The East Carolinian, April 28, 1981






�he lEaat Carolinian
bl
u
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 N
?JL
10 Pages
Tuesday, April 28, 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Walters Answers Allegations
Of Refrigerator Mismanagement
B DEBORAH HOI AUNG
In response to an article in last
"hursday's edition o The East
Carolinian, SCiA Refrigerator Ren
Ml Managei Ed Walters denied
allegations that he gave refrigerators
away and that he has been un-
cooperative with slate auditors.
Walters claims that not only has
not given avvav any refrigerators
bui (ha: he has tracked down
several refrigerators which had been
before lie came into office.
"I've found several refrigerators
which had been lost a! least three
rs ago. At one time, there was a
a general understanding.
ill owed those who worked up
office (refrigerator rentals) to
keep a refrigerator for free use for
the year.
"Thai was just one of the fringe
benefits which came with the job.
I he auditors recommended that we
do away with that because they said
it wasn't a good business policy
Walters also denied accusations
that he gave a "free" refrigerator to
Barrie Byland, 1980-81 Buccaneer
editor.
"Why would 1 give a refrigerator
to a girl 1 hardly even know and tell
her to keep it Walters said.
"There's no reason I'd ever do
that. 1 did give the Buc one
(refrigerator) to use for the year. 1
told them to turn it in at a truck
when they were done. No receipt
was written, of course, because I
didn't want any problems with them
claiming they had money due
them
Byland has submitted a statement
to Associate Dean tor Orientation
and Judiciary .lames Mallory citing
several specific instances when she
claims to have attempted to return
the refrigerator after a period o
time.
"Last summer Byland explain-
ed, "about at the end ot summer
school, my roommate and 1 talked
to Ed downtown, rhe subject ot my
refrigerator came up, and 1 asked
him what 1 should do with it.
"He told me to " keep it' and
something like 'it's just a little pre-
sent He gave me the impression
that it was his own little business
and the profits he made supported
their business. I believed him. I later
talked to David (Creech), and I ask-
ed him if it was SCiA affiliated, and
he said yes.
"I've given my statement to Dean
Mallory and I have no reason to
lie
Walters claims that he has tried to
get the refrigerator back on several
occasions but has failed to do so.
"I've tried to get the refrigerator
back. She won't tell me when I can
come by and get it. I don't even
know where it is Walters said.
Walters also denied statements
concerning his reluctance to talk
with an East Carolinian staff
See ALLEGATIONS, page 3

adidas
SGA Refrigerators
are being collected while manager alters denies
allegations of mismanagement.
Another Male Body Found In Atlanta River
A I i AM A UP1 I he body ot a
black male was found in the Chat-
tahoochee River west ol Atlanta laic
Mondav apparentlv the 26th victim
of the killers preying on the citv's
s v ung blacks.
"We have a body and it's a black
male" said Deputy Police Chief
Morris Redding commander ot the
� force investigating the siavmgs.
"We have no furthei comment
Redding would no: say whether
bod was believed to be the 26th
lim but Ins statement - it has been
rare foi anv member ot the task
force ' i anything to newsmen -
implied 'he task force was
assuming rhe bodv would no on the
hsi.
I lie body like those of nearly all
the recent victims was apparent lv
stripped to underwear or shorts.
I here was no indication of its size or
age. our other victims have been
found in the Chattahoochee in-
cluding Michael Mclntosh who was
buried earlier Mondav. The last
three victims have all been adults
ranging in age from 21 to 23 with
childlike builds. Two were mentally
retarded.
It took rescue units, who had
tremble finding a place to get their
boats in the watei along the heavily
wooded bramble strewn banks,
more than an houi to get the corpse
out ol the river. It was sent to the
Fulton County morgue where
medical examiners prepared to
begin the process ot identification.
Discovery ot a body came during
an intensive police search tor Jimmy
Ray Payne, 21. who disappeared
last Wednesday. Police had not add
ed Payne's name to the task force
list but the subject - like all three
adults - was slightly built. He was
only 5 teet 3 inches tall.
Jesse Grimes, 13. who had come
to the area with his stepfather, a
welder, said he was near the nver
benk when a man came running
away from the river yelling,
"There's a body down there
"I saw him stuck in the weeds
the boy said. He said it was dressed
in either "red underwear o' trunks.
At first 1 thought it was an inner-
tube
Police spokeswoman Beverly
Harvard said the missing persons
bureau had recieved several reports
that Payne had been seen. She said
police also have recieved other in-
formation warranting the delay in
turning his case over to the special
investigators.
"We've had reports he was spot-
Job Opportunities Differ
Engineers Are Hot College Commodity
;( PS) 1 he most job otters tor 1981
graduates will be "those areas
qualitative in nature that encom-
pass "logical thinking, working
prof . I contributing
then solution predicts
S ifie, director ot theUniversi-
� abama's C areei Planning
ii : Placement Service.
Sofie predicts that data process-
acc Hinting, finance and
.� skills m particular will be
argesl demand this summer.
m to the seemingly ever
�ed tor engineers o all
gineenng majors will continue
to be one ot the hones i ge com-
modities at least through the end o
the century because ot the boom in
energy-related industries, explains
David Small fo the I niversity o
Houston's placement center.
.At the I'niversity ot New Mexico,
engineerng students�who compose
one-tenth fo the school population-
gel about 609 percent o all job ot-
ters made to LAM students.
Moreover, the job market for
engineers increases at a yearly rate
taster that any other profession. A
March report by the College Place-
men! Council estimates least year's
increase in engineering hiring at 16
percent over 1979. I he entire
petroleum and allied products in-
dustries hired 34 percent more in-
dividuals in both engineering and
administrative management in 1980.
adds .lack Shingleton of Michigan
State.
1 he newest wrinkle in the job
market is that many experts predict
an increase in demand tor teachers
within the next live veais. 1 he Na-
tional C enter tor Education
Statistics says the education colleges
will be graduating less than one-half
the teachers they were a decade ago.
But in the meantime, however, the
demand�which has dropped steadi-
ly since 1970 -will start climbnti as
the products of the 195()'s baby
boom begin to have children of their
own.
NCES estimates the supply of
new teachers to be 780.000 in
1984-88, about 78,000 fewer than
the projected demand.
Even now, 37 states, mostly in the
booming south and southwest, com-
plain of teacher shortages, accor-
ding to the National Education
Association.
Currently, the market remains
strong for students in all health-
related fields, especially nursing.
Agriculture and science report a
balance between new graduates and
predicted openings, but job pro-
spects are particularly bright for
holders of advance science degrees.
According to a survey titled
"Recruiting Trends" published by
Michigan State, the market is
tightest for communication, human
ecology, liberal arts, and social ma-
jors.
In categories, however, prospects
are slightly better for minorities and
women.
ted as late as yesterday, Sunday
she said, "We are still trying to
verify this information
Services attended by about 1(H)
mourners were held for Michael
Cameron Mclntosh, 23. The body
of Mclntosh who was never
reported missing, was pulled from
the Chattahoochee River April 20.
He had been asphyxiated the same
cause of death listed for 13 o' the
other victims.
Five members o' the Guardian
Angels street patrol group dressed in
red berets, white shirts and black
pants acted as the pallbearers for
Mclntosh. They removed the bronze
casket from the hearse and carried
up the green carpeted steps ot the
Greater Mount Calvary Baptist
Church placing it between banks o
white and red chrysanthemums in
front of the church altar.
Groups o blacks sitting on the
porches of nearby apartments wat-
ched the procession and an FBI
agent in a parked car took photos of
people entering the church. Mayor
Maynard Jackson sent a represen-
tative and several members of city
council attended the services.
Deborah Mosely, a friend ot
Mclntosh. who had a police record,
addressed the gathering. "Mickey,
you rest on she said. "Nobody's
stepping on you any more. We love
you but Cod hues you best
The Rev. Mac Simmons said "A
book ought to be written about
Mclntosh's lite. It should be called
'Two forces in Operation When
you're poor, people make it harder
for you. When you're poor and
black they make it doubly hard for
you. When you're poor, black and
an ex-convict, they make it impossi-
ble tor you. But the I ord will make
a way for you
The slightly built Payne, whom
police said has an extensive criminal
record, was last seen by his sister
leaving their home on his way to the
Omni, a business and entertainment
complex m downtown Atlanta. She
said Payne had planned to trade
some old coins at the Omni shop.
Since July I. 1979 the task force
list of murdered and missing young
blacks has increased at times by two
victims a week.
The one youth still listed as miss-
ing is 10 year old Darron Class who
vanished last September.
Financial Aid Office
Releases Information
Sprml in I hr fusil urulimun
Information has been received
that the Federal Government is now
processing Basic Grants for the
1981-82 school year. Students who
filed their confidential statements in
early January should be receiving
their Student Eligibility Reports
(SER) within the next two weeks.
The Student Financial Aid Office
has received its first SER from a stu-
dent.
Everyone is reminded to forward
all copies of the SER to the Finan-
Mendenhall Offers
Extended Hours
For Exam Period
By KAREN WENDT
ssisl.nl No, I dii.u
Due to the cutback in student
hours the library will not be offering
its traditional extended hours for
the upcoming exam period.
Mendenhall Student Center will be
offering extended hours for students
who need to study.
The center's extended hours will
be: Tuesday, April 28 through
Thursday, April 30 until 3 a.m. and
Sunday and Monday until 3 a.m.
In past years the library was kept
open until 3 a.m. for the use of
students who needed a place to
study or do last minute research.
However, a spokesperson for the
library said that due to the "cutback
in student hours the library will be
open only during its regularly
scheduled hours.
Mendenhall Student Center will
be offering several different services
for students during the exam period.
Special areas including the Reading
Room, Music Listening Center,
Billiards Center and Table Tennis
Center will be available for study
areas.
Study groups may request con-
ference rooms for group study.
The snackbar will be open from
10 p.m. until 2 a.m. and will be of-
fering coffee and light snacks.
limited selection of school supplies
will be available at the in formal ion
center news stand.
Paul Breitman, associate director
of the student center, stated, "We
hope that students will take advan-
tage of the extended hours both to
study and relax in the student
center
cial Aid Office as soon as it is receiv-
ed. Should one wish to be con-
sidered for the Basic Grant only, the
person should attach a note to the
forms to notify the office of his or
her wish.
Before financial aid programs can
be developed, a payment schedule
which is used to deternmine the
Basic Grant award must be publish-
ed. The word is the Federal Govern-
ment will not publish a schedule un-
til all questions pertaining to the
1981-82 funding are resolved;
however, the National Association
of Student Financial Aid Ad-
ministrators will distribute an unof-
ficial schedule and distribute it to all
institutions. Robert Boudreaux,
financial Aid Director indicated
that upon receipt o the unofficial
schedule, the EC I Financial Aid
Staff will begin processing com-
pleted applications. He cautioned
that in all probability an adjustment
in the Basic Grant award will be
necesary later on.
East Carolina University hopes to
mail the first group of award letters
on or about May 15. Students who
receive their award letters and
return the acceptance letters to the
Financial Aid Office by July 15 will
have checks prepared for them in
time to pay fees at the beginning of
the fall term.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds6
Features5
letters4
Sports8
t
� , . - - . -





