The East Carolinian. June 25, 1981






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Vol SSNo 6 Pages
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Thursday June 25, 1981
New Drama Building Named
After Memorable President
New Drama Building Named
.dedicated to East Carolina mentor.
By FRANCE1NE PERRY
ECU Nri�sB�re�y
When East Carolina University
dedicates its newly enlarged theatre
arts center to its fifth president,
John Decatur Messick, in August, it
will pay tribute to one of the most
dynamic and colorful leaders in the
institution's 74-year history.
During Messick's administration,
1947-1960. he turned a small teachers
college of 1400 students, affec-
tionately (and derisively) known as
"Ee-Cee-Tee-Cee" into the state's
third largest campus.
From his retirement home in
Wilmington, former President
Messick, now 84, maintains a keen
interest in East Carolina, whose ad-
vancement began with Messick's
unceasing efforts and constant con-
tact with all possible source of
help� citizens, lawmakers, private
foundations, and state and federal
agencies.
"East Carolina was already more
than a teacher's college when 1 went
there Messick recalls, noting that
since 1941, students could take
Bachelor of Arts degrees in various
liberal arts.
But the school was sorely in need
of vigorous leadership. After the 25
years under its effective first presi-
dent. Dr. Robert Herring Wright, it
was beset by administrative and
financial woes during the brief
terms of three succeeding
presidents.
A careful search process resulted
in the auspicious choice of tall,
silver-haired John Messick. At the
time of his selection, he was describ-
ed as "cheerful, friendly, dignified
in manner and handsome in ap-
pearance according to a college
news release.
Messick's qualifications were ex-
cellent: education at Elon College,
UNC-Chapel Hill and New York
University, and experience as dean
of instruction at the progressive
Montclair. N. J State Teachers
College. A native of Beaufort
County, Messick had an insightful
grasp of eastern North Carolina's
culture and concerns� a gift which
was to prove invaluable to him dur-
ing his struggle to expand the little
campus.
One of Messick's most significant
undertakings was to push through
the N.C. General Assembly a bill
changing the school's name from
"East Carolina Teachers College"
to "East Carolina College Other
BA degree-granting teachers col-
leges were undergoing name
change, but East Carolina was the
first teachers college in North
Caolina to do so.
While the name change was im-
portant, the new president was after
more substantial recognition from
the legislature. Messick and his
trustees frequently lobbied for in-
creased appropriations.
In January, 1953, Messick cited
figures which showed that ECC's
share of funds per student enrolled
was less than for any other state-
supported white college except Ap-
palachian State. "It is not that the
other campuses need less, but that
ECC needs more he explained.
When East Carolina's tiny library
facility seemed to shrink with swell-
ing enrollment and library holdings,
Messick pleaded for and finally
recieved an $814,000 state ap-
propriation for a new building. So
while money was no problem,
critical post-war building supplies
were; there could be no construction
without steel.
Students were crowding each
other in the cramped library facility
and many volumes were stacked on
the floor for want of space, a situa-
tion which might have continued
had not Messick learned that Dr.
Ernest Hollis, head of higher educa-
tion in HEW, was to be given the
task of steel allocation.
In a cordial letter to Hollis,
Messick invited him tQ speak at East
Carolina's spring commencement
See Messick, Page 2
Possible A ddition
Mendenhall Student Center
Dining, BallroomsProposed
Bv KAREN WENDT
Though it is still in the early
staces, the Student Services Sub-
Commission has recommended to
the ECU Planning commission that
an addition be made to Mendenhall
Student Center some time in the
future.
"No decision has been made ex-
cept to study it according to
Rudolph Alexander, associate dean
in charge of Mendenhall Student
Center.
The recommendation asked for
the addition of three main areas: a
full-service dining facility, a
ballroom and additional meeting
rooms.
At present there is no full-service
dining facility on the north end oi
campus. This proposed facility
would offer the same services as the
cafeteria in Jones dorm.
Alexander feels that the ballroom
could take the place of Wright
Auditorium, which after its renova-
tions will have permanent seating.
Lester Nail, SGA president said
that at this time the SGA could not
endorse or go against the recom-
mendation. He said that the pro-
posal is still in its early stages and
said that he desires student opinion
on the proposal.
He stated that at the present time it
is too early to tell much about the
proposal since it has yet to be decid-
ed as to where the money will come
from the finance the facility and
who will sponsor the construction.
Nail felt that there was a need for
more meeting rooms than the pre-
sent facility can provide. The pro-
posed meeting rooms would be in
the same style as those which
already exist in the center.
Alexander did concede that a lot
of things needed to be considered
before the proposal was finalized,
citing the costs of building, basic
operational costs and staffing the
facility.
The idea of an addition began
with the Student Union and Student
Center task force, a group that in-
cludes representatives from the
residence life program, dining ser-
vices, public safety and 10 other
campus organizations. Work was
begun on the proposal about a year
ago.
Though no definite plans have
been made, Alexander believes that
if the addition is approved and built
it will be added onto the south side
of the building.
"Even aspect has been dealt
with Alexander said of the pro-
iect.
kHe also stated that he believed
that the ballroom could enhance the
services of the center, such as the
yearly Madrigal Dinners.
U.S. Post Office
Receives Go Ahead
On Nine Digit Zips
WASHINGTON (UPD The
Reagan administration has flashed a
green light ?'or voluntary use of the
mne-digit ZIP code, it was disclosed
Wednesday.
The Office of Management and
Budget, in a letter to Postmaster
General William Bolger, said the
longer postal zone code is in line
ith the administration's guidelines
that a regulation create more
benefits than it costs.
The longer code is expected to be
used mainly by businesses in its ear-
ly stages. It provides more specific
sorting information, directing mail
to specific blocks or buildings.
"We have reviewed your revised
regulators impact analysis, and on
that basis, have concluded that your
ZIP-plus-four is in accord with the
president's regulatory P"ncPles-
said James C. Miller III, OMB sad-
ministrator for information and
regulators affairs.
In the letter, dated Tuesday,
Miller said OMB had two concerns
including the cost and efficiency of
new equipment, and service given to
mail with the present five-digit ZIP,
the new ZIP-plus-four, and mail
without a ZIP code.
"Your staff has assured us that
any service differentials that do ob-
tain will not reflect the deteriora-
tion in the service provided to ex-
isting mail categories Miller said.
"We trust you will monitor the
situation and report to us any pro-
blems that may develop
I
Miller's letter followed requests
to the Postal Service to provide a
regulatory impact analysis of the
longer ZIP code. Bolger had told
OMB that since the use of the new
ZIP code would be purely volun-
tary, it would not have a regulatory
impact on anyone.
WMZ A r1sni"p A Postal Service spokesman said
W(Z ZlpOlOgl,C Wednesday that order forms have
been distributed for businesses to re-
quest tapes listing addresses with
9-digit ZIP. "We have not released
any tapes as yet. When the orders
start coming in, we will begin filing
them the spokesman said.
The Postal Service plans to begin
�making available ZIP-plus-four
tapes to individuals late this year or
early next year.
The staff of The East Caroli-
nian would like to apologize
for the lateness of this week's
issue, which was due to a
malfunction of our typeseting
equipment.
We would also like to thank
The Havelock Progress and
publisher Eugene Smith for
the use of their facilities.
Atlanta
Official Task Force Says It
Will Not Slow Investigation
REGISTRATION
ATLANTA (UPI) Two top
Atlanta officials said today the ar-
rest of Wayne B. Williams in the
death of one of the 28 young blacks
slain in the last two years has done
nothing to slow the year-long special
task force investigation.
"We have not slowed down one
inch Public Safety Commissioner
Lee P. Brown told his regular week-
ly briefing for reporters. "We are
going full speed ahead. We are pro-
bably working in more directions
and faster and harder than before
In Washington, Atlanta Mayor
Maynard Jackson met with Presi-
dent Reagan to thank him for the
federal aid involved in the investiga-
tion.
Jackson told Reagan the arrest of
Williams, who was bound over to
the grand jury Tuesday for the slay-
ing of the latest victim, Nathaniel
Cater, was "a significant step but
added, "we still have 27 cases that
are on the docket in connection with
the assaults and are conducting a
serious and continuing investiga-
tion
Brown, somewhat snappish with
reporters, gave only short answers
to queries about reports of a pro-
posed reduction in the FBI effort
following Williams' arrest. He was
also asked about continuing reports
that Williams' arrest was prompted
by pressure from Vice President
George Bush and Gov. George
Busbee.
The commissioner said he had
"been very pleased with FBI in-
volvement" in the investigation and
added, "I'm not aware of their pull-
ing out. I have no reason at all to
believe that it (the presence) will not
continue
In Washington, Jackson was also
asked about a possible FBI pullout
and said, "that would be entirely
contrary to what our understanding
is
The mayor went on to explain,
"our understanding is that the FBI
is committed tn the task force
operation until the 27 other cases
have been solved or substantially
solved.
Brown said all material taken
from Williams' northwest Atlanta
home in two separate searches had
been turned over to the crime lab,
and said police were still watching
the house at the request of Williams'
retired schoolteacher parents who
also live there.
