The East Carolinian, June 17, 1981






She Sast
man
Vl
- nM
I
I
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
6 Pages
Vol.SSNo.li Wednesday June 17, 1981
��Ji
Yearbook's Future Uncertain
Buccaneer Editor Resigns
Bv PAUl COL1INS time He added that the board had A letter from Josten's, the com- Maxwell then met with the staff SV ' V
By PALL COLLINS eduled a meeting for Thursday to pany that prints the yearbook, was of the Buccaneer on June 8 to p
nu.o.i.wei discuss the situation "We had not the first indication to the board that discuss progress on the yearbook SsUP
Following a request by the Media taken any action to fire her he ad- there might be some sort of pro- and the possible rescheduling of -
Board. Barne Byland has resigned ded- � said Bvland indicated at that time that
as editor of the Buccaneer. JXi rtd "I SS that the Buccaneer had missed its the classes section of the book
According to Board Chairman resign, Bylandsaid 1 ae� !� deadlines of the year and would be sent to the printer within a
Ron Maxwell, a decision was made STS g nrPage7had been submitted at week. "But she didn't meet that
las. Wednesday m an execu nye ses- anywa and er a� � tin� 8A total of 184 pages were deadline, cither Maxwell said. SKm
�ontoaskfOTsrcs�nanon trouble, meaning Media ,eted at tnat time Currently, 13 pages have been
He said that the action was promp- Board � sent to the printer. The book was
oftheb� Mae Fdr he avfLMheTm" abL the missed deadlines at its origin.ll scheduled to have 368 V' JX
Bvfand submUtJ hefresinaSon pression that if she did not resign meeting on May 25 "Barne said it pages, but that number has been Wf
t itvt.vvJell He indicated she would be fired. "I asked him was a personnel problem Maxwell reduced to 336. X
Tuesday to Max well. He nated she wou.ci oe nrea. explained. "1 felt that since 1 was Indicating that he could not speak I,
that the board wcmld accept her what would hap,pen �lididn p jrma she shou,d for (ne entire board) Maxwe� said �
resigna ,on and ask tjrre 'c he ' J" have a chance to work the problems "1 would have voted to fire her J
"ImfBv and s' poSn "Thinking about it, I decided to out before we took any action. But He added that he felt By land's J
"m SKtold Byland just go ahead and resign she con- she said JJ ma,n pr�blem " " inabllll l� ' Rflnie Bvand
of the board's decision Friday but tinued. "He said it would be a lot of in by that Friday (May 29), and she See BlJC Page Barne Byland
that she declined to resign at that hassle to fire me didn t. -r-fci � �"� j 1 M i I
Distributed Leaflet
�� Criticizes Loan Cuts
�& i -irm� mi i �i�- Al
?i m Bv DEBORAH HOTALING but if it's not handled correctly, as it Mertz said he hopes this leaflet if.
�I 30 iw m ' N�w,Kdiio, hasn't been, it can hurt the terests enough students to start a
� aW M WmM W On Mondav and Tuesday the students petition. The petition, which should
1 EVV1 If f ?" ,t, ion -e aaain bv an Marvin Braxton, SGA vice pres be instituted sometime next �ceK.
DUB 7 SLnnn dent was also mentioned in the will call for the reinstatement oil he
I 1L. "�ffiluth fhedec ion Teaflet. "1 think they're just Charlie loan program until the needed
-�- u'dV'nt.ntntGeme Sh�rod flashbacks he com- changescan be implemented by .he
emergency loans "IHerti said that he was not along "Hopefully, this petition iil bi
Tim Mertz, an ECU student took publishing, and ing about a referendum Men
credit for writing and distributing � � �� P said Th d snoud nave ,he
the leaflet although the publication �l�hl � the other right to decide on this, no. jus,
itselt was unsigned. students Lester. Lester savs thev're using the
The leaflet featured a cartoon of a rding Mert the leanet money (loans) 'for beer. Maybe
female and male student standing m J�g��Jffi to pt a some do. but then again.
Tgw"��imnnr IMIIIIIllllll llllf�" r trontofthefountamatV.nghtC- ?.os f thousand CODie don't. The same thing with the
�� �mmSmmmatmmmmm i Cle discussing the dilemma of not Mertz said he didn't feel that it medical emergency loans�Lestei
being able to borrow money from was necessary to sign his name to cuts it off because he said ihcy wcic
jdmrn� the SGA the issue "It's just a cartoon thing using it for abortions. As ta; a-
rnmnntino rr pro,o By chap gurlev The closing sentences of the paper , don.t agree it shoud have that's concerned, maybe they are u�
Computing enier renovations read' "There's an �Jd Yiddish �ay- fe rf d � wasn. SUpposed to ing U for that, but some need it to
Glenn Crowe takes a break during the renoxations. mg ,Dom chastize the innoCent for deface anyone. t�s to make them geT glasses or for other medical
A m � m ril . the crimes of the guilty This aware. lt wasn't to get at L ester. He needs
i pnter Kxoanus 10 z: -tjo, ��r
VVH lM JLJmM4 �- �, don't agree with what Lester ty ofthe publication. "I feel that it's possible solutions to this problem
m did. He just cut one of our services an excellent example of freedom of and cited an example " 1 hei e are
m m A m T 1 off and 1 think it should be the press. feel like its not being several things you could do such as
Tk M 4- Lai tt Swmcm TmT AAIC1 reinstated. Lester and I talked about slgned showed the character and the hire a student, for example to lo to
iXl DPI I 1 IVPlX I I V irtl I ! it earlier Mertz said. "I thought it 0f intestinal fortitude oi the these students doors to colhv. the
lTlVvl S VM kJll'J � �P-KJ uas poor judgement. He's person or persons who wrote it. money in person. It would be pretty
� , , 1h, c.nT rlflwes The med school also uses punishing those students who need That the person or persons would be hard tor the person who owed the
B KAREN WENDT Those groups include the students dasin.Theimea scnooi a s0 httle as to not sign their names money to turn the collector down
- MiMMi who must use the system as well, the system for its records, as does themon SaVs" to? because he (the collector) would be
-It keeps me motivated were Crowe adm.ts that if the consortium ospital. emergency loans and the $150 �if they want a loan program, standing right there asking lor the
the words of Glenn Crowe, director had not been tormed the system pensive novaxu � emergency loans. Due to thev have to realize they could lose a money.
of the Computing and Information would be much further behind, not fq.ulPitXncnfyth� Sf increasing number of students lot'of money. If students think I
Systems, who has been making only for ECU but tor the hospital as bnng about JJjJ X aveno?paid back their loans, screwed up, 1 want them to tell me ' "J
drastic changes in the university well. most basic nges Drmj J h khed almosl $7,ooo. wry they think 1 screwed up. The and go without the servue for
computing system. And, according Of five state funded universities, SlSSSaS Lester Nail? SGA president, said main thing 1 want to stress is: 1 think several months? Why ��keepe
to reports, he has been very sue- East Carolina receives significantly Building But this requtred expan l v someone djd , program and ughten ,t up � tOUId
1-7, i It it lower funding than the other univer- sion of the existing facilities, and i r "�� jusunca hi cu aDnlaud anyone who exercises their be an efficient program and it would
"ewe i tributes his success to a sit.es. Compared with the University a time the cmputerterminals were prog am. 1 took a set of facts and apptaudf june back
consortium of the ECU computer of North Carolina, which receives in an exposed hallway. stances SGA loans are a people to write letters to the editor.l gram until a better one is lound,
center the ECU Med School and 3.9 percent ot the school funds. See CENTER, Page 2 nrivileee It can be a great service need to know what students think. he added,
the Pitt Countv Memorial Hospital. ECU receives only 1.2 percent. And 0
Jsr'7CTs7d,fferen, Frevhmen Avvlications Still Arriving
equipment in order to improve their The computer system on campus � g s 3 I I K I jTM if if ' " ' w
facilities. According to Crowe, all handles a variety ot different tune- , By KAREN WENDT for students who need to come look
of those involved "get maximum tions, both administrative, and ���MMMMBI t&MrMM ' ��I�NW for housing during the summer,
benefit academic. The computer processes WMBMm$P. llMSlP�i Though the housing problem has Students are charged three dollars
At preset the three areas all have test scores, admissions, enrollment W not been solved it appears that for each night that they stay.
access to what was termed a "state financial aid. housing and drop-add l?mr �&,� ' W$8mml there will not be as many surprises But these alternatives do not
of the art" computer twenty-four to name just a tew 1 he system is iJfPMK ' Tr: jlfll1! as there were for students last vear. begin to cover the number of incom-
hours a day seven days a week, also used by students tor various Wrf � "BBBHUBmS But housinS ls stlU in short suppl mg students f�r lhe C�mi"8 f�
�-1 I � A J mi it mKM iJilfflBllHllwOinWr r prises there will be just as manv oc- the admissions office, as of June 12
flllflV1PSl ntirOVPU. 1 Wl W curVencesofdoublingupandpeople an estimated 6.000 people had ap-
jlllLli lizd jwfjfji yjyvt P' p i'1 H r being put on the waitinlist' pUed for admiss,on to J?0 men
r r � J BT.y iU HPlMr werelurpnsed to find that thev had and 1,500 men were admitted and
HliCCfltlPPY I KCllKKPO R JRJr W been placed in a room with two 370 were adm.tted to the school s
JL4vCw Will 11 MS f'iJ KsVlkJkJXs V Mpfc V IB W dP other people. Some freshmen found special studies area.
Regular student staff wages for SiSrandXeSSr oadverusing but ' "NB " , diorhoSingmi llylol
lhe East Carolmtan remain un- that a� .student staff salaries were V5 ?ar we have been able to honor all the housing problems. Wooten ex-
changed after a meeting of the under surveillance. VI W A applications He said that there is pressed the opinion that the univer-
Media Board Wednesday. when the Media Board .sked for 1 V V j noP eshman waiting list at this time shy should accept all qualified ap-
In an interview Student Union an explanation of the commissions �� V yjf Jt that oSe ahead? exists read- plicants regardless of housing, and