H! I M t'ARDI INIAN
Al'kll 28, 1981
Announcements
GAME ROOM
The College Hill Game Room
located in the AycocK bas
features electronic games, pin
ball pool ping pong ana toosebali
Hours are Mon Thurs I? II
p it r,c)i� 12 5pm ana Sun 8
II pm An proceeds arc returned
to the students through the Student
Residence Association please
suppo' t the game room
EGG HUNT
Chi Omegas ana Lambaa Ch.s
� Ml Easter Egg Hunt on Ape il
15 in Green Springs Par tor some
unaerpnvilegea chilaren of
He it was a sueess
MEDIA BOARD
The Media Boaro is now Keep
� ng apphcat.ons tor aay student
representative to serve on the
Media Boaro Applications can be
p ked up m the Media Boaro Of
fice Monday Friday Pub Bloci 8
am 1pm and 2pm 5pm
CO-OP
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base. Goldsboro. NC will have a
Coop position in recreation open
tor Fan, '81 interested students
should apply to the Co op Ottice.
313 Rawl Building, 757 6979 before
the end of this semester
The Department ot Energy Co
op positions available tor Fan 81
for the following maioS
chemistry physics oeology.com
puter science health sciences
v business administration
ann journalism Contact the Co op
�� e today!
ONA
The Organ ration
� cans cord a �
attend a recep'
JB 1981. 7 30 p '�
(ham Room toe
nornn s Bu
EXTRA!EXTRA!
an is your hnk to
East Carohna Untvt-rstty Keep in
touch by subscribing to The East
Caroltman a '� � reduced rate.
Sta V

FACULTYSTAFF
Ail ECU faculty ana stall
Menaenhali Student Center
members take advantage ot your
discount day at the Bowling
Center m Mendenhall Every
Wednesday from 5 00 p m until
100 pm faculty ana stall MSC
members may bowl two i2! games
and get a 3rd game FREE Don't
forget Wednesday is savings
aay at the Bowling Center
LOST
i lost a gold ladies SEIKO
watch near on the tennis courts at
Mmges PLEASE be detent and
honest enough to turn it in to the
lost and found or call 758 9875
(keep trymgi in be very
grateful'
IVCF
Inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship will conclude their
year Thursday night at 6 30 in
Mendenhall, rm 221 with a pot
luck dinner Press will be guarter
formal Bring a dish and please
come
SUMMER JOBS
The Wake County Employment
and Training Office is accepting
applications from rising senior
college students and graduate
school students for summer
employment as youth coor
dinators Conege graduates who
are interested m summer employ
ment on;y ana net ac lively seeking
tun tin men! are also en
courage I �. . . FOf more .ntor
rvtact I 0a Gaddis at
the Cai � � � . ana Place
����� . � . �. . n 63�!
HOMECOMING
Homecoming 1981 is now in the
planning process The homecom
mg festivities will be held on Nov
7. 1981 where the Pirates will be
playing East Tennessee State The
theme will be "Paint the Town
Purple and Gold " We want to en
courage any one interested in
helping plan homecoming at
tivities to contact Diane Davis at
752 8461 A beach concert is being
planned for that Saturday
SCHOLARSHIPS
Phi Eta Sigma Ireshman honor
society, will award book scholar
ships to a rising junior ano a rising
senior m the amount of J100 each
to be used during the 1981 82 school
year Applicants must be
members of Phi Eta Sigma
Qualifications emphasize par
ticpation m the ECU chapter of
Phi Eta Sigma and high academic
achievement interested students
should see Dr John D Ebbs. Pro
fessor of English at 2U Austin
LIBRARY
Due to the recent cut in student
hours, Joyner Library cannot pro
vide extended hours during exam
week ot spring semester 1981
The library hours durina exam
week will be Friday April 24. 8
am 9pm Saturday April 25. 9
am 5pm Tuesday April 28
t hur saay April 30, 8 a m 12 mid
njtii Fr,dav May 18 am 9
p m Saturday May 2, 9 a m 5
p m , Sunday May 3. 2 p m 12
midnight Monday May 4. 8 a m
12 midnight
ELDERHOSTEL
Persons over 60 years old who
wish to spend a summer week on a
university campus and enroll in
non credit college courses, are m
vited to participate in an
' Elderhostel" program at East
Carolina University June 28 July 4
or July 5 II
ELderhostel' students, who
will be housed on campus, may
enroll m these special courses
"Descriptive Astronomy a
non mathematical approach to
studying the universe, with em
phasis on recent discoveries m the
solar system ano current theories
on cosmology
Folk Traditional America an
introduction to folklife as an im
portant aspect ot American
culture, with a sampling ol tradi
t.ons Irom American regional, oc
cupational and ethnic folk qroups
"Cultures m Collision The Ar
chaeology and Early History of
the Carolina Coast, a detailed
study ot English exploration here
between 1584 and 1587 and the
eventual "cultural collision" bet
ween European settlers and the
Carolina Algonkian Indians
No previous background n any
ol the subiects to be taught is re
guireo Each course will be
enhanced by the use of films and
slides, artifact displays or live
performances Instructors are
ECU professors No formal
homework" is necessary
"Elderhostel " inspired by the
youth hostels and the toik schools
of Europe, is designed to give
retirement agea persons the ex
periences and intellectual stimula
tion of on campus life
Further information about the
program and application
materials are available from Dr
Ralph Worth,ngton. Division ot
Continuing Education, ECU,
GreenvMe N C 27834
MED-SCHOOL
APPLICANTS
All people planning to apply to
medical school in Fall 1982 should
attend this meeting in room 307
Flamgan'Building at 4 00 p m on
Thursday April 30 Details tor ap
piicants and applicants using the
AMCAS system w.n be discussed
Please plan to attend
CHI OMEGA
Chi Omegas volunteered then
time to help in the Special Olym
pics held on April 17 Many thanks
to them
SCHOLASTIC SEARCH
The Scholastic All American
Selection Committee is now accep
ting applications lor the 1981 Spr
mg Semester Students who are
active m scholastic organizations
ano who perlorm wen m class ar.
asked to iom
The Scholastic All American ,s
an honor sotiety founded to
recognize this country's top
undergraduate and graduate
students Students are selected
Irom over 1,280 schools covering
all 50 states Members participate
m various nationally organized
service proiects each year
Studenls are selected lor con
sideration based on the extent ol
their academic and scholastic per
formance both in ano out of the
classroom No one factor is wi
ed heaviest when a new men bet s
considered A students best asset
must be his or hers "well
roundedness "
Interested studenls are asked to
send a stamped self addressed
envelope to "Application "
Scholastic An American. Ad
mm.strative Offices P O Box 237.
Chnton. New York 13323
All students are encouraged to
submit an application regardless
ol their grade point averaae
COMMITTEES
Applications are now bemu ac
epted tor students ws'
serve on University Comr
for the 1981 82 school year �
positions are open on Un .
Administrative Comm"
Faculty Senate Comm.tte.
Planning Commission
Fortes Application blank'
the names ol committees � ��� II � rr
Applications may be �
the lollowmg locations
Ottice ot the Vii e o
Student Lite, 204 W �
Mendenhall Sludent Center I ntor
mat.on Desk SGA Oi'
'ihall Student Cent. .
fice ol intramu' at Reel
Services, Memor a
Residence Hall Dire, tors 01
The university greatly ao
preciates the ellorts ot II
students who have served
past and hopes mat student: .�.
continue theif interest ai
tic pat,on Questions
University committi �
membership may be directi
the Ottice ol the Vice Chan
lor Student Lite ('57 6SJi
GENERAL COLLEGE
l Wei � .� � " the 1981 � i
semester, the use ol M-
Gymnasium as an ativ sing
will be discontinued Eatf '
w.il be assigned to a S
� and Will sei
i �, hei
' I ii student will I � I �
his her assigng acu �
having the adv.s.
on the tall N8I moiv.du
� ' . personal
itl
Brewstet Build I I
mo of the fa
� .
'
Do You Like To Write?
Then we would like to here from you! The has!
Carolinian is now organizing it's writing staff
for the (981-1982 school year, it you are
interested in writing for The hast Carolinian
then please mail us a eard including your name,
address and phone number. We will send you
the information you need. Remember, writing is
a good way to make some extra money next
year. Please send the information to:
Karen Wendt
The Last Carolinian
Old South Building
East Carolina University
Greenville, .C. 27834
We look forward to helping you to join out
staff. Write soon.
2nd Annual Spring
'�
0
fe
cri
ifa complete
ach
IP'
'� �
� � �

i
fY
D�S3
BEACJH Pftk
CONTESTS i
MAY 9th4RLONG Wffl
MISS BJEttjjSIC
BEAUTt�NTEST)
Cash and other valuable
prizes to ivsnners,
7JP-
Bring your blanket cjjytawtrxhal
Concert bigin$ at 11:00 a.m.
10. 1981
(on thefceach)
Adm.
$10.00 adv.
$12.00 gate
lor more information
tin camping reserve
Hot i, call:
34-

JAZZ
� - � , , �
lireel
� its annual
cmcert
� at 8 oo (i m . in the
H iymna ' - -
� r SI 00 All
I
'
DISCOUNT DAYS
. � , .
i .�� .
I 0( OOWI

� ��
It each Friday I
5 30 p
H
� ' � , m un�
5 30 i
CHESS
�.
� � � . j.
ated .�!��.
Senior � ��
� itn � �
regular ly at 7: IS on V
nights � �.��
c ampu
DOG DAY
��
w.11 be lunch on Thursdays
�si and soil drinks
' 30 unl I I 30 Address 501
PAGEANT
nits lor
� �
� iccepted II nteri li i
i
SU ARTIST
.��
.� ; � i . . � I
� � approval
��
it ing protects w i tl
'its
nsibility ii �.
' alendar. broruri
The Fast Carolinian
. mpui � � n Turn'
� 192
Published every Tuesday ano
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ng the summer
The East Carolinian is the ot
dciai newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned
operated and published lor ano
by tne students ol East Carolina
un:vers,t.
Subscription Rate
Business S35 ye�r .
il others $25 yeany
Second class postage paid a'
Greeny.lie N C
The East Carolinian ot ��
are located In the Old Sor
Building on the campus ot E C
Greenville N C
Telephone 75? J6� 6367 630�
ADVERTISED
Each ol these advertised items is required to be readily available lor sale at or
below the advertised price in each A&P Store encept as specif ally noted
in this ad
pbices t ffecn . t iMujstt vai
T A�P . N O R E E N V I L I
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
c
Highway 264 By-Pass Greenville bquare
Shopping Center � Greenville, N C
J
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Bone-In
lb
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole or Half
Bone-In
16-19 lb. avg.
Cut Free
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAM FED BEEF
A a Ground
W Chuck
5 lbs.
or more
lb.
HOLLY FARMS FRESH
Fryer Leg
5 Quarters
Grade
lb.
79
20 OFF LABEL
iffrisc Crisco
I i Shortening
3lb I YOU
can I on
PAY
ONLY
ANN PAGE
Ketchup
32 02.
btl.
79
ANN PAGE
Salad Dressing
0
79
CHUNK LIGHT
Starkist Tuna
in
Oil
612 0Z
can
79
c
FLORIDA GOLD CHILLED
Orange Juice
Save
40�
1
19
FROZEN
Totino's Pizza
Canadian Bacon
Pepperoni
Hamburger 12oz
Sausage pkg
09
Sealtest Ice Cream
All Flavors
except
Butter Pecan
J89
WHIPPED IN QUARTERS
Mrs. Filbert's
Spread
2 88
c
MERICO BUTTERMILK OR
Homestyle Biscuits
Pepsi Cola
Mountain Dew
Bottie j
Carton
$ Tj 49 p.us
Deposit
ANN PAGE
Yi Lowfat Milk
Gal. Jug
A&P QUALITY
Charcoal Briquets
10 a I49
-4L�SfV-
FOR FRESHNESS ANO SAVINGS
GOLDEN YELLOW-RIPE-DOLE -
Bananas 31
oo
CALIFORNIA SWEET & JUICY
Navel Oranges
15 f
FRESH. RED, RIPE
Iran
M STIN. 1
In
lonj
pu
Ira:
dep
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Carolinian
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hup
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Pizza
J09

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M
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49
-
Briquets
49
ibs
inly
00
: RIPE
berries
Iranians Still Draw Controversy
l ST1N,TX (C l'Si Hoveyda, the late Ira- of the American university to question
In what ma be the man shah Rea hostages in lelnan. whether the five
longest-running earn Pahevi's ambassador to B the spring, 1980, students had violated
controversv ovei the I nited Nations. the case had turned into federal law requiring
Iranian students in this fhe arrests not only a freedom ol the press foreign students to
country, five Middle marked the first time issue in which pro have sufficient funds to
1 astern students almost the university had evei secutors attempted to meet all school and liv-
themselves leveled criminal felony force the Daily Texan, ing expenses while in
deported foi trying to charges against any ol the student newspaper, the United States
the controversy to its students, but it led to give them
a conclusion. to a hungei strike in photographs ol the
1 he five University lrats County Jail demonstration,
ol rexas students that, in turn, quickly When felony charges
Kbba Jamal, Maiid became an interna- were latet dropped b
Violation of tedetal
law is considered
grounds for deporta-
tion.
Joe Neal, director ot
kamalopoir, Yahya tional incident. The the university, the five UT's International Of-
Ibrahim M Oman. U.S. Department of students were put on fice, asked Richard
I ana Bouderi and Fere State eventually in- two years - ol
violate federal regula-
tions for admitting and
Casillas of the INS' San
Antonio office for
In civil action last elan I leat ion 1 w o
in Austin on nuing demonstrations September, a court fin- weeks ago, Casillas rul-
80, when' would jeopardize the ed the five $200 each ed the oaths did not
for public disruption.
New trouble,
however, arose when keeping foreign
the five appealled the students in the U.S.
lines. 1 he students, ac-
ting on the advice ol Casillas added that,
their attorney, signed even it the students'
oaths ol indigency last conviction is upheld.
October, declaring there is not sufficient
themselves unable to grounds foi deporting
I OS ANGEl.fcS, repeatedly distributed pay the $7,000 in court them unless their con-
khereadman tervened out of fear the disciplinary probation.
ig 26 people hunger strike and conti-
.IV i
shouted down a negotiations then un-
by I eievdoun folding foi the release
University Violates
Privacy Regulations
A negations Denied
By Rental Manager
IV PS
time
lot the sixth memos concerning costs necessary to carry duet is meaningfully
n as many students' privacy aftei then appeal to the disruptive" or causes
employee similar incidents during rexas Criminal Court. them to be expelled
I he oaths led the from school.
Continued From Page I
reporter. "I had 18 hours this
semester and school had to come
lust. 1 hat's why I couldn't meet
any time he wanted.
"1 also couldn't believe nothing
was said about how much I ap-
preciate the auditors' recommenda-
tions. 1 think the auditors do an ex-
cellent job. 1 hey help me tremen-
dously Walters added.
Concerning threats Walters
allegedly made, he claims he did not
know who would have broken into
the warehouse. "I honestly believ-
ed, though, that someone had pur-
posely done thai (broken in) to
make the refrigeration office look
had. It was such a coincidence thai
the break-in happened the same
week the auditor's report came out.
1 sincerely thought it could have
been someone trying to make me
look bad he said.
Walters commented on Marvin
1 ittle's statement in last Thursday's
edition of The East Carolinian. "He
never told me our system was in-
competent and he's had plenty ol
opportunities. I don't know why he
wouldn't have told me bv now.
lilt t s I N( ! IM'W
Al'kll 2K, 19X1
"I feel responsibility to the
students Wallets continued "To
my knowledge, we have not lost one
penney from any transactions with
students in the last two years
Byland commented on Walters
statement concerning certain people
allegedly try ing to nunhai lie Shei
rod's and his reputations. "That's
ridiculous she said. "I'm jusl tell
ing the truth because it needs to be
told. I'm not out "to get"
anybody
Byland stands bv the statement
she submitted to Mallory. "In my
heart, I know I'm telling the (ruth.
One me a stack ol Bibles and I'll
sweat to it. It it came to court, yes,
I'd go. I've given my statement and
that's all I can do. He (Wallets)
knows how to plav bureaucratic
ball, and I don't
"It you can't get justice bv telling
the truth, then there's no winning
she said.
Clyde Johnson, a t unt or
chemistry major, has been ap
pointed as the next refrigeratoi ren-
tal manager. Walters' term will end
May 30 and Johnson will take ovei
his new duties June 1.
tf you are a Senior
-j.t Nursing
�� Student