On The Inside
Editorials
Features
Sports5
Classifieds
A






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 25, 1981
Messick Receives Dedication
DR JOHN D MESSICK
Reagan's Speech Writer Leaves
To Pursue Other Interests
WASH1NGT O N himself sort of a con- say much newsworthy.
(UPI) President Reagan sultant He has no in- It was much the same
needs a speech writer. tention of staying on per- al Wesi Point. There
He had one, but he manently, he says. were those who guessed
qUI Still, there has been a Reagan might use the
Now Reagan and the good deal of criticism forum at the U.S.
administration are stuck, about Reagan's speeches Military Academy to
The problem became lately. And although deliver a foreign policy
apparent over the much of the complaining speech. He did not.
weekend when former has been done by He chose instead to
speechwriter Kenneth reporters, even an objec- stump for better pay for
khachigian was seen get- the observer might the military a subject un-
ting off Reagan's detect a lack ofdoubtedly dear to the
helicopter from Camp substance in his remarks, hearts of the assembled
David when it touched One line in a speech cadets.
down at the White last month to graduates
House. at the University of Reagan told a reporter
Khachigian left the ad- Notre Dame stirred up at his last news con-
ministration earlier tins some dust. It was the one terence he is comtortable
spring to pursue his own about how Western vMth his foreign policy
business interests ou; in civilization will no longer and sees no need to ar-
California. H dome so, compete with com- ticulate it in a speech,
he created a void that has munism, but will simply However, he cannot
vet be closed. "transcend" it. assign- continue to give com-
Ihere are a number of imz it a place in the mencement speeches to
candidates tor the job. historv books as a "sad. graduates. He will even
But it is clear that the biarre chapter tually have to make clear
position remains open. The line was in- his administrations
Khachigian says he terspersed among policy on a number ot
wants to avoid publicity reminiscences about issues.
about his re-emergence, Knute Rockne, Notre
arguing that it may look Dame and his days in
like he is undercutting college. Its significance
several of the full-time was almost lost in the
speechwnters already on fluffy rhetoric.
Reagan's staff. I ater, at his news con-
But the president ference, Reagan explain-
relied heavily on ed the line as meaning
Khachigian during the that the beginning of the
campaign and appear to end is nearing tor corn-
want his counsel once munism.
more. For the most part,
Khachigian. who used however, the president
to pen the remarks of took pains to explain
Richard Nixon, calls how he did not want to
Continued From Page 1
and bring his
wife also, to be house
guests of t!ie Messicks
in the president's
residence.
"While he was there,
I got his promise for
the steel for the library,
and he followed
through said
Messick. "Soon
thereafter, the state
budget officer, D. S.
Coltrane, and Gover-
nor (Kerr) Scott wanted
steel for UNC and fail-
ed
Coltrane remarked
that Messick must have
got his steel "through
persistence "I got it
through foresight
Messick says.
The dedication of the
new library on March
8, 1955. coinciding with
the 48th anniversary of
East Carolina's foun-
ding, was a gala affair.
Special guests included
legislators from as far
away as Buncombe,
Davidson and Union
Counties.
Messick's efforts
were spurred by in-
creasing student de-
mand upon East
Carolina College.
More and more
students, including
veterans with educa-
tional benefits, applied
for admission.
While classroom
space was ample, East
Carolina suffered a
severe lack of housing
space, on and off cam-
pus, so hundreds of ap-
plicants had to be turn-
ed away each year dur-
ing the early and
mid-1950's.
Messick appealed
several times to Green-
ville's citizens to rent
their "unused rooms"
to students as enroll-
ment doubled, tripled,
then quadrupled. He
was able to get funds
for five new student
dormitories and an ad-
dition to another.
In all, East Carolina
acquired 10 new
buildings during the
Messick years,
modified eight others,
purchased 80 acres of
land, doubled the size
of its library holdings,
tripled its number of
faculty members and
instituted 200 new
scholarship programs.
Always interested in
technology as a tool for
education, Messick
established a closed-
circuit television system
and campus public
radio station. ECC
became the first cam-
pus in the Southeast to
offer courses via com
mercial television.
New courses were
developed, resulting in
more degree programs
and pre-professional
curriculum. As ECC
grew, Messick stayed in
close touch with the
general public and
other educators, giving
speeches, writing ar-
ticles and completing a
book which was
published by the Duke
University Press.
His vision of East
Carolina was pro-
phetic� even as he
worked to strengthen
the basic science pro-
grams and establish a
nursing school which
received approval in
1959, his long-range
view was that East
Carolina might some-
day achieve a two-year
medical school. As far
back as 1953, Messick
urged at a civic gather-
ing in Rocky Mount
that East Carolii . be
allowed "to assume the
proportions of a
university
Inevitably, as the col-
lege grew, Messick
caused some consterna-
tion among budget-
minded officials and
competitors for the
education dollar at
other campuses. He
was told by a Con-
solidated University
chancellor that the
"State Board of Higher
Education was brought
into being to clip our
progress
There were disap-
pointments and delays,
but Messick, un-
daunted, achieved great
popularity among
North Carolina
citizens. A November,
1958, poll sponsored by
"The State" magazine
revealed that John
Messick, along with
Billy Graham, Carl
Sandburg, Sam Ervin
and Andy Griffith, was
one of the "ten most
interesting Tar Heels
He was the only
educator in the top ten.
Messick was men-
tioned as a possible suc-
cessor to Gordon Gray
as president of the Con-
solidated UNC system
in 1955, and a few years
later, some Greenville
leaders wanted him to
try for the Democratic
gubernatorial nomina-
tion.
But in October, 1959,
when Messick suddenly
announced his wish to
resign as ECC presi
dent, it was with no
stated intention to rise
into a more demanding
position.
He had enjoyed the
"loyal cooperation of
almost everyone involv-
ed in the on-going pro-
gram at ECC he told
the trustees, but he had
The East Carolinian
erng iherumpuscommunny
since 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
ticial newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned,
operated and published tor and
by the students ot East Carolina
university
Subscription Rates
Business 135 yearly
All others S25 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville N C
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campvis Of ECU.
Greenville N C
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rA
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Doin monthly breasi
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Am,
CLASS RINGS!
ECU OFFICIAL CLASS RING
!ECU Student Supply Store Lobby
June 25th and 26th
suffered frustration
often when "it was im-
possible to obtain suffi
cient appropriations"
for East Carolina. "1
am tired of being
tired he said.
Although he had
reached retirement age,
Messick continued for
another 10 years in
leadership roles, as
assistant director of 'he
National Committee on
Special Education and
Rehabilitation at Lyn-
donville, Vermont,
State Teachers College
and the developing of
Oral Roberts Universi-
ty, Tulsa, Okla.
As ORU's executive
vice president and
dean, Messick had im-
mense funds to support
his ideas, which includ-
ed an electronic dial ac
cess system and learn-
ing resources center
lauded by the Carnegie
Commission on Higher
Education as "the first
great technological
revolution in education
in five centuries
il Cmootl�9�4 Fauiu�s An
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Camping Equipment St�a� To�a
Shoes Dishes Ana Over 700 Dif-
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Co�Do, Boo'sSM 45
ARMY-NAVY STORE
1M1 S r�ani Street
Messick's long career
in education was
motivated by his un-
wavering belief in a
statement made by
Aristotle, which
Messick quoted in a
1950 address at the New
York University School
of Education. "All
who have meditated on
the art of governing
mankind have been
convinced that the fate
of empires depends on
the education of
south "
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on was
his un-
lief in a
;ide by
which
feed in a
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�tie last Ear0liman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, �� �c�y
Jimmy DuPREE. mmum�
Chuck Foster. ��. � mmi, Deborah Hotaling. m. n
CHRIS LlCHOK. �,�. H. WILLIAM YELVERTON v M
ALISON BARTEL. Pro.cuo� S4,�aer STEVE BACHNER. MM M�
June 25. 1981
Opinion
Page 3
The Buc
Preventing Future Problems
How would you feel if you spent
$13,000 and didn't get anything for
it? Such a thought is rather blood-
curdling, but that's what almost
happened with this year's Buc-
caneer.
When Barrie Byland resigned as
editor of the yearbook last week she
had spent nearly that much of the
Buc's $64,000 budget and had com-
pleted only 13 pages. There was a
very real possibility that the book
would not come out at all and that
this already expended money would
go down the tubes.
This is not merely far-fetched
speculation� just such a situation
occurred during the 1977-78 school
year when Susan Rogers was editor
of the book. When she left at the
end of the year, work on the Buc
had not been completed. No one
found out until the next fall,
however, and by that time it was too
late. No yearbook.
This year only complaints from
staff members and a letter from the
yearbook's printer tipped the Media
Board off.
Obviously, some sort of system
needs to be established through
which the board can monitor pro-
gress on the Buccaneer and Rebel,
another publication that only comes
out once a year. Under the present
system the Media Board has no for-
mal means to guard against such
situations. The board has set up a
subcommittee to study the problem.
This committee is faced with the
sticky problem of finding a way to
prevent further such problems
without compromising the authority
of the editors of these publications.
In choosing a solution the board
must make absolutely certain that it .
does not interfere with editorial or
other decisions that rightfully
should be made by the editor.
