The East Carolinian, June 10, 1981






2toe
(ftaroltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55No.t)
Wednesday June 10,1981
8 Pages
v.v am?.
Minges Path Blocked
To Stop Trespassing
it

Phoro By ROCHEL ROLAND
Residents of this house have blocked a popular student path to Minges Coliseum. They complained of excessive
noise and damage to their property.
By DEBORAH HOTALING
NmMM
Every fall the students pour into
Ficklen Stadium, most of them
walking from the dorms across 14th
Street to the stadium en masse.
And every fall, and most times of
the year for that matter, students
take a short cut through a yard, 906
East 14th Street, in order to save
themselves a few yards of walking.
J. Carl Hartsfield rents the house
at 906 East 14th Street and has plac-
ed "no trespassing" signs up
around his yard and makeshift
blockades in order to prevent people
from walking through his yard.
Hartsfield said that the signs went
up not only because of the constant
traffic in his yard, but also because
of the severity of property damage.
In a letter from Hartsfield to the
Chancellor's office dated May 14,
1981, several complaints were listed.
Hartsfield claims that he has had to
listen to "Loud and abusive
language by male sports teams
mainly football; Verbal assault by
same�threatening physical violence;
Destruction of private and personal
property such as a)()ne destroyed
trash can (kicked in), b) Three
stolen galvanized trash cans ($15 per
can), c) One stolen parachute
(canopy for shade), d) One (1)
damaged automobile paint job
(every panel on 1978 Toyota scrat-
ched), e) Several broken antennaes
and windshield wipers, f) Destroyed
mailbox (twice)
"When people walked by,
especially after a football game,
they'd break off the antennaes on
the cars. People just don't have any
respect at all Hartsfield said.
"They scratched every panel on my
old room-mate's Toyota. He finally
moved because of it. This happened
two years ago and when he con-
tacted the Dean of Student Affairs,
he said the only thing we could do is
go to the police and they said just
put up fences and 'No Trespassing'
signs
Hartsfield posted the signs soon
after spring semester ended. "My
landlord said I didn't have to have
anyone in my yard at all. I tried to
do it peacefully during the break
between sessions so that it wouldn't
cause any trouble Hartsfield said.
Before the signs were posted,
however, Hartsfield said there were
other kinds of trouble. Students
were parking their cars in the yard,
late at night, and trying to remove
them early in the morning so as to
go undetected. Hartsfield and his
roommates finally had to resort to
having the cars towed away because
they (the trespassers) were blocking
the driveway when the residents
tried to back their own cars out of
the driveway in the morning in order
to drive to work.
Hartsfield claims the situation
had been going on for six years
before he finally decided to post the
See MINGES, Page 3
Committee Approves Adoption Bill
RALEIGH (UPI) � A House
committee approved legislation
1 uesday requiring the release of
non-identifying information on an
adopted child's natural family but
amended the measure to restrict the
amount of information revealed.
The decision by the House
Judiciary I Committee sparked a
heated exchange between the bill's
sponsor, Rep. Mary Seymour,
D-Guilford, and Rep. Martin
Nesbitt, D-Buncombe.
As the committee adjourned, the
two lawmakers exchanged heated
Campus Police
words over the bill and Nesbitt's
role in pushing through two amend-
ments and forcing the bill out of
committee over her objections.
"I got an adoption bill out of
committee for you Nesbitt told
Mrs. Seymour, who introduced
legislation earlier this year that
would allow an adopted child to
contact its natural parents with the
consent of both parties. That
measure has been stalled in the same
committee.
Nesbitt's remark visibly angered
Mrs. Seymour.
She told him the action on her bill
was an example of the failure of the
General Assembly's committee
system, and later said she would at-
tempt to restore part of the bill dur-
ing House debate.
The bill requires officials to give
adoptive parents non-identifying in-
formation on an adopted child if the
information is available. The infor-
mation would also be available to
the child at age 18.
"This is not a right to search
bill Mrs. Seymour told the com-
mittee. The measure was adapted
from a similar law in Connecticut
that has created no problems, she
said.
The original bill listed nine
specific areas of information, in-
cluding the birth date and weight of
the child; the age, racial
background, education and health
histories of the natural parents; in-
formation on the natural parents'
talents, occupations and special in-
terests; and the existence of any
Survey Reveals Changes
By KAREN WENDT
Head of Campus Security Joe
Calder thinks his department did
"pretty good" in the last year,
despite the increased figures in
crime statistics released by the
department this week.
He also said that the university
tends to lean more towards the
order side of the traditional "law
and order" function of police.
He admittted, "We close our eyes
to a lot of things we probably
shouldn't He cited this ex-
ample�when campus police find a
student with a "minor amount of
marijuana" they generally turn the
student over to Dean Mallory rather
than to the Greenville police. The
number of arrests for violations of
controlled substances is one of the
figures which decreased in the last
year. According to Calder the
Greenville police "don't even
care"about campus violations.
"We run the campus, they run
Greenvillesaid Calder in an inter-
view on Monday.
But overall the crime statistics on
campus were up in almost all areas.
The only significant decrease was in
the number of maintenance calls
with which the campus police
assisted.
The total number of major crimes
reported rose from 513 in the
1979-1980 school year to 562 in the
past school year. Major crimes are
defined as robbery, assault,
burglary, larceny and motor vehicle
theft.
Rapes and homicides are also in-
cluded in this category, but accor-
ding to the report none occurred in
the past school year.
The property values of stolen
goods also increased significantly.
This category showed an increase of
$1,401, while the amount recovered
by campus police decreased by
$4,808.
There is also a marked difference
between the amount of goods stolen
and recovered during the school
year. Both years the amount of
goods stolen exceeded the amount
recovered by at least $50,000.
When questioned about the low
recovery rate, Calder stated:
actually our recovery rate is
very, very good compared to the na-
tional average
But the conviction rate for arrests
is significantly higher. "I would say
99 percent said Calder.
Arrests on campus almost doubl-
ed in the past year, increasing from
108 to 202.
But it is still noted that the arrests
made were lower than the number
of crimes reportedly committed.
The biggest difference came in the
area of larceny. There were 440
larcenies reported in the last year
and only 28 arrests made.
No arrests were listed in the
burglary category.
There was also an increase in the
number of arrests where crimes oc-
curred. Total arrests made in the
1979�80 school year were 108, as
opposed to 202 arrests in the past
year.
Arrests were made for such of-
fenses as forgery, motor vehicle
theft, shoplifting, and indecent ex-
posure. There was no record of ar-
rest for any of these offenses during
the 1979�80 year.
Although campus crime rates
have risen noticeably, campus police
seem to be keeping up by raising the
arrest and conviction rates even
faster.
bromers and sisters of the adopted
child.
But some committee members ob-
jected to two portions of the bill �
a provision saying non-identifying
information was not limited to the
nine listed areas, and the release of
information on the jobs and talents
of natural parents and the existence
of other children.
"We're opening up a scavenger
hunt said Rep. James Hughes,
R-Avery, who predicted the bill
would prompt adopted children to
search for their natural families.
Nesbitt introduced an amendment
restricting the information released
to those items specifically listed in
the bill.
The amendment was approved
despite arguments by Mrs. Seymour
the provision was needed to cover
information that would not fit in a
specific category.
Nesbitt then proposed a second
amendment deleting from the bill
the requirement for information on
occupational backgrounds of
natural parents and the existence of
siblings of an adopted child.
Those items should be addressed
in another bill, he said, because they
involve a policy decision on what is
non-essential information.
Mrs. Seymour said Information
on jobs and special talentc of the
natural parents should be presented
to adopted parents. She said a child
might inherit musical ability that
adopted parents should be aware of.
She also argued the list of infor-
mation should be left unchanged
because of the adoption of Nesbitt's
first amendment.
Two other committee members
backed Mrs. Seymour's argument
both amendments should not be ad-
ded to the bill and tried unsuc-
cessfully to get the committee to
reconsider the earlier amendment.
But they received no response to
the request and the committee
adopted the second amendment on a
6-3 vote.
Easter Seals Backs
Softball Tournament
Alcohol Tax Bill
To Help Highways
A
RALEIGH (UPI) � A bill raising
alcoholic beverage tax hikes as
much as 50 percent to help the
state's ailing highway program
headed to a Senate Finance subcom-
mittee Tuesday amid indications the
increases could be trimmed.
The proposal by Sen. George
Marion, D-Surry, would hike liquor
taxes 50 percent, beer taxes 38 per-
cent and wine taxes 20 percent to 40
percent.
Marion's original bill called for a
100 percent increase in alcohol
levies. He changed it at Hunt's re-
quest to make the proposal conform
to the governor's highway funding
package. As revised, the bill would
generate $45 million in extra
revenue for the highway system dur-
ing 1981-82.
Both measures will be considered
in subcommittee.
Sen. Harold Hardison, DLenoir,
said he helped fight to put the
measures in subcommittee because
he believes a 50 percent tax on li-
quor is too high. He said a percen-
tage increase "in the 20s" has a bet-
ter chance of success.
"I'm not opposed to it (a tax in-
crease), but if you aren't careful
you're going to have a counter-
productive situation he said.
Let's just don't overload the son
of a gun
Hardison and Sen. Marshall
Rauch, D-Gaston, both said they
feared North Carolinians in border
counties would scurry across state
lines to buy their beverages should a
hefty tax hike pass.
The proposal, for example, would
give North Carolina a $2.02 tax on a
$6 bottle of liquor. Virginia's levy
on the same bottle would total 90
cents, while South Carolina's would
stand at 99.4 cents.
Rain Keeps Students In Class
and inclement weather cancels beach plans
As many as 60 teams will be
"going to Bat" for Handicapped
North Carolinians in the Second
Annual Miller Time Softball
Marathon for Easter Seals, spon-
sored by the Miller Brewing Co in
conjunction with C.O.Tanhand
Co.IncWashington, N.C.
Scheduled for Saturday and Sun-
day, June 13 and 14 at Jaycee,
Evans and Guy Smith Parks in
Greenville, NC, the event, described
as a "Showcase of team work and
Community Involvementwill at-
tract Softball enthusiasts from city,
industrial and church leagues,
women's and mixed, from Wilson
to Cherry Point.
Last year's Marathon attracted
over 40 teams and generated over
$10,000.00 for Easter Seals with
Hamilton Beach, Washington,NC
raising $1,000.00 as top money.
Qualifying teams entering the
Marathon can win a host of awards
including special edition t-shirts,
cases of Miller High Life or Coca-
Cola, plus free refreshments for the
team. The two top teams raising the
most money will receive the
Marathon Award Trophy. Teams
winning their second Marathon
game will also receive trophies.
Other contributing sponsors in-
clude WOOW Radio, Greenville;
WSFL-fm, New Bern; WNCT-TV,
Greenville;and Hot Dog City,
Greenville, which is donating 1200
hot dogs to the cause.
J.C. Penny, Sears (Carolina East
Mall), Bond's Sporting Goods, H.L
Hodges Company and Coca-Cola
have contributed team-level prizes
which can be won by teams in the
event drawing.
Spectators will enjoy the antics of
the Clown Alley Clowns, and music
by EJ Company and the Elbo
Room.
Lonnie Willer's Parachute Team
will open the culmination game by
presenting the game ball from
12,000 feet to the winning team,
Sunday, June 14, 2:30 PM.
Endorsed by the Amateur Soft-
ball Association, the Marathon em-
phasizes Softball for Recreation,
and the game as a means of raising
funds for Easter Seals.
Miller, principal sponsor of the
event, is an operating company of
Phillip Morris Incorporated. Major
beer brands include Miller High
Life, Lite and Lowenbrau.
For more information, contact
Easter Seals, Greenville 758-3230.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds8
Features5
Letters4
Sports7
�i - t ��� �� wimmllmpm





