239
September 2. Wednedu
STUFFED GREEN PEPPER $209
2 vegetables
Everyday,
CHILD'S PLATE $125
A delicious choice at tried chicken, chopped steak, or a
specified entree plus 2 vegetables and a roll! For
childien 12 and under �ith adult
oaf
��
Carotin East Mall. MonFri LUNCH
Ha m 215pm . SUPPER 4 30 p.m -
8pm (830 Fri). Sat A Sun 11am 8pm
continuously (8:30 Sat.)
584
Tfche
Colleqe
� Shop
Back to SctiGv! Special
10 off
on all fall j
merchandise!
CLIP COUPON
Good Thru Aug. 25-Sept. 30
112 Price on Brown
Portsmouth Shoes
When raindrops are fallin' on your
head, your feet will be stayin'
completely dry. You'll look just duckie
in Pappagallo s puddle protection
with slip resistant sole.
Portsmouth
222 E. 5th Street only
?Tar Landing Seafood
ResUuran
Shrimp Cockteii
Appetizers
2.95 CUm Chewier
Seafood
.96
Seafood Flitter 6 96
nth, Soiiap. Oysters, Scallops. Strll Crib
Large Combination 5.25
Choicedltti Seafoods (Fish. Shrimp. Oysters, Scallops. Deri: Crib
Small Combination 6.26
Chela of 3 or 3 Seafoods FliA, Shrimp, Oysters, Scallops, De�il Crab)
ro dotou suras 01 cohkbaticis
Flounder
Trent
Shrimp
Oytors
DerilCno
Scallops
Boiled Shrimp
Halted Sit?, Craekm, Saaco
��.iml1
4.26
3.96
4.25
4.26
3.50
4.76
Larg
5.25
4.96
5.25
6.25
4.26
6.76
Oni Sin 6.75
Bob Hearing � Manager
Phone 758-0327
3.95
3.50
3.60
3.50
2.96
2.50
LUNCH SPECIALS
Small Combination - Choice of 2
(Shrimp. Oystrs. Flounder. Tmt)
Shrimp
fFrieJ or Boiled)
Oysters
Flounder
(Tried or Broiled)
Trout or Ocean Perch
G-round Beef Steal
THE ABOVE ARE SERVED WITH
ntEJCH FRIES OH BAKED POTATO. SLAW AID HUSHPUPPIES
Clam Chowder and Tossed Salad 1.99
Clam Chowder and Fish Sandwich 2.50
Ground Steak Sandwich 2.50
Set-red with Lettuce. Tomsto, baked potato or freach fries
Shrimp Burger 1.65
Serred with Slaw sad Tartar Sauce on a Baa
� ALL ITEMS AVAILABLE FOR TAKE-OUT �
Senior Citizens 65 or Over
(om mnage�r lor card)
Fish, Oysters, Derll Crab. Shrimp 2.76
Hamburger Steak 2.76
SERVED WITH
ranrcH fries, cols slaw aid wtttf
ALL OUTERS SERVED WITH
FRRTCB FRIES. COLE SLAW AID WfWf
Broiled Flounder
Broiled Trout
Broiled Shrimp
Broiled Scallops
Stuffed Flounder
RlbtyeStatk
Chopped Sirloin
SERVED WITH
FREICH FRIED OR RAKED POTATO AID COLE SLAW
Children
(urtotaMt)
Fish Plata (jour choice)
Hamburger Plate with French Fries
SERVES WITH
FRXfOI FRIES, COLE SLAW AID WWW
Free Fish Plate for Children 6 and under
With Ragalar Bluer. Oir Choice of Flab
6.60
6.50
6.76
6.60
6.60
5.96
4.76
2.25
1.96
Beverages
Pepsi, Mt. Dew, Sprite. Diet Pepsi.40
Iced Tea.30
Coffee.30
Hot Tea.30
Hat.40
Dessert
Lemon Pie.70
Apple Pie (Hot)�TO
� ALL ITEMS 01 RXtT ARE AVAILABLE
FOR TAKE-JJFT ORDERS �
advertising
pays
Call now � 757-6366
The East
Carolinian
KASH& KARRYNO. 8
CON VENIENCE STORE
Located at Mth & Charles (formerly Pirate Pit Stop)
Free Dip Of
PINE STATE
ICE CREAM or
FOUNTAIN COKE
� 31 thru (-13
Noiuf"1'
c?'o
"C"�t.
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IV
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BAG ICE
50
SELF SERVICE
GAS
Thrift Motor Oil
8H Quart
s
WISE THIS PAK POT A TO CHIPS
99 8 oz. pk.
Prices Good August 22nd-September 6th
Wecome Back Students
from
FAMOUS PIZZA
We are having a PARTY �
UIB LOJtT CW PI21A yx
come CELEBRA TE the new
school year with us
�VASE ftCATCH
FREE
BEVERAGE
FREE
PIZZA
FRIDAY, AUG. 28th 4:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m
758-5982 321 E. 10th St.
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?
Welcome Back ECU Students
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
P.O. Box 2 � 211 Jarvis St. � Greenville, N.C. 27834 � Phone: 752-5025
FRESH WHOLE
FRYERS
45
Whole or Half
Pork Loins Lb. I
Sliced 7-9 Chops
14 Pork Loin
1149
Lb.
PIRATE COUPON
10 Discount on �,
ANY FOOD ORDER
Regardless of size. j
Receive 10 off your grocery purchase upon presentation of j
coupon to cashier. Sorry, no discounts on keg beer.
Name��-�
ID Number� -
mtPyrcJigse�-�,
HEAVY WESTERN
T-BONE
STEAK
$049
FULL CUT WESTERN
ROUND
STEAK
$169
Lb.
r
Family Pak Specials
Pig Feet
Pig Ears
Neck Bones
5-7 lb. avg.
5-7 lb. avg.
5-7 lb. avg.
49
49
49e
Morrell Smoked Sausage
10 lb. pkg.
9.90
MORRELL
BACON
$19
12-Oz. Pkg.
Lb.
2
OVERTON'S FINEST
GROUND
BEEF
$169
3-Lb. Pkg. or
More Lb.
1
HEAVY WESTERN
SIRLOIN
STEAK
$239
Quantity Rights Reserved
EDGEMONT
TENDERIZED
HAMS
WHOLE OR HALF
u�99
COLD POWER
DETERGENT QtBOX
With this coupon and 47.50 food order excluding specials. Without coupon
Si.14. Limit one per customer. Expires 1-29-91.
98
ONLY A DIME
GREEN
CABBAGE
10
Lb.
CLIP THIS COUPONT jenos frozen
All Varieties
PIZZA
$129
10-OI. �
Buy one, get one free.
KRAFT
MAYONNAISE
98
Qt. Jar
With this coupon and S7.50 food order excluding specials. Without coupon
I $1.69. Limit one per customer. Expires l-29-lt.
I
J
2 LITER BOTTLE
RC Colo, Nehi
Orange,
Diet Rite Cola
88
T
TETLEY � Family Size
TEA BAGS
$108
24 Ct. P
GOLDEN GRAIN
MACARONI &
CHEESE
GENERIC
Evaporated
Milk
$100
DELTA
PAPER
TOWELS
38
Gt. Roll
Limit 2 with $7.50 food order.
ROYAL GUEST
CATSUP
18-Oz. Box
Limit 2 with $7.50
food order.
DUNCAN HINES
YELLOW ONLY
CAKE
MIX
68
MOUNTAIN VINE RIPE
TOMATOES
49
Qt. Bottle
68
GENERIC
POTATO
CHIPS
99
GWALTNEY
FRANKS
12-Oz. Pkg.
89
Lb. Bag
CHARMIN
TOILET
TISSUE
Roll Pkg.
88
JIFFY FROZ. � All Varieties
POT PIES
8-Oz. Pkg.
4H
SEALTEST � All Flavors
ICE
CREAM
68
12 Gallon
$1
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THE EAST CAROL IN1AN
Features
AUGUST 27. 1981
Page 7
Lecture Series:
Fuller, Chisolm,
Jack Kilpatrick
And Callaghan
Mendenhall Student Center will
present James Callaghan,
Buckminster Fuller, Shirley
Chisolm, James J. Kilpatrick and an
undecided fifth guest as part of its
1981-82 lecture series.
Former Prime Minister of Great
Britain James Callaghan will speak
on Monday. October 26.
Called by Marshall McL uhan
"the Leonardo da Vinci of our
times distinguished inventor,
poet, architect and designer of the
geodesic dome Buckminster Fuller
will speak next on Tuesday,
November 17.
The honorable Shirley Chisolm
will appear on Thursday, February
4, 1982. A U.S. Congresswoman
from New York, she was the first
woman, and the first black to seek
the nomination of a major political
party for the Presidency of the
United Stacv
On Wednesday March 17, 1982,
James J. Kilpatrick comes to cam-
pus. A chief spokesperson for the
conserat!e viewpoint, he is the na-
tion's most widely syndicated
political columnist.
All lectures will be held in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
drix Theatre.
Other MSC productions this
school year include a full seven-
program Artists Series, Dinner
Theatre and Madrigal Dinner pro-
ductions and a rich Travel-
Adventure Film Series with five ex-
cursions on tap:
�Robin Williams' "French Riviera"
� Wednesday, October 14.
� "The Great Train Trip Across
Siberia" � Monday, November 23.
�Kenneth Richter's "Two Tickets to
Timbuctoo" � Tuesday, January
26, 1982.
�Karl E. Stein's "Bewitching
Brazil" � Thursday, February 25,
1982.
�Don Cooper's "Hawaii" � Mon-
day, March 22, 1982.
The Lecture Series, Dinner
Theatre Productions, Madrigal Din-
ner Series, Travel-Adventure Film
Series and Artists Series are spon-
sored by Mendenhall Student
Center.
Former Prime Minister Of Great Britain Junes Callaghan (left) and political columnist James J. Kilpatrick.
Shopping Around For Today's Preppy Look
By KATHV WEYLER
Miff � nlcr
Doens of question about eery possible phase of
college life plague students new to campus. Where is the
cafeteria? How can I get to the mall without a car? And
. . . what do 1 wear?
ECU, like many schools today, has a wide variety of
students. It one observes carefully, however, one
notices a few definite styles of clothing that seem to
dominate among campus fashions. The new student,
eager to fit in as soon as possible, may choose to adopt