� r . . : '
m 8SN Ml N tccna-fd
proqrtm. It Ait Fore tos �n
opportunity usr tot fov
ft
- a u
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PlWltCl
C fi ?' � 'EODGE CARSTEft
so . iMQ D� SU' ' f
- I
� . ��-�
i : ,etsttv ot receni months
ornia 1 os Angeles
. primanded
fidential
.�tit records in
aces, thus
both universi-
ty and federal
line pi i ,io
idents' records.
i e s i s
me ts from I
� William Allen's
omics classe left
on a table oui side
c office I a s i
& presumably so
student s could pick
up & promoted a
llen ti om the
of-
si ucieni s

,
me
m i n
Ocan Kav
�Mien was
V 1
iV
Pipe
Dreams
University Arcade
218 Bb. 5th St.
752-4811
The Sale You've Waited for . .
Our 2nd
Anniversary Sale
WedThurs. � April 29-30
��
Glossy or silk finish
is available
COME TO THE STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
FOR FAST. QUALITY PHOTO FINISHING fIT
EVERY DAY LOW PRICES
12 exp. color film 2.99
20 exp. color film 4.55
24 exp. color film 5.46
36 exp. color film 7.84
We offer complete film processing services:
Black & White, Color Slides, Movies, Enlargements, Reprints
Satisfaction Guaranteed
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
owned and operated by East Carolina University
.�

' 1
L
ALWAYS FRESH
DAIRY FOODS
Supermarket, Inc.
'o
ft
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
P.O. Box 2 � 211 Jarvis St. � Greenville, N.C. 27834 � Phone: 752-5025
A full line of
John Morrell Meats:
��at
Sirloin & T-Bones
Round Steaks
Beef Stew
Bacon
Sausage
� Name Brand Can Goods
� Cleaning and Household
Products
� Fresh Produce
Section
Welcome Students! We know you are busy now, but we would like to
take a lew minutes of your time to tell you about Overton's.
We are conveniently located at the comer of Third and Jarvis Streets
only 2 blocks from t,CU and near downtown Greenville.
Overton's, a hometown family owned supermarket, features every day
low prices on over 300 items, Greenville's lowest meat prices, and deep-
cut advertised specials - plus 'clip-the-coupon' items. At Overton's we
pledge to you to do our part to stop high food costs. No stamps, no
games, no gimmicks, no frills - just our promise to save you money.
Come see why more and more people are shopping at Overton .i every
day.
Sincerely yours,
v ' -
Overton's Supermarket, Inc.
Summit
J�rviS
We have a full line of party
supplies including KEG beer!
We cash personal checks for students.
I 5�





(Hire iEaat (Earnltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paui COLI ins. ���,�, ��
JimmyDwmiee, uu�u�u i �
Paui Lincke, i ��� Deborah Hoiai inci, vi,
Chris Lichok. ��� �� CharlesChanim lr ,����
Al ISON BaRTKI . IMkwm Mta�n DAVID NORRIS. i,a,u, I,i��,
April 28, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Surplus
Legislature Needs New Planning
In this day and age, financial talk
is usually of budget cuts and
deficits, rarely of surpluses. As we
approach the end of the school year,
however, the SGA has more than
$47,000 in unappropriated funds
available.
Treasurer Kirk Little attributes
the surplus to what he calls a conser-
vative legislature. "They believe
very strongly in zero-based
budgeting he explained. "They
examine everything very closely and
were extremely conservative
On the surface the problem is a
pleasant one, surpluses are always
preferable to deficits, but the situa-
tion does point out one of the
SGA's fundamental problems-
lack of direction.
The legislature appropriated in
excess of S90,000 this year, but most
of it was done in a haphazard
tshion. If g up came the
legislature with a request for fun-
ding, it was given consideration,
rhe �' '
i ,an how joA litoiicj should DC
spent, there was no overall game
plan.
Guidelines for appropriations
were established by Ben Singleton,
chairman of the appropriations
committee. But they do not specify
who should receive money, only
who should not receive it.
In other words, the SGA, for the
most part, took a passive role ap-
propriations when it should have
taken an active one.
Instead of waiting to be ap-
proached by groups, the SGA
Legislature needs to devise a master
plan for spending each year. This
plan should represent the organiza-
tion's goals for the year and ways to
implement these goals.
For instance, it has been sug-
gested that the SGA take a more ac-
tive role in the selection of faculty.
Many student governments sponsor
polls in which the student body is
given an opportunity to rate faculty
members. The results oi these polls
are then published, and students can
see how their peers rate the pro-
fessors they are likely to face.
Such a project would be a perfect
undertaking for student government
at ECU. Other woiihwh; e
endeavors could certainly be found
with a little initiative.
h til ! b aise I
aKiiig a hard-nosed attitude toward
spending, but that attitude can be
carried too far. It the SGA cannot
find worthwhile ways to spend the
money given to it, perhaps the
university should consider reducing
the amount it receives. After all,
what student would not be glad to
pay a little less in student fees?
Press Must Be Trusted
Recent events on campus and
around the country have brought up
the question of press ethics. Janet
Cooke of The Washington Post had
her Pulitzer Prize taken away and
lost her job when she admitted to
fabricating a story about an eight-
year-old heroin addict.
Several people have claimed in re-
cent weeks that The East Carolinian
has misquoted them or
misrepresented what they said.
Trusted as we are with a great
responsibility to the public, we have
a duty to report our mistakes when
our reporters are wrong.
But we also have an obligation to
stand by our reporters when we feel
they feel they are right.
Complete accuracy and objectivi-
ty are ideals to strive for. Bias is an
inherent part of human nature; it is
the reporter's job to minimize it and
keep it from affecting the story.
In this matter, editors can only
trust their reporters. But it is not a
trust easily given� it must be earn-
ed through performance. Writers
should be broken in slowly and
given increased responsibility as
they earn it. This is how trust is
developed.
Regrettably, Janet Cooke
violated this trust, and we all suffer
for it. However, we can not allow
this violation to destroy trust that
has been established in other in-
stances, that would be guilt by
association.
Members of the press are in a
tenuous situation; our watchdog
role ensures that. We win few
friends, but popularity is not our
goal. Our goal is to inform our
readers as accurately and objective-
ly as is humanly possible.
l�1Ji iW .� 1 i
- Campus Forum
Refrigerator Story Rebutted
This letter is in reference to your
feature on the S.G.A. refrigerators in
your April 23 issue. 1 would like to com-
mend Ed Walters for doing a fine job in
the past two years that he has been
refrigerator manager. 1 believe he has
"ii the interest of the students to heart
tit has done much to improve on the
system presently employed.
In my dealings with Ed in the past
three years I feel that he has successfully
and sincerely strived to improve the
refrigerator rental system. Although he
has not achieved all the goals he has
strived for in his management of this
operation, I still think he should be com-
mended rather than criticized for his ef-
forts as has been the policy of this bird-
cage liner, you call a newspaper, in this
instance and in the criticism of others in
the past.
CLYDE JOHNSON
Junior, Chemistry
Hoax Perpetrated
I would like to take this opportunity
to call to the attention of the student
population the hoax perpetuated upon
myself and several others by a so-called
reputable night club, Papa Katz.
Papa Katz, together with the Beta Mil
Sisters and Record Bar, co-sponsored a
highly advertised New Wave dance con-
test in which more than $500 was to be
awarded to the winners. Despite a
relatively large turnout on the contest
night, a Sunday, Papa Katz decided to
change the rules � to suit their promo-
tional gimmick 1 suppose � and in-
troduced a series of elimination dance
contests to be held on successive Sunday,
nights beginning with the next Sunday.
According to the nev rules ten couples
would be selected from these series oi
eliminations and each would return for
the "main dance off" on April 5.
My partner and I along with several
others showed up on that first night (a
rainy night immediately following spring
break) and due to a lack of turnout were
declared winners and thus could advance
to the finals by default.
Soon after this disasterous night, 1
noticed that all leaflets and advertise-
ment announcing the finals had dissap-
peared from the campus including the
one which had appeared in The East
Carolinian. Nevertheless, we showed up
for the finals anyway, but much to our
chagrin discovered that Papa Kat had
postponed the contest becaue o a
"broken water main
Disgusted as we were by the whole af-
fair, we were advised by the manager not
to be alarmed, but to return next Sun-
day, which we did a la the same results
minus the broken water main.
It seemed, thereafter, that nobody at
the establishments aforementioned
wanted to discuss the events leading up
to this sham.
My first reaction was anger, not
because I felt we were due any prize
money, but because o the dishonest)
surrounding the proceedings o the en-
tire contest. After seeking legal counsel,
I was advised not to pursue legal action
in small claims court which was my t:r;
objective, because ol the lengthiness and
time involved in such a suit; however, I
felt and still do that some retribution is
due for lost entrance tees. gas. and
preparations not to mention studs time
which was sacrificed.
My last appeal will be to you. the
students of this university whose ex-
ploitation in cases such as this should
not go without criticism.
DAVID MAREADY
Junior, Math
Forum Rules
The Last Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the (ld South
Building, across from Joyner library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten paees,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Events Point To Hopeful Future
By DIANE ANDERSON
All good things must come to an end.
Summer is finally here, and with its begin-
ning, another school year has been com-
pleted. The year's events have been pro-
ductive, and some have taught us many
lessons, leaving us with a hopeful outlook
towards Fall of 1981.
Among the good things that have taken
place this year are the many philanthropic
projects that the campus has participated
in. Included in these activities are the Walk
for Humanity, Handicap Awareness Week
and other community projects and special
events.
Campus participation in these activities
was commendable, and 1 hope that next
year will see even more support and en-
thusiasm for such worthwhile endeavors.
The SGA had some ups and downs this
year, but with a new administration at the
helm, 1 am left with hopeful anticipation
for their success in the upcoming year.
A major improvement is expected in the
professionally and enthusiasm of the SGA
representatives, with a more smoothly run
administration.
A more clear interpretation of its con-
stitution and by-laws should prevent the
possibility of another set of elections like
the ones we recently experienced.
There is also the hope for more campus
interest and support for the SGA and its
activities. The administration will be
stronger with active support from the stu-
dent body.
Another exciting aspect of this year is
the expansion of the computer center. Its
continued growth will not only mean a
much more effective and up-to-date
registration system, but a streamlining of
all of the areas in which the system is used.
These modern innovations should also
be encouraged throughout the ad-
ministrative area of the university.
There were plenty oi activities around With everyone anticipating final exams
campus during the year to keep students and looking forward to the summer, we
busy when they wanted to get away from
studying. Mendenhall Student Center had
a variety of good movies, recreational
games; and the activities on the mall were
interesting and fun.
can be optimistic that next year will be bet-
ter than ever, and we can be proud to say
that we are part oi exciting, up and coming
last Carolina University
Duty, Honor, Country
By DAVID E. GIEEESPIE
Duty, honor, country. The late Gen.
Douglas MacArthur made those words his
personal credo. The words occurred to me
recently as stories about the death of Gen.
Omar Nelson Bradley brought portions of
my life flashing past again.
I was in one of the divisions under
Bradley's command during World War II
in Europe. But I never saw him in person
until last January during the inaugural gala
at the Capital Center in Maryland. An aide
pushed the wheelchair-bound Bradley into
the spotlight for a well-deserved ovation.
I learned most that 1 know about
"Brad" from others. For example, Ernie
Pyle and Ernest Hemingway wrote about
him during the war. When it fell my lot to
write a World War 11 history of my regi-
ment after V-E Day, my research tracked
Gen. Bradley and his troops through
North Africa, Sicily, France, Belgium and
Germany.
One thing that came through clearly
about Bradley was his concern for his
troops. He was a superb tactician, but he
shrank from spending the lives of his men
if advances could be made by other
means� artillery and aerial bombard
ment, in particular, and swift armored en-
circlement of the kind that Gen. George S.
Patton mastered.
Bradley grieved over the heavy loss of
life in the Normandy invasion. He never
ceased to marvel at how American GIs,
weighed down with equipment, managed
to scale the heights oi the French coast
from the beaches and grab a toot hold on
the continent.
Later, the ex-Missouri farm boy got
criticism for the slowness oi the American
advance through the hedgerows oi' Nor-
mandy. But that was tough going. The
Germans were dug in well and had clear
fields of fire from one hedgerow to the
other. Tanks were vulnerable to
penetrating fire when they attempted to
cross the hedgerows. He also had the
messy job of having to clear out the Cher-
bourg Peninsula on the American flank
while trying to press ahead.
The Ninth Division, which I was to join
later in Belgium, had the job of cutting the
peninsula and then, with two other divi-
sions, taking the port of Cherbourg.
Ernie Pyle, who was killed later in the
war on a Pacific island by a Japanese
sniper, sent this report to the papers back
home: "The Ninth is good. It performed
like a beautiful machine in the Cherbourg
campaignIt kept tenanciously on the
enemy's neckIt never gave them (the
Germans) a chance to reassemble or get
their balance
(David Gillespie is an editorial writer on
the stajj oj The Mews and Observer.)
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IHl I-AS I CAROl INIAN
Features
AI'Kli 28. 1VKI
I'age 5
I)an Cannon. country and western singer Willie Nelson and sultry Amy
Irving star in "Honeysuckle Rose this weekend's free flick at
Mendenhall Student (enter's Hendrix theatre. "Honeysuckle Rose"
marks the first starring role for the talented Nelson. Times for the film
are 5, 7:15, and 9:30 p.m. The film is sponsored h the ECU Student
Union Films Committee.
Mother's Finest Concert
Band Plays To Enthusiastic Crowd
By JOHN VVEYLER
The lady in BAAADD. There is
no other word to accurately describe
Joyce "Call Me Babv Jean" Ken-
nedy in concert Sunday night (April
26! at the Attic. She sang, strutted
I shook with an intensity that far
outshone the band supporting her.
Mother's Finest. In fact, you could
go so far as to say Baby Jean IS
Mother's Finest. At least, she's one
ot the finest this mutha's ever seen.
The other Mothers, Cilenn Mur-
doch (vocals), Gary "Moses Mo"
Moore (guitar). Jerry "Wizzard"
Seay (bass), and Barry "B.B.
Queen" Borden (drums), helped
keep the crowd happy and hot.
Missing was keyboardist Mike
Today's Trivia Quiz
Tests Knowledge Of
Adventure Movies
B DAVID.NORMS
and
WILLIAM YELVERTON
1. What was Ben-Hur's full
name
2. What war was going on in the
movie "African Queen"?
3. Name the German gunboat
that Bogart and Hepburn were try-
ing to sink in "The African
Queen
4. Who played Aaron in "The
Ten Commandments"?
5. True or lalse: Sam Peekin-
paugh pioneered the use of slow-
motion photography in violent
adventure films.
6. Who played President
Theodore Roosevelt in "The Wind
�i, i The I ion"? (Hint: he also
placed on a TV sitcom during the
1960's.)
7. Who are the Three
Musketeers? (Their fictional names,
not actors from any particular
movie.)
8. Who starred in the first Tarzan
film made? (It was not Johnny
Weissmuller.)
9. Who was famous for playing
Jungle Jim in movies and TV?
10. Who was the king of England
in most Robin Hood films? He was
usually gone off crusading or
something.
11. In "The Adventures of Robin
Hood" with Errol Flynn, who
played the villianous Guy of
Gisbourne? (He also played
See TODAY'S, page 7, col. 1
Keck. Rumor has it that he's gone
for good, but a replacement has not
yet been found, as Sunday night
they played keyboardless.
An opening act was provided by
Ziggurat, a rock'n'roll band con-
sisting of Nathan Barfield (lead
guitar & vocals), Russell Daniel
(drums & vocals). Bob Geresti
(keyboard & vocais), Don
McWhorter (bass & vocals) and
Dave Sansom (iead vocals). Their
printed publicity states, "while cer-
tain passags, licks and chord struc-
tures may indeed remind the listener
of another, better-known band, the
tapestry o' eloquence within