The best solution might be to
establish a contract between the
editor and the board. This contract
would spell out the responsibilities
of the editor� primarily that a
publication be put out.
The contract could also contain a
provision that the editor establish
deadlines and inform the board
periodically of progress toward
meeting them. If the board were to
take part in establishing the
deadlines, however, it would be
guilty of overstepping its authority.
When the Media Board hires an
editor, a certain amount of trust
must be given to that person. The
board is not a "babysitter If it
tried to perform such a function,
asy editor would be rightfully of-
fended.
By the same token, many editors
frown on the suggestion that stu-
dent publications need advisers to
oversee their operations. The feeling
is that "advisers" often become
"editors and the valildity of the
term student publication becomes
lost in the shuffle.
Students, after all, are adults and
must be trusted with responsibility.
But adults make mistakes, and
hopefully the guidelines mentioned
above can be enough to prevent
these mistakes from being too costly
to the students of ECU.
r Campus Forum
Fraternities Praised
1
On behalf of the Easter Seal Society
of North Carolina, I would like to ex-
tend this special word of thanks to Kap-
pa Alpha Psi and Lambda Chi Alpha
fraternities and company for their hard
work and dedication to the Second An-
nual Miller Softball Marathon for
Easter Seals.
Played last weekend on four city fields
for two days in a blistering heatwave,
the event attracted 70 soft ball teams and
raised $18,500.
Kappa Alpha Psi served as the
backbone of the softball marathon by
providing a flow of working volunteers
at the fields, an equipment strike crew
and a leadership organization that
helped to move the event to its successful
conclusion.
Lambda Chi Alpha hosted the
hospitality component by opening their
house and helped to serve more than
2,000 players and fans. Lambda Chi also
rendered critical support to the
marathon headquarters unit.
Keith McCorkle, president of Kappa
Alpha Psi, and Dan Brown, president of
Lambda Chi Alpha, were present Sun-
day afternoon at the marathon awards
presentation where they each received a
plaque in recognition of their contribu-
tion.
The special efforts of these two
organizations made for a quality fund-
raising event. Easter Seals has been for-
tunate to have them serve as the founda-
tion of our marathon volunteer team.
JEFFREY L. PEYTON
Easter Seals Regional Director
with such matters as human rights, it is
impossible for a super power like the
U.S a nation that has always condemn-
ed apartheid and aggression, to turn
around and stand in suppon of the most
evil system of racial oppression in the
world.
This U.S. plan to establish closer ties
with racist South Africa, and the recent
declaration of the plans under way for
U S. arms sales to that country is only
going to help perpetuate world-wide
racial descrimination policies, and may
even stir renewed racial tensions in this
country itself.
The American people must demand a
clear-cut foreign policy from their
government. Is America now abandon-
ing its belief in the equality of mankind?
Has aggression, such as demonstrated
by Israel in the Iraq raid become accep-
table by the foreign policies of the
United States?
It seems to me that President Reagan
is pushing too hard in his aim to restore
confidence and faith in the American
nation. A people do not have to be on
the bad guy's side in order to prove that
they are tough.
Human rights supporters must act
now. I want to re-emphasize the call by
Bishop Desmond Tutu of the South
African council of churches for black
sports and entertainment figures to
boycott and condemn South African
events. There is no doubt left that black
liberation is in our own hands.
SAFARI MATHENGE
Junior, SLAP
Policy Protested
Recent developments in the Reagan
administration have left no doubt that
the U S. is now ambitious to restore the
separationist South African regime into
some respectability in the world. The
U.S. is taking a big step backward in ot-
ficiaUy admitting the white minority
South African government into the
western alliance. This unfortunate move
will inevitably deteriorate the already
eroding U.SAfrican relations.
Although the president made it clear
in his earlier speeches that his govern-
ment would not be deeply concerned
KN0UI THE PRESIDENT PROMISED TO
APPOINT h UOMN TO THE SUPREME COURT BUT
.&Mt?m�mm&8i
Middle
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or,
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
By LISA PENT
If two of the budget cuts President
Reagan has recently proposed are pass-
ed, 1 will not be able to attent
Georgetown University next year. The
reason is this: the average cost per year
at Georgetown and most of the nation's
private universities is $10,000. For the
rich, this this not a problem; their own
resources can meet the expense. For the
poor, it is an inconvenience because they
must fll out many financial aid forms.
For the middle-class student like me, the
$10,000 yearly cost is a great problem
because, unlike the rich, my own
resources cannot meet the expense, and,
unlike the poor, I am not eligible for
most financial aid.
What, then, does a middle-class stu-
dent do? First of all, he works as many
hours as he can during the school year
and full-time during the summer. Se-
cond, he takes out a student loan.
Third, he claims financial independence
from his parents so that he might receive
a government grant. And fourth, he
hopes that some unexpected expense
doesn't arise.
Unfortunately, the unexpected ex-
pense that I had hoped wouldn't arise
has. President Reagan wants to cut two
programs, the Basic Educational Oppor-
tunity Grant Program (BEOG) and the
Federally Insured Student Loan Pro-
gram, both of which make it possible for
me to attend a reputable institution like
Georgetown. If they are cut, the Ivy
League schools will cater to an in-
finitesimally small percentage of the
population, the rich and the poor.
The BEOG program awards, upon
demonstration of need, $200 to $1,800
per school year to college students. The
federally insured loans are obtained
from the student's home stte. These are
low-interest loans, around 7 percent,
which the student isn't required to begin
repaying until nine months after gradua-
tion. A student is entitled to $2,500 dur-
ing any single school year and not more
than $7,000 during total undergraduate
study.
Here is where the problem begins.
President Reagan has suggested that
both programs be cut in terms of total
dollars and that the criteria upon which
need is demonstrated bocome more
Memories
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Many Americans would like to forget
the Vietnam war, but like a recurring
nightmare, the fallout from the war just
won't go away. That was made un-
mistakably clear when Veterans Ad-
ministration police evicted fasting Vietnam
veterans from Los Angeles' Wadsworth
Hospital after the vets camped on the
hospital lawn, demanding greatly improv-
ed health care and expanded benefits. On-
ly 35 vets took part in the protest-a tiny
fraction of the four million who served in
Vietnam-but the demonstrators spoke for
many vets with their dramatic act
Simply put, America has used-and is
using-Vietnam vets shamefully. Thrown
into an unjust and unpopular war, sprayed
with toxic chemicals, mustered out with
dim prospects of getting decent jobs, shun-
ned by "hawks and doves alike, hit by
devastating psychological problems and
disease and, finally, fobbed-off by an un-
caring federal bureaucracy, Vietnam
veterans have been drafted as society's
guinea pigs. That's why vet James
Hamilton, apparently mad with frustra-
tion, drove his jeep into the Wadsworth
lobby in March, then died of an overdose
of pills and alcohol last month. And that's
why the vets went on their hunger strike-
restrictive. For example, the BEOG pro-
gram currently rewards students whose
family income is $25,000 or less. This
prerequisite is disputable in its present
form. The government assumes that a
family with an income of $35,000 a year
can afford to send even one child to a
private university at $10,000 a year.
Now the president wants to reduce the
cutoff mark for aid to perhaps $20,000 a
year. (The exact amount is notyet
known.) This restriction will exclude
students from middle-income families
entirely and a percentage of the students
from lower-income families as well.
To date, the Federally Insured Stu-
dent Loan Program has been the saving
grace for the middle class. If a family
that earns$35,000 a year wants to send a
child to a private university at $10,00 a
year, it must take out a loan and pay the
balance from its personal funds. The
family currently isn't eligible for federal
grant monies� unless the student is
finalcialy independent� and will bee
less so if President Reagan's proposal
passes. Further more, it the student ap-
plies for aid from his school, he will be
one of the last in line for aid� that is, if
he is eligible for any at all. The only
alternative is a low-interest.
Unfortunately, the Federally Insured
Student Loan Program is currently hav-
ing a problem with students who default
on repayment. However, the answer is
not to cut the program or reduce the
amount a student may borrow. Two
alternatives to cutting this essential pro-
gram are to require the parents to co-
sign for the loan and to make those low-
interest loans available to the parents to
use for the student's tuition.
Again, if the Federally Insured Stu-
dent Loan Programs were cut, the mid-
dle class would be the hardest hit. If the
BEOG program were cut, some of the
middle class and most of the students
from lower-income families would be af-
fected. Both of these programs have
bad a positive effect of minority and
lower-income student enrollment; thus,
a negative impact if they are reduced.
For example, in an article about student
financial aid, George Neill, columnist
for Phi Delta Kappan, says, "between
1968 and 1978 the percentage of blacks
enrolled in colleges and universities at
the undergraduate level increased a
phenomenal 300 percent. This increase
can be attributed directly to a boost of
$3.8 billion in federal appropriations for
student aid between 1973 and 1980. Dur-
ing the same period, guaranteed student
loans increased 400 percent� from $1.1
billionto $5.5 billion
Clearly, the previous two adminstra-
tions recognized the need for increased
student aid. The Reagan administra-
tion, on the other hand, in eliminating
many of the unnecessary government ex-
penditures, has chosen to decrease stu-
dent financial aid. However, of the
$14.2 billion allotted for education in
the 1980 budget, only 22 percent went to
student loans and grants. The remaining
78 percent went to the states for elemen-
tary and intermediate educa-
tion. Moreover, the monies from the
federal government for local education
are further supplemented by the in-
dividual states. Thus, if the state funds
were combined with federal funds, the
college student actually receives less than
22 percent of the total funds allocated
for education.