one of these clothing styles in order to hasten his or her
sense oi belonging.
Reigning head and shoulders above all other campus
fashions is the preppy look. Hard-core preppies would
not be caught dead without at least one alligator
emblazoned upon their bodies � usually in the chest
region. Add-a-bead necklaces, one or more, are still
mandatory for girls, although other types of gold
necklaces (real gold, please!) are acceptable and are, in
fact, gaining in popularity. Fashion colors, of course,
are mainly pink and green, and sometimes navy, for
males and females alike. A lot of girls seem to be
tempering these blindingly bright shades by mixing them
with white or khaki. Guys do this, too, but, as in nature,
the plummage of the male preppy is, by and large,
gaudier than that of his female counterpart. Button-
down collars, bermuda shorts, and polo shirts are warm
weather staples. For the feet, leather or the newly-
popular canvas top-siders are worn. Girls dress up with
espadrilles, guys with weejuns.
The preppy look has become so popular recently that
all types of creepy-craw lies now grace polo shirt-fronts.
These are acceptable, but not as good as the standard
alligator. Ralph Lauren's polo ponies, however, are
creeping into a position of equal status with the good
old gators. Also, a good many preppies have been spot-
ted lately wearing most un-preppy things � like
lavender clothing and tropical print shirts. Could this
signal the beginning of the end for preppiness?
Closely tied to, and often overlapping, the preppy
look is the athletic look. Functional sports clothes are
the key � jogging shorts, warm-up suits, football and
baseball jerseys, and slightly worn tee or polo shirts.
Feet are shod in some type of (preferably expensive) ten-
nis or jogging shoes. Wet hair, straight from the gym
shower, is a must as is a dark tan.
With many students at ECU studying visual or per-
forming arts, yet another fashion style has evolved: the
arty look. This look takes several forms, the most ob-
vious being the student of dance � particularly females.
They can be identified by the leotard worn most often
under a flowing wrap skirt, perhaps with leg warmers.
Other types are less obvious, but nonetheless iden-
tifiable because the arty style shows an appreciation for
originality. If you wish to embrace this style, girls are
advised to wear black Chinese coolie slippers and
anything slightly wrinkled and cotton, preferably with
embroidery on it. Longer than usual hair is a must for
guys, as are clothes that fit badly, bespeaking a frame
lean with ascetic emaciation.
The arty look may often be mistaken for the hippie
look, a fashion style that is currently experiencing its
death agonies. Indeed, it is often impossible to tell the
two styles apart. As a rule of thumb, however, the arty
look is often a bit neater and more contrived than the
hjgppie l�ok. And, while arty clothes may be ill-fitting
and wrinkled, they never actually look sloppy. Well,
almost never.
Then, there are the strange, unclassified styles. There
are some people on campus who actually do not adopt
any particular fashions and may even go so far as to
dress according to their own tastes in styles that are flat-
tering to them. Such people prize individuality in the
clothes closet. Well, there's probably no long-lasting
harm in that. They'll just be a little slower fitting in,
that's all. But how in the world do they ever know what
to buy when they go shopping?
Georges Melies
Another 'Trip To The Moon'
By JOHN WEYLER
SUN Writer
Science fiction-fantasy is currently a very popular
film genre. "Star Wars" and "Close Encounters of the
Third Kind" were huge moneymakers and significant
cinematic achievements. However, the paths to these
blockbusters were blazed by innumerable little-known
� and much less artistically successful � science fiction
films. This column will present the best of the worst of
these movies, celebrating their occasional ac-
complishments and condemning their many mistakes.
We begin at the beginning, with the first recognizable
sci-fi film, "A Trip to the Moon . .
Bad Sci Fi
William Hurt Stars In Russell's 'A Itered States'
Ken Russell's frenetic foray into the world of isolationism, "Altered States will be shown this Friday
and Saturday night at 5, 7, and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre.
Sci-Fi cinema, and indeed, cinema itself owes a great
deal of credit (or blame) to a man named Georges
Melies, who early in life had been a shoe manufacturer,
cartoonist, and part-time magician. His wealthy parents
encouraged his hobby by buying him the Theatre
Robert-Houdin in Paris, where he became a popular
professional prestidigitator.
On December 27, 1895, Melies attended, by special
invitation, the unveiling of a new invention by the
Lumiere brothers, which they called le cinemotographe.
Melies was amazed and mesmerized by this marvelous
new brand of magic-motion pictures.
He bought a camera. His first films, like those of the
Lumieres, were simple recordings of everyday events.
Then one day an accident occurred, and the history of
motion pictures was forever altered.
Melies was shooting scenes of traffic when his camera
jammed. Soon, he fixed it and resumed recording.
When the finished film was viewed, it showed an om-
nibus magically transforming into a hearse! Modern
moviemaking had begun.
The clever fellow was quick to see what camera
trickery could create. He built a movie studio, began ex-
perimenting and before long invented almost every film
technique: stop-motion animation, substitution,
superimposition, split-screen, dissolves, fade-in, fade-
out, model work, miniature work, even the sub-title,
among others.
Director, producer, scriptwriter, set and costume
designer, special-effects man and star, Melies made
1500 movies in twelve years. Most of them were fast-
paced, often funny, visual fantasies, crude but clever.
His main theme was the supernatural, naturally, with
titles including "The Devils Castle" (18) and "The
Laboratory of Mephistopheles" (1897).
"Cinema was giving a new, visual form to the tradi-
tional horror story says Denis Gifford in A Pictorial
History of Horror Movies, "at a time when, in print,
imaginative literature was meeting an exciting new
challenger Science-fiction, as a label, was unknown.
The trend setting tales of Jules Verne were called
"Imaginary Voyages while H.G. Wells' novels were
publicised as "Fantastic Romances Both authors met,
uninvited, in Melies' "A Trip to the Moon" (1902).
Cinema's first sci-fi epic took the cannon-fixed space-
shell from Verne's "From the Earth to the Moon"
(1865) and the crustaceous Selenities from Wells' "The
First Men in the Moon" (1901).
The so-called plot of the magician's masterpiece con-
cerns the exploits of a group of top-hatted, turn-of-the-
century lunar explorers. Loaded into a huge cannon by
a line of chorus girls, their protective projectile shoots
up into space. It lands right in the eye of the man in the
moon, who grimaces in pain. On the lunar surface, the
explorers encounter their own unbrellas taking root in
the soil and quickly growing into gigantic mushrooms.
Next, they run into a race of grotesque creatures who
explode at the tap of an umbrella. Finally the humans
return home safely, due to the "pull of the Earth's
gravity
No wonder Wells reportedly walked out of the theatre
where the film was being shown!
It should be noted that despite Monsieur Melies'
many accomplishments, he died penniless and forgotten
in 1938. It seems that his uncouth but cute films were
fine for the earliest movie audiences, but he simply
couldn't keep up with the times. He made movies until
about 1925 but never progressed beyond the simple-
minded pseudo-scientific slapstick of "A Trip to the
Moon
t