President and Media Board Chair- pau, Colhns, editor in ch.ef oi The VNJF W 1 Lmi missions returning and transfer hat the more admissions that the
man Ron Maxwell said that some East Carolinian, said that they were Jfif � I C SaH Aden's g university receives, the more money
board members felt that student instituted during the 1979-80 school W V J students. uTklloted
sUpStionathat salaries would be ex- or'gmated at a meeting of the Na- W j f �H Sanedfor thlSse' rooms "in sid'woote'Burheill tell'that
amined at a later date. tional Organ.at.on of College S t Je �ri were infed S to there was no way to avo.d a wa.fng
Newspaper Business and Advertis- tin the spring wcic cu .
SSSSS navianaaers Inc (cnbam) Cl I whether their room would house list.
rVl ThO ItlQlriP The reason behind the commis- i LsS1 three �pk bef0re the' S'gned "P 2 at w "STf
Un ie IllblUt; Jn,s to give the editor and director I jrm$ for the room. 4 C)00 students w.ll be admitted tor
"� of advertising incentive to push thetr I MttBmF the faU semester. An estimated 500
F-d.tor.als 3 salesmen. Collins said. He pointed 1 JgZfflULmW During the past year the housing students have been denied admw-
Ed,t�na,S out that increased advertising I -l- office has opened a new office and s.on and about 370 have been admit -
Features4 rCvenues meant that less money was Orientation Ph� By ROCMEL HOLAND staff to aid students in finding off- ted into the special studiesprograrn
5 needed from student fees to pay for o, o reading to these incoming campus housing. They also make So far ar estimated 1,000 student
Sports3 mmmf seems 10 mean u iui uj cuui 6 dor� space avaiiabe for a few days will come from out-of-state.
See MEDIA, Page 2 freshmen.
Classifieds�
fl
t
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THf HAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 17, 1981
Media Board Approves Newspaper's Salaries
Continued From Page 1
the newspaper.
Foster said that
advertising brings in
about $100,000 yearly.
Collins said that this is
the reason that student
Staff salaries are at
their current level. He
added that it onlv
$20,000 a year were
made in advertising,
salaries would be one-
tit'th what they are.
"Right now they (the
students) are getting a
bargain because we pay
about three-fourths
what we need stated
(. ollins.
ssociate Dean of
Mendenhall Student
(. enter Rudy Alexander
suggested that The East
Carolinian look into
salaries paid for com-
parable positions on
student publications at
othei North Carolina
institutions.
In an informal poll.
The East Carolinian
found salaries to be:
� The Dailv
Tarheel�UNC Chapel
Hill
Hditor in chief: ap
proximately $500 per
vear
Desk Editors: $13
weekly
Managing Editor:
approximately $500 per
year
The director of
advertising and the
business manager of
77ft' Daily Tarheel are
both full-time, non-
student positions and
are paid more than
$10,000 yearly. Cir-
culation is 15.(XX) daily,
and advertising revenue
is approximately
1250,000 a year.
�The Caroli-
n ia n � W e s t e r n
Carolina I !niversit
Lditor in ctnet: t �
percent of advertising
Desk editors: $15 per
week plus $1 per col-
umn inch
Managing editor: $40
per week
Business manager:
17.5 percent of adver-
tising
Director of advertis-
ing: 10 percent of all
ads he sells
The commissions
listed are only for col-
lecled advertising
revenue. which
averages about $22,(XX)
yearly. Circulation is
5,000 weekly.
� The Techni-
cian�N.C. State
Universitv
Editor in chief: $200
per month
Desk editors: $150
per month
Director o advertis
mg: 8 percent commis-
sion
There is no managing
editor at The Techni-
cian, and figures for
the business manager's
salary were not
available at this time.
Circulation is 15,000
triweekly, and adver
tising revenue is ap
proximately 1200,000
yearly.
� The East Carolinian
Editor in chief: $180
per month plus Vi per-
cent advertising com-
mission
Desk editors: $135
per month
Managing editor:
$150 per month
Director of advertis-
ing: $160 per month
plus 2: : peicent adver
tising commission
Business manager:
$170 per month
The salaries listed are
(er the approved
budget cuts. Advertis-
ing revenue is approx-
imately I �,(.�, and
circulation is 10,000 hi
weekly.
SCiA President
I ester Nail proposed a
constitutional amend
ment, which would re-
quire a student to have
a 2.0 grade point
average and be
'making progress
towards graduation
"What I want to
safeguard against is
having someone come
in under the pretext of
being a student and
making a lot of money
over there and never
ever graduating Nail
explained.
( ollins said that he
felt such an amendment
to be unnecessary,
because a student must
maintain a certain
grade point average to
stav in school, and
discussion on the pro
posal was dropped
Alter the approval ol
)�- East Carolinian's
present salaries, an
amendment was pro
posed ami discussed
concerning progre
reports tor annual stu-
dent publications. A
subcommitt ee ��- a
chosen to meet and
draw up some
guidelines concerning
publication progre
I he M dia Boai I
also approved the
ol some unused equi
ment a! The I
( aroliman It w a
ided that the mon
ould be placed ii
fund to bi
editor's dis
v ided he
Buc Editor Resigns Under Pressure
Continued From Page 1
lead and organize her
staff. "That was her
mam failing
By land agreed, sa
ing that her primary
problem during the
year was "ineffective
management of person-
nel and time
Bvland felt another
problem was that most
staff members were
new either to the vear
book or in their posi-
tions "There was an
adapting that needed to
take place that never
did. When 1 went in I
didn't know
everything, and
sometimes I telt in-
competent when I
didn't "
Picket t. who in-
dicated that she would
accept the job as editor.
said she telt Bvland's
tailing was her inability
to see the yearbook as a
whole "She's a ven
talented and creative
person, but sometimes
Center Expands To Meet University Needs
Continued Irom Page 1
The building changes have been
completed foi the most pan. Walls
have been built in two of Austin's
hallways which section off the
system from the test ol the building.
1 his made the hallway into a
semblance of a room. The office
space was extended into what was a
classroom to bring the average
number ol people in one office from
three to two. But the biggest change
was the bringing in ol a new system,
a "state ol the art" Univac 1100 b2
It doubled the processing ability of
the old system and made life easier
for all ol the parties involved
"We're still verv cramped savs
�we, but he feels that definite
has been made. He also
I thai the Institutional Steering
dvisor v. ommittee is due to make
commendation to the chancellor
thai the services be given even more
ice
rhe space is considered needed.
Storage of much equipment is done
in the hallwav making the area verv
row To move around the dif-
ferent areas of the computer there
places where the space available
negotiate through is about eight
inches. And due to the lack of suffi-
cient ail conditioning there are parts
ol the computer which cannot yet be
used
Crowe has held his position since
August ol 1980. Since that time a
tremendous amount ol renovation
has taken place. He attributes much
ol this progress to the held ol two
men. dene Howe, superintendent ol
buildings nd maintenance, and
Cliff Moore, vice chancellor of
business al fairs.
Crowe termed Howe "absolutelv
magnificent" for his help in com
pteting the renovations. According
to Crowe the building work u;r-
completed in a record five das.
Though he was not sure how they
did it. Crowe was verv grateful.
But the biggest praise went to
Moore. "He has been like a god
father to me said Crowe. Though
Crowe said that the entire universitv
has "tried to be helpful Moore
has been outstanding. And, says
Crowe, "He really sates about the
student
I hough there was some student
opposition to the renovations at
first, according to Crowe the im-
provements seemed to have changed
their minds. There had been a tear
that the administrative end ol the
center would overtake the students'
time, but with the increased hours
and increased number of terminals.
the fears seem to have been
alleviated.
When Crowe first took the job
there were onlv three terminals
available for student use. At present
the number is six and is soon to rise
tii ten. But Crowe still savs that "we
have more equipment in a small
space than any university in the
world
Also, according to Crowe,
department is running "in
black" for the first tune since its ex-
istence. In the end, Crowe hopes to
have 38 microprocessors. The) will
be placed in different departments
which have requested them, such as
Coastal and Marine Resources,
Biology, Institutional Research.
Physics, and Audio isuals
Crowe said that he wanted the let
minals "where the students can get
access He said that the goals that
he had for the renovations were two
fold, first, to give the students data
base priority, and also to aid the
personnel payroll system. At pre
sent. 28 payrolls are processed pet
month.
she seemed to have a
lack ol interest or
maybe a lack ol trust
Pick en commented.
"She tried to do it all
her self.
"I think we were left
with a lot ol work to
do she continued.
"But with a lot ol work
on the staff's part we
an get it done
Bvland said she
hoped to continue to
work on the book
"I'm not quitting the
yearbook; I'm resign-
ing as editor.
"W hen I became
editor ol the yearbook
it was basically because
1 wanted a yearbook
And it that can he a(
complished bv m be
ing out ol office, then
I've made the rij
choice in resigning
Asked about the
board's dcuv
Bv land said. ' I hey
were justified in mak
ing it with the in forma
tion thej. had
Bvland estimated
that although onlv 13
pages ol the book have
been sent to the prinl
about (SO percent ol the
worked on the bo �
has been completed.
Pic ken, however,
fell that no more tl
40 perceni ol the ork
was completed. She a
d e d that a fin
deadline has beet; set
for Sept. 7 and that the
vearbook should be
back to campus sh �rtl
betore fhankscivii
ATTIC
WED 8. THURS
PEGASUS
PLUS