In any case, if President Reagan s ob-
jective is to cut the excess from the
Education Department, he should look
down avenues other than the one leading
to student financial aid. Tuition costs
alone have risen all oner the country as
much as 15 percent, which in the case of
Georgetown University means an addi-
tional $750 for each student.
Today, most students have some type
of financial aid package� i.e loan,
grant, work study or scholarship. Thus,
a reduction in funds or an increase of
restrictions to obtain them on the Basic
Educational Opportunity Grant Pro-
gram or the Federally Insured Student
Loan Program will exclude the middle
class from the nation's private univer-
sities, and only a select group of students
will be able to attent them� namely, the
upper- and lower-income students. My
financial aid officer spelled out the
situation quite clearly: "You won't be
able to afford this school next year
And, indeed I won't, if these two essen-
tial programs are cut.
(Lisa Pent is a student at Georgetown
University. This article is reprinted with
permission from The Washington Post.)
so there will be no more James Hamiltons.
What the vets are calling for is sweeping
in scope, but simple in design. They want
belated recognition for the sacrifices they
have already made and concrete support to
help ease their suffering in the years ahead.
Among the vets' demands are calls for:
� an investigation into Hamilton's
death. Protesting veterans say it was trig-
gered by the VA's refusal to certify as
service-related a hearing loss Hamilton
said he suffered in Vietnam.
� an investigation into the abysmal
quality of health care in the VA system in
general. .
� readily available treatment for vets at-
flicted with what doctors call "delayed
stress syndrome which causes many to
become uncontrollably angry or depressed.
� a full-dress study of the effects of the
chemical herbicide Agent Orange, used
widely in Southeast Asia during the war,
and blamed for a variety of ailments, rang-
ing from headaches to cancer. (Ironically,
the most dangerous indredient in Agent
Orange, the chemical diosix, was a
byproduct of the manufacturing process
that didn't harm plants, only people. It
was left in the finished product by the her-
bicide's manufacturers to cut production
costs.)
�a personal meeting with President
Reagan- a noted Vietnam war hawk who
couldn't say enough about "our boys"
when they were fighting in the jungle half a
world away 15 years ago.
So far, the main show of support for the
protesting vets has come not from the
president, nor from traditional veterans'
organizations like the American Legion
and Veterans of Foreign Wars, but from
people such groups despised during the
war years. Peace advocates such as black
activist Dick Gegory, for example, joined
the hunger strikers when their protest
shifted to a Los Angeles church after the
eviction from Wadsworth Hospital.
Ob ervers who thought antiwar activists
like Gregory would be the last people on
earth to support men who fought a war
they opposed shouldn't really be surprised
by this turn of events. While the peace
movement often . criticized American
soldiers for fighting in Vietnam, it didn't
condemn them. Most activists recognized
that the majority of soldiers were draftees,
and that many were working class and
minority youths with little choice but to
fight the battles that vhiter, richer, older
and better-educated men managed to
avoid.







JUNE 25, 1981
THE DAILY PLANET
Page 4
Earth Saved!
Superman Once Again
By JOHN WEYLER
SUff Writer
"Superman H" is a super movie too, just like
"Superman I It has all the excitement, scope and
spectacular special effects of it's predecessor.
The same cast is back-Christopher Reeve is the kid
from Krypton, Margot Kidder is lovely Lois Lane, and
Gene Hackman is lethal Lex Luthor. The only absence
is Marlon Brando, who evidently wanted too super a
salary for his small part.
Movies
The heroic Man of Steelflying with our nation's colors following another of his incredible triumphs.
Whereas "Superman I" was directed by Richard
Donner, "Superman II" is carefully crafted by Richard
Lester. Knowing the director of "A Hard Day's Night"
and "A Funny Thing Happened On the Way to the
Forums love of offbeat humor, I was afraid he
wouldn't take Superman seriously enough. However,
Part II, in parts, is more serious than Part I, attempting
at times to understand what it must feel like to be the
most powerful man alive.
The serious stuff starts when Superman (GASP!)
Loses His Powers. He willingly reneges on his awesome
abilities in order to make love to Lois. (No, not because
otherwise he might orgasm her to death; he does it due
to Kryptonain laws against miscegenation.)
Supes has much soul-searching and teeth-gnashing to
do when he finds out that while he was busy romancing,
three super villians have attacked Earth. Powerless, the
Man of Steel becomes the Man of Mud.
The villians are Kryptonian criminals who have all the
powers Superman once had. Zod, Ursa and Non
(Terence Stamp, Sarah Douglas and Jack O'Halloran)
come across as a sort of super punk group in their
flashy, all-black outfits. Sexy Ursa seems like a Super-
bad Blondie, a masochist's wet dream come to life.
Of course, Reeves eventually regains his strength and
goes after the bad guys, resulting in some battle scenes
which are a marvel to watch and must have been mad-
dening to film. "Superman II" is excellent entertain-
ment, in turns supenseful, awe-inspiring and funny.
My only complaint with the film is that it is full of in-
consistencies and mysteries. For instance, at one point,
Zod emits some sort of anti-gravity ray, causing an
unluckv victim to dangle helplessly in mid-air. How did
Zod do so? He is supposed to have the same powers as
Superman, but Superman exhibits no such powers. It
could not be a power common to all Krypotnians, since,
again, Superman could do so. The villian wasn't
holding any type of weapon either. There are several
such faults in the film.
Other than these minor mistakes, the movie is a ter-
rific two-hour escape from reality, fun for kids of all
ages.
The Super Saga Of The Man Of Steel
Bv JOHN WEYLER
Stiff Writer
Superman is a most intriguing fic-
tional character. Created in 1933 by
two 17-year olds, Jerry Siegel and
Joe Shuster, Superman has become
a national institution, celebrated in
countless comics, toys, TV shows,
and now, two popular movies with a
third on the way. Why is Superman
one of the most famous literary
creations of the 20th century? What
is Superman's secret?
"The Superman fantasy
stimulated a host of intellectuals to
write interpretations analyzing, in
terms of Nietzschean and Freudian
philosophy, what any child could
have told them wrote Jim
Steranko in his "History of Com-
ics "The truth was that Siegel and
Shuster's imaginary world tended to
be more Alderian that Freudian; the
drive wasn't for sex but for power-
for the ability to dominate their en-
vironment through sheer brute
strength
Jules Feiffer, in his classic "The
Great Comic Book Heroes sees
Superman's secret identity as the
secret of his success. Unlike most
fantasy heroes, the Man of Steel is
not in reality a normal human who
puts on a colorful costume and
becomes a Superheroe-the opposite
is true in his case. Says Feiffer:
"Did Superman become Clark
Kent in order to lead a normal life,
have friends, be known as the nice
guy, meet girls? Hardly. There's too
much of the hair shirt in the rold,
too much devotion to the im-
primatur of impotence-an insight,
perhaps, igto the fantasy lif ejsf the
Man of Steel. Superman as "a secret
masochist? Field for study there.
For if it was otherwise, if the point,
the only point, was to lead a
"normal life why not a more
typical identity? How can one be a
cowardly star reporter, subject to
fainting spells in time of crisis, and
not expect to raise serious ques-
tions?
The truth may be that Kent ex-
isted not for the purpose of the story
but for the reader. He is Superman's
opinion of the rest of us, a pointed
caricature of what we, the non-
criminal element, were really like.
His fake identity was our real one.
That's why we loved him so. For if
that wasn't really us, if there were
no Clark Kents but only lots of
glasses and cheap suits which, when
removed, revealed all of us in our
true identies-what a hell of an im-
proved world it would have been
What do Superman's inventors
say? In an article in a 1975 issue of
Mediascene magazine, Jerry Siegel
said this about his brainchild:
"What led me into conceiving
Superman in the early thirties?
Listening to President Roosevelt's
'fireside chatsbeing unemployed
and worried during the depression
and knowing hopelessness and fear.
Hearing and reading of the oppres-
sion and slaughter of helpless, op-
pressed Jews in Nazi Ger-
manyseeing movies depicting the
horrors of privation suffered by the
downtroddenreading of gallant,
crusading heroes in the pulps, and
seeing equally crusading heroes on
the screen in feature films and
movie serials (often pitted against
malevolent, grasping, ruthless
madmen). I had the great urge to
helphelp the despairing masses,
somehow.
"How could I help them, when I
could barely help myself?
"Superman was the answer. And
Superman, aiding the downtrodden
and oppressed, has caught the im-
agination of a world
What Siegel said is what J see "a
the secret of Superman: he is a
Super-Savior. Like Moses, he was
saved from destruction as an infant
by being cast off into the void in a
protective vessel. Like Jesus, he was
sent by his father in the sky to help
us hapless mortals. Superman
Saves.