T
I





Chapter I.
Getting J?e
CLAIROL SHAMPOO
Condition
Shunpo
Centrum
F3
C
20-Oz
Btl
SHAMPOO OR CONDITIONER
L'oreai Ultra Rich
$444
160z. 1 SAVE
Bti � 65
30 FREE WITH 100
MIMTI POTENCY MULTIVITAMIN
Centrum
$E77
REGAL K6727 WH
SELF-BUTTERING
Com Popper
130-Ct
Btl.
SAVE
5"
Only
REGAL K 7427 WH, 4 CUI
Hot Pot
7
Only
GILLETTE 1000 WATT HAIR DRYER
Supermax 2 1000
$16
SAVE
$2 MORE
SAVE WITH GILLETTE
3� MAIL-IN
Noxzema
SlUKCflt"
REBATE!
MEDICATED SKIN CREAM
Noxzema
$4
10-Oz. 9
Jar �
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
Quantity Rights Reserved
None Sold to Dealers
Items and Prices
Effective Wed , Aug 26
thru Sat . Aug 29, 198'
in Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Fach of these advertised
items is required to be
readily available for sale
m each Kroger Savon,
except as specifically
noted m this ad if we do
run out of an item we will
offer you your choice of
a comparable item when
available reflecting the
samsavings or a ram
ceck which will entitle
you to purchase the
advertised item at the
advertised price within
30 das
V-

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r
11
4R

7

5
vy
V
&�
BIANCO OR
Remigo
Lambrusco
E
7i
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J4-
Chapter IV
The Party
(�M
TAB. MR PIBB
MELLO YELLO OR
Coca-Cola
$405
2-Ltr I
Btl �
WISE
Potato Chips
rPiBB
8-Oz.
Twin
Pack
W?S�
potato
tTWMI
OSCAR MAYER
ALL-MEAT SLICED
Bologna
ROSE, CHABLIS
RHINE OR
Cribari
Mello Burgundy
8 0z
Pkg
i cm'uit
MELlO
l�U�GUNDY.
FAVORITE BRi W
Wiedemann
6$439
12-oz. m
Btls. �
SAUSAGE OR PEPPERCM

y
0.
h- u
4tJ .� �.
J&

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'V
IK
&

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FROM THE DELI-
SLICED TO ORDER
?
sx
Boiled Ham r-�
69
V4-LD.
ALL VARIETIES COUNTRY CLUB
Wafer Sliced Meats.
33-oz I
Pkgs. �
S
A X
Chapter III
The Apartme
nt
USD A INSPECTED QUALITY
CONTROLLED CHUB PAK OR REG
STORE PAK
Ground Beef
Lb.
BATHROOM
Northern Tissue
Roll
Pkg.
SPRINGDALE HOMOGENIZED
Whole Milk
NORTHCRN
WE MAKE IT
YOU BAKE IT
VARIETY TOPPINGS
Fresh
Pizza
For
WITH ROLL & ICE TEA
SERVED 12 NOON TO 7 PM
Only
GAD
Only
� i
f





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"V

v.
7�
Make
Kroger Sav-on
Your ONE
STOP
SHOPPING
Headquarters
all through
the year!

exit
Vftvi
U.S. NO 1 WHITE
Potatoes
578�
Bag ��
DECORATIVE
Foliage Plant
$449
4-Inch
Pot
THOMPSON WHITE
'H�RM
Only
Seedless Grapes
GALAXY 20" BREEZE BOX
3-Speed Fan
s19
f "
4 �VL I
� ,N
SAVE
�3�
L
ft
ICE TEA
N TO 7 PM
ffM
9A
Me
V
tctcctttttitc;
OPEN Mon. thru Sat. 8 AM TO MIDNIGHT�Sun. 9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Chapter II
The Class
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS
Business Analyst I
BEST RITE LINED
Only
$19
88
SAVE
�2�7
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS "MATH ON KEYS"
BOOK AND Tl 30 CALCULATOR
TI-30 Math Kit
$i488
? K5 fcTT
RtlttfcPR
SHAFTS
MEAD 5 SUBJECT
i 5 Subject
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Only
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SCIENTIFIC CALCULATOR
Ea
FABER CASTELL NO 2 YELLOW Hffifflffl
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Pkg.
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$2fi88
SAVE
,3�,

ASSORTED COLORS FIBER POINT
Ea.
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V

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Chapter V
The BiS G
TIRE BREWED STROH S OR
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6$489
2 PIECES & ROLL. SNACK PAK
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99
FROM OUR BAKERY,
BIG FRESH BAKED
Chocolate Chip Cookies
12-oz. m
Cans �
SERVE N SAVE
ALL MEAT OR ALL BEEC
SvW
wieners
12-Oz.
Pkg.