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CREED

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HE-
OKG-
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Ladies' Lockout
- Super Thursday
Wed.
Thurs.
one admission at the door
� free beverage all night
long
Fri. � Bucket Night
Beverage in 32 oz. bucke
tor a buck. No cover fron
3 'til 9.
Sat. � A Night to
Remember �
d'oeuvres
Sun. � Orientation
Kxtravaganza
Doors open at 9:00
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav on
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$1.89
Free Iced Tea with College I.D.
Offer good any time.
�?????
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Hours: 11:00a.m. 10 00p.m. �Mon. Thurs.
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LURE
JICE
1
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fertised items
lv available 'or
-ejecting
"ie adver
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on
to
at
pes
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OFF
SUGG
RETAIL
1
?N
Greenville
She iEaat (Kawltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
PAUI.CoI l INS, id,Hri�hf
Jimmy DuPREE, mm"
Chuck Foster, ,� .� .i Deborah Hotaling, m�
CHRIS LlC'HOK. Bmimm Wll.l.lAM YEI.VERTON (wnfW
STEVE BACHNER, hfuiurr ttt'tor
Alison Barvi i , v,��,��� �unui
June 17, 1Y81
Opinion
Page 3
Media Re
Board And Paper Move To Unity
In an act that may go unnoticed
and unheralded by much of the
university community, the Media
Board gave final approval to this
newspaper's budget last week by
okaying the salary structure as it ex-
isted. After debating the matter for
hall an hour, the board voted
unanimously to approve salaries.
This may all seem rather ordinary,
but last Wednesday's meeting of the
Kurd could mark the beginning of
a new era of cooperation between
The East Carolinian and the Media
Hoard.
The relationship between these
two organizations in the past has
been a stormy one, characterized by
disputes. The issues disputed were
sometimes important, but it seemed
that more time was spent bickering
about petty politics.
The board was created, in part, to
take financial administration of
campus publications out of the
political arena. Previously the SGA
was responsible for funding the
newspaper and other media. The
power engendered by this duty was
awesome. And the SGA, by nature
one of ECU's most political
organizatons, allowed politics to
creep into its decisions concerning
newspaper financing.
I he Media Board, of course,
would change all that. It would con-
si- o student leaders and faculty
and administraton representatives
who would be purely interested in
producing the best newspaper possi-
ble.
Perhaps this was true during the
board's first few months of ex-
istence, but slowly and surely
politics infiltrated the board and
became the basis for many of its
decisions.
This tendency is evident in acts
ranging from the suspension of
Doug White to an attempt last
semester to force Chris Lichok to
fire a staff member. More than once
the editor of this newspaper has
been afraid to publish a story
because it might displease a member
of the Media Board.
Some call that reality. We call it
censorship.
Hopefully though, all that may be
changing. By approving newspaper
salaries, the board helped put a
volatile, devisive issue to rest. Its
members had the good sense to
realize that East Carolinian had
made an honest effort to cut its
budget and limit salaries.
Each member of the board
deserves praise for not letting
politics and personal feelings affect
their decisions. The board showed
that it could be calm and reasonable
collectively, something that it was
not in recent months. On the basis
of this, there is no reason to believe
that the Media Board and The East
Carolinian cannot settle down to the
task of producing the best possible
newspaper.
'Student's Press' Criticizes,
Offers No 'Alternatives'
Press
What the Hell is The Student's

But maybe there's a better ques-
tion: who the Hell cares?
First, this incoherent bird cage
liner attacks staff members of The
East Carolinian for making too
much money in the performance of
their jobs. This is 1981, and any stu-
dent should be aware of the need to
earn extra income � if only to sup-
port their festive habits.
Nonetheless, these crusaders took
it upon themselves to "look out for
the welfare of the student body" by
attempting to rally the Media Board
into their select fold. The East
Carolinian often draws criticism for
not being representative of the stu-
dent body, yet this apparently small
group considers itself the voice ot
the students.
The next appearance ot the r
dealt with the campaign of Kirk Lit-
tle for Student Government
Association treasurer. Again, some
rather outlandish charges were set
forth for the students of East
Carolina to contemplate. Little was
eventually the victor over Angela
'Project Censored9 Reveals Wiretaps
Pepe but only after a run-off elec-
tion was granted.
Now it's summer, and apparently
these students have enough spare
time to publish more ludicrous
waste basket fillers. SGA President
Lester Nail recently halted issuance
of emergency and medical loans �
a difficult decision for a leader to
make in his first month of office.
His ruling was based on the trouble
the SGA has had over the years col-
lecting delinquent loans.
When the system in existence
doesn't work, change the system. In
order to do this, all loans had to be
temporarily suspended.
Naturally there are cases when
students are financially drained and
in need of emergency funds. Those
students will have to suffer for the
misbehavior of their predecessors.
Obviously this is unfair, but that's
life.
We do, however, have one sug-
gestion to offer those short of cash.
Why not give a call to Tim Mertz
or another of the contributors to
The Student's Press � they ob-
viously have no shortage of funds.
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
ii you're like most Americans, you've
never heard of the National Security Agen-
cy. If you make or receive international
telephone calls, however, the NSA has
heard of youactually, heard you, in
fact. The reason? The powerful, super
secret agency "automatically records
telephone calls, wireless and cable
messages to and from the United States, in
violation of the Bill of Rights
The source of that shocker is a blue-
ribbon panel of 13 journalists and pro-
fessors who work under the banner of Pro-
ject Censored. Every year, the panel
chooses ten news stories that are under-
reported or misreported in the American
mass mediain effect, censored. The
news about an agency nobody's ever heard
of is runner-up in the Top Ten "censored"
stories of 1980, right behind El
Salvadora story everybody's heard of,
but, according to Project Censored's
panel, one that few people really unders-
tand
Project Censored's director, Carl
Jensen, a professor of media studies at
California's Sonoma State University, lays
the blame for that squarely on the
American mass media. Jensen charges that
the media have portrayed the escalating
U.S. involvement in El Salvador as a
simplistic morality tale, with Uncle Sam as
the selfless hero and unscruptulous Rus-
sian and Cuban outsiders as the villains.
"Like the Tonkin Gulf media event in
1964 Jensen declares, "this is a prime ex-
ample of how the mass media, either
through misinformation or ignorance,
generated public support for a misguided
U.S. foreign policy that threatens to em-
broil America in another Vietnam war
Jensen, who started Project Censored in
1977, worked this year with a group that
includes author�activist Noam Chomsky,
press critic Ben Bagdikian, former Federal
Communications Commissioner Nicholas
Johnson and syndicated columnist Mary
McGrory. Rounding out the just-released
list of 1980's Top Ten supressed stories
are:
� The continuing censorship of the nuclear
lssueincluding infant deaths at Three
Mile Island, uranium mining in 'remote'
New Jersey and the charge by Physicians
for Social Responsibility that nuclear war
is history's greatest public health threat
�The Benedictin cover-upsupression
of evidence, by the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration and Richardson�Merrel,
Inc that the drug Benedictin produces
serious birth defects when taken by preg-
nant women.
� Something is rotten in the global super-
marketprime agricultural land in
Third World countries is being converted
to cash export crops by multinational cor-
porations, throwing once self-sufficient
peasants into dependency and starvation.
� The circle oj poisondangerous
pesticides, banned here, poison the Third
World, then re-enter the U.S. on imported
foods.
�Space warsthe race between the U.S.
and the U.S.S.R. to develop lethal
weapons for nuclear war in outer space is
heating up.
� Tobacco companies censor the truth
about cigarettes and cancerby
threatening to withdraw their lucrative
advertisements from magazines that
publish hard-hitting reports on the hazards
of smoking.
� The oil companies' monopoly on the
sunthe Seven Sisters are quietly buy-
ing up the "alternative" solar power in-
dustry.
�Poisoned water, poisoned landthe
Environmental Protection Agency fails to
effectively monitor the 78 billion pounds
of toxic wastes dumped every year into
51,000 sites nationwide
Project Censored tries to bring these and
similar stories to light, Jensen explains,
because people have a right to know
critical information that the mass media
fail to report.
"The stories we cite deal with the health,
wealth and future well-being of every
American, (but) the lack of coverage given
to issues such as these suggests a form of
media self-censorship he said.
Jensen believes that the mass media
generally avoid exploring complex, long-
term subjects, such as the dangers of low-
level radiation, because such investigations
require specialized knowledge that most
journalists lack; because analysis simply
doesn't play as well as shootem-up action
on radio and TV, where most people get
their news; and because, "Let's face it, the
first priority of the commercial media is to
make a profit, and these kinds of stories
step on a lot of toes
Project Censored will be stepping on
toes again next spring, when its mediawat-
chers pick the Top Ten overlooked stones
of 1981.
College Is For Rounded Education
�"�9. X.RfcSTONSfe IS ABOUT BMU HNWD-WU Mte TCKfcD Off �"M�
SSKK KtSjk mm mon�tw wm zip cwr
By LINDA ALLRED
In last week's editorial column,
"Education or Expediency? written in
response to a letter in the June 3 edition of
The East Carolinian, the author defends
"those who must complete their degree re-
quirements quickly because of financial
limitations. However, the original letter
addressed the widespread attitude of
students at ECU that the primary purpose
of being here is to get a degree rather than
to get an education.
The major objective of any liberal arts
institution is to provide students with a
quality education. Degree requirements are
designed as a framework around which an
individual program can be designed to
meet the student's needs and to prepare the
student for the future. These requirements
should be considered the basis for the
educational program, not the entire pro-
gram. When education is sacrificed for ex-
pediency, even because of understandable
problems like financial hardship, the quali-
ty of education suffers, and the institution
becomes little more than a "diploma mill"
churning out degrees for anyone willing to
pay the tuition and do a minimal amount
of work.
A college diploma should represent at
least a basic level of competency in the fun-
damental "three R's The value of that
diploma in the job market is directly
related to the competence of the
diplomate. As an increasing number of
students opt for the "quick degree" the
value of the diploma is declining. When ex-
pediency becomes the goal, the degree
itself is meaningless because it no longer
represents education.
Financial hardship is a serious problem
for many students. However, if a student
genuinely wants to get an education, finan-
cial aid is available. Because of the
generous amount of financial aid which
has been available in the past few years, it
is difficult to believe that any student who
wants to take a course would have to defer
because of financial hardship. This has
become an easy ex: ase for those who simp-
ly don't want to be bothered with the extra
effort necessary for optional courses.
"Education or Expediency?" is an ex-
cellent example of the alarming trend in
our educational institutions. The article is
riddled with grammatical and syntactical
errors. The meaning of the article is lost in
a convolution of clumsy sentence struc-
tures and yet the author is defending the
quick degree. The point is made that one
objective of a quick degree is to obtain a
job, yet the author ignores the fact that a
graduate who is not competent will not
keep that job. The college diploma has
become a universal passport into the white
collar job market, yet as increasing
numbers of graduates enter the job market
without fundamental skills (like writing),
the diploma is losing much of its power.
Employers now look for Master's degrees,
and the trend is increasing to Ph.Ds.
The real tragedy of this situation is that
many unqualified graduates are currently
filling professional positions. This is par-
ticularly frightening when the job is
teaching. English teachers who can't write
a correct sentence and math teachers who
can't add are a prime example. Three years
ago the son of a friend of mine complained
that he was not doing well in a junior high
school math class because the teacher (a re-
cent graduate) could not do the assigned
problems and the "word problems" were
nonsensical. My friend monitored the
child's assignments for several weeks and
found that the teacher simply could not
write a meaningful sentence and made fre-
quent errors in basic math.
Educators must assume part of the
responsibility for failing to emphasize the
quality of education over expediency. As
the author of the June 3 letter points out,
many advisors here at ECU encourage
students to take only those courses
necessary to graduate. However, the
students themselves are also partially to
blame. Educators are responding to the
demands of students to minimize degree
requirements. As students, we must
recognize that our futures depend upon the
quality of the education we receive here,
and we must begin to demand the depth
and quality of education which will be
necessary for us to compete successfully in
the job market.
For many college graduates, the harsh
realities of the job market come as a severe
shock because they are not prepared to
compete in that market. The diploma
which should represent the completion of
an education, becomes a cruel hoax tor
these students. For those who do find jobs,
holding onto the job can be just as difficult
as finding it was because the necessary
skills have never been developed.
It is critically important for each of us to
recognize that the opportunities for educa-
tion are here. The student who wants to
learn can get a quality education but he
(or she) must be willing to work for the
degree. It is not a simple task that can be
breezed through in between parties and
beach trips. Education should be a tull-
time proposition if it is to be worthwhile.
For those who must work in order to at-
tend school, the task becomes more dif-
ficult but it is not impossible. There are
literally hundreds of people on campus
(professors, instructors, and ad-
ministrators) who are here to help with the
educational process; you have only to ask.
Don't sell yourself short. Financial pro-
blems may seem insurmountable, but I
personally have found that it is possible to
overcome them. Education doesn't have
to be sacrificed for anything.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
4