THE EAS1 CAROLINIAN
June 10, 1981
At Least A Year
Garwood's Conviction Upheld
JACKSONVILLE
(UPD � An attorney
for Robert R. Gar-
wood, the Marine ap-
pealing his conviction
on charges of col-
laborating with the Viet
Cong, said Tuesday the
next ruling in the com
plex case is at least a
ear awa
Garwood's convic-
tion and sentence were
uphold Monday by
Maj Gen. David B
Barker, the comman-
ding general of Camp
I eieune � where Gar-
wood's court-martial
was held. The case now
goes on automatic ap-
peal to the a court
of Military Review, a
panei of three senior
Nav or Marine Corps
officers in ashineton.
Vaughan Taylor, one
of Garwood's civilian
attorneys, said the
military provides Gar-
wood with a new
military lawyer for the
appeals process, and it
will take the new lawyer
up to four months to
become acquainted
with the two-year-old
case. It will take
another four months to
prepare the briefs and
several more months
for the military appeals
court to familiarize
itself with the issues,
Taylor said.
"The Garwood trial
in to mv knowledge the
longest court-martial in
American history
Taylor said. And it
will be at least a year
before oral arguments
on the case
A jury of five Marine
Corps officers con-
victed Garwood in
February of col-
laborating with the
enemy and striking an
American prisoner of
war during his almost
14 years behind enemy
lines in Vietnam. He
was not given an active
sentence, but was
reduced in rank to
private and ordered
dishonorably discharg-
ed.
Garwood, a native of
Adams, lnd disap-
peared outside Da
Nang in 1965 and
didn't resurface until
March 1979. when he
approached a foreign
businessman in Hanoi
and asked to return to
the United States.
American POWs ac-
cused him of helping
interrogate and indoc-
trinate prisoners, stan-
ding armed guard and
acting as an interpreter
in a series of jungle
prison camps in Viet
nam.
If the Navy Court of
Military Review
upholds the conviction,
Taylor said the case will
be apealed to the
Military Court of Ap-
peals, a panel of three
civilian judges, and if
necessary, to the U.S.
Supreme Court.
He declined to com-
ment on Barker's deci-
sion to uphold the con-
viction.
"We have always
maintained pursuant to
American Bar Associa-
tion standards the prin-
ciple that we will not
discuss an ongoing
case Taylor said. "It
just isn't appropriate.
The Navy has
scheduled a hearing to
determine Garwood's
status during the years
in Vietnam as part of
his battle for more than
5148,000 in back pay
and interest.
The case will be
heard Sept. 1 at the
U.S. Army Judge Ad-
vocate General's
School in Charlot-
tesville, Va near
where Garwood has
been hospitalized for
psychiatric treatment.
Garwood's at-
torneys, who have filed
suit in the U.S. Court
of Claims for the
money, have contended
Garwood's status dur-
ing his time in Vietnam
was settled when the
judge in his court-
martial dismissed a
charge of desertion.
"There are many
reasons he is entitled to
back pay, and certainly
among them is the fact
he was acquitted of
desertion and being ab-
sent without leave
Taylor said. "Our posi-
tion is that the military
has decided that issue. 1
don't understand why
it isn't clear to anyone
else
Courts historically
have awarded back pay
to a serviceman,
"regardless of any
other allegations or
convictions of miscon-
duct it he was neither
a deserter nor AWOl ,
Taylor said.
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NIGHTTOWN

Three ECU Faculty Members Accept
Administrative Positions This Summer
GREENVILLE- I hree
facultv members in the
! asiarolina I niversi-
t i lleg� ' rts and
Sciences have accepted
M . e far

o:
W ! 1 I
dean
V j
chairperson ol the
Department of I ibrary
Science August 3; and
G a r Richardson,
associate professor of
i tics who
m e s ac t i n g
the
Dep i ?ni
M
ap-
Dr
n e m a 11 c s