School Movies: Learning Aid
Providing Camouflage For Sleepy Scholars
By DAVID NORRIS
Antiunl F�uf� Editor
One of the disappointments of my college
career was the lack of movies that plagued most
of my classes. With the rather obvious exception
of film history courses, we hardly ever had
movies to break the tedium of sitting around in a
classroom.
Movies are not only an excellent visual learn-
ing aid, but they are lots of fun as well. Even if
the movie is dull, there is still plenty of entertain-
ment in watching teachers match wits with some
of the projectors.
Movie projectors that are affiliated with
educational institutions are different from
regular projectors. School projectors seem to be
older, more complicated, more temperamental
and much more irritating to operate than the
same projector would be in someone's home.
1 think the projectors in my elementary school
were among the worst anywhere. Most of the
teachers refused to mess with them, leaving it to
one of the students. There was always at least
one kid in each class who understood the
mysteries of coaxing one of those cantankerous
projectors into more or less running a movie.
Different projectors specialized in different
ways of lousing up a movie. Some liked to stay
perpetually out of focus. Others liked to distort
the sound into a deafening blend of shakey music
and dialogue. The more destructive models
sometimes shredded large sections of film, or let
the take-up wheel jam, spilling the whole movie
all over the floor.
For a couple of years, my elementary school
had a tradition of having a movie day each Fri-
day. The whole student body would file into the
auditorium to watch three movies. The fact that
this was usually the high point of the week for us
shows how exciting our school careers were at the
time.
The movies picked for the movie day showings
were a pretty strange bunch. A typical day's fare
might have consisted of a film on crop rotation,
a movie on "Daily Life In Today's India" and
perhaps something light such as "Long Division
Can Be Fun" to round out the triple feature. I
somehow get the feeling that the movies were
chosen at random.
Some of those movies, like the one on crop
rotation, were helpful sometimes � you never
know when you might have to rotate some crops.
Other movies, though, weren't too great,
especially the thirty-year-old geography films.
That "Daily Life In Today's India" had a map
of India with a British flag flying over it. This
was okay, since the globes in our classrooms had
countries like British India and French Indochina
on them too.
Math movies were among my least favorite
films. It's hard to make an interesting movie
about some guy who stands at a chalkboard and
draws math problems on it for twenty minutes.
We didn't get many history n.ovies, except for
the geography movies I mentioned above. I do
remember one about the French and Indians War
that consisted solely of maps, one after another.
The narrarator would describe a campaign or a
battle, and the only action on the screen would
be a dotted line marching along the route of, say.
General Braddock's expedition.
Now and then they had a pulsating splatter
mark to represent a battle, and then a dotted line
slinking along the route of an army's retreat.
(We saw this one backwards, too, but it wasn't
much fun.)
If we were lucky, we got to see a real tuli-
length movie. The trouble was, the only one they
could get was "Heidi with Shirley Temple or
somebody like that. My mother told me that she
had to watch that movie when she was in elemen-
tary school, and got just as tired of it.
In high school, we had a better variety of
movies. (And, somebody told the moviemakers
about the British leaving India.) One movie that
was a big favorite then was one about the
Monroe Doctrine that had George Reeves (he
was Superman on the old TV show, in case you
don't read trivia quizzes) in a bit part. I think he
was a boyfriend of James Monroe's daughter or
niece, and the actor who played Monroe explain-
ed the doctrine to him.
We also got to see a "Julius Caesar" with
Marlon Brando as Mark Antony, and a good
"Romeo and Juliet" that didn't have anybody
we recognized it it.
In college, though, they just never seemed to
See MOVIES, Page 6
Richard Pry or Live In Concert
This Monday, June 29, at 9 p.m. in Mendenhsll Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre, The Student Union Films Committee will present
"Richard Pryor Filmed Live In Concert The movie is an
hilarious account of Pryor's best stand-up routine, captured live in
Los Angeles, California.
LerAJG IftoviT Coucgc. Th� HAfio ia;�i
6V OfiNW Mjtis
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SeTOJG T(CK�Tb TO A
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Lunatic Press Inspires
Threats To Its Staff
(CPS)-Anonymous callers accused seven staff members of Cornell
University's humor magazine, the Lunatic, of racism and threatened their
safety after the magazine printed a mock advertisement depicting Ku Klux
Klan members surrounding a flaming cross.
Two weeks after the ad appeared April 8th, all seven people received
calls within a few hours of each other. Some warned of bombs or "broken
necks while other callers were "more reasonable according to Lunatic
editorial board member dam Castro.
The timing of the threats led staff members to believe the callers
"worked in connection with each other he adds.
Castro says they were surprised by the reaction, noting the ad was meant
to "compare the atrocities of Nazi Germany to the actions of the KKK
The ad suggested Klan members who've "had a long hard day lynching
niggers" should relax with a "Genocide Cream Ale, imported from Ger-
many,of course
The ad "was not meant to be taken at face value Castro asserts.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 25, 1981 Page 5
William
Yelverton
The Aussie Wh
Won The Open
George Burns couldn't stop him. Bill Rogers couldn't
either. Even the Golden Bear, Jack Nicklaus, couldn't
do it. Nobody could stop David Graham in the U.S.
Open last weekend. And there's only one reason why:
he was perfect.
No ifs, ands or buts. When a player as consistent as
David Graham is hits all 18 greens, there's nothing you
can do about it. That perfection gave him a paycheck of
$55,000, but more importantly, he won one of the most
prestigious golf tournaments in the world.
He shot rounds of 68-68-70-67. When the last round
began he was three strokes behind Burns, but he never
lost his composure� he was as serious as he always is.
He never smiled. He didn't let anything distract him. He
was a machine.
His 7-under-par was the second lowest score ever
recorded at the Open, and his victory marked only the
third time a foreigner had won this tournament. To win,
he didn't let Nicklaus intimidate him, even when the
I egend birdied two consecutive holes to go to three
under, compared to Graham's five under. No, the deter-
mined Aussie just griaed his team and played his game.
Perfect David Graham.
Burns, who led after the second and third rounds,
tried to be another Severiano Ballesteros, the young
Spaniard who miraculously saves pai after an erratic
drive. Burns suffered from poor tee shots that left him
in the deep rough time and time again.
Graham could not be stopped. He birdied the first
and second holes to move to within one stroke of Burns.
Then, Burns bogeyed No. 4, and the two front-runners
were tied at 6-under.
The 14th hole, a par four, 414-yarder, unveiled a new
Open champion. He dropped his second shot four feet
from the pin and calmly sank it for a three. He didn't
even smile.
"Not bad for a man whose
father vowed never to speak to
him again if he played the
game.

Then, on the next hole he hit a beautiful iron shot that
was about 6 feet from the cup. Birdie.
Not bad a for a man whose father vowed never to
speak to him again if he played the game. "He didn't
either, for 15 years" Graham was quoted as saying.
He has admitted that he never lets emotion interfere
with his profession. He's no Lee Trevino, and he
doesn't play with the flamboyancy of a Ballesteros. He
plays like David Graham: serious, straightforward and
he parred the last hole and the championship was surely
his, he smiled. Perfect David Graham.
Ford Motor Companv Marketing Researcher Joe Ter-
ranova makes his hobby keeping tabs on the recruiting
wars incollege football. In a national sports publication,
he has come out with the schools he thinks had the best
recruiting years in the country:
� Notre Dame. Rookie Coach Gerry Faust signed such
blue-chippers as quarterback Ken Karcher, "possibly
another Joe Willie and running back Chris Smith,
who "may be the only player in America to compare
favorably with Herschel Walker
�Michigan. Running backs Rick Rogers "left scouts
drooling" and Brian Mercer "easy to bring down if you
can catch him" are heading to the Wolverines.
�Oklahoma. Signees include Greg Sims, "probably the
best defensive lineman in the state of California Tony
Casillas "garnered equal accolades in the state of
Oklahoma" and Lawrence Hardin and Keith Stanberry
"vicious hitters and the most highly sought-after defen-
sive backs in the Lone Star State
�Alabama. "David Gilmer (6-5, 255), Hardy Walker
(6-4, 270) and noseguard Chuck McCall (6-2, 240) are
all possible All-America candidates Enough said.
�Florida. "If they ever award one of (Coach Charley)
Pell's young line recruits a game ball, he'll probably it
Rounding out the top 10 were Florida State, USC,
Stanford, Pittsburgh and Texas.
� �
Poop from the North Mate Summer League: Camp-
bell leads the league with an 8-4 record, followed by
N.C. State at 6-4, Wilmington and East Carolina at 5-6,
and North Carolina is in last place with a 4-8 mark.
Ronnie Lee of State is swinging the hottest bat this
summer. He's leading the league in hitting with a mark
of .522. Campbell has three hitters in the top five, all
hitting over .400.
Tim Whitehead of Wilmington and Tracy Black of
State arc co-leaders in the runs scored department. Each
has 11. Mike Sorrell of East Carolina is second with 10.
Dale of Campbell leads the league in homers with four,
followed by teammates Strickland and Hoffman with
three and two respectively.
Bucs Rally Past
Camels In Wild One

ECU's Jay Carraway heads for horn?.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Sports MMor
To hit or not to hit. That is the
question. And Pirate baseball coach
Gary Overton may have found the
right answer.
Hit was exactly what the Pirates
did at Buies Creek Monday night.