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 17, 1981 Page4
'Raiders'
Re-Creates Old Serials
By JOHN WEYLER
Slaff Wrilrr
Watching "Raiders of the Lost Ark the new movie
now playing at the Plitt Theatres in Greenville, is an ex-
hilarating, exciting and exhausting experience. One
member of the audience in attendance at the showing I
saw remarked that they were worn out after the first fif-
teen minutes.
"Raiders of the Lost Ark" is like "The Ten Com-
mandments "Patton "Close Encounters of the
Third Kind" and every Saturday afternoon serial ever
made all rolled into one movie.
The film moves with the speed of a runaway express
train, filled with all the suspense and non-stop action a
master of the genre such as Steven Spielberg can pro-
vide.
It is evidently the spirit of the old Saturday serials that
director Spielberg and producer George Lucas were try-
ing to re-create.
Serials were the action-packed kids' films that ap-
peared in chapters, one-a-week, accompanying the
feature film of the day in the theatres of the 1930's and
40's.
As popular as they were however, serials were low-
budget quickies churned out by the Hollywood film fac-
tory of the era. "Raiders of trie Lost Ark" is done with
all the stvle, expertise and expense the makers of
"Jaws "Close Encounters" and "Star Wars" can
command.
Just as "Star Wars" took the conventions of the old
science fiction serials like "Flash Gordon" and "Buck
Rogers" and transcended them with intelligence and a
lavish budget, so does "Raiders" evoke and improve
upon "Jungle Jim "Tailspin Tommy" and "The
Phantom
In the June 25 issue of Rolling Stone magazine,
George Lucas explains what he and Spielberg were after
when they set out to make "Raiders "These are going
to be different kinds of movies. 'Star Wars' developed
as a saga, but what interests me here is this fascinating
character.
"If I could be a dream figure, I'd be lndy (Jones: the
film's hero, played by Harrison Ford). It's not just that
I'm interested in archaeology or anthropology; a lot of
that got into 'Star Wars too. It's that lndy can do
anything. He's like a lot of different Thirties heroes put
together. He's this renegade archaeologist and adven-
turer, but he's also a college professor, and he's got his
Cary Grant side too.
"In some stories, we'll see him in top hat and tails.
We don't want to make him Superman � he's just open
to all possibilities. "Raiders" will be the most action-
oriented of the Indiana Jones movies � the others
should deal more with the occult
The story of "Raiders set in the thirties, concerns
Indiana Jones, the "archeologist-adventurer" that
Lucas describes, on a hair-raising race with the Nazis to
find the Lost Ark of the Covenant.
The Ark is the vessel built by the ancient Israelites to
hold the broken pieces of the tablet of the Ten Com-
mandments, and is supposed to contain tremendous
powers.
The movie's plot has as many twists and turns as the
human intestinal system, but we are not supposed to pay
too much attention to it � we are supposed to simply sit
on the edge of our seat, breathlessly awaiting the next
thrill, shock and surprise. Rest assured, you will indeed.
The film does have its faults: while the action is fast
and furious, it is also often too far-fetched to be believ-
ed. Doc Savage would have difficulty displaying all the
stunts and shows of strength exhibited by Indiana
Jones.
Of course, the film is not meant to be taken too
seriously, but some audiences will demand more credi-
ble material and thus will be unable to suspend disbelief
� a prerequisite for this type of fare and really very lit-
tle to ask.
My main complaint with the movie is that it is ex-
tremely violent. While there is no explicit sex, kids and
adults alike should be prepared for a barrage of blood,
battery and butchery. (It is oft times confusing to me
that some harmless lovemaking is a hotter concern for
the censors than the brutal violence that creeps into so
many contemporary films.)
These minor criticisms aside, "Raiders of the Lost
Ark" is a stunning cinematic effort. It should be the
season's biggest and best hit, grand-scale competition
for the soon-to-be-released (and similar) "Superman
II
Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford) cracks his deadly whip in a scene from "Raiders of the Lost Ark
Sword-And-Sorcery Comes To The Movies
By JOHN WEYLER
V�ff Wrtltr
Conan is coming. The battling barbarian of paper-
back and comic book fame will soon appear on the mo-
tion picture screen. His comrades-in-arms, King Arthur
and Perseus, are already here, ushering in an era of
cinematic sword-and-sorcery.
Sword-and-sorcery is a genre of fantasy and fiction as
old as mankind itself, that has recently been embraced
by the movie industry. Current or upcoming films in
this field include John ("The Wind and the Lion")
Milius' "Conan John Boorman's "Excalibur"
(reviewed in the May 27 edition of The East Carolinian);
the Disney studio's "Dragonslayer "Clash of the
Titans currently on display in this month's issue of
American Film magazine and featuring the stop-motion
animation of genius Ray Harrvhausen, and "Heavy
Metal based on the adult fantasy magazine of the
same name.
While the boundaries between the two are often blur-
red, sword-and-sorcery is a distinct, separate genre as
regards it's literary and cinematic cousin, science fic-
tion. SF is a more intellectual medium, concerned with
fact as much as fantasy.
It looks to the future, and it's common iconography
is rockets, ray guns and robots. S&S looks to the past,
and is about what it's name states: warriors and
wizards. It's characters are usually brutal barbarians in
battle with sinister sorcerors and their inhuman compa-
nions. Sword-and-sorcery evokes the primordial past
and a feeling of time-lost terror.
The roots of this genre go far back into the past also.
Ancient myths and legends are the forerunners of
modern sword-and-sorcery, which uses the old stories as
inspiration. "Clash of the Titans" is taken from Greek
mythology: "Excaliber" is based on the tales of King
Arthur and the Knights of theRound Table. The up-
coming "Conan" is based on the fiction of Robert E.
Howard (1906-1936) who used his heritage of Celtic
myth to create a new art form.
Scholars generally refer to Howard as the father of
modern sword-and-sorcery. He was a unique and erratic
individual. Howard committed suicide at the age of thir-
ty, leaving behind a legacy that gave birth to a original
genre of fiction, and now, film.
A look into Howard's writings will give a clue as to
why stories of brute primitivism are so popular today.
Howard often had long narrative dreams, envisioning
himself as one of his heroes. He once wrote:
"I am never, in these dreams of ancient times, a
civilized man. Always I am the barbarian, the skin-clad,
tousle-haired, light-eyed wild man, armed with a rude
axe or sword, fighting the elements and wild beasts, or
grappling with armored hosts marching with the tread
of civilized discipline from fallow fruitful lands and
walled cities.
"This is reflected in my writings, too, for when I
begin a tale of old times, I always find myself instinc-
tively arrayed on the side of the barbarian, against the
powers of organized civilization . .
Fiction and films are a reflection of the society that
produces them. It is easy to see why sword-and-sorcery
is in vogue today, as we see civilization crumble around
us, and violence and terrorism become epidemic.
As we slowly sink into the slime, we would do well,
while watching Conan bloody up the silver screen, to
remember Howard's words: "barbarism is the natural
state of mankind, and barbarism must ultimately
triumph
il Coping With The Hot Weather
'If You Can't Stand The Heat, It's Too Bad'
By DAVID NORRIS
Ami. Featum Editor
For some time now, I have been interested in
writing something about the summer heat. I was
going to wait until August, when the heat usually
becomes brutally oppressive and unbearable.
However, as some of you have probably noticed,
"brutally oppressive and unbearable" pretty
well sums up the weather this June.
One positive effect that this weather has on me
is that it makes me get up earlier in the mornings.
What with that cacophony of cascading garbage
cans that heralds the garbagemen's arrival and a
constant flow of noisy deliveries to the store
across the street, I'm usually awake by 9:30 or
so. Normally, I just go back to sleep for a couple
of more hours, but the 94 degree temperature in
my room does much to prevent that.
The withering heat bakes into the roofs and
walls of buildings, and works its way inside to
heat up everything. The stereo amplifier feels
hot, even if nobody has been using it. Cooked
food stays warm for a good while, and heating
ovens is fast, since they are already halfway
preheated. Ice-cold drinks become watery warm
drinks in a few minutes.
If ice trays and pickle jars were a little more
comfortable, refrigerators would make nice
sleeping quarters.
Even if pickle jars made nice pillows, it
wouldn't do me much good, since our
refrigerator is broken. Once a cool paradise, the
old icebox has become a barren desert, divided
into shelves and a vegetable compartment.
The broken refrigerator necessitates constant
raids on convenience stores, plundering them of
anything that's cold and drinkable.
Air conditioning is now a status symbol. If the
heat stays the way it is, people in bars downtown
will begin pickups with lines like "Wanna come
up and see my air conditioner?" ("Wanna come
up and see my fan?" won't work as well.)
Speaking of fans, I imagine that they are sell-
ing like hotcakes (as if there could be cool cakes
in this weather.) Two or three fans running in a
hot, heat stale atmosphere can soon start an in-