Ann . :ing I
n i m e n I
ngelo olpe, dean ol
the 1 c I c ollege of
Vrts and Sciences, said,
' 1 am delighted thai
Professors Farr, Boyce
and Richardson have
laccepted these posi-
tions, and I am looking
forward to working
with them.
"All t hree have
outstanding credentials
in then areas of exper-
tise, and L asi Carolina
Universit) is fortunate
o have individuals ol
such h i g h caliber
assuming these posi-
tions of academic
leadership
A member of ECU'S
1 nglish faculty since
1972, Dr arr previous-
1 taught at Seattle
I niversity . Dunne her
'enure at ECU, she has
been awarded the an-
nual Robert I . Jones
Alumni Award for
Teaching Excellence
and a Da n f o r t h
A ssi vi ateship nom ina-
tion.
She chairs the ECU
Planning Committee's
Subcommission on
cademic Support and
has been active in in her
campus committees
and task forces.
A specialist in
modern drama, Dr.
Farr has degrees from
1 oyaola University.
Purdue University and
the University of
Washington, and has
done field research in
England and Greece.
She has written several
studies and reviews and
has contributed various
annotated
bibliographies to
"English literature in
Transition: 1KN0 1920
a reference work tor
scholars. She is a
native ol Chicago.
Prot. Boyce, who
joined the ECU faculty
in 1959, is a Raleigh
native and a former
resident of Rich
Square. An last
Carolina alumna
(BS.MA) she holds the
Master ol Science
degree in library science
from INC -Chapel Hill
��
Copyright 1981
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i
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 10, 1981
ECU Alumni To Anchor KNBC-TV
GREENVILLE -
John Beard, a 1975
East Carolina Universi-
ty graduate and native
of St.Paul's, has an-
nounced his decision to
accept an offer to
become weekday news
anchor for KNBC-TV,
Los Angeles.
Beard will anchor the
5 PM to 6 PM portion
of a daily two-hour
news broadcast at the
NBC-owned station
which is located in the
nation's second largest
television viewing area.
KNBC's rival station
had also negotiated
with Beard to join its
news team as weekday
reporter and weekend
anchor. Both offers
coincide with the end of
Beard's contract with
his present employer,
WTVB-TV,Buffalo,
N.Y where he has
been anchor for the sta-
tion's 6 PM and 11PM
news programs for the
past four years.
At East Carolina
University, Beard was a
drama and speech ma-
jor with a minor con-
centration in broad
casting. He also work-
ed at a local television
station, WITN-TV,
Washington, where he
was 11PM weekday
news anchor from
1972-76.
Excursion Planned
Minges Traffic Halted
PnotO By ROCMEL ROLAND
A Sign Of The Times
forces students to seek new paths
Continued From Page 1
signs and block off the
yard. He and his room-
mate stopped an at-
tempted assaultrape
two summers ago from
occurring in their yard.
"I heard the girl
screaming while I was
in the house. My room-
mate ran after him but
didn't catch him. It was
in broad daylight. She
decided not to call the
police or anything
Hartsfield explained.
He said he suffered
the worst harassment
after football games
and concerts. "I've
found broken whiskey
bottles on my porch'
after the last two con-
certs held over in
Minges he said.
Hartsfield said he
has also suffered an in-
vasion of privacy
because trespassers
walk so closely by his
house. "1 couldn't
stand in my living room
or kitchen without so-
meone peering in
Actually, the path
way through his yard is
no shorter than walking
the 200 yards directly
from the west end of
Belk Dorm to the
school property where
students andor staff
could cross. Another
alternate route begins
on 10th Street next to
Darryl's Restaurant.
"There's a small
railroad track next to
DarrvU's that comes out
right in front of the
East Carolina Steam
Plant. That's not far at
all.
"I've really tried to
deal with this, but I'm
not going to have it
anymore. The fence
will go up soon and
that should take care of
it for good he said.
GREEN V ILL!
Broadway plays
"Evita" and "Children
of a Lesser God" will
be highlights of East
Carolina University's
second annual New
York City Theatre Ex-
cursion, Oct.8-11.
The four-day trip
will also include visits
to other New York at-
tractions and ample
time for shopping and
sightseeing.
Cost per person is
$455 (double occupan-
cy) which includes
round trip air fare from
Kinston, hotel-airport
transportation, three
evenings' lodging,
tickets for two plays
and tickets for two city
tours.
Registration should
be completed by
August 15 with the Of-
fice of Non-Credit Pro-
grams, Division of
Continuing Education,
ECU, Greenville, N.C.
ECU Management Seminar
Scheduled For June 26
SAAD'S SHOE
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I l 3 GtandV Avr
751228
Quality Repair
The following organizations need to send a representative to
the BUCCANEER office June 11 between 1!00 and 4:00. The
representative will need to be able to identify the members in
their group picture. Any group not identified by June 16 will not
be represented in the yearbook. Please call the BUCCANEER
office at 757-6501 if further information is needed.
GREENV11 I E -
"Increasing Produc-
tivity through Manage-
ment Action an in-
depth seven-hour
seminar designed to
assist managers in im-
proving their firms,
will be offered through
the East Carolina Divi-
sion of Continuing
Education June 26.
Seminar leader will
be Thomas Zimmer,
nationally recognized
lecturer, manager,
author and consultant
to IBM , Motorola.
Burger King and other
firms.
The seminar is in-
tended to help paricipa-
tion business personnel
employ strategic
management techni-
ques, set meaningful
objectives that lead to
success, develop action
plans and examine their
respective forms' ob-
jectives effectively.
Organized as a work-
ing seminar rather than
a lecturem, the pro-
gram is particularly
helpful for teams of
employees who can
work togethe: in
developing plans for
improving productivi-
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developed for the
firmhe said.
Further information
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To be directed by
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Continuing Educa-
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Further information
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Office of Non-Credit
Programs, Division of
Continuing Education,
ECU, Greenville, N.C.
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Stic iEast (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, mmmam
Jimmy Dupree, ,�� t-ju
Chuck Foster, am�, Adven Deborah Hotaling, mm wur
Chris Lichok, ���� Ma��rr William Yelverton ����
Alison Bartel, pr��cno �����' Steve Bachner, nmmmimm
June 10, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Student Wages
Board To Decide Paper's Future
While the Student Government
Association has taken a turn from
the pseudo-political organization it
once was and become a financial
revolving door, the ECU Media
Board has taken over pursuit of the
campus newspaper through
monetary control.
It is doubtful that this editorial
will benefit The East Carolinian.
But then, we don't really care. The
decisions made at today's meeting
will not only attempt to compensate
for what some conceive to be in-
justices of the past, but will also
punish future employees for matters
over which they had no control.
Certain campus factions have
long been opposed to the idea of
staff members of a student publica-
tion being paid for their services.
Recent opposition to the salary
structure of The East Carolinian led
to "tenative" approval of the
paper's 1981-82 budget with the
stipulation that student wages be
discussed at a later date.
In the early- and mid-1970s the
SGA made a habit of attempting to
control the content of the student
newspaper, then called Foun-
tainhead, by threatening to
withhold funds necessary for its
operation. Stories concerning ques-
tionable practices of certain
legislators were greeted with opposi-
tion to line-item transfers; stories
critical of university administration
solicited court proceedings, etc
etc etc.
Perhaps the height of petty antics
was reached when a requisition for
repairs to typesetting machine was
delayed because an aggravated
legislator refused to sign it. Only the
use of typewriters by enterprising
staff members made it possible for
the Fountainhead to continue
publication.
With the idea of putting an end to
such haggling, the board of trustees
created the Media Board in January
IFWaWtWL
NCURKOe
QJOWOJIL
SEE.
1978. The original Media Board was
comprised of "friends" of the
newspaper, making it appear to be a
"Land of Oz" solution to a com-
plex problem: freedom of the press.
This means not only freedom to
print anything newsworthy and fac-
tual, but also freedom from con-
straints placed on The East Caroli-
nian in recent years by represen-
tatives of various campus interest
groups. These representatives now
wish to dissect a salary structure
which was based on 1979 budget
figures. It doesn't take an
economist to realize the bite of in-
flation over the past two years.
Emplyees of The East Carolinian
earn an average of about $2.25 per
hour. How many students apply for
jobs with that pay? Damn few!
With this in mind, the Media
Board in its infinite wisdom decides
not only to refuse increases but also
to hack away at the already
established salaries.
The East Carolinian has gone
through a whirlwind of change dur-
ing the years which included the in-
stallation of "state-of-the-art"
typesetting equipment, modern
page layout and the evolution of an
advertising department capable of
generating 75 percent of the funds
necessary for the paper's operation.
With concentrated efforts, the
newspaper could eventually become
self-supporting, not independent,
but self-supporting. Without incen-
tives � monetary incentives � this
will never happen. More and more
student fees will be needed to con-
tinue operation, and the present
system of media allocations cannot
withstand that demand.
The time is now for the Media
Board to recognize that The East
Carolinian is making strides toward
becoming financially self-sufficient
and to have the good sense not to in-
terfere with this progress.
wqmmwwwM3Br
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Uetler
HELLO.MR.BEGIN?THIS IS THE CITIZENS' ACTION
COMMITTEE OF HARRISBURG.PA. UET LIKE TO
HIRE yOUR AGENTS FOR A LITTLE JOB HERE!
Education Or Expediency?
By JANE DODGE
In response to the letter last week com-
plaining that students' advisers seem more
concerned with helping a student finish
their degree as quickly as possible, rather
than the students' getting an education,
there is another side of the question to con-
sider.
There are many students attending ECU
on a part-time or full-time basis while
working in a "regular" job. These
students have families or simply do not
have the good fortune to be subsidized by
parents or other benefactors. So their ob-
jective is to complete the necessary degree
requirements as quickly as possible, with
the objective of obtaining a job better
suited to their interests and abilities,
perhaps. Hopefully, also, a job whereby
they can better support themselves and
their families.
The administration of ECU has made a
concerted effort to make many courses and
degree programs available to the working
person on the campus itself and through its
continuing education programs at Camp
Lejeune, Cherry Point, Fayetteville,
Goldsboro and elsewhere. The administra-
tion and faculty should be commended for
continuing this broad and successful ef-
fort.
I, for one, would relish the luxury of be-
ing able to take courses for my own educa-
tional edification, such as in art, music, or
history. But I have a family to consider, so
these courses will have to continue to be
self-study or to wait until a later time.
It would be wonderful to have the luxury
of taking interest courses, and I urge those
of you who are financially able to take
them to do so.
But, on the other hand, do not condes-
cend to those who must complete their
degree programs as quickly as possible
because of individual circumstances.
The objective of a university is to help to
educate, but to do so toward a specific
goal, with a definite purpose in mind. The
student is the one to determine his in-
dividual goal. So it is up to him to decide
which courses to take, to use his adviser as
a resource person. The student must tell
the adviser what his goals are, so that the
adviser can make the appropriate recom-
mendation. Hopefully, education and ex-
pediency can be combined and both goaK
met for the student.
r-Campus Forum
Loan Suspension Supported
Having read the front page story,
"Outstanding Loans Cause System's
Suspension in the June 3 issue of The
East Carolinian and having heard
discussions on campus, I feel compelled
to ask some questions which 1 believe are
important issues in this matter.
First, however, I would like to state
that I fully support the action of the
SGA executives (Lester Nail and Marvin
Braxton) in suspending the student loan
fund. I further believe that this fund
should not be reinstated.
Many students pay tuition and fees us-
ing state or federal money in the form of
education grants, VA basic eligibility
grants and other public funds. In
essence, the taxpayer's money is being
used. 1 feel that it is incumbent for all
government officials (including student
government) to ensure that public funds
are used in only efficient and worthwhile
enterprises.
I have no direct facts to draw on, but
my suspicions tell me that these so-called
$25 emergencies are little more than
cases of student mismanagement. I have
also heard accounts of the Medical
Emergency Fund being used largely to
fund abortions for students. I certainly
do not intend to provide money for cash
loans and abortions when I pay my fees
to the university.
I further suspect that the general tax-
payers who provide, the funds used by
the VA and other support organizations
do not intend for their money to be used
in these manners.
Before I could support any reinstate
ment of the student loan fund, I would
like to view the findings of the state
auditor concerning such issues as fun-
damental legality, protection against
default, collateral for loans and other
similar related issues.
Would it not be a greater service to
reduce the amount of fees to all students
(however slight the reduction might be)
than to provide a convenience which on-
ly reaches a few?
JAMES F. NEL SON
Senior,
Business Administration
to
I am writing in reference to The East
Carolinian editorial of June 3, concern-
ing the SGA loan fund.
President Lester Nail and Vice Presi-
dent Marvin Braxton are to be com-
mended for their courageous action on
deciding to suspend the SGA loan fund.
The intention of the decision was to sus-
pend the loan fund temporarily and
allow the legislature to formulate an ac-
ceptable program in the fall. The deci-
sion and resulting effect have several ad-
vantages:
�sound management decision in terms
of reducing inefficiency
�allows for a re-evaluation of the pro-
gram
�allows for a continued effort to col-
lect outstanding loans
�provides time for consultation
draw up new operating guidelines
�precludes any future loss by stopping
the outflow of monev
The suspension is a more attractive
alternative than the complacent and
laissez-faire attitude that your editorial
suggests. The editorial was also critical
of Mr. Nail nd Mr. Braxton, claiming
that they were inexperienced and lacked
sentimental attachment to the program
both of which might have clouded their
judgement.
Often times it is necessary for our
leaders to take a responsible and objec-
tive view of a situation and divorce
themselves of emotion which may in-
terfere with a logical decision. Mr. Nail
and Mr. Braxton are concerned and sen-
sitive to the needs of students and out of
this concern the decision was made.
The decision was based on sound
economic and management principles
and provides the necessary time to create
a new and better program. In the mean
time the potential losses have been stop-
ped and continued progress can be made
to collect the outstanding loans. The dif-
ficult decision, contrary to "an old Yid-
dish saying will result in better effi-
ciency and be in the best interests of all
students.
GARY R. WILLIAMS
Senior, Finance
2
P
Vill