Scoring 10 runs in the top of the
seventh inning, the Bucs' rally paid
off to the tune of a 19-10 slugfest win
over the Camels of Campbell.
The victory upped the Pirates'
record to 5-6 on the season.
The Pirates hit well again in a
double-header split with North
Carolina last Sunday. ECU defeated
the Tar Heels 9-2 in the First game
and had an 8-2 lead in the second
before Luke Rosnake's grand slam
gave UNC a 12-8 victory.
In the opener, the Bucs jumped
out to a 4-0 lead in the top of the
First and never relinquished the lead.
The Pirates scored two runs in the
second and added two more in the
fourth to cap the scoring.
The Buc barrage was started by a
Mike Sorrell double. Todd Hendley
followed with a single to score Sor-
rel and put the Pirates up 1-0.
Hendley then scored on a wild pitch
before Jay Carraway walked to load
the bases. Charlie Waynick also
walked, forcing home Smith and
Pete Persico, who reached base on
an error.
The Tar Heels scored once in the
j bottom of the third to narrow the
fmargain to 6-2, but the Bucs storm-
ed back to score two more times and
stop the rally.
Rick Ramey picked up the win for
the Bucs by going the distance and
allowing only two earned runs and
six hits.
Hitting leaders for the Pirates
were Sorrel, Hendley, Evans and
Carraway, each collecting two.
In the nightcap, ECU saw an 8-2
lead dwindle to 8-7 when UNC
scored five runs in the fifth inning
before the Tar Heels tied the game
in the sixth. The winning grand slam
came in the seventh.
The Pirates grabbed a 4-1 lead in
the second when Persico walked,
moved to second on an error and to
third on Waynick's sacrifice. Mark
Shank then belted a home run over
the rightfield fence.
The Bucs added two more runs in
the third and two more in the fifth
before the Tar Heels began to rally.
The Pirates could collect but six
hits compared to 15 for the Tar
Heels.
The Bucs found their trip to
Raleigh last Thursday afternoon to
be an unwelcome one as N.C. State
whallopped them 10-3.
Tim Barbour's three-run homer,
a 340-foot drive, did much of the
damage, as did Ronnie Lee's three-
for-three performance at the plate.
Right-hander Robert Bowman,
pitching for the first time in the
summer season, allowed East
Carolina only seven hits and struck
out six in going a strong six innings.
Reliever Mike Parrott retired all
three batters he faced in the seventh.
Kirk Parsons took the loss for
East Carolina, his second without a
win. He allowed five runs, four of
them earned.
The Pirates' bat went on strike
during a Friday night encounter
with Campbell. The Bucs collected
only one hit off Darin Clonger in
the Camels' 7-2 victory.
However, Campbell could only
get seven hits off two ECU pitchers.
starter Charlie Smith and reliever
Robbie Harper. Five of them came
in a big fourth inning when the
Camels scored seven times.
The Pirates did manage a 1-0 lead
in their half of the second. Smith led
off with a walk, and Jay Carraway,
pinch running, advanced to second
with two outs. Persico hit a
grounder between first and second
into right. Rightfielder Tim Handy
kicked the ball away, allowing Car-
raway to score.
After losing three straight games,
the Bucs got back on the winning
track by defeating North Carolina
7-3 last Wednesday night in
Pikeville.
Rick Ramey, starting for the se-
cond time, picked up his first win,
going the first five innings. Smith
and Harper eached hurled an inning
of relief.
The Bucs provided fireworks by
hammering two home runs, one by
Mike Sorrell and another by Jack
Curlings. ECU managed eight hits
off Carolina hurlers.
Sorrel gave the Pirates a 1-0 lead
with his home run. Carolina,
however, scored three runs in the se-
cond inning, but the Bucs came
back to score four more times in the
fourth inning to take the lead for
good, 5-3.
Sorrell and Curlings each col-
lected two hits for the Pirates.
Overton feels his team is starting
to hit again. "More or lesss, they
were in a general slump, but beating
Campbell was a fine opportunity to
bunch up the league some
Next action for the Pirates occurs
Thursday night when they host
North Carolina in a double-header
at Harrington Field. Gametime is 6
p.m.
State, UNC Must Fill Gaps
By CHRIS HOUMAN
Editor's Note These are the second and third
reports in a series previewing East Carolina's 1981
football opponents.
As far as the Pirates and Tar Hee!s are concern-
ed, this is it. On Sept. 12 at 1:00 in Kenan
Stadium, East Carolina and North Carolina will,
meet for the last time. It will be an emotional
game, not just from a rivalry standpoint, but also
because of the fact that Carolina is dropping the
Pirates from future football dates.
But what about the Pirates chances against a
team that went 11-1 last season, including a bowl
victory over Texas?
First of all head coach Dick Crum lost quite a
bit of talent on the defensive line including first-
round draft pick and All-America Lawrence
Taylor. On offense however, UNC retains seven
starters on the offensive platoon that led the
Atlantic Coast Conference in total offense,
rushing offense and scoring last season.
When you talk about the upcoming Tar Heel of-
fense you have to talk about tailback Kelvin
Bryant and quarterback Rod Elkins. Last season
Bryant, a native of Tarboro, N.C, ran up 1,039
yards despite the fact that he shared playing time
with "Famous" Amos Lawrence. Bryant alsc
averaged 5.9-yards a carry. He was second in the
ACC in all-purpose running and third in rushing
and scoring( 12 touchdowns). He was All-ACC last
season as well.
Elkins, who was thrust into a starting position
last year because of injuries to the starting
quarterback, tied for the ACC passing lead with
1,002 yards and 11 touchdowns. Elkins completed
60 of 81 passes.
Elkins is also known as a good scrambling
quarterback and that ability may be tested more
this year than last. The offensive line that pro-
tected Elkins so well (he was sacked only three
times) lost two of its top players, Ron Wooten and
Rick Donnalley.
Wooten was an All-America selection and Don-
nalley was All-ACC and considered one of the
best centers to ever play the game at Carolina.
Even with these losses Crum isn't too concerned
because he has a good group of talent to fill in the
gaps. They are tackles David Drechsler and Mike
Marr and guard Ron Spruill. Marr, however, suf-
fered an injury during spring practice and may not
play this fall.
If Marr can't answer the call this fall, then the
Heels will line up with Drechsler and Brian Blados
at the tackles, Spruill and Steve McGrew at guard
and Brian Johnston at center.
Starting tight end, Shelton Robinson, will be in
his position for the third year in a row although he
is used as a blocker and not a pass receiver.
The only missing key in the UNC backfield will
be at the fullback position where graduation took
Billy "the Horse" Johnson. Johnson, a 253
pound bull, will be hard to replace. The Heels will
probably go with Alan Burrus, a 5-11, 200
pounder, who is very quick.
It is believed that with the experience that Elkins
gained last year that the passing game will be a big
factor. UNC has the receivers to do the job too.
At the wide receiver positions will be Victor
Harrison and Jon Richardson.
Last season, Harrison finished .he year with 16
grabs and Richardson chipped in with 15.
Cnim's real problem area this fall will no doubt
be a defensive line destroyed by graduation. Only
one starter, defensive end Calvin Daniels, returns
from a defensive front that reigned over the ACC.
Making matters worse is the fact that there is only-
one letterman in the fold, Jack Pary, to choose
from. The Tar Heels will be forced to go with an
inexperienced group of linemen, including Joe
Con well, Wendelle Battle and Bill Lawson.
At the linebacker position All-ACC back Dar-
rell Nicholson returns as well as starter Lee Shaf-
fer. If the line doesn't develop during the season
these two will provide the brunt of the stops for
Carolina.
In the secondary, Bill Jackson and Greg Poole
return with help from Darryl Lucas and Walter
Black
Overall, it appears that the Tar Heels will field a
good team this fall but the loss of the 1980 UNC
defense will be felt when the season starts. The of-
fense has to take the pressure off of the young
defense to give it time to develop. In other words.
North Carolina will only be as good as their young
defensive and offensive lines allow them to be.
three touchdowns. Dee Whitley and Randy Phelps
will be in line to replace Curtis Rein at the flanker
position.
At the important tight-end spot, Rufus Friday
and Bobby Longmire will fight for playing time
though neither player has caught a pass for the
Pack. Both are trying to fill the shoes of Lin
Daw son.
The running back (or tailback) spot will be man-
ned by one of three candidates. They are Andre
Marks, Chris Brown and bullish Dwight Sullivan.
If these players don't produce then Joe Mclntosh,
one of the state's most recruited high school foot-
ball players is waiting in the wings.
The returnees to the offensive line include All-
ACC tackles Chris Koehne and Todd Eckerson
and Doug Howard and Earnest Butler at the
guards.
On the defensive side of the ball the Pack could
well rate as one of the top defensive teams in the
country by season's end. No less than nine starters
return for the 1981 season, and that doesn't in-
clude Donnie LeGrande and Eric Williams, who
were regulars on the '79 ACC title team. In addi-
tion to these players, all four of last year's starters
in the secondary are back in the fold. They include
Dee Dee Hoggard, Perry Williams, Hillery
Honeycutt and Louis Meadows.