vigorating draft of hot, humid air flowing slug-
gishly through the room. It seems that 90 degree
air is 90 degree air, whether it is sitting still in a
hot, stagnant room or being blown through a
fan. (In fact, at times it feels like the air is made
hotter be being run through an overheated fan.)
Did you ever see a fan explode? Most of my
electric fans die a quiet death resulting from
overwork in the summertime, but one decided to
go in a spectacular blaze of glory. Naturally, I
quickly noticed the flames coming from the fan's
See COPING, page 6, col. 1
Bullitt' Back On Big Screen
Steve McQueen stars in the detective shocker "Bullitt" tonight at 9
p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center's Hendrix Theatre. The film
sports McQueen in the grandaddy of all car chases through the
treacherous hills of San Francisco. Film critic Andrew Sarris of The
Village Voice writes that "whatever you may have heard about the
auto chase is probably truea terrifying deafening shocker On
Monday, June 22, at 9 p.m. the Student Union Films Committee
presents "Gilda Live" featuring old Saturday Night Live regular
Gilda Radner in her most memorable roles. The film also stars
comic Father Guido Sarducci. All summer films will be shown in
the Hendrix Theatre on Monday and Wednesday evenings at 9 p.m.
Admission is by student ID and Activity Card or MSC Membership
for faculty and staff. All films are sponsored by the Student Union
Films Committee.
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 17, 1981 PageS
UNC- W Sweeps Two
By WILLIAM YELYERTON
Sports r dilor
1 he University of North Carolina
ai Wilmington was picked at the
beginning of the North State Sum-
mer I eague season as the team to
beat. However, the Sea Hawks had
been playing like anything but the
favorite. After a double-header
sweep by Campbell, UNC-VV was
0 .V
I ast Saturday night at Harr-
ington Field the Sea hawks decided
to play like the favorites. And did
they ever � at the expense of the
Pirates of Hast Carolina.
Y hen the night had ended, Wilm-
ington had swept a twin-bill from
the Bucs � to the tune of 16-3 and
9-3.
I said before the season began
that Wilmington was the team to
beat Pirate coach Gary Overton
said "They showed it that night.
Ihe hit the ball really well. That
was (he key
Hit was something the Pirates did
not do. In the first game, Wilm-
ington's Mike Antle allowed only
two hits while his teammates col-
ected 13.
In the nightcap, Jaymie McGuire
gave up only one hit in the 9-3 rout.
Buc second baseman Mike Sorrel
broke up no-hit bids in both games.
In the first contest he singled, and in
he nightcap he gained the Pirates
only tut. that coming in the last inn-
ing.
tlmington did some heavy hit-
g in the opening contest. The
Seahawks pounded out seven extra-
base hits, five doubles and two
home runs.
In the second game. Wilmington
collected 11 hits, including a home
run and three doubles.
I he two losses put the Pirates tied
tor tourth place with a 2-3 record,
as is Wilmington.
Wilmington iced the game in the
second inning by scoring four times.
Antle helped himself by doubling in
two runs.
The Seahawks added two more in
the third. One run scored when first
baseman Clyde Holley stroked a
double. He later scored when Antle
singled.
The bombardmen continued into
the sixth inning when Wilmington
added six more suns. A triple
brought in one and a walk loaded
the bases. Right fielder Slaughter
then belted the next pitch over the
right-field wall for a grand slam.
Wilmington finished their scoring
in the seventh when shortstop Paul
Murr belted a homer, and Tom
Jones and Holley scored when
Richard Foy singled.
The Pirates' two runs came in the
second and the seventh innings.
Charlie Smith walked and later
scored on Robert Wells' sacrifice
fly. The other run came when David
Walls' scored on a wild pitch after
he doubled.
Antle walked seven and struck
out two in going the distance.
Murr, Jones and Holley went
four-for-four in the first game.
The Wilmington bombardment
continued in the second game. Tim
Whitehead led off the first inning
with a single and advanced to se-
cond on a sacrifice. Holley reached
first on a fielder's choice and
Slaughter walked, loading the bases.
Angle, the designated hitter, singled
in Whitehead, and an error on the
play allowed another run.
The Bucs cut the lead to 2-1 in the
bottom of the first when Mike Sor-
rel walked and was sacrificed to se-
cond. He went to third and scored
on a sacrifice bv Todd Evans.
Wilmington added one more in
the second when David Price singl-
ed, stole second and advanced to
third on a wild pitch. Whitehead
drove him in with a sacrifice fly.
The eventual winning run was
produced in the third when Antle ,
drove in Holley after the first
baseman reached on a two-base er-
ror.
By the end of the fourth, the score
was 9-2. Highlights included a dou-
ble by Holley and Whitehead and a
home run by Jones.
The Pirates tasted defeat for the
first time in a Friday-afternoon
game with the Wolfpack of N.C.
State. With one out in the seventh,
Leo Thomas singled and Mo Bar-
bour followed with another hit. Jeff
Hudson then delivered a pinch-hit
single, driving in Thomas and give
State a hard-fought 3-2 win.
The Bucs took a 1-0 lead in the se-
cond inning when Jay Carraway
drew a two-out walk and scored on
a double by catcher Jack Curlings.
East Carolina pitcher Kirk Par-
sons had a perfect game going into
the fourth inning but State's Chris
Baird ended the threat with a double
and later scored on a single by Jim
Toman.
The Pirates took a 2-1 lead in the
fifth when Mike Sorrel walked and
moved to second on a balk by
State's Mark Roberts. He scored
when Todd Hendley reached first on
an error.
State came back in the bottom of
the inning to tie. Nelson Carlton
doubled and scored when Thomas
singled.
Roberts allowed no more Pirate
runs in the contest, and he gave up
only five hits the entire game.
Overton felt his team was un-
prepared. "I just don't think we
were ready to play this game he
said. "We should have been more
opt �mistic because they have a solid
club
Charlie Smith pitched a complete-
game victory over arch-rival North
Carolina last Wednesday night to
lead the Pirates to a 6-2 win.
Smith held the Tar Heels to four
hits, three of them coming in the
sixth inning. He walked two and
struck out six.
Smith helped his team in the se-
cond when he singled to center. He
moved to second on a double by
Charlie Waynick. Robert Wells
reached first on a infield hit. Mark
Shank walked to score Smith, and
the Pirates were up 1-0.
The Tar Heels added two runs in
the top of the third. Jeff Hubbard
was hit by a pitch, and Ronnie
Broome drew a walk. They advanc-
ed on a sacrifice and scored when
Mitch McClenny got the first
Carolina hit of the night.
Jay Carraway tied the game for
the Pirates in the fourth inning
when he belted a home run.
The Pirates took control of the
game in the fifth by scoring four
runs. Todd Hendley reached first on
a fielder's choice and Evans singled.
Smith was hit by a pitch. Carraway
drew a bases-loaded walk, scoring
one run. Curlings and Robert Wells
singled, driving in two runs.
Shank closed the scoring by draw-
ing a bases-loaded walk for the se-
cond time in the game.
Evans and Wells had two hits for
the Pirates, and McClenny collected
two of the Tar Heels' four hits.
"We looked sharp Overton
said of the victory over North
Carolina. "Even though we're 2-3
now, 1 think we have a chance to be
a good ballclub.
The Pirates take on the Tar Heels
tonight at C.B. Aycock High School
in Pikeville. Gametime is at 7:30
p.m.
Photo By RACHEL ROLAND
A Pirate batter takes a hefty cut during game action.
Western Carolina Looks To Rebuild
ic: This is the first in a series oj
:ris on Pirate Football Op-
rients in 1981
By CHRIS HOLLQMAN
AaUul V�� Mlior
1 -or the Catamounts ot Western
( arolina. the 1980 football season
has to be described as one of the
high hopes and bitter disappoint-
ments. The Cats were set to fly last
on with the return of 17 starters
and the number-three pass receiver
in NCAA history is Gerald Harp.
The team was all set for a piece of
the Southern Conference crown
with the Cat followers referred to as
a "potentially strong defense
But it was not to be. Last year a
eak running game, an unsettled
situation at quarterback and a rash
of injuries on defense left the Cats
minus their tails and sporting a 3-7-1
record. For Western Carolina, it
was their first losing season since
75.
This vear looks like it could be a
lough one for Western as only ten
starters return to the fold including
three on defense and seven on of-
tense. Still head coach, Bob Waters,
remains optimistic that the Cats can
rebound in 1981.
"You don't rebuild from a losing
seasonyou break the program
down, examine it and revitalize each
part as you put it back together
W aters said.
Waters, whose record at Western
Carolina is 71-49-4 has been in this
situation before and has bounced
back, so he certainly plans to do it
again. For the Cats to improve on
last year's record, an inexperienced
defense must grow up very fast, and
the offense has to perform to its
potential.
"Our offense could be much im-
proved explained Waters. "We
will have a vastly improved running
game and a solid passing game
Waters, however, has a good
reason to feel that the Cat running
game will be better - his name is
Melvin Dorsey.
Dorsey is a 6-0, 198 pound
tailback who transferred from the
national champs, the University of
Georgia. He is considered by many
to be the best back ever to sign with
the Catamounts, including its
former All-America, Darrell Lip-
ford, who played for the Cats from
1974 -76.
Another reason the running game
appears to be solid is the retun of