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Modern Baseball Players Face Familiar Arbitration Matters
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
As baseball fans gnaw their nails and
wonder whether the boys of summer will
take a powder this season or next, it may
be worth recalling that this has all happen-
ed before � and then some. Back in 1890,
major league baseball players not only
walked out, they went a giant step further:
they formed their own league. Called,
naturally, the Players' League.
The rhubarb between athletes and
owners nearly a century ago was strikingly
similar to today's conflict in some respects,
quite different in others. Unlike today's
stars, who earn several thousand dollars a
game at the peak of their short careers, top
players in the 1880s bumped up against a
ceiling of only $2,500 a season. To add in-
sult to injury, players' salaries were deter-
mined according to a classification plan
that took into account not only their on-
field performances but their behavior out-
of-uniform � thus tying their ability to
make a living to a moral code imposed by
club owners.
Like today's ballplayers � who have
demanded to see the owners' books to
check their claim that player salaries are
breaking them � yesterday's heroes
suspected the sporting magnates of holding
out on them. And, like most of today's
major leagers, 19th century players were
bound by a reserve clause, specifying that a
player must perform indefinitely for the
team that signed him, until he retired or
the team let him go. That prevented
players from shopping around for employ-
ment, as workers in nearly every other
business did, and do.
The reserve clause has since been
modified. Now, after six years of work for
one club, players can become free agents
and sell their labor to the highest bidder.
This has raised salaries dramatically for
some players, but owners complain that it
is costing them their shirts. Hence, they are
demanding greater compensation when a
player jumps to another team. The players
retort that this would make teams reluctant
to sign free agents. As a result, they have
threatened to strike.
Major leaguers of 90 years ago,
frustrated by their lack of power in the
established National League and the
fledgling American Association, did
something at once more desperate and
more imaginative when they founded the
Players' League. They attempted to fun-
damentally change baseball as a business,
replacing traditional autocracy with a
heady brand of democracy.
Instead of being run flat-out by club
owners, for example, the PL was governed
by a "senate Half of its members were
chosen by the players and half by finan-
ciers who backed the new league. The
hated reserve clause was done away with
entirely. Salaries remained low, as the
league struggled to get off the ground, but
players were encouraged to buy inexpen-
sive stock in the new teams, and many did.
One thing the Players' League did not
challenge was racism in organized
baseball. Like the National League and the
American Association, the PL was all-
white. There had been some 20 black
players in the early 1880s, actually, but a
campaign headed by one Cap Anson, a
white star of the day, drove black players
from the diamond. It would be 60-odd
years until the Brooklyn Dodgers signed
Jackie Robinson, often mistakenly believ-
ed to be the first black major leaguer.
The great baseball rebellion had several
things going for it. First, the PL attracted
most of the top players from the older
leagues, including Charlie Comiskey, later
the owner of the Chicago Cubs, and Con-
nie Mack, the future manager. (One of the
few stars who didn't join the players'
rebellion was Cap Anson.) Second, the PL
was seen by the fans as new and exciting.
Finally, PL teams frequently played in
spanking-new or attractively remodeled
parks. The league fielded eight teams,
competing head-to-head with established
clubs in six Eastern and Midwestern cities.
There were serious obstacles to the new
circuit's success, however. The league was
undercapitalized, and the press reception
to the experiment in diamond democracy
was often hostile. Some newspapers refus-
ed to print the scores of PL games.
t
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MN
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to take
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SD�
The
m-
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must tell
the
i
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Ked
gram
� A t hei r
and ob
divorce
ich may m-
n Mr Nail
led and sen-
ts and out of
is made.
Mi sound
It principles
jme to create
the mean-
Je been stop-
lean be made
ins. The dif-
t'an old Yid-
better effi-
Iterests of all
IW II I IAMS
finance
le PL attracted
from the older
'omiskey, later
tubs, and Con-
ner. (One of the
n the players'
?cond, the PL
and exciting
Intly played in
felv remodeled
eight teams,
h'h established
(western cities.
ides to the new
he league was
press reception
md democracy
spapers refus-
igames.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 10. 1981
Bucs Rally To Win Opener, 7-6
Another Pirate run scores.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
NporU K4ilor
If last Sunday's opening of the
North State Summer Baseball
League is any indication of the
things to come, then hold on to your
hats folks, because it's going to be a
wild season.
The Pirates of East Carolina,
down by two runs in the last of the
seventh, and 6-0 at one point, rallied
for three runs to nip the SeaHawks
of the University of North Carolina-
Wilmington in Raleigh.
"This was a very big win for us
said Coach Gary Overton.
"Wilmington is supposed to be the
best team in the league, and we
wanted them very bad
The Bucs' winning run actually
came on a play you won't see most
every day. With the game tied 6-6,
Robert Wells missed the squeeze
sign, and Charlie Smith was thrown
out at the plate. However, Wells
stepped back in and calmly drilled a
single down the first base line to
score catcher Jack Curlings.
"We just didn't execute Over-
ton said of the unsuccessful play.
"We were able, to advance the run-
ner though
Wilmington jumped out to a 4-0
lead in the third inning on four hits
and a walk, keyed by a two-run
single by Tom Jones.
That lead was upped to 6-0 in the
fifth when singles by Tim
Whitehurst and Paul Murr, along
with a Pirate error, produced two
runs.
In the bottom half of the fifth,
the Pirates came alive by scoring
fours runs on four hits and three
walks, knocking out Wilmington
starter Mike Antle. Greenville
native Mark Shank drove in the first
run with a double. Singles by short-
stop Pete Persico and first baseman
Todd Evans closed the gap to 6-3.
Smith drew a bases-loaded walk
to cut the Pirate's deficit to two,
6-4.
More dramatics came in the
Pirate half of the seventh. After
scoring one run on a wild pitch,
Curlings, a transfer from Guilford,
drove in Todd Hendley to tie the
game at 6-6. Wells them came
through with a two-out single to
drive in Curlings for the win.
Robbie Harper picked up the
opening win for the Pirates by
allowing no Wilmington hits or runs
for two and two-thirds innings. He
struck out two.
Donnie Walker took the loss for
the SeaHawks.
Persico was the offensive star for
the Pirates, going three-for-four
and knocking in a run. Shank added
two hits.
W :Imington was lead by
Whitehead, Murr and Slaughter,
each collecting two hits.
Overtoil was impressed by the
Pirate win, "Our felt side ol the in-
field was outstanding, especially
Persico Overton said. "Charlie
Smith also showed us he cai pitch
Smith allowed one run in one and a
third innings.
The Pirate skipper was also pleas-
ed with the showing of the
newcomer, c urlings. "Jack showed
us a good arm, something we
haven't seen since Raymie Styons
left he said.
In Sunday's second game, the Tar
Heels of North Carolina held ol a
N.C� State rally in the bottom of the
seventh to win anothei cl tme
6-5.
State, trailing h five runs enter-
ing the last inning, closed the gap to
one and had the eventual 'vine run
on third when North Carolina extin-
quished the rally.
The Pirates, 1-0, now look tor-
ward to hosting die I ar Heels at
Harrington field tonighl at 7:30.
Friday, the Pirates travel to
Raleigh for a game with State.
then they take on Wilmington in a
double-header, beginning at 6 p.m
at Harrington Saturday, eveninj
Pirates Might Have Discovered Gold
in
By VMl 1 I AM YEI VERTON
head football Coach Ld
. Villinova's loss is hopefully
Jed to drop football
its athletic program a few
player transfer-
. ools are eligible to
I this fall.
,iu eaught the
ick Kevin ln-
tck Milt Corsey,
Rogers and kicking
BwMibeck.
g to a source close to the
these players have
immitted to play football
na next season.
I - emains optimistic about
ming the players. "It takes a new
hree to tour ears to work
h's personnel he
"Mosl ol the personnel we
. did not play for Dye
. h). These four young
en played at a major Division 1
People like this can help us in cer-
in are s
irteroack ingram could De a
the Pirates. The 5-11,
ill be a sophomore
next fall, so he will have three years
of eligibility left.
Ingram has been offered over 90
grants, including ones from
Oklahoma and Tennessee. He at-
tended Dobbins Tech High School
in Philadelphia where he rushed for
1.000 yards and passed for another
847 his senior year. He was named
Public League Athlete of the
Decade by the Philadelphia Daily
News.
The important thing about In-
gram is that he's a wishbone
quarterback. Villinova coaches
learned the wishbone from former
Pirate coach Pat Dye.
Playing behind a senior last
season, Ingram did not have im-
pressive statistics, although some
were misleading. His attempted 31
passes, completed 15 for 235 yards
and threw two interceptions, for a
48.4 percent completion rate.
According to Villinova Sports In-
formation Director Craig Miller, In-
gram was effective when he saw ac-
tion. Describing him as "really,
really quick Miller pointed out
that Villinova got off to an 0-3 start,
but with Ingram inserted at quarter-
back, finished the season at 6-5.
Ingram lead his team to an im-
pressive 20-9 win over Boston Col-
lege. The young quarterback was
roughed up against Navy, and the
Villinova coaching stall rotated
quarterbacks the rest o the season.
Ingram carried the ball 66 times
tor 32 yards. Miller said, but
pointed out that the youngster was
sacked a number of times
Kicking specialist Chuck
Bushbeck would be a valuable addi-
tion to a kicking game that was
leveled by graduation. Bushbeck,
with one year o eligibility remain-
ing, ran up impressive credintials at
Villinova. He kicked 62-67 extra
points and 27 out of 42 field goals.
Last season, he was 9-13 in the field
goal department, including one
48-varder.
Miller said Bushbeck was "great
on kickoffs, very consistent
Villinova's kicking game was con-
sidered to be one of the best in the
country last season. The punter has
signed to play football at the
University of Florida.
Emory said that Bushbeck would
be a very welcome addition because
"our young kickers are not ready
yet. He would definitely help
Bushbeck would have been pro-
moted as an All-American can-
didate this fall.
With Jeffrey Warren lost to
graduation, linebacker Jerry Rogers
would be a big help, Emory said.
The 6-2, 220 pounder is a transfer
from Maryland but did not see ac-
tion last season because of the
sitting-out period. He will have two
year of eligibility left.
Running back Milt Corsey is con-
sidered to be one of the fastest
Villinova backs. He carried the ball
nine times for 35 yards last season,
and is described by Miller as "very
quick He will
have two years of eligibility left.
Emory remains cautious concern-
ing the possibility of these players
coming to East Carolina. "These
players would add a great deal of ex-
perience to our team he said. "We
feel good about the possibility of
them coming to play for us
The pirate coach said two
members of his staff are going to
Philadelphia this weekend to talk
with Ingram.
Take Me Out To The Picket Line
Baseball talks are at a stand still.
A summer without baseball is '
likewell, a summer without
baseball. And that is exactly what
fans will be facing unless the players
and owners iron out their dif-
ferences.
The strike has been in the news
for weeks, even months, and the
average baseball fan probably does
hot understand how complex the
problem is. Here is an attempt to
clarify the situation.
The Major League Baseball
Players Association (MLBPA) set a
May 29 strike deadline, which was
averted, in its continuing dispute
with the owners over what further
restrictions, if any, should be placed
on a free agent's ability to negotiate
with the teams he chooses.
Since 1976, the MLBPA has ac-
cepted two limitations on its
members' freedom to sell
themselves:
First,only a player with six years of
major league experience can become
a free agent.
Second, a team signing one of these
free agents must compensate that
player's former team with a draft
choice.
The owners want this last clause
changed. Instead of a draft pick as a
form of compensation, they want an
active player from his former team.
A "ranking" player, that is.
This new demand is a touchy
situation with the players. They
William
Yelverton
know that this would make most
teams think twice about signing free
agents, so they have rejected this
proposal.
The players have filed an unfair
labor practice charge against the
owners. So, this is where the Na-
tional Labor Relations Board
(NLRB) comes in.
The NLRB has asked for an in-
junction that could delay for one
year the threatened strike. The in-
junction would have delayed for one
year implementation of the free-
agent compensation issue.
Monday, Federal Judge Henry
Werker said he will rule later this
week on the board's request. If he
grants the injunction, the strike will
be averted. However, if he refuses
it, Marvin Miller, executive director
of the MLBPA, says the players will
strike within 48 hours of the ruling.
The NLRB filed the charge of un-
fair labor practices against the
owners because of accusations that
the club bosses have not bargained
in good faith.
The injunction seeks to further
postpone the strike deadline.
It is very hard to determine which
party is right, almost impossible.
The owners, by paying these
escalating salaries, are partly to
blame, as are the players, who are
demanding more money than they
are worth.
However, the players do have a
point. Baseball is their job, so
what's wrong with them selling
themselves on the job market?
The average major-league salary
is about $130,000. Not bad, con-
sidering the average salary for
players in the 1940s was about
$9,000.
The owners will go as far as they
have to in building their team's
public appeal. The fans want winn-
ners, which means quality players,
which equals more people coming to
the ballpark. All of the factors equal
one thing: revenue.
Just how far the owners will go
was depicted when George Stein-
brenner signed former Padre Dave
Winfield to a whopping $23 million
contract. Winfield is a quality
player. The question remains,
however, is anyone worth that
amount of money?
Steinbrenner has been successful
in luring free agent to the Big Apple.
And these players, such as Reggie
Jackson, Jimmy Hunter and Bucky
Dent have helped bring a champion-
ship to New York.
Other owners, Gene Autrey of
California for example, have failed
miserably when it comes to selecting
the right players in free-agent draft
to help their team win a champion-
ship.
Autrey signed Don Baylor. Joe
Rudi and Bobby Grich to million-
dollar contracts, and what did it br-
ing him? One division title, that
coming in 1979.
One owner, Minnesota's Calvin
Griffith, has refused to pay such
high salaries.However, there has
been one exception; he signed short-
stop Roy Smalley to a large contract
last year. Where has his stern stance
gotten him? Well, as of now, the
Twins are 15-38, and in the cellar of
the American League West.
Griffith has also lost a number of
quality players to the free-agent
market, such as Rod Carew, Larry
Hisle, Dan Ford and the late Lyman
Bostock.
The owners may be right; the
players may be right. Who knows?-
There is one thing clear, though. If
the owners keep paying these high
salaries, that mean the price of a
ticket to a major league game will go
up. And that means the fans are the
biggest losers.