Last season Monte Kiffin entered the NC State
head coaching position with a major rebuilding
job in the offering. Kiffin's 1980 version of the
Wolfpack was predicted to finishing near the bot-
tom of the ACC and win three or four
games. Kiffin had other ideas, however, and
after the Pack went through a mid-season slump
they came on like gang-busters near the end. That
late season frolic included a close 21-13 loss to j
Penn State, a 38-21 win over Duke and a 36-14 win
over East Carolina. All this resulted in a 6-5 mark
for the man who replaced the late Robert "Bo"
Rein.
This year the Wolfpack has the numbers to be a
conference contender if all the right combinations
fall into place.
The State offense will return all but Frank Sisto
on the offensive line, and at the quarterback posi-
tion, Tol Avery will get the call once again. Avery
was fourth in the ACC in total offense as a
sophomore last season. He threw for 1,114 yards t
with a 53 percent completion rate and ran for 456
more.
The one big difference on offense will be the
formation used by State. The veer, which was
brought from William and Mary by Lou Holtz in
1972 has been discarded for the "I" formation.
"We're going to the I-formation for a number
of reasons explained Kiffin. "We can throw the
play-action pass better because we can get the
quarterback off the line of scrimmage quicker. We.
can also run some option out of the I, and we can
utilize our quarterback to his full talents, yet not
ask that much of him by working him all the time
Also, I feel the defense has caught up somewhat
with the veer
Avery will again this year have the talents o
split end Mike Quick to aid his passing game. Las
year Quick caught 43 passes for 632 yards and





T Ht I SI C ROl INIAN
ll M 25, 1981
All-Star G a m e S e t
Ficklen Stadium will
he the place to be this
Saturday night at S
when the best high
school talent in the
state will be matched
against each other in
the Boy's Home All-
Star Football Game.
Heading the North
�squad will b e
Associated Press North
Carolina Player of the
N ear Joe Mclntosh.
I he 6-0. 185-poundei
from I exington has
signed to pla at N.C.
Suite next tall.
All-State performei
ince Evans will lead
the South squad.
Evans, one o! the most
highly-recruited backs
in the suite i- from
Fayetteville Pine
Forest, and like Mcln-
tosh, has signed to pla
with the Wolfpack next
season.
ron O a k e s o1
Vance Senioi High
School will be the head
coach for the North
squad Assisting him
are Bud Deters of
Roanokc Rapids,
Glenn Nixon o t
Clayton and Bob Sapp
of Currituck.
Bob Paroli � ill coach
the North. His
assistants include Bob
Marr of Cherokee.
I arry Tomason of
North Rowan and Jim
Henderson of
Chocowinity.
The plavers began ar-
riving Sunday and will
practice from 9 to 11
a.m. every day this
week on the ECU and
Rose High practice
facilities. An afternoon
session may also be
held, depending on the
heat.
All but two all-stars
arrived Sunday. Henry
loo Too. a 6-1, 211-
pound guard from
Wilmington-Hoggard
will not play, as he is
recovering from knee
surgery. John Grier, a
6-0 205-pound running
back from Cabarrus
will miss the game due
to sickness.
Joining Evans on the
South squad is Lance
Smith, a highly-touted
tackle from A.L.
Brown High School in
Kannapolis. The 6-4,
280-pounder will play
for the Tigers of Loui-
siana State next fall.
More than 30,000
tickets are on the
Tennis Planned
Sl i OMl SESSION (June 25 July 29)
ACTIVITY
CoRec Volleyball
CoRec Racquetball
Putt Pun Fournev,
Water Volleyball
CoRec Softball rourn
Badminton rourn.
3 on 3 Basketball
I ennis Doubles
Prediction Run
I IMS
6-P
7 s
7-9
7 9
6:30
5:15-6:15
5:15-6: Is"
8:00-9:00
8:00-9:00
I ()(. Al 1CV
r&R vlall
I R MC c is
WR Hwy.33
LV MG Pool
M.r IM lids
r-R Ni
r-R mg
IK CHCts.
IR Univ. Tr.
1 NTRY DAD S
7 7
7
S
13
14
1 21
7 21
7 21
BEGINS
625-73
6 25-73
6 25-77
6 25-7 3
6 30-7 10
7 7- 17
7 7-7 17
7 77 22
Movies Aid Learning
Continued From Page 4
hac main movies in class. (No
wonder 1 never got enough sleep).
rhe first I got to see here were in an
anthropolog course 1 look during
hman yeai When 1 took a
ni anthropolog course the
next yeat. ihe rai ame movies
lin
(me - ear. we got to see two
movies on the Salem W itch I rials,
but that good start seemed to ex-
haust all the I .S. histon films and
we didn't get an more
Most of the educational movies
were noi real exciting, bui we did gel
to see some good disaster movies in
geologx 1 here was a real good one
ol a volcanic eruption in Hawaii and
anothei with some pretty nift
avalanches
It's hard to remember all the iats
thai I learned from school movies
ocr the years, since ihe all tend to
blur together, but the did teach me
one valuable skill: how to make
shadow puppets on the screen alter
the moie ends.
market. ,Of that
amount. 8,000-12.000
are being sold state-
wide, and another
11,000 were given to Pitt
County students.Nine
thousand tickets are be-
ing sold in the Green-
ville area.
There will be 35
players on each squad
for the 19th annual
classic.
Tickets are $3 in ad-
vance and $4 at the
stadium. The game will
feature one of the most
talented groups of
athletes ever assembled
for the game
CLASSIFIEDS
SMOR T TERM LEASES
Available tor sharing house across
trom campus Call 7SJ 021 or
7S6 40S7
PAPERS TYPED For students
1019 E Wright Rfl Call 753 6733
JUST YOUR TYPE Fast, ac
curate, professional typing
Research papers, resumes, let
ters, etc WRITE RIGHT
7 St 9946
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE 1979
Oakwood 12X60 in wooded park 10
mm from ECU. two bedrooms,
heat pump, screens and storms
GE range, retng. washer and
dryer under service contract to
4 83 Dinette set. all like new S2S00
down balance owner financed at
13 percent 752 6735 or 467 2354
BASS GUITARIST Country and
top 40 band, local act. established
artist Mostly weekends 758772
FEMALE STUDENTS for sum
mer session needed to rent room n
tour bedroom two bath house
located two blocks trom campus
S85 per month Call 758 7010 or in
Fayetteville 1 800 682 3460 ask tor
Mrs J Sharpe
FOR SALE ladies bicycle 5
speed 560 Call 757 3436
PAPERS TYPED Accurate, pro
tessional lypmg Reasonable
rates Call 753 9665
J J I love you
Football 81 Invades Ficklen Stadium Saturday Night
TAKE A BREAK FROM VOL RSTl DIES A V
THE COFFEEHOUSE
Featuring: Hugh Evans
Monday. June 29 9:00-10:00 p.m
Room 115. Mendenhal!
Admission FREE Free Snacks
Pickard Wins
s s i s t a n t L ad
Pirate basketball coach
Sherri Pickard brought
home a championship
Sat . in more
wathan one
Pickard captured the
Women's National
Softball Home-Run
Hitting Championship
in Oklahoma Or. She
defeat ed 1 u I sa's
Shirle Rose, 16-14.
Dick Bartel ol San
�ntonio won the men's
competition as he
belted homers on his
first two swings of a
five-swing playoff. He
defeated Don Arndt ol
�iiis 1 ord, v V
the end gulation,
both men had 2 2
homers in 55 swings.
Third place went to
Dan Daniels ol Kings
Bech, Calif who
belted r homers.
re re s a Held o f
Anoka. Minn was the
third-place finisher.
she hit 12 round-
tnppers.
Pickard has just
completed her first yeai
i! She same to
Greenville aftei serving
as head women's
basketball coach at
Raleigh Millbrook. she
is a graduate of N.C
State, where she was art
all state performer in
volleyball, softball and
bsketball.
She was named Most
Valuable Player of the
national tournament
last summer. Her team,
Rubi-Ott's, won the ti-
tle.
Pickard and Bartel
won expense paid trips
to Santa Clara. Calif
for the World Games I.
a competition that w ill
feature 17 different
sports, rhe competi-
tion will begin July 24
and continue until
�lllHlsI 2.
1
ranaN
The Fleming Center has been here for you slnoe 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of an ages, at a reasonable oost
Saturday abortion boor
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us
Oan7Bl-aSBOtnyala4gh
THE rr.nnvmya CgWIgB
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far
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Take Out Serv.ce 2903 E. 10th St 758-2712
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Hours It 00 am 10 00 pm Mon Thurs
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� Why Pay $1.19
i
Jeimonte.





ATS
.v
-
t&
lb Ai-g Wt
im Lb. 2.09
lofna POP
m L�tr Ch��s�
feats or 69C
12 Or. 1.29
3 Ox
wc
im
lam
4 Or 99C
4 ax WC
4 Or
99c
lam
the ft
lam 4 oi 1.09
fauage Puttie
t Pafttri
U(h 1.59
SmithficUf
Ham Sausage n o. 1.09
SmlihfirW
Bacon
SmlthfUUI
Luter's Franks u o. 99
SmtthflcUi Lutr's
Beef Franks
Food Town HotMild
Sausage
Sulft
Sizzlean
Tabl Treats
Steah-Umm
Jubilee Smoked
Sausage
12 Or 1.19
Lb 990
12 Or 1.39
14 ox. 2.69
Lb 1.19
?:?