Leonard Williams and Anthony
James at the tailback spot. During
the last two seasons, both backs
alternated in the l-inf6rmation and
gained 3,972 yards between
themselves and scored 30
touchdowns.
With the arrival of Dorsey from
Georgia, however, James has been
spending some time at the flanker
position for a possible change in the
fall. The fullback position appears
to be strong again this season with
the return of Mark Womack, a 6-0,
210-pound junior.
A backfield weakness last year
that could be a team strength this
season is the quarterback position.
This year's juniors, Ronnie Mixon
and David Mashburn, are set to
alternate at the signal-calling posi-
tion. Both players are expected to be
improved this season after gaining
valuable experience last year.
"Our entire offensive backfield
returns, plus we've added an
outstanding transfer and our
quarterbacks have the experience
they lacked last year Waters said.
"Our offensive line, despite being
very young, should be more physical
this year he continued.
Though the Cats return only three
starters on the offensive line, they
are considered very good ones.
At the tight-end position, Eddie
McGill, a 6-6, 225-pound senior
returns. He was an All-Southern
Conference selection last year with
33 catches for 465 yards and 5
touchdowns.
Also on offense, Lonnie Braxton,
a 6-4, 235-pound guard and Steve
Grason, a 6-3, 235-pound center,
return. In addition to these linemen,
backup help has been found. They
are Robbie Jackson, a 6-3,
242-pound tackle and Mark
Bicknese, a 6-5, 230-pound center.
The offensive line easily ranks as the
biggest in Western Carolina's
history.
Perhaps Water's biggest problem
will be his defensive unit, where he
has been hit very hard by gradua-
tion. Only three starters return out
of 17 lettermen last year.
"This will be the youngest defen-
sive team that we have ever put on-
the field at Western Carolina
Waters said. "We have a lot of
talented athletes on defense but are
they very green
The three returning defensive
starters include George Alston at
defensive end, Glay Bullard at the
noseguard, and Scott Strickland at
the other defensive end.
The kicking game appears to be in
good shape for the Cats with both
its place-kicker and punter return-
ing. The placements and kick-offs
will be handled by Dean Biasucci
and McGill will do the punting
chores.
The schedule won't be very kind
to the Catamounts this year either as
Western plays Furman, East
Carolina, VM1, and Florida State.
Still, Waters feels good about his
team's chances this fall.
"This team has a lot of exciting
and talented players but is unpredic-
table because of the inexperience of
our offense line and the whole
defense Waters explained. "Our
success will be determined by how
quickly these young players
mature
Bob Waters
Baseball Strikes Out
Photo By RACK
An East Carolina runner heads to second during the win
over UNC-CH.
Well, they've gone ahead and
done what they said they'd do if
they didn't get what they wanted.
In other words, major league
players have gone on strike.
Never fear, WRAL-TV in Raleigh
shows some pretty exciting Tarzan
movies on Saturday afternoon. Or
you could watch minor league
baseball on the Entertainment and
Sports Programming Network. Or
you could spend the afternoon wat-
ching a bunch of 350-pound men
carrying refrigerators on their backs
on CBS Sports Saturday.
Better yet, you could catch some
of the North State Summer League
games at Harrington Field this sum-
mer.
If you don't care for any of those
suggestions, consider these:
�Search through an old trunk in the
attic and see if your dad has any old
Chip Hilton sports books for boys.
Chip covers nearly every sport.
Read at least two a week.
� Read all the summer issues of
Sports Illustrated dating back to
1960, the year the Pirates won the
World Series on Bill Mazerowski's
home run.
�Read The Boys of Summer at least
twice to get a sense of the time
baseball was reallv Dlaved.
� Learn how to cork your own bat.
First, bore a hole about eight inches
deep and half an inch wide into the
thick end of the bat. To get the ball
to jump off the bat better, leave
most of the hole empty but plug the
very top with cork, sawdust and
glue. Former Detroit Tiger star
Norm Cash says it works pretty
well. Especially in 1961, when he hit
.361 with 41 homers and 132 RBls.
�Learn how to doctor a baseball.
You might try giving Gaylord Perry
a call in Williamston. Gaylord has
been accused of using Slippery Elm
for keeping a waiting supply of
saliva; K-Y Jelly, used for lubing a
greaseball, and even Pillsbury flour,
used to throw a puffball � that's
right, a puffball� that supposedly
forms a cloud of dust in the hitter's
eyes. It's been rumored that A's
Manager Billy Martin once brought
a bloodhound to sniff the Indians'
ball bag when Gaylord was pitching
for Cleveland.
� If you don't care using lubricant to
doctor the ball, then Astros pitcher
Don Sutton is the man to see. Don
has been accused of scuffing the
ball. Doing this causes the ball to
drop by as much as half a foot.
�Practice the hidden potatoe trick.
This proved successful in a game in
William
Yelverton
Florida earlier this year when, with
a runner on third, the opposing cat
cher tried to pick the runner off but
threw the ball into left field. At least
it looked like a ball. It turned out to
be a potato.
When the run scored, the oppos-
ing manager stormed onto the field,
demanding an explanation. The um-
pires searched all over the outfield
for the "ball" but had no luck. The
left fielder had eaten it. Wouldn't
an apple have tasted better?
� If you like to play first base, prac-
tice deceiving the umpires by stepp-
ing lively to make them believe you
had your foot on the base when the
throw came. Shortstops can try the
same thing. This takes a lot of prac-
tice.
�Practice blowing the ball foul. This
could be successful on a slow roller
down the line. Seattle Mariner Len-
ny Randle was accused of doing this
but swore he was just talking to the
ball, telling it to go foul.
� Try to think oi at least one reason
why Enos "Country" Slaughter
hasn't been elected to the Hall of
Fame.
� Devote your interest to boxing.
There is usualy a good fight on
every weekend.
�Start your own Frog Jumping
League, like the one Mark Twain
described in "The Notorious Jump-
ing Frog ot C alaveras County
�Try inventing new statistics. Like
CPG � the number of times the star
player combs his hair between inn-
ings.
� Invent an All-Money team. Players
could include Dave Cash, Bobby
Bonds or Ernie Banks.
� Try designing new uniforms for
major-league teams. Be original.
�Start you own collection of check
stubs from major leaguers. One
from Dave Wifield might be nice.
Remember, these suggestions
hope to keep the avid baseball fan
from going insane this summer if
the strike continues. If this isn't any
help, you might try pitching a tent
outside the Hall of Fame in
Cooperstown, NY. At least you'll
be close to the game you love.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 17, 1981
Nicklaus Ready For Open
ARDMORE, Pa.
(AP) � There is a dif-
ferent feeling, a dif-
ferent outlook, for
Jack Nicklaus in the
U.S. Open this year.
"Last year 1 wasn't
sure. 1 wasn't sure
where 1 was or where 1
was going. This year I
am Nicklaus said
before a practice round
on the Merion Golf
Club, where he will de-
fend his American na-
tional championship
beginning Thursday.
Last year there were
doubts.
This year, there are
none.
Last year, coming in-
to the U.S. Open,
Nicklaus' matchless
career appeared to be
nearing an end. His
game was, at best,
questionable. At age
40, he hadn't won in
two years. He was, he
later admitted, con-
sidering retirement
from the game he had
dominated so long.
There were doubts
and self-doubts.
All were erased by
his record-setting
triumph at Baltusrol
and a subsequent vic-
tory in the PGA,
pushing his record col-
lection of major profes-
sional titles to 17. And
they re-confirmed
Nicklaus' stature as the
dominant force in golf,
at least insofar as the
showcase Big Four
events are concerned.
He has not won this
season. But that is not
significant.
"I changed my
priorities several years
ago said Nicklaus,
generally considered
the finest player the
game has known. "If 1
had not, 1 would be
gone from golf now. I
would not be playing.
"Between the ages 25
to 35, 1 expected to win
every time 1 played. I
prepared for every
tournament like 1
prepare for the majors
now.
Marzilli Wins Racquetball
closest prediction wins the race. You see,
it's simple; so get involved! You can enter
the race by coming to the Intramural office
by June 18th and filling out a roster form.
The races are scheduled to take place at
6:30 p.m. Thursday June 18th at the
university track.
PREDICTION RUN SCHEDULED LOR
THURSDAY JUNE 18TH
How well do you know yourself? Do
you think you know yourself well enough
to predict your time in a 2.5 mile or a 5
mile race? that is exactly what this activity-
is all about. It is a cross campus run of
either 2.5 miles or 5 miles in which you
estimate vour time of completion. The
MARZILLI CAPTURES SUMMER
RAQUETBALL SINGLES TITLE
The men's division started out with ten
competitors. Tom Marzilli, seeded second,
upset the number one seed Bob Brew-
ington in two games; 15�3 and 15�9,
during the fifth round of the men's double
elimination tournament. That loss sent
Brewington into the loser's bracket where
he faced the number three seed Pete Mace.
In a hard fought battle, Mace prevailed
over Brewington; 14�15, 15�13, and
11 � 10, to advance the finals against Mar-
zilli. In the finals, Marzilli captured the ti-
tle in two games over Mace; 15�7 and
15�7. CONGRATULATIONS TOM
Tune in next Wednesday for the results of
the women's tournement.
' Vv
tt.
fc,