10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27. 1981
We or loo!td n� �t
to �W� back tnt'ontt
ofH.lM �� �����
Mlk'� Mk� Shop In
th Unl��r�l�y
A read �
752-5878 218 E. FIFTH
NOON-MIDNIGHT 7 DAYS A WEEK
Blackfoot In Concert September 17
Southern Rock greats Blackfoot and special guests Johnn Van Zandt
and Def Leppard will be in Minges Coliseum on September 17.
Tuition Increase Inspires
Ultimate Student Protest
THESE ARE THE
GOOD OLD DAYS
Remember the doys of the old soda shop where you
were given a delicious product, a fair price, ond
friendly service? - Hearts Delight is a visit to that
past with some new twists, like our 25 toppings, in
eluding our real homemade chocolate syrup, hot
peach, M&M's, and some zany surprises We
feature the best ice cream this side of the rainbow,
and try to make the best milk shakes, sundaes, and
ice cream creations you have ever eaten
MOSCOW. Idaho
(CPS) � While tuition
protests elsewhere have
been as large as the tui-
tion increases imposed
for next year, at the
University of Idaho
some protesters
threatened to blow up
much of the campus if
fees are raised.
Members of a group
alternately calling itself"
the Socialist Action
Coalition, the National
Socialist Party
Organization and the
National Socialist
Association phoned in
bomb threats to area
police and media in the
early morning hours of
August 20.
The callers pledged
to detonate fixe bombs
on the campus unless
the legislature and
education officials
agreed to maintain
fee5 academic pro-
grams and student ser-
vices at their current
levels, to use funds ear-
marked for expanding
the football stadium
for academic programs
and to make faculty
salaries competitive
with other schools.
Though the calls and
a letter detailing the
demands didn't specify
which buildings would
be destroyed, the stu-
dent radio station said
one bomb was in the
Student Union
building.
The building itscii
was closed for an hour
wlhile police searched
it. They found no
bombs. Moscow and
Latah County officers
searched other campus
buildings through the
week, but found no ex-
plosives.
The threats came just
a month .after the
Board of Regents im-
posed a $100 fee in-
crease for next year and
as the legislature
debated charging tui-
tion for the first time.
The state constitu-
tion prohibits tuition at I
state schools, but I
budget cutbacks in the
See TUITION, Page 11
A Special Place for Special People
Only in Greenville
OPEN NOON TO MIDNIGHT EVERY DAY!
752-5878
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COUPON GOOD FOR ONE
FREE
TOPPING
ON ANY SUNDAE
(Coupon Expires April 30, 1981)
YOU CAN CHOOSE ANY
OF OUR TOPPINGS
�Walnuts 'n Sauce
� Homemade Chocolate Syrup
� Hot Fudge
� Jimmies
�Whipped Cream
� Special Mix
� Butterscotch
� Almonds
�Pecans
� Reece's Cup
� Raisins
� Granola
�Carob
�Oreo Crumbs
� Strawberry
�Marshmallow Creme
�Chocolate Chip Cookie
� Hot Peanut Butter
� Pineapple
� Chocolate Chips
� Heath Bars
�AA & AA's
�Coconut (Toasted & Shredded
� Dry Roasted Peanuts
AND 24 DELICIOUS FLAVORS
FOSDICK
1890 SEAFOO
NOW OPEN MONDAY
MONDAY NIGHT SPECIAL
SHRIMP
ALL YOU CAN EAT
Clam Chowder & Salad Bar
$6.95
$1.00
OFF
ANY MENU ITEM
WITH PRESENTATION
OF THIS COUPON
One Coupon Per Meal
Not Good Towards Specials
DAILY LUNCHEON
SPECIALS
Fast, Courteous Service
FEATURING MANY REGULAR
MENU ITEMS
S1.00OFF REG. MENU PRICE
HOURS: sunfri.
11-2:30
DINNER �
SUNTHURS.4:30 9
FRI.& SAT. 4:30-10
Shop Rite Aid For
Quality And Savings
m
iOBALl PENS
RITE AID
10 PACK
3ALL PENS
BIC
PENS
cursiai
BlUE OR BLACK
COLLEGE
RULED
THEME BOOK
c
� 11"
100
SHEETS
RITE AID
FILLER
PAPER
COLGATE
TOOTH-
PASTE
9 02 TUBE
200
SHEETS
3 HOLE
PUNCH
IC
200
gra
� ivi uaxm
5 SUBJECT
SPIRAL
HEME BOOK
RITE AID
MARBLE
COMPOSITION
BOOK
200 SHEETS
12 INCH
WOOD
RULER
LEGAL
SIZE
CLIPBOARD
PERT
SHAMPOO
MORMAl DRY OR OUT
1S0Z.MTTIE
I
W SCRIPT0 OR
CRICKET
LIGHTERS
p�c one
OF 3
-ctoi
PENCILS
16 TO
PACKAGE
KLEER-VU
REPORT
COVERS
EFFERDENT
DENTURE
CLEANSER
T
on

-
i
I Camouf
- Ste�
�rant N�
Cowboy Be

PKG.
Of 40
TABLETS
etferdent
TYPING
PAPER
RITE AID PKG. OF 200 SHEETS
200
RITE AID
ENVELOPES
100 LETTER SIZE
OR SO BUSINESS SIZE
J
CARBON
PAPER
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES
PIKES EFFECTIVE AUG. 24 THRU 30, INI
NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TTPOGRAPHICAl ERRORS
AVAILABLE
ONLY AT:
2814 EAST 10TH STRUT
WEST END SHOPPING CENTER
CAROLINA EAST CONVENIENCE CENTER,
RT. 11 AS. MEMORIAL DR.
1102 WEST 3RD STREET
GREENVILLE, NC