STOCK UP NOW!
jENOf
REYournoNAftf
CRISP N TASTY CRUST PILU
!?fe w ?
DEL MONTE
Frait
Cocktail
ARGO
Peas
RATION DOG FOOD
Field
Trail
Clair
Mist
DEL MONTE
ORANGE or GRAPE CRUSHFRESCAMR. PIBB
REGSUGAR FREE SPRITETABMELLO YELLO
Coca-Cola, LB �9�
1 LB. PACKAGE FOOD TOWN
Margarine
Quarters 3j$t
Why Pay 470 Each
FRENCH OR THOUSAND ISLAND
Pjeiffer
Dressing .�, 99c
Why Pay $1.39
LIGHT CHUNK TUNA
Star Kist � 85c
Why Pay 990
CUT OR FRENCH DEL MONTE
Green
oeans 303 c.�
285c
Why Pay 2990
ASSORTED TOILET TISSUE
White
Cloud
REGULAR OR UNSCENTED NON-AEROSOL
WHOLE OR CREAM STYLE DEL MONTE
Gold
COYTl 303 Can 2OC
Why Pay 2990
DEL MONTE
Peas .03 285c
wny Fay 2990
ASSORTED FLAVORS DRINKS
Shasta -� 89c
Catsup 32 o, 89c
� Why Pay $1.19
MAYONNAISE
JFG
Why Pay $1.19
-99c
Why Pay $1.29
PHILLIPS
Pork &
Beans
16 Oz.
399c
Why Pay 2810
DELICIOUS
Jeno's
Pizza
L, $1�
Why Pay $1.29





Another
Free Value
TOWN
LFPINCSCAA
750 VALUE - 15 OZ. STAR
Cole Slaw
When you buy a Quart
Star Brunswick Staw
TURKEYTURKEY A CMICKIM CAT FOOD
Friskies u. 4$
Why Pay 275C
Creamy DeluHgi
?Fosnnc
Penobotcot u;Ch�� or Chlue
Ballad Potato to ox. SOC
Assorted Cake Mixes
Betty Crocker i�.s ox. 73C
Betty Crocker Ready To Spread
Frostings �6.$ ox 99�
Delirious
Bacos
Baking Mix
Bisquicfe
Honey Nut
Cherrios
Spread Margarine
Mrs. Filbert's
3-25 Ox. 89C
40 Ox. 127
14 Ox 1.29
2 Lb 1.09
-�
HoneyNut
Cheerios
IW
BisquicK
BUTTERMILK BAKING Ml
Buy two,
get one FREE.9
S2.20 VALUE - HALF GALLON
ELSIE BRAND SQUARE CARTON
Ice Cream
170 OFF SLICED AMERICAN SINGLES
Borden
Cheese �. $149
Why Pay $1.77
KRAFT ASSORTED
Barbecue
Sauces � 75c
Why Pay $1.05
TETLEY
Tea 100 c� X6
Why Pay $2.09
ALL FLAVORS
Liquid
Slender �o, 35l
Why Pay 59C Each
Food Town
Coffee
Creamer �. 99c
Why Pay $1.49
ABSORBENT
Rally
Towels Rol 49c
Why Pay 59C
LIGHT N' LIVELY
Cottage
Cheese .�� sl09
Why Pay $1.59
200 OFF LABEL
Liquid
Lux "o. 89c
Why Pay $1.33
TEXAS PETE
Hot Dog
Chill ice. 3$l
Why Pay 289C
South Park
Shopping Center
115 E. Red Banks Road
Monday thru Saturday
8:00 A.M. 'til lOOO P.M.
USDA Choice Boneless Beef Rou
F
$198
Lb.
Round Ste





REFRESHING VALVES
BomofM
BUSCH
J k5V-4i ��
CHENIN BLANC, RIESLING, ZINFANDEL,
CHABLIS, BURGUNDY, ROSE, RHINE
Taylor Calif.
Cellars u,3
RED, PINK, WHITE TAYLOR
Lake Country
Softur3
MT. CHABLIS, RHINE, SAUTERNE, NECTAR ROSE,
BURGUNDY, CLARET, CHIANTI
Almaden
3 Liter
S�99
CHENIN BLANC, ZINFANDEL, FRENCH
CLUMBARD, GRENACHE ROSE, CAMAY ROSE
MONTEREY BURGUNDY, MONTEREY CHABLIS
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Busch$179
PACKAGE Of B - 12 OX. CANS
Stroh's 19
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Stroh Light W
PACKAGE OF B - 12 OZ. CANS
Schlitz Malt
Liquor $Z2S
PACKAGE OF 12 - 12 OZ. CANS
Carting Black
Label $319
s�
m
Almaden
1.5 Liter
5369
CHOW
V g-iBf JA1bw ��-�- . (CHOICE
mbj bbvbp
GRADE A 4 - 7 LBS. AVG. WT.
Turkey p,
Breast - $139
Why Pay S1.59
FOOD TOWN IMPORTED
Cooked
Ham - 3
Why Pay $3.59
ARMOUR CANNED
Ham 3Lb 54
Why Pay $599
USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN BONELESS
Sirloin
Steaks - 5348
Why Pay $3.99
FRESH PORK
Country
Ribs - 5148
Why Pay $1.58
SWIFT
Hostess �
Hunt
Why Pat
Register for a
FREE
Whole Country Ham
Each week during Grind Opining wi will
hivi 1 drawing lor two FREE Stidlir't Whola
Country Himt. Bi luri to riglitir whin you
thop it our mw Food Town store





VALVES CHOICE PRICES
TACK AGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Busch sl79
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Stroh's $1
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Stroh Light 2�
PACKAGE OF S - 12 OZ. CANS
Schlitz Halt
Liquor $22S
PACKAGE OF 1 2 - 1 2 OZ. CANS
Carting Black
Label 3"
�W -J
TAYL@R
SI v -t �?. �1 �T
ir ,mik 'S
MADfcN
Iain white maslin
SLICED FREE 10-12 LBS. AVO. WT
USDA CHOICE BEEF RIB WHOLE
Rib Eye
Lb.
S3 99
Why P�y $4.00
FRESH GROUND DAILY 3 LBS. OR MORE
Ground
Chuck u $168
Why Pay S 1.88
GRADE A 4 - 7 LBS. AVG. WT.
Turkey
Breast
SLICED, SKINNED A DEVEINED
Beef Liver � 89
m Why Pay $109
Why Pay $1.59
FOOD TOWN IMPORTED
Cooked
Ham
FROZEN OCEAN
Perch Filtets �OM BOCK
$139 Corn is It
Hens 20 0I. $179
Why Pay $1.89
Lb.
$299
Why Pay $3.59
Lb.
ARMOUR CANNED
Ham 3Lb. 549
3 Lb.
Why Pay $5.99
USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN BONELESS
Sirloin
Steaks
.�. 348
Why Pay $3.99
FROZEN '7 LB AVERAGE WEIGHT
Whiting Frozen
,b S9c Hens , b9c
" � WhyPay89C
LEAN AND TENDER PORK
Cubed
HOUSE OF RAEFORD BONELESS � V&
Turkey Ham Steaks Ml
X USDA CHOICE EXTRA LEAN
Stew Beef $18
Lb.
Lb.
Why Pay $2.18
FRESH PORK
Country
Ribs
Why Pay $1.58
FROZEN CHICKEN
Fillets
$229
SWIFT
Hostess
Ham
Register for a
FREE
Whole Country Ham
Each week during Grand Opening we will
have a drawing for two FREE Stadler's Whole
Country Hams. Be sure to register when you
shop at our new Food Town store.
4-Lb.
Why Pay $8





FRESH PIIOMJCE.
LARGE JUICY
Cantaloupes .
qqc
TENDER YELLOW
Squash - W�
FRESH GREEN
FRESH GR�" g
Broccoli nch o�$
FRESH CUCUMBERS OR
Peppers
5l
SWEET JUICY
Peaches
Lb.
29t
ATLO
CALIF)
S
v A
??
R�wwjb(a.
IK4' 1 MS? � A
0Krii3
fSrn?�V
LI a �BSfeii�ft 1
V ??'
SNOW WHITE
Mushrooms -99c
Auocadoes 3s
SUNKIST
Lemons
Ea.
12C





ODVCE
AT LOW PRICES
X
colt
Bunch
69
�SH CUCUMBERS OR
eppers
5n
CALIFORNIA
Strawberries ot xI9
SNCW WHITE
Mushrooms 99c
TASTY
Avocadoes 3l
CALIFORNIA PERLETTE
Grapes u, $12
SALAD PERFECT CHERRY
Tomatoes 59c
CRISP ROMAINE
Lettuce -39c
SWEET JUICY
Nectarines u. 59c
SWEET TEXAS
"�
N
1
�3
!�&:�'
of
:j�$�
'
Lemons





Title
The East Carolinian. June 25, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 25, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.136
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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