p?fe'
k i

Don't Miss NC's Own
SPLIT IMAGE
Sunday Night At 8 PM On The University Mall
Rain Site: Hendrix Theatre
Sponsored By The Student Union Special Concerts Committee
Coping With Heat
Continued from page 4
motor and was able to get things
under control. There is something
strange about relaxing in front of a
tan and seeing it burst into flames.
It makes me slightly paranoid about
running a fan all night long.
Attic fans are nice to have. While
sweltering here, 1 remember the attic
fan we had when I was little. One of
the most relentlessly efficient
machines 1 have ever run across,
that fan would cool the house off so
well at night that I'd wake up in the
morning half-frozen. It also would
hurl paper planes into the attic, if
one flew by. So, brother and I made
sure that lots of paper planes did
just that. The planes would end up
scattered around the floor all over
that end of the attic.
In the evening, many people like
to sit outside on their porches, since
it's usually a degree or two cooler
there than indoors. Less hardy (but
more lucky) individuals can stay in-
side and cower in front of their air
conditioners.
The pervasive heat causes many
changes in our lifestyles. Doing
garden work or mowing the lawn
doesn't seem to be all that impor-
tant after all once the thermometer
hits the 90's.
Concern for neat clothing gives
way to acceptance of the fact that
people are usually going to look
damp and wilted in this kind ot
weather.
Many people look forward to
working if their place of employ-
ment has air conditioning.
I wonder if wines that should be
consumed at room temperature take
on a different character when room
temperature is just under 100
degrees.
In closing, 1 have a little saying
that Harry Truman might have said,
if he had thought of it: If you can't
stand the heat, it's too bad
CLASSIFIEDS
SHORT TERM LEASES
Available for sharing house across
from campus Call 752-071 or
75 4057
PAPERS TYPED: For ttuOcnti
101? E Wright Rd Call 75J 4733
JUST YOUR TYPE Fast, ac
curate, professional typing
Research papers, resumes, let
ters, etc WRITE RIGHT
7S4W44.
MOBILE HOME FOR SALE 1�7�
OakwooO i?X60 in wooded park 10
mm. from ECU. two bedrooms,
heat pump, screens and storms
GE range, retrig, washer and
dryer under service contract to
4 13 Dinette set, all like new S1S00
down, balance owner financed at
13 percent 752 4735 or 447 2354
ONE ROOMMATE To share
three bedroom apartment at
Eastbrook Call 753 914. ask tor
Ray or Ivan
BASS GUITARIST: Country and
top 40 band, local act, established
artist Mostly weekends 75� �772
RIDERS WANTED: June If going
to Boone via Its and 1-40 notify by
Thursday. Linda Harris 174 Jar
VIS.
INSTRUCTION
"Drivers tmployd
by Imrgm trucking
conpMnii hmdmnmimt
mvrmgm �mrnlng ot about
$18,300
to 1074
t :TO;
The Fleming Center has been here for you Btnoe 1974
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of an ages at a reasonable oost
The Iteming Center we're here when you need us.
cajnTai-aeaotayjOeifh
rnen your
ajqjttma.
m:i
FLEMING gggggB
As Quotea by Ife
U S Oepf crflatxy
Buf0u of i atxx
SMMfeCS 8u�eivnVo 87b -
NOFUTURf? hattfcrt?
Start now to plan fur ,i profession,ti
career dining a "Big Riij'Oui private
training schoil offers competent in
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lenRinu training fields Keep ow job
andtiain on part lime basis (Sat &
Sun.1 or attend our 3 week full time
resident training Call right now for
full information
Revco Tractor-Trailer Training lnc
Greenville
(919)752-5568
TAKE A BREAK FROM YOUR STUDIES AT
THE COFFEEHOUSE
�M
u-
y
Featuring: Joe Collins
Monday, June 22 9:00-10:00 p.m.
Room 15, Mendenhall
Admission FREE Free Snacks
Sat. June 20
Where Bands make if RockRoadies makes it
Roll! 200 W. Walnut St Downtown Goldsboro ph.
734 4551 Presents
n
In Concert"
CASH
NOW!
with special guest Pegasus Pius'
Gl Camouflapad Fatigues And T-
Srin's Sleeping Bags Backpacks
Camping Equipment Steal Toed
Shoes Dishes And 0�er 700 Dit-
laieri New And Used items
Cowboy Boos J3S 9S
ARMY-NAVY STORE
SAAD'S SHOK
RKPA1R
113 Grande Ave
758-1228
Quality Repair
It voo need money, consider selling your goid and silver valuables And here s a good
way to get EXTRA CASH
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
$
;
Your Favorites
THURSDAY
Broiled Beef Liver
with choice of 2 vegetables
Almost iviryooe his i high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Click your dressir drawers
and bring your class ring into Coin & Ring Man. Wore
your professional buying strvic and wo guireotn you
lair prices and good service
June 18 Only
FRIDAY
Trout Almondine
with slaw and hush puppies
$029
June 19 Only
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F01 JfWIllY, VAUIUUSAITTMHK
MAMil 10� - UR - 1M
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CAM FORITIM1MARRIR
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1 Where America Comes Home To Eat!
Carolina East Mall
US 264 Bypass West Haven Rd
& N. Carolina Hwv 11�Greenville. NC
OF & SAlES eo. INC
401 8. EVANS ST.
DPINS )Q � IUMUN SAI
MONY HOUSl SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER


t






Greenville
South Park
Shopping Center
US E. Red Banks Road
Monday thru Saturday
8:00 A. M. 'til 10:00 P.M.
Cookout Special
Fresh Ground
Daily
5-lbs. or More
Juicy Sun Blushed
Ground Beef
Peaches





FRESH PRODUCE
JUICY SUN BLUSHED
Peaches
Lb.
33�
LARGE SWEET TEXAS
Honeydews. $129
TENDER YELLOW
Squash -29c
FRESH GREEN �
Broccoli ea. OVv
�.Vs?
�-fff r
r rf v '
JUMBO SIZE TEXAS
Cantaloupe 7"4
DELICIOUS CALIFORNIA
Cauliflower 99c
SNOW WHITE
Mushrooms $139
STO
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Shasta
Drinks
2 Ltr.
89c
PHILLIPS
Pork&
Beans
16-Oz.
399c
Why Pay 281C
TURKEYTURKEY A CHICKEN CAT FOOD
Frishies
4$l
e.s-Ox.
Why Pay 21
17C OFF LABEL BORDEN S
SLICED AMERICAN SINGLES
Cheese
$149
12-O1.
Why Pay S1.77
89c
22-oz.
Why Pay S 1.3 3
20C OFF LABEL
Liquid
Lux
TEXAS PETE
Hot Dog
Chili 10.M 35
Why Pay 280
nv .