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Tuition Hike Panned
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wake of a Proposition
1 3 -1 y p e tax relief
asure ha.e led to
drastic fee mcreasaes in
last two ears and
s gislative considera-
of charging tui-
tion.
Similar increases at
hools across the
nlr have sparked
sts. The most
�lent have been at
irnell, where marches
and a purposeful tangl-
ampus phone
hnes climaxed with a
three hour sit-in at the
iident's office.
Mam on campus in
Idaho now consider the
eat there a hoax
Dick Beeson, I 1 assis-
nt professor of
sociology, suspects the
person or persons who
the threats aren't
ore re olu-
i ar les.
' I he ideas expressed
it Camouflaged P�fqu�s Ae�d T.
Mrts. Sl�ping Bags Bacfcpacks
:amping Equipment. Siaa' Toad
"�, Dlshas And 0e- TOO Dt-
it Naw And Utao iams
Cowboy Boots S3S 95
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1501 S Evans Street
fin the threats) reek
with middle class
values Beeson savs.
"A professional
revolutionary wouldn't
give a damn about the
faculty
Police currently have
no suspects. "We had
sent an original of the
letter to our lab, but it
takes three-to-six mon-
ths to get any results
back said Lt. Dave
Williams of the
Moscow police depart-
ment.
Terry Armstrong, ex-
ecutive assistant to the
president, says
typewriters are being
checked all over cam us
to see if the letter had
been written there.
Back to
School
Eyeglass
Special
For all ECU Students,
Faculty & Staff
Offer Good Through
Aug. 31, 1981
Located across Dr Park
752-1446
OPTICIANS
OptXMHB
aaoaobor
atf amancB
vru
Biology Club
Meeting
Date: August 31, 1981
time: 6:30 P.M.
Place BN-102
Refreshments will
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This introductory meeting will feature Dr. Charles E
Bland, Chairperson, and Dr. Gerhard W. Kalmus,
Assistant Chairperson of the Biology Department.
The Biology Club officers will be introduced and club
objectives presented.
All prospective science majors and interested per
sons are cordially invited to attend!
SKIP
CASTRO
SUNDAY
30th


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1 HI EAS1 CAROI IN1AN
Sports
M (.1 SF 27, 19X1
Odom Says Team 'Just A Step Away'
B CHARLES CHANDLER
S�ort� l-dllor
'This is the best thing that has
happened to our basketball program
since I've been here
ECU head basketball coach Dave
Odom is obviously elated at last
week's announcement that his
Pirates will be competing in the
ECA south, a seven-team con
fcrence, this coming season.
The announcement came after
long months of trying to ac-
complishment such a teat by the
ECU administration. In the con-
ference with the Pirates will be Old
nonunion. Richmond. William and
Mary, George Mason, Navy and
James Madison.
1 here will be a post-season tour-
H right,
Underwood
Ineligible
Iwo East Carolina men'1- basket
ball players I iat were expected back
this season will be ineligible for the
1981 -82 campaign.
Forward David Underwood and
guard Rarrv Wright both are
demically ineligible to plav with
the team thi season
Wright, the team's second leading
scorer a year ago and an honorable
mention selection to the Basketball
Weekly freshman All-America
team, came back to school this past
summer hut fell short of his attempt
get his grades high enough to
return this fall. I nderwood did not
attend summer school. Underwood
isferred . Pirates four years
ago from South t arolina
Underwood apparently has left
good, but Wright did
not rule out the possibility that he
cturn to the Pirates.
"We did everything we could for
Barry this summer ECU head
CQach Dave Odoi said "It is very
unfortunate that he will not be with
:K,s year.
"Barry told me that he was
undecided what he wanted to do
about the future Odom con-
tinued. "1 will be willing to work
him and help him in an way 1
ECU Hires
Two New
Head Coaches
East Carolina announced the hir-
ing of five coaches Wednesday �
two head coaches and three
assistants.
Pat McGuigan was named as the
new head women's coach and Sue
Manahan was tabbed as the
women's head Softball coach.
Beth Burns and Laurie Sikes were
both named as assistants to
women's basketball head coach
Cathy Andruzzi, while Alan Far-
four will become an aide under
Caroline Brown for tennis.
McGuigan served as head
women's track coach at Memphis
State in 1979. She is the chairperson
of Track and Field Guide: Tips and
Techniques, which is published b
the National Association for Girls
and Women in Sports. She is a
graduate of the University of Pitt-
sburgh and earned her master's
degree in physical education from
the University of Wyoming,
McGuigan has coached 11 na-
tional qualifiers, along with one na-
tional champion and American
record holder.
Manahan is a 1973 graduate of
Longwood College. She taught PE
and coached for six years at Douglas
Freeman High School in Richmond,
compiling a 69-12 overall record, in
eluding one state title. She takes
over an ECU softball team that
finished third nationally this past
season.
Burns is a former graduate assis
tant on the Ohio State women's
basketball staff. She lettered in the
sport for four years at Ohio
Wesleyan.
Sikes finished out her collegiate
career last season, helping to lead
the ECU women's team to its first
national ranking. She now will turn
to coaching the Lady Pirates.
Farfour is a former Wake Forest
tennis great and is currently ranked
as the number two player in the
state. He plans to continue his
studies of physical education while
doubling as an assistant coach.
nament in early March with the win-
ner going to the NCAA champion-
ship tourney.
"This is such a big thing for us
Odom claimed. "Basketball is a
tournament sport. Unless you're in
a conference, it's hard ro make
basketball all it should be
The third-year Pirate coach added
that he felt a conference alignment
was vital for most schools.
"I've always thought being in a
conference is necessary for about 99
percent of the schools in the coun-
try he said. "There are a few big
independents that can do without it.
Believe me, we needed it
Odom said that when he was be-
ing interviewed for the ECU open-
ing three years ago following the
resignation of Larry Gillman, talk
of a future conference alignment
was frequent.
"One of the majoi topics of con-
versation when I was being inter-
viewed was a conference he said
"I was assured that the athletic
department and administration in-
tended to join a conference as soon
as possible
Ihe Pirate mentor says he is
grateful for all the work that was
done to make his dream a reality
"Through the last two years the
administration has proven to me
that they meant what they said I
have worked with l)r (Ken, ECU
athletic director) Kan and others to
make this come Hue It seemed like
a long time coming, rune seems
meaningless to me now that it's all
been achieved, though
Odom said one ot the great things
about the 1 �( At South membership
is what it means to the Pirate
players
"We've recruited many of,the
people that are in our program now
with the promise that we would
soon be in a league he explained
"I'm now glad that I can look them
in the eves and know that what we
all promised is a reality. You can
believe that the plavers share my ela
Hon. This gives them new lite and
new purpose
Odom quickly changed the sub-
ject, though, saying that the con-
ference membership put a big
responsibility on everybody involv-
ed � the 1(1 coaches, players,
students and fans
"Everybody needs to totally
understand that with this conference
affiliation comes the chance tor
each and every one of us to pick up
the responsibihtv that is our own
he said. "We coaches and the
players have got to show some
results on the court 1 believe that
we now have the talent that is need-
ed to compete in a league. The
players must play good and the
coaches must make the right deci-
sions
Odom added, though, that the
tans had a big responsibility as well.
"1 expect our tans to support us
with enthusiasm he said. They
need to be more enthusiastic and
create a better basketball at
mosphere than has been the .ase in
the past
"People have long called tor e
citing teams in (Minges Coliseum)
he continued "No we � � �
them rhcy have cried out tor
renewed rivalries and we've done
that They've cried out for exciting
games - they should be forthcom-
ing
I he Pirate mentor said he belie
that his club and the ECU program
is almost where everyone want-
be
"So many thing yv have ah
worked foi so long are just a step
awav he said 'But we mui '
work together to make that step We
can be successful in the 1-V
South �
their par:
Quarterbacks Shine In Scrimmage
.
Scrimmage Scrapbook
The ECU football team held an formal intrasquad
scrimmage Wednesday nigh! al Ficklen Stadium in
preparation for the team's Sept. 5 opener with Western
(arolina. In top photo, sophomore running back
Karnest Byner (44) crosses the goal line as the Purple
team, which was made up of first and second team