IHtt AST CAROLINIAN
JUNE 10, 1981

T
I
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o Q o o Q Q o o oo ' � � Q OQQQ
p
o
The "Super (irit" logo garnishes the cover of their latest album.
New Super Grit
Album Is Here
C oiiiinued from page 5
di nuke it slow I'm always ready
lo rock and roll And indeed,
whether fast or slow, country or
rock, or a stylistic blending of the
musical lexicon (There's no disco in
his dictionary!), Super Grit pulls it
and pulls it off with a lyrical
and instrumental clarity, equally
complemented by skillful produc-
tion and engineering expertise.
Band member Clyde Mattocks
directed the production, and Mega
Studios' Richard Royall and Bernie
Petteway supplied flawless engineer-
ing; and except for the final master-
ing in Nashville, "If You Can't
Hang is a total North Carolina
production. Hoodswamp Records is
Super Grit's own label, Mega
Studios is in Bailey, and the
photography, art and layout were
all done by North Carolina artists.
it's somewhat surprising and cer-
tainlj refreshing to have a local pro-
duct that can easily compete with
��mega-studios" in Ne York.
1 os Angeles or Nashville.
During nn first listening. I had
expected al least occasional flatness
in performance and some uneven
production, which seemed to be in-
digenous to North Carolina produc-
ed records; but from the opening
crisp chords of "Reads to Rock and
Roll
melodic introduction to
Clyde Mattocks's closing "Amie's
Dog a bouncy instrumental
bluegrass number featuring Clyde
on dobro, banjo and guitar, with
c saucy mandolin accompani-
� by guest artist Dale Reno, I
found little, if anything to complain
about.
Compliments first: On both sides
oi the album the sequencing perfect-
ly balances the shifts in tempo, so
that it's impossible on first listening
to predict what may come next. And
on successive hearings, the tempo
shifts become more fully ap-
preciated as the broad range of
Super Gut's repertoire sinks in.
The opening, country dusted
number is followed by symphony
trained Mike Kenzie and Woody
1
on s
'Loe for Strife.
Evidence ol Mike's early training in
violin at the ECU School of Music
dnA later enthusiasm for the
bluegrass fiddle culminate in a head
jerking, rapid tire finish.
Mike not only plays all the fiddle
and string parts on the album, but
also plays harmonica, sax, piano,
and acoustic guitar. The other
players in Super Grit are Clyde Mat-
tocks, pedal steel, banjo, dobro and
electric guitar; Bill Ellis, bass and
keyboards; Danny Vinson , drums
and percussion; and Curtis Wright
on lead guitar. All numbers on the
record, except "Semi Diesel Blues
a downright country fun tune by
Jerry Dunbar, with Mattocks sing-
ing lead and prancing about equally
well on dobro, pedal steel and
guitar, were written by current or
former band members; they all sing
and take turns at lead vocals.
For those of you who know Super
Grit, the variety of tunes on this
album should come as no surprise-
it can only serve, with the added
clarity of excellent studio condi-
tions, to heighten this awareness;
for those of you who don't, and
have a tendency to shy away from a
"country" sound, two soft rock
tempoed love songs should provide
the clincherCan't Play for Real
written by Bill Ellis and Pam Green,
and "Sweet Lady by ex Grit Dana
Belser and sung by Curtis Wright,
combine vocal and instrumental
harmonies and a crystalized lyrical
sincerity reaffirmed by Belser's
winged lead guitar into what this
listener experienced as gooseflesh.
This should happen to both
categories of listeners.
Two numbers, "If You Don't
Know Me By Now" and "This Ol'
Highway are scheduled for a na-
tional airplav release as a single on
June 15. "If You Don't the
A-side, spotlights practically every
aspect of Super Grit's talent: a rock
steady rhythm section led by drum-
mer Danny Vinson lets a variety ol
instrumental breaks ride betweer
the lead vocal and three part har
mony chorus. I hesitate to classify
this in one regimented category: it
part bluegrass, part country, par
rock, part roll. You'd better cal
this one.
Curtis Wright takes the vocal leat
on "This Ol' Highway the B-side
Simpler to nail down, this numbe
piston-pumps out that good ol
country rock and roll.
As for complaints-I guess there
aren't any. We each pick our
favorites and certainly I'm no dif-
ferent. Overall, what we have is a
masterful new Super Grit Cowboy
Band album certain to bring the at-
tention hard work and talent
deserve. If you're wondering what
the ellipsis following the cover title
stands for just turn the album over
or, better yet, listen to Curtis sing,
"If you can't hang Drag your
country ass home Agreed!
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o1
Emerges as both a wonderful love story and convincing portrayal of onej$
woman s life.
VARIETY
unit mi
O
o
DATE Monday, June 15 TIME 9:00 PM-
PLACE Mendenhall
ADMISSION JD, etc
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3
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nnnoQOOOOOOOOOQOOQOOOQOQ'oooocOSU(J u (
Graduation Jitters Bring On
Doubts A bout Career Goals
Continued from page 5
Margolis also took on "the real
world" versus the school scene.
"1 have a few bones to pick about
that phrase 'the real world he
said. "By using those words one
reinforces the idea that school is a
dit ferent kind of world.
"I think that is a disservice to
what happens in high school or col-
lege. Tasks of education are basical-
ly the tasks of adult life. They are
real tasks, even through not per-
formed on the job.
"The tasks include meeting com-
mitments, forming relationships
and developing personal and in-
tellectual skills.
"When we say things are dif-
ferent in the real world, we discount
skills learned in school and do not
recognize academic achievements as
real.
"I would encourage parents and
graduates and prospective
employers to recognize that the
tasks of school are tasks of adult
live. The 'real world' is not totally
different from school
On the graduation, the actual
ceremony and time of celebration,
Margolis said most focus is on the
exciting emotions. But it is impor-
tant to own up to the sadness � the
other part of the "mixed emotions"
accompanying the graduation
ritual.
"In making the transition, we
acknowledge and review the past;
we let its memories, feelings and im-
ages accumulate in us, while we
simultaneously anticipate the
future he said.
We join past and future in a mo-
ment of the present � graduation
� where we structure our goodbyes.
"Even with the ritual, strong feel-
ings of sadness, love and relief sur-
face. They need and demand our at-
tention.
"As at other moments of great
transition we surround ourselves
with family and ceremony
Another aspect of graduation is
what it means for the family of the
graduate.
"It is a time of development of in-
dependence, of growing away from
one's family Margolis said.
"There are two juncture points �
from 18 to 22, and from 22 to 26 or
later.
"One's reliance on one's family
changes. But, again, it is not as if
the graduate didn't need family
altogether. It is a transition that
may span years.
"Families are needed for certain
things.
"Graduation is a part of the
gradual process of becoming in-
dependent.
"And as adolescents become
adults it is important for parents,
also in the process of letting go � of
child-rearing responsibilities � to
refocus on their own lives
Congratulations, graduates; hap-
py transition!
PIRATE BASEBALL
Tonight at 7 p.m. � Harrington Field, ECU
ECU vs. UNC
Pirates �
1980 NCAA
Tourney
Participant
Tar Heels -
Preseason
ACC title
Pick
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
JUNE 10. 1981 Pa�e7
Bustin' Loose
Overdose Of Sweetness
Sinks New Prvor Film
JOHN WEYLER
Staff Writer
�Bustin' Loose now playing at the Buccaneer
theatre in Greenville, is a case study in cinematic
schizophrenia. Half the film is typical Richard Pryor,
profane, fast and funny. The other half is, believe it or
not, typical Walt Disney, so sickeningly sweet as to pose
a danger to diabetics in the audience.
Prvor, in his vulgar, funky fashion, is one of the fun-
niest and most powerful performers around today.
"Bustin' Loose" begins in true Pryor tradition, with
him plaving an inept ex-con bungling a heist.
Caught, he is shanghied by his parole officer into do-
me penance for his sins by driving a group of problem
children and their teacher cross-country in a decrepit
bus The teacher, played by Cicely Tyson, has a dream
of raising these unwanted children on her relatives farm
in Washington state.
Cinema
Once the above plotline is established, one knows ex-
actly how the storv ends (so bear w.th me for revealing it
here) After a series of comical mishaps on the road,
the make it to the farm, the kids have a good time,
Pryor and Tyson fall in love, and a general happy en-
dine is had by all. . ,
The fact that the plot is so predictable is not so bad.
most movies are that way. The problem is that about
two thuds of the way through the picture, the bus and
all it's occupants take a wrong turn into a swamp ot
sugary syrup.
The happy ending is too happy; the scenes where
Pryor tries to help the kids with their problems (one is
blind one a pyromaniac, one a nymphomaniac
etcetera) come off forced and foolish, the soundtrack
music becomes too trite and cloying.
A subplot introduced toward the film's end serves as
a summary of the mood of the entire movie. The
subplot starts out amusingly with Pryor posing as a rube
to rip off money from a crooked investment operation.
The sequence quickly degenerates into an
unimaginative, unfunny chase scene, done with all the
style and polish of a bad TV movie.
Still the film does have some good moments, i ne
robbery scenes at the beginning, where Pryor is allowed
to operate in his natural milieu, are genuinely tunny.
The interactions between he and the kids, in the
scenes not supposed to be "sensitive" and "moving
are amusing. The film only really falters when it tries to
out-Disney Disney.
Whv did Prvor, who produced and co-wrote
"Bustin' Loose make such a mess of a movie? One
would suspect he was trying to appeal to the child and
family audiences (though 1 don't believe kids like the
tvoical sugar-coated entertainment that is thrust upon
them: they'd also rather see the usual unencumbered
'However, due to the profanity in the film, it's
R-rated, so kids can't see it anyway. Whether Pryor or
director Oz Scott was to blame for the overly-sweet
parts, someone should have taken charge and called in a
cinema psychologist to treat the film's schizophrenic
tendencies. . . .
Unfortunately, "Bustin' Loose" is on an equal scale
with most of the motion pictures currently being ottered
audiences. It is suggested that if one wants to have an
eniovable, entertaining time at the movies, one should
go see "Bustin' Loose" and leave about two-thirds ot
the way through.
A t,m. Richard Prvor stars in "Bustin' Loo currently PW �' '�� ��" T�5
Mixed
Graduating from high school or
college brings more than diploma.
parties, dances, and a plunge into
"the real world
Graduation evokes mixed feelings
joy, sadness, says Dr. Gary
Margolis. Graduates who unders-
� and"that will will suffer less from
separation trauma" as they cut the
old school ties, he claims.
It will help, too, if graduates
recognize that commencement does
not mean one door slams and others
open all at once, said Margolis. He
is director of counseling at Mid-
dleburv College in Middlebury, Vt.
Elaborating on a report on the
subject in the school's magazine,
"Middleburv" and in "The Journal
of College Health Margolis said
graduation is part of the gradual
transition to full adulthood. There
are stages � from high school to
work, from high school to college,
from college to work, from college
to graduate school, from graduate
school to work.
The main transition periods are
from 18 to 22. from 22 to 26, from
26 to 30, according to Margolis. No
one, he guarantees, ever gets to
where he or she intends to be all at
once.
"It is important to recognize dur-
ing all those post-school periods, in
eluding the one from 26 to 30, that
most are in the process of ex-
perimentation and growth � which
requires a good degree of flexibility
toward decisions he said.
No one, Margolis said, should ex-
pect to go straight as an arrow to a
career goal. Changing course, a bit
of meandering, probably is in the
cards for most heading out.
As a result, Margolis said
graduates who keep flexible will en-
counter less turbulence in the transi-
tion that, for most, will span years.
Margolis said that goes for all
kinds of graduates. This season the
numbers include:
�2.2 million graduating from
high school and on their way to the
work world.
� 1.3 million coming out of high
school and headed for college.
� 1.3 million coming out of col-
lege and set for jobs or � more col-
lege.
See GRADUATION, page 6
Whether In Lines Or At Home
Waiting Will D
� Little Big Man' At Hendrix Tonight
��! iitip Rio Man" tonight at 9 p.m. in
Spacek in "Coal Miner's Daughter
Hot
By DAVID NORRIS
wMini Jenlurrs tdltor
"Ifs the wailing .ha. ge.s you, kid Th.s cliche, repealed in hundreds
of movies wi.h characters waiting nervously for anything from an
Anache raid"to a grand jury verdict, has its signiftcance in everyday life
aTwell wing patiently ,s an ar, that Amencans, ,f no. everyone, have
here aretwo main kinds of waiting. One is waiting forever in boring
ofHces or Itnes lending to boring offices, and .he o.he, involves gotng
�K2 SK5M saw. ff�ffi�
n&SSsft sss or aatsrKSSs;
moTbortng'lacer bud, The onlyer�;avadabk :n�g
either reading battered and uninteresting magazines, or watching
VeThrpCwas a barber shop near where 1 grew up that had bunches of
comubook to read whilewaiting for a haircut. 1 didn't mindwaitinjta
ong time there, since 1 got to read lots of XttoXk
a nice thine about waiting in an office is that you get to sit down
(unless U' a rLFcheap office8 and they make you stand up.) Waning in
hnes is much worse, and will be until they make lines with chairs.
SomeUmes'have felt like my life was just waiting ,n one never-ending
ImeTwould get out of all the drop-add lines in order to get a me at the
grocery store fheck-out counter. After that I'd wait at ����
buy some stamps. A wait in line at the bank would come after that.
U�UMt jsoviTCougfegTHCHW'AMll
Finally, when it was time to relax, I would go stand in line to get into a
"waiting in lines can get pretty dull and uncomfortable but waitingrat
home is not reallv much better. The main difference is that at home,
pass the time by starling to clean up my room. If I get s.oocupand
teeth laaino try reading a book. After three pages, 1 usually put the
book down and try .0 hold my interest some other way, such as p.ay.ng
iMplay .wo or more albums, 1 s.ar, ,o ge .he W�"�5�
be stood up. This calls for despera.e measures; luckily, .here are a few
somewhat sure-fire ways of getting tardy friends to show up
One way is to star, watching a good, but long, movie on TV. As soon
as?get wrapped up enough in the movie to wan. to s.ay ,n and wa.ch
whoever I'm waiting for will show up. �r�nrt
in'm waiting to go out and eat with people who are late. I can pretend
to gwe up wSg and start to fix some food. This usually brings them in
PTthink Everyone knows that if they are waiting for a phone call, the
have to k on waiting. This ,s not. by any means fun. but at least it
keeps one well-fed and clean.
Album Arrives
By RICHARD NEWBY
Staff Wrttar
Whatever expectations a new
listener to the Super Grit Cowboy
Band may have, or preconceptions
that arise from a cover depicting a
mustachioed cowboy struggling
with a reluctant burro� just forget
'em. Unlike many outlaw country
bands who� like the skittish, stub-
born burro� wear blinders to keep
them on a narrow musical path, the
eleven numbers on Super Grit's "If
You Can't Hang released in
May deftly and freely range the
backroads and super-highways,
swamps and deserts of straight rock,
country rock, outlaw country and
bluegrass, and a slick soft rock
highlighted with rhythm and blues.
Perhaps a few lines from the title
track, "Ready to Rock and Roll
may succinctly illustrate their
musical philosophy: "Make it fast
See NEW, page 6
ffi�ntJ HE hi �
'�v.
JVn4 IQ
v
M