DVCE
r �
ffifc
:W��.
�K.
,�2 WFVl
tf .v
upe
Ea.
79
FORNIA
lower 99
lrootnsLb $139
STOCK UP NOW!
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Shasta
Drinks �. 89
PHILLIPS
For h&
Beans 399
Why Pay 281C
TURKEYTURKEY A CHICKEN CAT FOOD
Frfskies o. 4$l
Why Pay 275C
17C OFF LABEL BORDENS
SLICED AMERICAN SINGLES
Cheese
Why Pay S1.77
20C OFF LABEL
Liquid
Lux
22-Oz.
Why Pay S1.33
TEXAS PETE
Hot Dog
Chill 100 3$l
8 BOTTLE CARTON - 1 � OZ. MT. D1W AND
Pepsi-Cola o5
savings fei
COUNTRY TIME LEMONADE, SUNKIST,
MOUNTAIN DEW, DIET PEPSI AND
Pepsi-Cola .u. 75
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
Cold
Power
84 Ox.
$$69
Why Pay S3.83
ASSORTED FLAVORS DOG FOOD
Mighty
Bog o. 389
Why Pay 278C
33C OFF LABEL
Liquid
Wish
$2T
1 2 Gal.
Why Pay 83.83
STAR KIST
Tuna �. 85
8.5-Oz.
Why Pay 09C
CUTFRENCH STYLE DEL MONTE
Green
Beans � o 285
DEL MONTE
P0HS 303 Can
Why Pay 299C
285�
Why Pay 299C
WHOLECREAM STYLE DEL MONTE
Gold
Corn 303 c.n 289
Why Pay 299C
DEL MONTE TOMATO
Catsup 5J.o, 89
Why Pay 81.19
MAYONNAISE
JFG
� 99
Why Pay 81.29





Buy one,
get one FREE
JENOS
Revolutionary
CRISP NUSTY CRUST PIZIA
79c VALUE - 12 OZ.PACKAGE
$1.09 VALUE � 6 OZ. PACKAGE LAY'S
REGULARBBOSOUR CREAM A ONION
Winlty Dessert Potato Chips
58C VALUE - 8 OZ. BEEF OR CHICKEN
Rice-A Roni
$1.05 VALUE - LARGE ASSORTED
Jeno's Pizzas
21C VALUE - 1 OZ. PACKAGE 37 VALUE - 8.5-OZ. BUSH
Cracker Jack Baked Beans
� .06 VALUE � 2-LB. CR.MKLE CUT POTATOES B.C VALUE - 6 CT. EXTRA CR.SPVS0URDOUGH
Russ-Ettes Oroweat Muff in
Another
Free Value
,9�c VALUE - 7 OZ. STAR
Chicken Salad
Wh�n you buy a 15-ox. Star Plmanto Chaaaa
f Buy two, get one FREE! )
$1.85 VALUE - 12 CT. BORDER'S
Ice Cream Sandwiches
Maple Syrup
Dixie Dew u-o 80
Thank You Cherry
Pie Filling � can 1.51
Assorted Drinks
Shasta 6 12-ox. cans 1.39
Fisher Jumbo
Peanuts xz-o. 1.87
Marios
Salad Olives 6-0 85C
Strawberry
Bama Jelly 1 o- 1.21
Gorton's
Fish Sticks 2 Lb 2.80
Dog Wood
Liv-A-Snap
Sauers Onion
Gravy Mix
Sauers Mroum
Gravy Mix Packet 204
Delicious
King Cola 6 12-oz. cans 1.65
PLAIN OR SELF RISING
Pillsbury
Flour s Lb 79$
Why Pay $1.19
FRENCH OR THOUSAND ISLAND
Pfelffer
Dressing ,� 99$
Why Pay $1.39
� 35C
Packet 35C
BEEF DOG FOOD
Alpo
DELICIOUS
36
14.5-Oz.
Why Pay 287C
King Cola � 99c
2-Ltr.
Why Pay $1.25
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Light N' Lively
Yogurt so, 399c
Why Pay 49C Each
South Park
Shopping Center
115 �. Red Banks Ro
Monday thru Saturday
8:00 A.M. 'til 10:00 P.M.
Cookout Spe
Fresh Gr
Bail
$11S
Lb.
5-Ibs. 01
Ground Be





AT LOW PRICES
SWEET CALIFORNIA
SWEET CAUfUMWi &4F �8 g
Strawberries �. I1
SWEET JUICY
Nectarines S9c
JUICY 8UNKIST
Lemons � IZc
LARGE ZESTY
Limes
sn
SWEET BING
Cherries sl2i
FRESH GREEN
Cucumbers 5$l
LARGE BELL
Peppers 4$l
BEAUTIFUL
Hanging
Baskets E. $4�
SW�T YELLOW 60
Corn �- v"v
fresh





CHOICE MEATS
FRESH DAILY 5 LBS. OR MORE
Ground c�a
Beef Lbl18
m Why Pay $1.38
HOLLY FARMS GRADE A
Chicken . A msmammasmm�
Breast � $1
Why PayS 1.49 mfct' . ,
HOLLY FARMS GRADE A
Drumsticks �. 98c
Why Pay SI.08 v
HOLLY FARMS GRADE A
Chicken
Thighs u, 98c
� Why Pay Si .08
5SLTST" SEE �"� :ron,
Chicken KTEL. umi ��-�-� ��
Liters 79c m�- ���� � t , �
���;� �Jh, �fy ,7.2. Ce�UFrai.lu u.X.69 B��f Frank. i. 1.14
Curtis tirtw'i
Party Treats i�. Ulf Dinner Franks 11.29
GROUND DAILY Wfcote M�g Eani�i
Meat Loaf ! ?� IT"�
Why Pay S1.89 CMU iH. 79 SizzUan izH.1.39
Armour JU�l�rbf Holly Farm
Hot Dogs 10 1.W Chtekon Franks "W
FRESH DAILY 3 LBS. OR MORE lil B IDiligaaJPOP H? . Oa
- Lh�r Ch��ee�al Luncheon CHUUen BolOgflO Lb. WV
Crf0t4ftfl Armour Salami h 69
Chuck Lb 18
Why Pay S1.88
USDA CHOICE BEEF RIB (10-12 Lb�. Avg.) Svf?- ' '
Whole UP I fi&L a
Rib Eye - 3W I .W.l-
WhyPayS4.99 W -Bjk ?-V " S�
USDA CHOICE EXTRA LEAH JSI MiSt. &
Stew Beef $178 L m&r jmjmv
Why Pay 81.98 EK&Sh- fci J&m�i9W
MOLLY FARMS GRADE A l-tllM4i -
Mixed Fryer
Parts 58
Why Pay 780
CHOIC
� i,
-raw la
' Sfc V
LEAN A TENDER PORK
Cubed
Steak Lb 5168
Why Pay $1.98
OCEAN PERCH
Fillet u, t
Why Pay S1.59
FRESH GULF
Shrimp - 4I9
� WhyPayS5.U
TYSON ROCK CORNISH
Hens $79
Why Pay S1.89
4-7 LBS. AVERAGE WEIGHT
Smoked
Picnics u 79
Why Pay 99'
ARMOUR
Canned
Ham 3-LWhyt$l
SWIFT
Hostess
VLnttt �
Why
Register for a
FREE
Whole Country Horn
Each week during Grand Opsnlng we will
have e drewlng lor two FREE Stadlere Whole
Country Hame. Be aure to reglater when you
shop at our new Food Town store.





TS
1.09
1.49
1.69
1.09
1.49
79C
1.19

69C
rfeSg
iV"
i '
V
Armour
Pepperonl o- 79�
Latter!
Regular Franks tx-o 99v
Lutor'j
Beef Franks �-ox 1�M
Lut�r'f
Dinner Franks u� 1.Z9
Lutrr'f B��1
Dinnc?r Franks Lb. 1.49
Swift
Sixxlean �-� Itjf
Holly Forms
Chicken Franks i. 894
Hotly FarmJ
Chicken Bologna Lb. S9
L
o
�V
feUrti
? a
f it
CHOICE PRICES
LEAN TEHDER PORK
Cubed
Steak
$168
Why Pay $1-90
Lb.
OCEAN PERCH
Fillet - !??
Why Pay $1 -59
FRESH GULF
Shrimp " s419
p�' Why Pay $5.19
TYSON ROCK CORNISH
Hens -$79
�� Why Pay S1.89
4-7 LBS. AVERAGE WEIGHT
Smoked
Picnics -79
Why Pay 99 c
ARMOUR
Canned
Ham 3 - H
Why Pay SS.99
SWIFT
Hostess
Ham
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Chuck ggjj Aja
Roast rl08
$J98
4-Lb
Why Pay $8.98
Register for a
FREE
Whole Country Ham
Each week during Grand Opening we will
have a drawing for two FREE Stadlers Whole
Country Hams. Be sure to register when you
shop at our new Food-Town store.
Lb.
Why Pay $2.08
$128
Pork Loin u
� Why Pay SI.48
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Shoulder
Roast u 52�
Why Pay $2.38
USDA CHOICE FAMILY PACK
Cubed
Steaks
$258
Why Pay $2.98
Lb.
GRADE A
Turkey
Breast
si
Why Pay $1.59
FREEH PORK
Country
Ribs
Wrw Pay $1.48





REFRESHING VALUES
VIN ROSE, CHIANTl, RHINE, HEARTY BURGUNDY
Gallo uV
CHENIN BLANC, RIESLING, ZINFANDEL,
CHABLIS, BURGUNDY, ROSE, RHINE
Taylor Calif.
Cellars ��. ,36�
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Busch$1"
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. NR BOTTLES
Milter sl
PACKAGE OF 12 - 12 OZ. CANS
Eudwelser $3"
PACKAGE OF S - 12 OZ. CANS
Schlitz Malt
Liquor $ZZS
PACKAGE OF 12 - 12 OZ. CANS
Carling Black
Label $319
RED, PINK, WHITE TAYLOR
Lake Country
Soft 19L�$36
MT. CHABLIS, RHINE, SAUTERNE, NECTAR ROSE,
BURGUNDY, CLARET, CHIANTl
Altnaden
3Utor
$599
CHENIN BLANC, ZINFANDEL, FRENCH
COLUMBARD, GRENACHE ROSE, GAM AY ROSE,
MONTEREY BURGUNDY, MONTEREY CHABLIS
Altnaden�u $369
i &LA3$M
ME
SWEET BING
Cherries
Lb.
1
FRESH GREEN
Cucumbers 5
LARGE BELL
Peppers
4
BEAUTIFUL
Hanging
Baskets � $4
SWEET YELLOW
Corn





Title
The East Carolinian, June 17, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 17, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.135
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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