players, scored one of its many touchdowns. At bottom
right, assistant coach (�ar Fast makes an important
point. At bottom left, tight end Norwood Vann puts the
finishing touches on a successful pass play. (Photos b
Gar Patterson)
w
'4
I
Charles
Chandler
The Eastarolina I
tered in Ficklen Stadium
night (Wednesday) and held i
contact scrimmage Tho obsei
saw both some positive a: . �
things as the i
I he most positive

Kevin Ingi
Villanova
ware- most impres
Just by watching
the intrasquad scrimn tj
dent to any knowledgeab
that the two are ,
their styles
The two are hat I �
sent tor the starting QB
Nelson obviousl
grasp of the ECl system - a
should, having been here I
� ears previously. Ingram,
is in his first yeai with the B
transferring from the now ca
illanova program.
Ingram is not as smooth with
E( 1 wishbone, option-type
tense He is. though, a better pa
than Nelson.
Where Nelson looked more im-
pressive in the scrimmage when the
Pirates wanted to run the foott
Ingram looked better when
cent was on the aenai game.
Ingram appears to have
natural passing instinct that is
nice to watch. Time and again he
drew back and came through with a
nice pass play
Nelson had his moments or glory
also. His control of the option
tense is much better than it wa
year ago. His confidence level is
noticeably higher than it has been in
the past. The entire football team
should benefit from that.
All of the above is not to sav that
Nelson is a poor passer or that In-
gram cannot run the option. B
can do those things. It's just that the
two quarterbacks appear to excel in
different areas. Both definitely give
the team a lot more depth at the
position than was present last
season
Bushbeck Did His Thing
1 t, l kicker Chuck Bushbeck.
who transferred from Villanova
with Ingram, also competed in the
scrimmage Bushbeck learned
week that he has Hodgkin's disease.
a nulgnant cancel of the lvmph
nodes.
Bushbeck is undergoing tests this
week to determine what treatment
will be necessary to start him on the
toad to recovery The tests will also
dictate what capacity, if any, that he
will be available to the Pirates this
vear.
It Wednesday's scrimmage is anv
indication Bushbeck will not onlv
plav but plav well for the team
Wednesday night, he did not don
anv shoulder pads but wore all the
other gear that is customary. He
served as the kicking specialist tor
the Purple team, which consisted of
the first and second string plavers.
Bushbeck was successful on each
extra point try that he attempted.
Once he booted a kickoff deep into
the White team's endzone.
The former Villanova star has in-
dicated that he will play football un-
til he is told not to by the proper
authorities. He appears determined
to defeat the disease.
Watching him play � and well at
that � was certainly an inspiration
Wednesday night.
K





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27, 1981
13
inc
am
h
U he
im-
Bive
MZ
lanova
in the
d las!
fisease,
, mph
its this
itment
Ion the
ill also
Rhat he
les this
is any
t only
un.
lot don
all the
ry. He
Bist for
sted of
layers.
n each
mpted.
kp into
has in-
)all im-
proper
trmined
well at
nration
Kiffin Confident
� �
.��
Tol A very
EDITOR'S NOTE:
The following is the
first in a series of five
previews of East
Caroline's "big game"
football opponents for
1981. Pirate coach Ed
Emory split the
schedule into "big
games" (against stiff
competition) and six
"must wins" (games he
feels the team should
and mus win). There
will also be previews
forthcoming on the lat-
ter six clubs.
By CHARLES
CHANDLER
Sporti Editor
After watching his
team struggle to a 6-5
record in 1980, N.C.
State head football
coach Monte Kiffin is
confident that 1981 will
be a different sort of
year for the Wolfpack.
"I feel good about a
lot of things Kiffin
said. "We played well
the last three games last
year and that carried
over. We should have a
fine season
Last season was the
first at the Pack helm
for Kiffin, who says a
winning season in the
transition year was
crucial. The team had
to wait until the final
game of the season to
get the win that put it
over .500, though.
"That last game (a
36-14 win over East
Carolina) was as big as
any we played he
said. "It made a big
difference in the at-
titude of this year's
team, knowing that this
was still a winning pro-
See BACKFiEU)
Page 15
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Fri "End of Week Party
Sat "Best in Dance
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E. 5th St. � 218 Arlington Blvd.