8 THfe FAST CAROLINIAN JUNt 10, 1981
Bennet Named New Director
The officials of the
ECU Educational
Foundation, Inc the
Pirates Club, have
named Richard Bennett
Dupree as its new ex-
ecutive director.
Dupree, who
assumes his duties on
June 15, will replace
Gus Andrews, the ex-
ecutive director of the
Pirate Club since 1976.
Andrews resigned the
position in mid-May
after he was named the
head football coach at
Wilson Fike High
School, where he serv-
ed as an assistant
coach.
Dupree, 32, has been
associated with ECU
Chapman-Smith Champs
CU ONE-ON-ONE BASKETBALL
The ECU Intramural Department's
1-on-l Basketball Tournament was com-
pleted Monday night as Willie Chapman
and Keith Smith battled for the champion-
hip. The match was certainly a contrast in
stvies. Chapman, at 6'4 is a strong inside
player, whereas Smith, at 5'11 possesses a
deadly outside shot. Earlier in the tourna-
ment Smith had beaten Chapman (23-21),
becoming the only player in the double
elimination event to remain undefeated.
Chapman battled back through the losers
bracket, beating Alonzo Ncwby by a score
of 21-16 and Marshall Walls bv a 21-18
count to force another showdown with
smith. The first game was won by Chapman
by a score of 26-24, forcing a second match.
It was a bitterly contested match, but Chap-
man won out by 21-16. Congratulations gc
to Willie Chapman and all the participant'
for making the tournament a success.
ECU GOLF CLASSIC
The ECU Intramural Department is spon-
soring a golf tournament on Tuesday, June
16th at the Ayden Country Club. Entries are
being accepted through Friday, June 12th,
and are open to all students, faculty, and
staff members. For more information, call
the intramural office, extension 6387.
for 14 years, both as a
student and a faculty
member. Dupree has
been a faculty member
in the School of
Business since 1976,
after earning his
masters degree in
business administration
from East Carolina.
"We are most pleas-
ed to have Richard
Dupree join us as our
new Executive Director
of the Pirate Club
stated Director ot
Athletics Dr. Ken Kerr.
"Richard is most
familiar with East
Carolina University,
both from an academic
and athletic standpoint.
His excellent
background in
business, both in the
classroom and in
private consulting
work, gives Richard the
expertise we feel is
needed to execute the
position of a fund
raiser for a major col-
lege athletic program.
"Enthusiasm is a key
for this position con-
tinued Kerr, "And
Richard Dupree brings
visible enthusiasm to
our program. We feel
stronglv that Richard is
Wood Picked By Hawks In Second
All ANTA (LPD�
Atlanta Hawks Coach
Kevin Loughery got the
"swme" player he
wanted Tuesday in 6-6
V Wood of North
C arolina after com-
pleting a swap of draft
picks to give the Hawks
the No. 4 pick in the
NBA draft.
"We had to work
very hard to get him
said Loughery, concer-
ning the swap of first
round picks with the
Chicago Bulls. He pro-
jected Wood as a small
forward who will also
see action at the big
guard slot.
"When I took the
job I felt our pressing
need was a swing man
who could stick it from
outside said
Loughery. "We got the
best man available. He
comes trom perhaps
the greatest college pro-
gram in the country, or
one of the greatest
Wood, who averaged
18.1 points per game in
leading Dean Smith's
Tar Heels to the run-
nerup spot in the
NCAA tournament,
said he was "really ex-
cited" to be chosen by-
Atlanta, only 90
minutes from his
hometown of Gray,
da.
"I haven't talked
contract at all but I
really can't see it being
a problem because they
want me and I want to
be here said Wood.
"I think I will be play-
ing a little of both
(positions), which is
what 1 want to do and
what Coach Loughery
wants me to do
In addition to Wood,
the Hawks picked
DePaul point guard
Clyde Bradshaw, 5-11,
170, in the second
round, and
Southeastern Con-
ference Player of the
Year Rudy Macklin of
LSU, a 6-7, 205-pound
forward, in the third
round.
Wood, who would
likely have to beat out
former all-star John
Drew for a starting
position, said via
telelphone hookup
from New York that he
wasn't worried about
starting, "although I
think I'm capable of
it
"I want to do
whatever 1 can to help
the Atlanta Hawks,
whether it be as the
sixth man or seventh
man or what. But 1
don't think it will be
seventh, however
Loughery would not
be pinned down on
whether he expects
Wood to start but said,
"I also believe one of
your best players, par-
ticularly if he can put
the ball in the bucket,
should come off the
bench
"Al Wood, with his
ability to play two posi-
tions, should play a lot
of minutes said
Loughery.
Loughery appeared
delighted that Macklin,
who averaged 15.9 last
season, was still
available in the third
round. "We had him
projected in the first
round at one point he
said. "He's not a great
shooter but he's a great
athlete
Concerning Brad-
shaw, Loughery said,
"He's got an air of
great confidence about
him which is very im-
portant in that position
(point guard). He's a
winner
Loughery said the
Hawks, who acquired a
second round pick in
the deal that gave
Chicago the No. 6 pick
in the first round, were
trying to get a pick high
enough to tab Bngham
Young All-America
guard Danny Ainge.
the man ready for the
opportunity that East
Carolina University of-
fers
Dupree, a native of
Smithfield and a
graduate of Smithfield
High School, attended
ECU and graduated in
1974 with a B.S. degree
in biochemistry.
Dupree then entered
the graduate school.
Besides his work on
the faculty in the
School of Business,
Dupree has been a con-
sultant for various
businesses in areas of
organizational struc-
ture, marketing, sales,
accounting, cash flow
management, finance
and computer opera-
tions.
In accepting the posi-
tion of executive direc-
tor, Dupree takes over
a program that has ex-
panded rapidly in the
last five years, making
East Carolina one of
the fastest growing
athletic programs in the
nation.
"I can describe in
one simple word the
real reason I want to
CLASSIFIEDS
SHORT TERM LEASES
Available tor sharing house across
trom campjs Call 751031 or
7S 4057
PAPERS TYPED For students
101 E Wright Rd Call 752 �732
FOR SALE Small refrigerator.
2.5 ft good condition. 0. Call
752 724
JUST YOUR TYPE Fast, ac
curate, professional typing.
Research papers, resumes, let
ters etc WRITE RIGHT
75 M44
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED For trailer, central air
washer, dryer Rent 582 50 plus
halt utilities Call 757 134
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Two bedroom traoler, air condi
tion. washer Rent 575 plus halt
utilities Call 757 123
AIR CONDITIONED Furnished
apartment tor one. Utilities m
eluded Across trom college
7S� 253
TA KE A HREA K FROM YOL R S It DIES A T
THE COFFEEHOUSE
zM
14
Featuring: The ECU Sign Language Club
and
Roy Green
Monday, June 15 9:00 10:30
Room 15, Mendenhall
Admission Free
Free Snacks
i
An excitingly unique way to renew your body, mind and appearance!
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAYS 1 - 5 p.m. �
0�N DAILY 7 . m 10 �m MOMDAY TNKU SATUHOAy � w �.� ,�nr xiinki C
FAMILY HOT TUB SPA A SAUNA FAMILY HAIR CARE SALON t
1 Parson 1 Hour . . SB 95 Style A Shampoo $8 95 N
3 People . .1 Hour . . �5.�5 each "fB,s�CM1 mmmtewm MM MM �mt.tmr- Perm $24.00 S
Family or Group (1 Hourl $19 95 Facial $5 95 JJ
San lor Citizens Group (1 hour) $14.95 O
"4 6P�P"1 &W afaW � Vitamin, 4 Minerals �
j al ��� -��r Food Supplements j
m. � .�-JMMMt��, 1 �faV � Personal Care "
Sun Tanning LLv CaT Harare �
OM.tid.FTON BOOth J Twc-Kf� W � Skincare
one visit (only $199 (tVA�TIMIIlVr � Household Products R
15 sessions $28 OO aT M W A 1 LaVa PSHPH U
thi r.OupOni taaaaataaL bbbbT HI bbbbbV bbbbbb. H K � HbWb ! V
FREE T-SHIRT a�t M 1 M k � Wfk
rornetsf too M M 1 r.r � �ill ��-�
Customers S aaw� I
j m if w k s m BORED"?
- tnergi Saving Coupon � K & M m Wk B
ff m sk U � m Make Money Make Friend .
S2.00 Gas Coupon � B Wt 0 m Make a Future �
� epg� 'or each car with L I K�kH asT Shaklae it more than fc
r "i'lWl 4 or mort cuitom�r� WV �� Laaaaa aV a living it's � lite- style
� 'iim r eaaaaBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaB
FREE FOOT MASSAGE . �� �,� ��aT
Included with any service sjs THE SHAKLEE WAY SUM PLAN
i�HlTloi�! �Mtw�couoor, aaPlaaaaaaaaaaaatafaa What Have You Got To Lose? �
-�:�Daes5ER j a aaaaaaa H
FREE VaaPWTr�aT
WM - ECU SEASON - ftf 1 W
� I FOOTBALL TICKETS " ������ E
1 ' WITH 3 MONTH MEMBERSHIP California Cooperage Dealer $
j TMP i" Mot Tub. Spa. Saunas
� F�' �"� ormatton: LIFE-FORCE CENTER 1
ci7" 2�76 �'7"� 620 SOUTH PITT STREET, GREENVILLE, N.C. "
Me�t�v tmmmm irnroeueton im (Located between 5th and Dickinson) (read upi
KATHYMOOei
HOSTESS
i
�MkVaal MATMCOCK
hai� onciiia
BOM NICHOLS
� MICI
Now Open Grand Opening Friday. June 12
LISA BUTT
MOSTfSS
work for East Caroliru.
University and its
athletic program �
love said Dupree
upon taking the posi-
tion. "Love for its
tradition, people and
courage.
"I want to contribute
a part of myself to the
growth towards na-
tional recognition in
athletics. With the
students, staff, alumni,
people of eastern North
Carolina and all other
fans of East Carolina
-
University, we will be pirate Club raises money for scholarships.
successful
&iii Yii "udw
Ibe Itaatnf OentBr has been here for you sinoe 1974
providing prrtvfce, urie'leretajidtrag health oare
to women of ell egee at a reasonable cost
The PVumlntf Centw we're here when you need us
THS WJj M IQ C aMTl
WESTERN
SIZZUN'
Steakhouse
LUNCH SPECIAL
MonFri. 11:00-2:00
4 oz. USDA Sirloin w,thk n9
baked potato or trench tries and Texas toast
$1.89
Free Iced Tea with College I.D.
Offer good any time.
Take Out Service 2903 E. 10th St. � 758-2712
264 By Pass 756-0040
Hours. 11:00a.m. 10:00p.m. � MonThurs.
10:00a.m. 11:00p.m. Fri. Sun.
'S HAMBURGERS
FRESH NOT FROZEN.
AIN'T
NO REASON
TOGO ANYPLACE ELSE
SALAD BAR
SiVE
I
Not valid with any other o�er
Please present coupon
when ordering
Good at participating Wendy s
Offer expires MM
V.WS�
501 E. Tenth St.
CHICKED SANDWICH
M.19 "�
I Good at participating Wendy's
Not valid with any other offer
Please present coupon
when ordering
Oiler expires MM)
MEESEITMUTt
Wejws�
301 Greenville Blvd
?