14
THE EAST CAROL IN1 AN AUGUST 27. 1981
Golfers Regaining Form?
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Avtalul Sports f'diiur
Glancing at the the fall golf schedule for the
Pirates of East Carolina might make a weaker
man wince but not Coach Bob Helmic.
Helmic is a determined coach, the kind who
can influence a team for the better, especially
when a team like his has to face the likes of Atlan-
tic Coast Conference powers Wake Forest, Clem-
son and North Carolina. National powers
Georgia Southern, Ohio State, Oklahoma and
South Carolina are included, also.
However, a good returning nucleus like Helmic
has eases the pain quite a bit.
"We have a whole lot more strength this year
Helmic said. "The golf program here has improv-
ed so much. We could be stronger than the '72-73
team (which dominated the Southern Con-
ference). However, we're playing tougher com-
petition.
"I think we're getting to the point where we're
getting better, considering the competition we
have. I'm looking for big things from golf this
year
The 1981 nucleus supports the coach's op-
timism. Don Gaffner. a senior, heads the team.
greenville
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His strong points are "strength and leadership
according to Helmic. Other key returnees include
Chapel Hill's Don Sweeting, a player Helmic says
he is expecing "a whole lot of help from. He's on-
ly a sophmore but will be a leader The ECU
coach also says he is expecting "a good bit of
help from Jerry Lee, whom he says could
possibly play at the number four or five position.
Greenville's Mike Moye and Plain View,
N.Ys John Derrico also added much-needed
depth to the squad, as does Dan Lawruck.
The team's newcomers will make a difference,
Helmic says. "We are taking the strongest looks
at Jimmy Coleman (Greensboro), David Wag-
goner (Graham), Chris Czaja (Conneticutt),
Chris Dugeunski (Lawrenceville, N.J.)and David
Woodard (New Bern).
Helmic scheduled six tournaments last fall but
has changed the format for this season. He has
scheduled what he calls the four "best" tour-
naments. On September 23-25 the Pirates travel
to Campbell, followed by a trip to James
Madison the next weekend. There is a tournament
also scheduled at Duke in the middle of October
and one at William and Mary October 25-27.
"We finished fairly strong last year" Helmic
noted. "With capable returnees and real fine
freshmen, I think we'll be pretty strong
The Pirate coach said he was impressed with
Coleman and added that Czaja "could possibly
step in and help right away. Both are all-around
good golfers. They seem to be talented in all
phases
Helmic said the early-season lineup, although
not set, included Gaffner at the number-one posi-
tion, Sweeting at number two, followed by Moye,
Lawruck, Lee and Derrico.
The coach added that the team was also
holding tryouts.
Helmic hopes his team is striving for perfec-
tion, even with the difficult schedule. That dif-
ficult schedule, however, doesn't deter Helmic
one bit. "Hell, we played 42 of the top 50 teams
in the nation last year he quipped.
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food labels?
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756-6200
J
It makes sense to know
what your food dollar
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Enjoy a wide range
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including:
snacks
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dairy products
nuts
dried fruit
cookbooks
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Special orders and bulk
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Rivergate Shopping Center
Greenville, N. C.
Monday-Friday 10 a.m. 'til 8p.m
Saturday 10 a.m. 'til 5 p.m.
�v
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Second
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We Sell Used
couches
chairs
beds
lamps
stereos 2
j� ORANGEBURG. S C
14 Karat Original
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necklace with
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14 Karat guarantee!
Something she'll grow with proudly surely
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J. D. Daws on Co.
2818 E. 10th St.
Greenville, N. C.
752-1600 27834
102 Main St.
Belhaven, N.C.
943-2121 27810
appliances (Ig. and sm.)
pictures
typewriters
desks
dining tables
coffee tables
end tables
sets of dishes
carpet
televisions
mattresses
dressers
chests
night stands
bars
skates
Just to name a few.
Second
Chance
Open: Mort Wed Fri Sat. � io6
Tues Thurs. � 10-8
Located across from Western Sizztin'
in old A&P building at 2808 E. 10th St.
Phone 757-1322
Bi
Continued
gram
As Kiffir
1981 couidl
good yea
Wolfpack,
14 starter;
from a yearl
of them on
"I hav
defense wj
strong suit,
mitted.
very 'veterl
sWely. Oui
should be I
strong and
linebacking
in good sh
we have a
that we nt
more dept
defensive
The
strong" sea
Kiffin spok
be just th
starters
Williams,
Hoggard
Meadow
Honneycuttl
Also back
LeGrande
Williams,
1979 start el
out last seaj
juries.
LeGrand
only six
selections
ACC pre-s
ball team.
the eight
coaches.
Defensive
Etheridge
chosen to
squad an
mainstay o(
sive line m
Bubba G
departed.
Howard, 6-
a starter or
sive line ai
steps in for
A strong
corps is ledj
All-ACC
pick, Rober
Two mer
State squ;
spots on th(
fensive unit
Mike Quick!
Chris Koeht
Kiffin bl
for Al
honors, say
would be ;
the team's
"Mike is
athlete tl
year men
"Sornedav
Si
Ml
C!
Ti
Bl
Wl
o
Tl
S"
Fl
U
S
B.
?





US
E

leenvilie
b
1
25
REG
59
II
d
ions
sses
trs
tands
e
10-6
Izzlin'
th St.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 27, 1981 15
Backfield Problem For Pack
Continued From Page 13
gram
As Kiffin suggested,
1981 could be a very
good year for the
Wolfpack, what with
14 starters returning
from a year ago � nine
of them on defense.
"I have to feel
defense will be our
strong suit Kiffin ad-
mitted. "We can feel
very 'veteran' defen-
Mvely. Our secondary
should be extremely
strong and I feel our
hnebacking situation is
in good shape also. If
we have a problem, it's
that we need to have
more depth on the
defensive line
The "extremely
strong" secondary that
kiffin spoke of should
be just that. All four
starters � Perry
Williams, Dee Dee
W o g g a r d, Louie
Meadows and Hillery
Honneycutt �- return.
Also back are Donnie
I eGrande and Eric
Williams, a pair of
1979 starters who sat
out last season with in-
juries.
LeGrande was one of
only six unanimous
selections to the All-
ACC preseason foot-
ball team, chosen by
the eight conference
coaches.
Defensive end Ricky
Etheridge was also
chosen to the all-star
squad and is the
mainstay of the defen-
sive line now that big
Hubba Green has
parted. Doug
Howard, 6-6, 254, and
tarter on the offen-
� o line a year ago,
ps in for Green.
A strong Hnebacking
rps is led by another
Ml-ACC pre-season
:k, Robert Abraham.
T members of the
Stai squad landed
a the all-star of-
� unit � split end
MUt �juiok and tackle
Chris Koehne.
Ki? led Quick
All-America
honors, saving that he
woul -a cog in
the team's offense.
"M ke is just a great
second-
said,
be a
top draft pick I'm sure.
We'd be foolish not to
get him the ball with all
the ablities that he's
got
The man that must
get Quick the ball is
junior quarterback Tol
Avery, who begins his
second full seasonas the
team's number one
signal-caller.
"We feel verv good
about Tol Kiffin
said. "He has ex-
perience and he im-
proved a lot this spr-
ing
If there is a problem
on the State team, it is
the lack of proven
players in the offensive
backfield, Kiffin said.
We're very unsettled
at running back he
said. "Our leading
returning rusher is
Chris Brown (brother
of Ted) and he gained
only 250 yards last
year. Although some of
our backs have poten-
tial, some of them have
got to come to the front
for us to do well this
season
Brown and Lar-
mount Lawson, who
did not letter a year
ago, are the leading
candidates at tailback
heading into the fall
drills. Freshman recruit
Joe Mclntosh of Lex-
ington, an all-state per-
former, may be called
on for early help.
Dwight Sullivan is
listed as the starting
fullback. Sullivan
returns to the starting
lineup after multiple in-
juries sidelined him last
season.
Kiffin sees the Pack
offensive line as
"strong but lacking
depth Tackle Todd
Eckerson and guard
Earnest Butler, along
with Koehne, started a
year ago. Chuck Long
takes over at left guard
for Doug Howard, who
switched to defense.
Aiding Kiffin and the
Wolfpack in their quest
for a big season are
seven home games. The
coach plays down any
advantage there, saying
the schedule is tough
nevertheless.
"It's always nice to
play at home he said.
"But I think the home
advantage is more im-
portant in basketball
than in football,
especially with the
schedule that we've got
at home this year
North Carolina,
Maryland, Penn State
and Miami, Fla all
bowl teams a year ago,
along with East
Carolina will converge
into Raleigh's Carter-
Finley Stadium before
the season ends.
Cartcr-Finley was the
scene of several Kiffin
antics a year ago � a
helicopter drop and a
horseback ride are two
examples. Will the col-
orful coach pull
something different out
of his hat this year?
"As far as getting ex-
cited, I'll never
change said the
former Arkansas assis-
tant. "If we have a pep
rally I like to get people
interested. 1 may not
ride horses or jump out
of a helicopter, though.
"This time he add-
ed with a chuckle, "I
may drive all over
Raleigh with a big red
fire engine
If the Wolfpack of-
fense catches up with
what should be a fine
defense, the machine
Kiffin spoke of may be
needed to put out the
Wolfpack fire.
BOYD'S BARBER &
HAIR STYLING
By Appointments
1008 S.EVANS
GREENVILLE,N.C
PHONE 758-4056
e a r m e n t o t
nedav he
Our goal is to make dining with
us a pleasure, with the best food
and service. A special Thank You
for your patronage.
Woody and Janie Smith
Your Host and Hostess
THflK
STttflS
pestauRant
2725 Memorial Drive
Greenville, N. C. 27834
Phone 756-2414
Breakfast, Lunch, & Dinner
Gourmet Salad Bar, Steaks,
Seafood & Other Dinners
Fine Wines & Champagne
Banquet Rooms
"
Brown Bagging Permitted
To Private Members"
MonFri. 6 a.m9:30 p.m.
Sat. & Sun. 7 a.m9:30 p.m.
Open 7 Days a Week
WESTERN
SIZZLIN'
Steakhouse
BAIL Y SPECIALS
MONDAY -
CHOPPED STEAK
TUESDAY -
BEEF TIPS
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THURSDAY -
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1.99
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All Meals are Complete
Including Baked Potato or
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and
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Famous Salad Bar
Take Out Service - W0C f '0thSt7$i-27U
264 By-Pass � 754-0040 � Hours 11 a.mlO p.m. � Mon. Thurs.
10a.mIt p.m. FriSun.
Room Supplies
for your
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bamboo
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DISCOUNT CENTER 7523m J
On The Mall Downtown Greenville
NIKON EM
Automatically Affordable
IT'S AUTOMATIC. ITS PRICED RIGHT
AND. IT'S A NIKON With Super-sharp.
interchangeable Nikon SOmm 11.8
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With Nikon
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Kodak Carousel
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hats and fans
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stackable
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fu�. $11.00 WmJtW M
BISSCTTFS
East Carolina Dining Services
JONES CAFETERIA
"All you can eat, three meals per day"
M-F
Sat.
Sun.
Breakfast7:15-9:308:00-9:30Brunch
Lunch11:00-1:3011:30-1:3010:00-1:00
Dinner4:30-6:304:30-6:004:30-6:00
MENDENHALL SNACK BAR
"Continual Service all day long"
BreakfastM-F SatSun.
Lunch7:30 A.M 11:00 A.M
Dinner7:30 P.M. 6:30 P.M.
THE GALLEY
"Located next door to Jones Cafeteria"
Lunch Dinner�? SatSun. 10:30-2:30 clo$e6
4:30-7:30
Faculty-Staff Buffet Dining
Reopening on Aug. 31
Servomation � E.C.U.
P. O. Box 3375
Greenville, N. C. 27834
Lunch
MonFri.
11:00-2:00
T