Greenville
Opening at 8:00 A.M.
Wednesday
June 10,1981
South Parh
Shopping Center
115 E. Red Banks Rd.
ill CTflDE Rflllli
If you redeem this gift certificate
at our new store during Grand
Opening week, we'll give you five
more $1.00 gift certificates good
for shopping during the next five
weeks.
REDEEM AT ANY FOOD TOWN STORE
RING ON STOtE COUPON KEY " - ;V - �:GIFT CERTIFICATE
NomtTo acquaint you with FOOD TOWN'S Lowest Food Prices in North Carolina, this Gift Certificate for merchandise in the amount of $1.00 is yours with a S10 00 or more purchase
Addrat City .i S�at� Pton

GOOD JUNE 10 THRU JUNE 13. 1981
limit one per Customer
Store Hours: Monday thru Saturday, 8:00 A.M. 'til 10:00 P.M.
To The First 3O0 Customers
Wednesday, June 10,1901
At The Greenville Food Town Store
$1.29 Value � 12 Ox. Package
Jesse Jones
Franks
PRFF
The Fastest Growing Food Chain In America Comes to Greenville
Food Town Stores. Inc. is the fastest growing food cha.n in America today
Ten years ago we had 15 stores and sales were $37 million This year we will
B more than 120 stores and sales will be more than $600 million! The
for this rapid growth is LFPINC (Lowest Food Prices In North
Carolina). Now, the residents of Greenville have an opportunity to experi-
ence first hand the satisfaction of shopping where they know they will
always get the lowest prices on thousands of items eery day of the week





CHOICE MEATS
IN
HOLLY FARMS GRADE A
Whole Fryers
Lb.
USDA
CHOICE
SLICED FREE INTO STEAKS AND ROAST
USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Whole Bottom
Rounds $17
Why Pay $2.09
USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Bottom Round
Why Pay 690
Roast
USDA.
CHOICE) Lb
$2ZS
Why Pay $2.89
USDA CHOICE BEEF ROUND
Rump
Roast
USDA
CHOICE
Why Pay $2.99
Armour Regular
Hot Dogs 12 ox. 1.19
Armour
Baconu ox. 1.19
Armour
Beef Hot Dogs izo. 1.29
Armour Bologna, B�f Bologna, P&P,
Salami, lAvcr Chcoso and
Spice Luncheon to. 69c
Luter's
Dinner Franks u 1.29
Lutor's Baaf
Dinner Franks u 149
Smithflaut
Ham Sausage no. 99
Curtis B��f Master
Franksi. 1.79
Curtis Bagular
Franksito. 1.09
Curtis tUtgulmr and Thick
Bolognal�. 159
Curtis Whole Hog
Sausage u.
5 LBS. OR MORE
FRESH GROUND DAILY
Ground
Beef
u, 128
Why Pay $1.48
3 LBS. OR MORE
FRESH GROUND DAILY
Ground
Chuck
$158
Why Pay $1.88
Lb.
GRADE A HOLLY FARMS MIXED
SLICED, SKINNED A DEVEINED
Fryer
Parts
Beef
Ag. Liver � 79-
V Whv Pay 99
Lb.
Why Pay 68�
Why Pay 99C
1.69
Curtis
Red Links u. 1.89
Oscar Mayor
Wienersu�. 1.49
Oscar Mayor
Beef Franksl�. 1.69
Oscar Mayor Bagular ami Baaf
Bologna� o�. 89
Oscar Mayor Bagular, Baaf ami Thick
Bologna u�. 139
Oscar Mayor
Baconu�. 1.99
10 - 12 LB. AVG. � SLICED FREE
USDA CHOICE BEEF RIB
USDA ,
choice:
GRADE A HOLLY FARMS
Chicken Whole
Livers u, 79c Rib Eyes 3�
Why Pay 990
Why Pay $4.99
USDA CHOICE FAMILY PACK
USDA CHOICE
Cubed
Steaks
USDA
CHOICE
Stew
$258 Beef
USDA
CHOICE
Lb.
Why Pay $2.99
Why Pay $2.08
STAR KIST
Tuna
LARGE ROLL
Rally
Towels
SEALD SWEET UNSWEE'
INDIAN RIVER PINK UNS1
Grapefr
Juice
PLAIN OR IODIZED
Morton
Salt
28 Oi.
19
SEALTEST
Cottage
Cheese
,�o, si0





EATS
IN NORTH CAROLINA!
Why Pay 69C
5 LBS. OR MORE
FRESH GROUND DAILY
Ground
Beef 128
hy Pay $1.48
3 LBS. OR MORE
FRESH GROUND DAILY
Ground
Chuck u, $15
Why Pay $1.88
SLICED, SKINNED A DEVEINED
Beef
Ag. Liver u. 79�
�VV Why Pay 99C
ty Pay 68C
10 - 1 2 LB. AVG. - SLICED FREE
USDA CHOICE BEEF RIB
Whole @�S
79, Rib Eyes u, $3"
USDA CHOICE
Stew S�Sj
2�8 B�cf Lb 188
Pay $2.99 Why Pay $2.08
STAR KIST
Tuna ox &$c
Why Pay 990
LARGE ROLL
Rally
Towels 49c
Why Pay S9C Each
SEALD SWEET UNSWEETENED OR
INDIAN RIVER PINK UNSWEETENED
Grapefruit
Juice�.o� 79�
Why Pay 97C
Mayonnaise �. 99
v Why Pay $1.29
PLAIN OR IODIZED
Morton
Salt
26 Ox.
Cottage
Cheese
24 Ox.





LFPINC
Lowest Food Prices
In North Carolina
It doesn't take many words to describe prices at Food Town. Just some figures. At Food Town
we feature low prices every day. We do not have "weekend" specials or play supermarket
games that inflate your food bill. Compare our prices with other supermarkets in this area
and you'll see why Food Town is the fastest growing food chain in America.
L - LOWESTgg
Kraft Mayonnaise (16 oz.) .93
Hunt's Catsup (14 oz.) .58
Regular A-l Steak Sauce (5 oz.) .73 I
Mount Olive Dill Salad Cubes (12 oz) .75 I
Realemon Juice (32 oz.) .98
Tang Instant Orange (18 oz.) 1.71
Campbell's Tomato Juice (46 oz) .82
Del Monte Fruit Cocktail (8 oz ) .44 L
Seedless Raisins (6 pack) .93 L
Del Monte Cut Green Beans (16 oz.) .43 L
Del Monte Whole Kernel Corn (17 oz.) .45
Hunt's Whole Peel Tomatoes (14'i oz.) .56
Hunt's Tomato Paste (12 oz ) .68
Comet Long Rice (28 oz.) .78 L
Campbell s Cream Chicken Soup (can) .35
Campbell's Chicken Noodle Soup (can) .28
Campbell's Chunky Beef Soup (19 oz) .99
Lipton Onion Soup (2 pack) .73 I
Armour Beef Stew (24 oz 1.47
Bunker Hill Chili (10 oz.) .85 L
Spam Luncheon Meat (7 oz ) .94 L
Armour Potted Meat (3 oz .28
Armour Vienna Sausage (5 oz ) .46
Star Kist Light Chunk Tuna (6' oz .85
Chef Boy- Ar-Dee Cheese Pizza (15 oz 1.22
BC Cheese Mac Hamb Helper (8 oz .95
Golden Grain Macaroni Dinner (7 oz) .33 L
Taster's Choice Coffee (8 oz ) 4.39 L
Nestea Instant (2 oz.) 1.49 L
Nestea Instant (3 oz.) 2.09
Sego Very Chocolate (10 oz .43 L
Sweet n Low (8 oz.) 1.14 L
Bisquick Mix (20 oz.) .79 I
Betty Crocker White Cake Mix (18! oz.) .73 L
Duncan Hines Fudge Brownies (15' oz.) .81 L
Toast-Em Apple (10 oz.) .82 L
Del Monte Chocolate Pudding Cups (4's) 1.05 I
Arm & Hammer Baking Soda (8 oz.) .23 L
Kellogg's Fruit Loops (11 oz 1.19 t
Kellogg's Special K (15 oz.) 1.51
Quaker Instant Oatmeal (10 oz.) .91
Quaker Quick Grits (2 lb.)68 L
Quaker Quick Grits (5 lb.) 1.33 L
Gerber Strained Beef .48 L
SMA Ready To Serve (32 oz) 1.35
Overnight Pampers (12s) 1.83
Pampers Extra Absorbent (24s) 2.98
Bounce (10 ct.) .56 L
Windex (20 oz.) .85 I
Dove White Bath Bar (4V4 oz .63 I
Giant Dynamo (32 oz.) 1.65
Condensed All Detergent (9 lb - 13 oz.) 5.06
Giant Cascade (35 oz.) 1.59
Gain Detergent (49 oz.) 1.89
Lemon Pledge Furniture Polish (7 oz.) 1.34 I
Ken-L Ration Beef Dog Food (6 pack) 1.84
Mighty Dog Beef (61 oz.) .31
Alpo Beef Dog Food (14'? oz ) .36
Purina Dog Chow (5 lb.) 1.84
Purina Cat Chow (22 oz.)75
Cut-Rite (100 ft.)76 L
Stayfree Maxi Pads (30 ct) 2.90 L
Prince Albert Pocket Can .41 I
Tampax Super (40's) 2.39
Del Monte Asparagus Tips (10! oz.) 1.33 L
Pillsbury Lemon Struesel Cake (27V4 oz.) 1,80
Dukes Peanut Oil (24 oz ) 1.55 L
Total;
Items Higher Than Food Town
Items Lower Than Food Town
BIG STARA&PWINN DIXIEKROGERHARRIS
99.91 L10989 I103
.6550 L.6369.65
89.898983.85
.9389.85
1491.49.991.39
1831.791951.711.95
9385.79 L.87
51515249
1.151.15109
5353.504555
5153504553
34 L5663
697968.77
997999105
34 I37403539
29.3327 L3337
1091.0799109
.8379838183
1621591751 45 L1.67
83.69836981
99999998103
3133322828
465346.51.50
8599851061.19
1.391 07 L1.39122139
959589 L951.07
39353841
4 594594 59459539
1992091991.551.79
269299209219
6950
1451351251391.43
103
.89
1.091.091.0982105
83
1.19109
34292935
1.331.33119133
1.511.83
991091.15911.13
89.75.7589
1651.501.651.38
59.57.595453
1 33 L1 25 L1.24 L1.24 L1.39
1631851.891.761.85
2.982993.393.093.29
656565
.95
.69.67.73.6969
1.851.651.661 75
5.695395.065.57
1.691.651.59159169
1891.952.091.892.09
1.591.551.531391 47
2.001.981.642.10
393940.31.37
3643.36.36.47
1.892191.841.84229
95.9395.7595
79858578.79
3.393.693.192.96
.55.5359
2592992.27 I3.23
1491.49
1.991.59 I1.79
1891.73
26 5�
OOD
TOWN
LFPINCSCAA
V
K.A-
This comparison was made on May 12, 1981. Some prices may have changed since that time.





LOWEST FOOD PRICES
WISE TWIN PACK REGULAR
Potato
Chips
8 0z.
69
FOOD TOWN
Bleach
Gallon TrC
Why Pay 79C
FOOD TOWN PINK OR LEMON
Dish
Detergent
� 59
Why Pay 65c
49 OUNCE DETERGENT
Pah
Stbq
Why Pay $2.31
ONE POUND FOOD TOWN BRAND
Margarine
Quarters 3sl
Why Pay 47C Each
QUICK MAID
Topping s ox 49
� m Why Pay 61
DEL MONTE
Catsup 32 o 89
32 Ox. C
Why Pay $1.19
ASSORTED TOILET TISSUE
White
Cloud
4 Roll Pack TrTr
Why Pay $1.27
Why Pay $1.19
PLAIN OR WITN MEAT
FRENCH'S
Brown Gravy Sauce
FRENCH'S CHILI SAUCE,
SLOPPY JOE AND
Spaghetti Sauce
35
43
Ragu Spaghetti Sauce
15 O.
84
4-7 LB. AVG. Gl
Turh
Brea
FOOD TOWN CO
Ham
ARMOUR CANNI
Ham
u





CES
It
-T�BGENT
$b9
Why Pay $2.31
fN BRAND
ne
s 3$l
Why Pay47C Each
Why Pay 61 c
32 Ox. CJ"C
Why Pay $1.19
ISUE
4 Roll Pack ���
Why Pay $1.27
.AIM OR WITH MEAT
paghettt Sauce
CHOI

C�v9
14 - 17 LB. AVG.SLICED FREE
FRESH WHOLE OR RIB HALF
Pork Loin
SVi Oz.
84
f
4 - 7 LB. AVG. GRADE A
Turkey
Breast u, l
Why Pay $1.59
FOOD TOWN COOKED
Hamu.aw
Why Pay $3.99
ARMOUR CANNED
Hama- 54
Why Pay $3.99
USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN BONELESS
Sirloin @gj
Why Pay $3.99
Register for a
FREE
Whole Country Ham
Each week during Grand Opening we will
have a drawing for FREE Stadler s Whole
Country Hams. Be sure to register when you
shop at our new Food Town store.
28
Lb.
Why Pay $1.48
FRESH PORK
ML jMtflv EB9 ��. JK CW SI BB BE mf
Ribs Lb. 538
Why Pay $1.48
LEAN AND TENDER PORK
Cubed
Steaks u, 168
Why Pay $1.99
2V� - 3 LB. ARMOUR BONELESS
Ham Jiw
Why Pay $2.19
SWIFT HOSTESS
Ham � 798
Why Pay $8.98
HOLLY FARMS GRADE A
Chicken
Breast u, slz
Why Pay $1.59
OCEAN
Perch
Fillet u,l
Why Pay $1.59
FRESH OCEAN
Flounder i. 79
Why Pay $1.29
' v
W-





FRESH
RODVCE
JUMBO SIZE, TEXAS
Cantaloupe
Save 300
c� ,x- Ik
FRESH

Beans
i �
Lb.
NEW, TENDER, YELLOW
Squash
Lb.
39.
29.
.W3
Lj&f& I?
��'��
. ' -
�?��
s � r

Til AtTaV

TENDER, YELLOW
Corn
sfJVSW-U
w
y.M i of
RHINE V
RED, PINK, WHITE
Taylor
Countr,
MT. CHABLIS.RHINI
BURGUNDY, CLARE
Almad
CHENIN BLANC, ZINI
COLUMBARD, GRENj
MONTEREY BURGUN
Almad
SNOW WHITE
BEAUTIFUL
Mtishraoms u. $139
WASHINGTON STATE, RED DELICIOUS
Apples u,49�
Hanging
Baskets
4�
2 For $8.99
(8 qjL Potting Soil 790
8 BOTTLE CARTON!
Pepsi
COUNTRY TIME LEl
MOUNTAIN DEW, DJ
Pepsi-





s" �
or $8.99
790
STOCK UP NOW!
VIN ROSE, CHIANTI, RHINE, HEARTY BURGUNDY
CHENIN BLANC, RIESLING, ZINFANDEL,
CHABLIS, BURGUNDY, ROSE, RHINE
Taylor Calif.
Cellars uM $3b�
RED, PINK, WHITE
Taylor Soft Lake
Country uu. $3bg
MT. CHABLIS, RHINE, SAUTERNE, NECTAR ROSE,
BURGUNDY, CLARET, CHIANTI
Almaden
3 Liter
CHENIN BLANC, ZINFANDEL, FRENCH
COLUMBARD, GRENACHE ROSE, GAMAY ROSE,
MONTEREY BURGUNDY, MONTEREY CHABLIS
Almaden
Pepsi-Cola
8 BOTTLE CARTON - 1 0 OZ. MT. DEW AND
Pepsi-Cola 85
COUNTRY TIME LEMONADE, SUNKIST,
MOUNTAIN DEW, DIET PEPSI AND
2 Lifer





REFRESHING VALUES
A
PACKAGE OF 12 - 12 OZ. CANS
Budwetser s3"
PACKAGE OF 12 - 12 OZ. CANS
Stroh's$379
PACKAGE OF 0 - 1 2 OZ. NR BOTTLES
Miller $1"
PACKAGE OF 12 - 1 2 OZ. CANS
Schlitz 379
PACKAGE OF 6 - 12 OZ. CANS
Schlitz
Light
SWEET, JUICY, Si
Peac
S

A

5
fr





�S
AT LOW PRICES
Stf9
CANS
5179
CANS
SOO
W
1
light!
3&,
CHLITZ
j&
SWEET, JUICY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Peaches
LUSCIOUS, CALIFORNIA
Strawberries
Qt.
$Z9
CRISP
Cucumbers 4$l
CRISP
Peppers
4l
-r .ft. V .lIv. f � ,�
�v
TENDER, GREEN
Broccoli
Each
� I
v





GRAND OPEN SC SPE
AW RNBREAD
Pouch Mix
MARTHA WHITE BLUEBERRY MUFFIN
Pouch Mix
CRISP
�� mUpS
HER
JS
'itltoti Cl4D�fS
Jscuits
iACK S
nillfl Wafers
PACKAGE GWALTNEV
Great Dogs
Wafer Meats
Buy one, get one FREE!
A Message
From Our
Chief Executit
Offu �!
i

Food Toun Features
� PARCEL PICKUP SERVICE �
� FOOD STAMPS Gl
� ABOUT YOUR CREE N
� NEVER ON SUND
�ar W-?
mvT
'
iHr
VJ





PENINC SPECIALS
REE
eatures
PARCEL PICKUP SERVICE
100 STAMPS GLADLY REDEEMED �
I0UT YOUR FREE MERCHANDISE �
NEVER ON SUNDAY
Buy two, get one FREE!
43C VALUE - 8 OZ. SKINNER SHORT CUT
Macaroni
71 C VALUE- 100 FOOT
Glad Wrap
43C VALUE - 1 4 OZ. COMET BROWN
Buy three, get one FREE!
57C VALUE- 107�0Z.
Campjire
Miniature
Marshmallows
Rice
S1.06 VALUE � 1 2 CT. MORTON GLAZED
Donuts
61 C VALUE - 1 9 OZ. PINE GLO
Disinfectant
$2.48 VALUE � HALF GALLON BORDEN'S
OLD FASHIONED ROUND CARTON
Ice Cream
$2.15 VALUE � 6 CT. PLAIN
CRUNCHY SEALTEST
Polar Bars
$1.99 VALUE � 14 OZ. GUNNOES PEPPERONi
Pizza
More FREE specials
66C VALUE - 2 LB. MARTHA WHITE
Corn Meal
Whan You Buy 9 Lb. Martha Whlta Salf Rising Flour
89C VALUE � 7 OZ. RUTH'S
Chicken Salad
Whan You Buy 15 Oz. Ruth's Pimanto Chaaaa
$1.69 VALUE - 1 LB. CURTIS
Bologna
Whan You Buy 1 Lb. Curtis Whola Hog Sausaga
v-v Wv-





Title
The East Carolinian, June 10, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 10, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.134
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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