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 27. 1981
Pirates Sign
Four Carolina
Prospects
1aliWlinrlirlt-r
The Pirate coaching
staff has done a little
home cookin' and land-
ed four area baseball
stars that will help the
team in the outfield, on
the mound and in the
infield, head coach Hal
Baird has announced.
The four players, all
from eastern North
Carolina, are pitchers
Charles "Chubby"
Butler of Roanoke
Rapids and bobby
Davidson of Fayet-
teville E.E. Smith, out-
fielder Craig Brown of
Goldsboro and in
fielder Joh nny Banks
of Garner.
The bucs, 28-15 in
1981, were looking for
more speed in the out-
field and strength on
the mound. Depth was
also needed for the in-
field. The Pirate
coaches believe they
have succeeded in all
three of these areas
with the signings.
Brown, who will also
play football for the
Pirates, was a four-year
starter and two season
all-star for Mike
Glover's Goldsboro
High team. Scouts say
he possesses impressive
speed, a good arm and
a quick bat. "Brown is
a very physical player
assistant coach Gary
Overton said. "He will
help us right away
Davison, a highly-
recruited 6-0,
175-pounder, is a
"polished" pitcher.
"He has a very good
delivery and a good
command of his pit-
ches Overman said.
"He is a very smooth,
mature pitcher. He
could pitch right away
for us
Head coach Hal
Baird said Davidson
was recruited by Clem-
son, Florida and
Mississippi State. "He
could step in right
away he said.
��
.����a� -
.
IF YOU LIKE CONTACT SPORTS, LOADS OF
FUN AND WILD PARTIES AT PANT ANA
BOB'S, THEN TO THE ALLIED HEALTH
FIELD ON TUES SEPT. 1st. COME OUT -
YOU WONT BE DISAPPOINTED.
Pitcher Bill Wilder
yDOArux
u.
ItTLoNOGRAMS UNLIMITED
THIS WEEK'S STUDENT
SPECIAL - WI.D.
IRREGULAR POLO SPORT
SHIRT s))50
WYOUR MONOGRAM 225�
It Can Be Monogrammed
We Can Do It
Phone 7568555 0pe"
After 6 p.m. 754-6207 Mor
The Staff of WZMB would
like to announce a
STAFF
MEETING
to be held
Monday, Aug. 31st, in
the radio studio.
All members of last year's staff
are expected to be there.
ffmmd Opemnfjm
AUG. 24-29
Gotcha Covered
&WEAR
0-13
AUTHENTIC WESTERN
BLOUSES AND SHIRTS
$18-22 VALUE
ABILENE AND DURANGO
BOOTS 20off
3U O off SELfiOT GROUP OF STRAW HATS
COME SEE "MAKSHEL DESTIN" - WO�Uy$ FASTEST DRAW
TAKE ON "WILL C" Of ED EYE CINEMA I
"JOSH HUMPHREYS" Of WAZ2 - SAT
AUG 29th AT HIGH NOON.
WITH THE PURCHASE OF ANY PAIR
OF CORDS - SAVE 20 ON
ANY REGULAR PRICED TOP &
MANY MORE BARGAINS
$600 OF FREE PRIZES AND REFRESHMENTS
HWY. UN
AYDEN, N.C.
m
9T.
m � m
U
Sigma Nu and Schlitz
in cooperation with kash and karry
present
ii
BULL RUN '81"
ah keas of your favorite beverage
Free to all ECU students (with I.D.)
"Chugging Contest Free T-Shirts, Hats and Huggers
Thursday, August 27 Starts at 3:30 and lasts 'til 7:00 p.m. � All at the Sigma Nu House �
Corner of 13th and Cotanche Streets
Sponsored by our friends at:
Margate's
The Mushroom Gift Shop
Todd's Stereo Center
Herman Hines of Roffler
Godfather Pizza
Papa Katz
The Wash House
The Flower Basket
University Book Exchange
The Happy Store
Craftsmanship Unlimited
Country City
Marsh's Surf �r Sea
Famous Pizza
Marathan Restaurant
Elbo Room
Overton's Supermarket
Pizza Inn
Mitchell's Hair Styling
The Crow's Nest
Rafters
Flamingo Records
King Sandwich Shop
Pro Clean INT.
American Defender Life
H ignite - Melvin and Ass.
Sportsworld
Accucopy
Taylor Beverage Company
t
r
i





Title
The East Carolinian, August 27, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 27, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.142
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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