simplicity makes such analogies on-
ly fleetingly valid
Whether that statement is true or
not, the fact is that Ziggurat is a de-
cent rock group. They kept the au-
dience entertained though it was a
bit restless, as everyone was eager to
see the star attraction and had
already endured a long wait outside.
The MFers took the stage at 11:00
and held it tightly in their grasp for
an hour and a half.
The Mother's blend of rock and
funk went over well with the jam-
packed, enthusiastic crowd. It was
the groups' first appearance at the
Attic, though they've played at
ECU a few times before. Selections
for the evening ranged from their hit
songs "Baby Love" and "Mickey's
Monkey" to Jefferson Airplane's
"Somebody to Love" and the Roll-
ing Stones' "Satisfaction The lat-
ter proved that "Baby Jean" Ken-
nedy is not only a better singer but
also prettier than Mick Jaggcr.
Kennedy's been called, "the per-
former that Grace Slick could have
been had she only been black and
is often compared to Chaka Khan,
but she is really incomparable. In a
semi-revealing shirt and tight jeans.
Baby Jean just about set the stage
on fire. She was all over the place,
bumping and grinding, shaking, rat-
tling and rolling, playing to and
with the audience, entreating them
to join her in song, and otherwise
nisi generally going berserk.
She and Murdock, who have been
playing together for around ten
years, form the background oi the
group. Critic C.A. Bustard, who
personally considers Mother's
Finest the best rock band in
America, has described the duo
thusly: "Their onstage movements,
apparently spontaneous, make
"The Dance of the Seven Veils"
seem like Vaudeville by comparison.
Their singing tests the physical and
emotional limits unlike anything
you will hear outside a black
Pentecostal church
Easy Test
The easiest national test for a
driver's license is given in Egypt,
where applicants must show thev
can drive about 20 feet in forward
and reverse.
'Honeysuckle Rose'
Is Final Free Flick
Of The Semester
"For twenty years he's been sing
ing to the country, but he never
figured he'd be living his own love
songs
This Friday and Saturdav night at
5, 7:15, and 9:30 p.m. in
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre, the
Student Union Films Committee
will present Willie Nelson in
"Honeysuckle Rose Admission is
by ID and Activity Card or MSC
Membership Card.
Willie Nelson, fabulous superstar
of country music, captures his first
starring role as Buck Bonham. a
footloose, weatherbcaten country
singer in this contemporary roman-
tic drama based on the story by
Gosta Steven and Gustav Molaner.
Dyan Cannon packs some roman-
tic fireworks as Nelson's gutsy,
loyal wife who stands by her man,
lighting his wandering ways and in-
fidelity with his pretty young guitar-
pickin' girlfriend, lily, played by
sultry Amy Irving.
Buck and his troupe ramble
across the countryside playing in
smoke-filled halls and saloons. The
film sparkles with favorite Nelson
songs including fresh new numbers
like his "On the Road Again
"Honeysuckle Rose" takes its cue
from the plangent homilies of coun-
try music. Buck Bonham (Nelson) is
a moderately successful singer with
a strong, loving wife (Dyan Can-
non), an adoring son (Joey Floyd)
and � shift to a minor key here �
an ambitious girl guitarist (Amy Irv-
ing) who snakes her way into Buck's
band and bed.
Once she and Buck become
lovers, the dramatic tension
slackens. Seven decades of movie
romance have prepared the audience
for a climactic reconciliation of
Buck and his wile.
And since Amy Irving acts as if
she bought her clothes and accent at
Bloomingdale's. Buck's infatuation
seems perfunctory.
It is simply one long bumpy road
he must travel on his way back to
home and honey.
For much of the trip, though,
"Honeysuckle Rose" provides
good, earthy company. And when
Nelson and Cannon team to sine a
sexy country duet, the romantic
charge is as strong as any pairing
since Leslie Howard and Ingrid
Bergman � or at least since Kermit
and Miss Piggy.
Rhythm-and-blues band The Niyhthawks Mill be performing at The Attic
tonight. The band consists of Mark Wenner, Jim Thackery, Jan
Zukowski and Pete Ragusa.
The Versatile Potato
Offers Many Recipes
ByKATHYWFYFFR
Through the years, the poor
potato has gotten a bad name. Com-
pletely misunderstood, the potato
has acquired the reputation of a
calorie-laden monster, a diet
wrecker, a complexion ruiner (when
fried), and heaven only knows what
else. This hideous reputation is com-
pletely undeserved. Believe it or not.
a medium sized potato has approx-
imately the same number of calories
as an apple of the same size! In ad-
dition, potatoes contain vitamins A,
C and G as well as some minerals
and even a little protein.
When buying potatoes select
those that are fairly regular in shape
with as few eyes as possible. Califor-
nia long white potatoes have almost
no eyes but they are often difficult
to find. Don't buy or use sprouted
potatoes that have turned green
from exposure to light� the green
parts and the sprouts are poisonous!
If you only need a few small
potatoes, you might consider buying
canned potatoes for their conve-
nience. They are easier to store but
may have an unpleasant "tinny"
taste from the can. Fresh potatoes
should be stored in a cool, dry, dark
place. Some cooks have discovered
See VERSATILE, page 7, col. 1
New Wave Music And Clubs:
'This Ain't No Foolin' Around'
By STEVE BACHNER
1 he mirrored ball high in the ar-
ched roof ot the new dance hall
remembered ils role, turning sedate-
ly to cast speckled circles o light on
the laces ot the dancers. Indeed the
dancers themselves, some with
shocking pink hair, others in wide-
shouldered leopard skin jump suits,
were two-stepping � but not in the
fashion of the slick kids who had
danced in this very same club just a
couple ot years before.
No. this wasn't happening in
Greenville. It was the scene at one ot
Atlanta's hottest new clubs. I he
limelight, shortly alter the
Christmas holidays last year. I hese
dancers were hopping rhythmically
from one loot to another � one.
two, one two � to a brand new
beat, a mixture ol the hard
tour tour ot rock 'n' roll and the
slight syncopation of West Indian
ska music, pumped out by a British
band called I he Specials, a beat
that, coming through a few million
dollars worth of stereo equipment,
made standing still a waste of legs.
White shirts and shapeless jackets
apparently bequeathed by the death
of a salesman; grey porkpie hats
tucked over haircuts so short the
scalp gleamed through; ordinary
faces hidden partially by dark
sunglasses � this was the look of
one group that hung tightly by the
bar for most of the evening.
Was there anything like this in the
'60s? Sure, the energy. Is there
anything even remotely like this here
in Greenville? No, not really. Not
yet, anyway.
The Atlanta crowd, like others all
over the U.S Britain, and beyond,
really lives the message carried in its
music: "It's better than pleasure
and it hurts more than pain Con-
tori your body and adjust your
soul" are the '50s-style instructions
to a dance song by James White and
The Blacks.
The energy of new wave is
reminiscent of the mid60s, when
that first British rock invasion
changed the look and heart of a
generation, and some fans contend
that the new music � which in-
cludes more styles and sounds every
moment � is just a revival of good
old rock 'n' roll.
One local band, All You Can Eat,
plays a sampling of the old '60s
tunes, cranking out familiar radio
classics like The Who's "Go to the
Mirror Boy but are at their best
when rendering current songs by
bands like The Police, Dirty Looks,
The Ramones, and Blondie. Here
one can listen to the pared-down
musical arrangements, the dissonant
guitar, the sometimes annihilating
beat, the steady bass-line, the
compressed-sounding voice of lead
vocalist Stacy Heller with its rich
edge trimmed off, the mingled wit
and cool despair of the lyrics.
So far All You Can Fat has battl-
ed at the constraints of Greenville's
Rathskeller but will move into JJ's
Music Hall this Friday and Saturday
night to play in conjunction with
Allan Handelman's "New Wave
Party The band's sound is
danceable and, appropriately
enough, there will be a dance con-
test on Friday night.
So, even in an area where disco
and beach music still hang in the air
as thick as the musk oil worn by
many of its followers, some local
bands are performing what is
undeniably music for the '80s, for
See HOT, page 7, eol. 1
Photo by JON JORDAN
f-noio oy jo
'All You Can EaV Performing At JJ's This Weekend
From left to right: bassist Bruee Hall, lead singer Stacy Heller, drummer Greg Boy kin and guitarist Henry
White. "All You Can Fat" will be performing this Friday and Saturday night at JJ's Music Hall in downtown
Greenville. The band will play in conjunction with Allan Handelman's "New Wae Party" and a dance con-
test is to be held on Friday.
T
I
'
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l'HI t si i ko IM
M'KIl . llM
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FOR RENT
ApT F-OR I t AS ���
Georgetown Huns tiom mid Mav
to Mia August Call '�8 0123
ROOMMATES WANTED Mice
house n 4th St near campus ond
downtown Fiom mid Mav 'o mid
August Call f$l 2659
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Only 7J pt-i month
plus one th;(d utilities Pi ��
'oom ai condition Withm walk
mo, 0-stani.e ot campus Fo sum
mer only Cj 'J I - i
ask tor Brtki Hi "� . � s
PERSONS NEEDt D
sub lease apt
Located on E 31 o Street
bedrooms pa It nsnod HVatei
inc ijded in r em Fi
mation call S8
LARGE BEDROOM Foi rent an
conditioned utilities included
Across liom campus
'46 :sss
FEMALE KOOV
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apt i bloc �
month one "i
sauna and tennis i.
i a til
ROOMMATE A � I �
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and utilities Ct
ACT FOR SUBLET 1
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Located at River-biut' 1175 pi"
month �" OS'4 01 til 8006
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
Can
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FEMALE ROOMMATE
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share 7 btdroon- � . Lo�
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campus IIS n plif one
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and tall sessioni M
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WANTED To share largi h
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available Cai 's; j -
FOR RENT On
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to subieasi -
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FOR 5UMME NCW
OAK MON1 ' � (
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to Mid August Can
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hoi ��� On -th St near i a 'V,
downtown From mid Mas to mid
Auqust Call 7s; J6S"
II M J L I ROOM M A TI
WANTED On Is S p.
plus on, rfi.irj u IteS '
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included For i
mation can rSI s
LARGE BEDROOM i rent an
' oned Utilities mt luded
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MEED ' MOVE IN WITH
established
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WANTED '
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FOR SALE
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p to TOO othii , price package
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Of
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.I � N rHI NEXT ; s.su t
nRadio XhaekT")
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3rd S'
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Radio
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ph. 752-3223
A
EVEN IN SPACE
THE ULTIMATE ENEMY IS STILL MAN.
Ifrnfi
SEAN CONNERY in
"OUTUND"
PETER BOYLE
FRANCES STERNHAGEN JAMES B. SIKKING KIKA MARKHAM
Produced by RICHARD A. ROTH Executive Producer STANLEY O'TOOLE
Music by JERRY GOLDSMITH Written and Directed by PETER HYAMS
Wttyisitw
iitMnnaxiji
MAO THI VAkNf
A LAOO COMPANV RELEASE
MM WABNW I0O5
KMIBNte COMMUMCAIONS COMPMTr
SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS BEGIN MAY AND JUNE
Vei
LjMOt)b fidovTCocLeGC . Thc Hao lA,y
IN Gc)rj Got T�osr
GftwvfiiTiOrj invitation:
I StMT �vi TO Rtt n
Aro rfV� worn TVAr ,
f fUOQCf; books
Qa wis
tfU AJ07
6rPUATM( f
Senior Music Recitals Announced
Violisl Jeffrey Hert-
zberg of Kill Devil Hills
and Roslyn, N.Y. and
i o 1 i n i st Katherine
Campbell of Oxford
and Morganton, senior
students in the East
Carolina University
School o Music, will
perform Friday, April
24, at 9 p.m. in the
Fletcher Music (enter
Recital Hall.
Both are students of
Dr. Rodney Schmidt of
the ECU School o
Music strings faculty.
Hertzberg, a can-
didate for the Bachelor
ot Music degree in
music therapy, will per-
form Bela Bartok's
"Night in the Village"
and "Slovak Peasant's
D a n ce" and the
Schubert "Arpeggione
Sonata
Piano accompanist
will be Roberta Cumm-
mgs.
His parents are Ed-
ward and Esther Hert-
zberg of 5 The Inter
vale. Roslyn, N.Y.
Kat herine Campbell,
a candidate for the
Bachelor of Music
Education degree, will
be featuied in
Beethoven's "Spring"
Sonata in F Major,
Opus 24, Bartok's
Rumanian i oik Dai
and William Ki
"Banjo and id
Pianist l
Braxton will be pia
accompanists.
She is a residei
College Si . 'i
and a formei i
ol Morganl i
I eresa Mane (iui
soprano a juni
student in the 1 ast
Carolina I
School ol M .
perform in
day, p;i: 24
Hot
Mar
(.11:
mm
SHOE
HI r 4th St
Oreenvill N C
REPAIR
Downtown Greenville
Across From
Bount Harvey
Parking In
Front & Back
Of Shoo
PHONE
7580204
OPTICIANS
10 Discount to Students & Focualty
Over 1,000 Frames to choose from
Single Vision-White Glass Lenses $19 o
Bifocal Lenses � White Glass130 so
Single Vision Photo Gray Lenses12.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra$32 SC
Bifocal Lenses Photo Grayi3i.so
Soft Contact Lenses
$89.95
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
Parkievommons
(across from Doctors Park)
I .a � . �
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force scholar
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
dicat schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
ihomore year. The
scholarship provides for tur
tion, books, lab fees and
jipment, plus a S400 mon
. allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
high cost of medical
a tion
Contact
qr Bob Pne
Profes
ting
Suite G: Navaho
Or
Rateigh N
PAIR FORCE
��
GRADUATE
FROM
By joining the Army tor certain sp
get port ot your college debt fi �
Here s how it works
h you ve attended colli . S . v- , :
n ot .�. Juaranteed Student 1 oai
Ni 5 ,ind qua I lent s.ir
iol mn debt ' ��lsU
Tod,
Acl
W.
tv.shrv i
-r.
Obv iousl .i three-yeat ei
100� .ol your debt But it you want ;i sh n
can still receive 2 5 loan krgi t
enlistment iv.nK the Army
Oi you might consider sen irvj in tl
Ann Reserve liyouqualih as iRc
s� "� ist yi �u v an ta home get p;ud
tor your active duty and riL-i
IS'o loan forgiveness i a $50
whu r ei is greater) tor
ch year ot service
.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE

M
�Eat n up to
� Pull, i(tn
A





I ersatile Potato Offers Many Recipes
i mil mm (I 11 mil p.tea 5
Hot New C lub Scene
Marks Eighties' Music
liatel cui Place in a shallow greased baking
p ot each dish and brush with aboul I cup
n and present melted buttei 01 i risco Sprinkle
lightly with salt. Bake at 450 degrees
dories low loi twent live minutes, basting
! i asionalh with extra lai Serve and
eal in -a 01!
Scalloped Potatoes
If ith C heese
1 im .( tanciei potato dish H
S 1 1 OP! I) POTATOES VYIIH
i HI 1 M Pare and slue thin three
edium sized potatoes. Heal one
i k i earn ol mushi oom iw celei
stii in 1 4 cup gi ated cheese
Poui this mixture ovei potatoes in a
hth creased casserole di-di and
miIi bread
paprika Hal

� :
I i Ml!
I'( I I . JP
'
sal!
adi
I
I
ake loi about one houi
esl loi don
a! J25
A ith a
nothei one-dish meal with
latoes as a mam dient is
PO'l I (fc I'll . Prepare packaged
ished potatoes, or make youi own
am want to take the lime and
iblc I ine a greased pie pan with
potatoes to a thickness ol ab
nch 1 ill the centei w ii li crea
fish, chicken oi meal am: 11
h additional p
pi i n
s )SS()
Kl PAIR
Grandi i
I . "
I ft hnh al
Fdectroni b
And
Main��-nan t-

liitin. ideo,
2 W �
mnmunil utions
Vlainli
('ii i ii11 in
I In rliiul i
(1)1 !
H
I IV( I
( onvenieleh I w ,
liloi k oftampu
I'uk I p and Delhi
vaitahle
'Ml I a V arrant
Period
Today's Trivia Quiz:
d vent are Mo vies
1.1 - i iiii
V J
s II
� I
� si y .
i i
w � �
J sJ.IW l
Mount Olive College
SUMMER SCHOOL
1981
Term A
Term B
( � �
Din
May 25 June 12
June 15 July 17
� 11 ansti i abli lo Othi i Colli qi
and Untvi rsitn
�Christian Atm
ed Facilitn
e, N
919
j)NEYSUCKLE
For20 n stngint to the country
But he never fmurei
�. be living his own love sonns
r
"When Nelson and Cannon team to sing a sexy
country duet the romantic charge is as strong as
any pairing
� Richard Corliss, TIME
'HONEYSUCKLE HOSE is a celebration of man,
and a king of music, and a part of the country,
and a life style-and it is intelligent as well as
warm-spirited
� Charles Champlin, LOS ANGELES TIMES
DATE: May 1 and 2
TIME: 5 7:15, 9:30 P.M
PLACE: Hendrix Theatre
PRICE: ID ai,d Activity Card
SPO N SORED BY THE
STUDENT UNION
E1EMS COMMITTEE





ka
ill I s ! I XKi l ll W
Sports
Athletes Of The Year Are Named
Collins Gets Male Award,
Sets Sights On Pro Draft
u iiuhiim H wm i k
rom Pi
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nv (
Mil
Vthlct�
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was
e-
Si
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him ahead ot such

S
bruised his ribs before 0111 lirsi
ai Duke and was bothered
it eai Also, we dad
to go with a first yeai quartci
back and an inexperienced line
1 hat makes it toui m een the
he compeii
we faced
I moi y pointed
i olhns averaged 4 f1 yards pei
carry despite the inefticienl line

. Bik inentoi also said thai
his stai senioi did not finish as
���
k 1C k I (
. . � � the team
� i. brought so nun � h
It
d been
c stat consch i e could
riished numbei one I
�w - the calibei ol kid
is He's s ot cI;
of) the field
Loll � I by
. �
I moi
Jica
Perhaps iI �ffensii
; And
dial
moi e i. leai b.
VV e' x e I �
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'Hut wl ai I
11 Oiler Cs manage!
I his
:
Two-Sporter Riley Wins
Second C onsecutive A ward
.at
.IIMMN Dnl'KI I

Whei
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be considen
and
Rile
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( ollins balances, reaches lor eaten, and signifies what
t�und he'd iik. i; be drafted in.
(
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head
Wha d a
. Hi I
ai the running back positions and


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Kath Hikx displays both of her intercollegiete skills softball and basketball,
Purple
Defeats
Gold
IU H KI f s It M)I I �

-
Down UNC In Finals
Lady Hues Win Title
I
the
P ii pie
I
i Iroi ua
B � ntci
i� . o
1 � : : -
he Gi ld 4
. quai lei bat I
h tighl
I � � ; ai d
i ball all the
I � . � a.i three rum
I alfbaek
, a a
fumbled � end one and
I by halfbacl lames M
mpi failed
ei up 6-0
1 . ked the iold I
vhen Chuck Bishi�
first touchdov I he
Purple' Vn �n recovered
the Ciold yard line and the
Pirates Scramble I �r Fumble In Purple-Gold (�ame
game's tone was set. back S - intercepted a
Bvnei got the call once again, this Stexxari pa �e mo
linn into the ball and scor- ed the ball lJ trple fout ya
put his team up 12-0. A two line before kG raid Sykes
pom: conversion attempt via the interce Bi .sat the one
ground by Stewart tailed yard line.
he final score of the game came II Gold ved to the Pin
in the second quarter, the Purple pie 1 m the fourth period, only to
team driving 4.1 yard from theii get stopped on downs aftei fakii
own 42 to the Gold 15 before calling field
on placekickei Pere to attempt a he Pur : the
31-yard field goal. Hie ball soared game offensively, outg the
thiough the uprights as the Purple Gold quad 27: � I io 1S2. right
finished the game' ring, going end the star, grabbing
up 15-0 loui ca Is, includ
I he iold team did not go down one Ml nn ! imidst a con
with light, though, advancing tingeni ot delenders.
siv times aftei the first period in ti Id fullhacl hip Simmon
Purple territory only to come away ' i lech, was the
empty each time On most occasions game's leading rusher, p up 47
turnovers ruined excellent oppot yards on 13 carries. Purple backs
tunitic lame Martin and ndre Bentley
rhe beM shot loi the Ciold came followed with Aud M) yard out
hi the third period Mtci defensive puts, respectively
') u us
i pie. (haw
� �" �� � �
Bv Wll I I n II M KION
when ii seemed the top-
ranked 1 ady Bucs would be stopped
from playing theii game lot the se-
cond outing in a iou. the team's
nevei say die attitude prevailed,
thus enabling the Bucs to score two
runs in the seventh to beat � arolina
i and capture iht State champion-
ship
"We let them beat us Dillon
noted aftei a 3 I deleat by the 1 at
Heels in Saturday's second game.
�� I hey played very well they kick
ed Sta it ot the toutnament but
wi had six errors, and they killed us
1 here were also �ome close calls that
went against u I he loss brought us
dow n to eai th
In the championship game, the
hei o w a 11 eshman Io I anda
i avion, w ho doubled home 1 �
Rountree and 1 ran Hooks in the top
o the seventh to cue the Pirates a
2 t) iy (. layton latei scored on
shortstop Mary Powell's sacrifice
fly
I he I ad Heels were able to push
v
II
R 11
men! at Johnson C ity, I .
they play Milligan
I hui sday mot n
c arolina, beii
received a bid, as did Sta
who received an at invitatii
1 he I ady B
the hist day's comp�
estei nai olina and I
ing bv scoies ol 14 I and I
lively
In the opening
c atamounts, Dillon said hei
hit well, but Ttk' the thini
most impiessive was h laci
t stei n i arolina didn't mal
ei to! s
1 ast ai olina jumped out
quick 0 lead in the Ins! inn
added eight more in tin
home runs by Brown and. Powell to
lead the toui. I he game was called
in the fifth aftei Western scored its
only run ol thi
Davis powered the 1 ady Bucs ol
fensively bv pounding out a s:
record three tuples Outfielders
m H
:
In i
B
H

1 he Pirates, defending K
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Karr Announces New Plans
IHhl AST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 28. 1981

e
he
�s ll-
lu-v came
e seventh
Region II
irnamenl
ipeli-
b. Northern
Student Ticket Pick-up Set f
f
t
f
A restructuring plan for I icklen
stadium has been announced by
East Carolina athletic director Ken
Karr. Included in the plan is a
system in which students will pick
up tickets (tree of charge) prior to
each home game.
Student will be sealed in the north
stands in sections 21-26. This
represents a change Irom past prac-
tices In the past students have been
allowed to sit anywhere in the north
stands that they desired.
1 he change came about, Karr
said, as a part o the athletic depart-
ment's attempt to create more
revenue
1 he ticket pick-up was brought
about to prevent hassles tor students
such as have been the case in the
past, when the) had to wait in long
lines on game dav to enter the
stadium with an ID and activity
card.
"That's the biggest change as tar
as the students arc concerned1 said
Assistant Athletic Director tor Pro-
motions Ken Smith in a meeting
with student leaders last week.
1 hat should make things a lot
more hassle-tree on game days.
Now students will have a hard ticket
to get into the game
The entire plan as was linalied
last Iridav when Karr, Smith and
ticket manager Brenda l-dwards met
with student leaders tor a second
time is as follows:
. Students will sit in sections 21-26.
This area will he divided into two
different sections � a Reserved
Seating section and a Reserved Sec-
tion.
Tickets to the Reserved Seating
section will put the students in a par-
ticular seat. These seats include all
of section 2b and Hal) of section 25.
I hese seats run from the 30-50-yard
line. Tickets to this section will he
distributed on a first-come, first-
served basis.
tickets to the Reserved Section
will seat students in any seat they
desire from the goal me to the
30-yard line.
(tor clarification on the locations oj
these two sections, see the stadium
diagram
2. Students may pick up their
tickets from Tuesday through
Thursday (during the week of a
Saturday home game) at 'he Minges
C oliseum ticket office or at the Cen-
tral Ticket OJJice at Mendenhalt
Student Center by showing their ID
and activity card.
Students MA Y MOT pick up
tickets on Fridays but will be allow-
ed to make late pick-ups oj tickets
remaining (ajter sales and earlier
pick-ups a. a special student win-
dow at Minges prior to the game on
Saturday. These tickets will be for
the Reserved Section only.
3. Each student will be allowed to
pick up their own ticket and one for
one other person by presenting the
ID and activity card of both in-
dividuals on pick-up days.
4. Each student will be allowed to
purchase one student guest ticket
per activity card for $4.50. (In the
past their was no reduced rate for
student guests) After purchasing the
one guest ticket the student may buy
as many other tickets as desired at
$9 each.
SPECIAL (iROUP PLAN
5. Student group seating will be
available in the Reserved Seating
section only. All groups (whether
fraternity, sorority, dormitory or
other) must register with the ticket
office, listing their intentions to take
part in the group seating plan prior
to the first home game.
Specific instructions will be
available at the beginning of the fall
semester.
A lottery system will be used
weekly to determine each group's
seating location.
Several gripes arose in the
meetings between Smith, Karr and
the students. The top area of con-
cern from the students pertained to
the goaline-to-50-yard line student
seating section.
Smith attempted to explain the
issue, noting that the remaining half
of the north stands would create
much-needed revenue.
"Students gripe, and for good
reason, about their student fees in-
creasing he said. "The only way
to curtail student fees is by finding
revenue someplace else. We hope
this new plan will make Ficklen
Stadium a much more profitable
place on Saturday afternoons
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10
I HI I S1 c KOI ISI
fKii :s. iwi
Seahawks Get
Season Sweep
The Easl Carolina
baseball team saw its
playoff hopes take a
big blow this past
weekend, dropping a
pan ol games to rival
UN( Wilmington.
1 he two ictoi ics
gave the Seahawks a
sweep of their tour
game scries with the
Pirates this season.
1 he Bucs lost the
Saturday game 4-3 as
I V game from
behind to win. One da)
later the Seahawks
made it look much
easier, winning 9-3 to
claim the season sweep.
lit Saturday's game
W ilmington pushed
actoss single runs m the
eighth and ninth inn-
ings to topple the Hues.
Shortstop Paul Murr
scored on designated
'utter Johnny
Slaughter's sacrifice t'K
after reaching on a
single.
1 he Seahawks knot -
ted the score in the
eighth when 11 r s t
baseman Clyde Holle
scored on a throwing
error In the Pirates.
Junior lefthander
Ron Inman (5-2) hand-
cuffed tire Pirates on
five luts. 1(1 ace Hill
Wildei took the loss,
falling to 7 5.
I V scored two
in the first before 1 C I
could produce an out.
1 he Seahawks loaded
the bases on two walks
and a hit be To re
Holley's ground ball in
the hole was booted tor
a two-run error.
ECU tied the game
with runs m the second
and third. Third
baseman Todd Hendley
scored in the second on
a fielder's choice off
the bat of catcher I-ran
I itzgerald. In the third
left fielder Mark Shank
singled, stole second
and moved to third on
a bunt single b short-
stop Kelly Robmetfe
Heroic Evans brought
him home on an infield
grounder.
I lie Priates went
ahead in the fourth as
the Seahawks commit-
ted three errors to allow
courtesy runner Pete
Persico to score to
make it 3-2.
In the Suuda game,
the Seahawks scored
single runs m the first.
ECU To
Travel To
Missouri
last Carolina athletic director
Ken Karr announced this past
weekend that the Pirate football
team will be (raveling to Big Eight
power Missouri for games in 1982
and 1983.
Earlier, Karr had announced that
the Bucs would travel to West
Virginia and Florida State in '82.
The West Viginia series starts this
fall in Morgantown with the Moun-
taineers scheduled to come to
Cireenville in 1987 and 1988.
The Florida State series covers
three years with 1982 and 1988 con-
tests in Tallahassee and a 1987 game
set for Cireenville.
Missouri finished last season with
an 8-3 regular season record before
going on to face Purdue in the
1 iberty Bowl, falling 28-25.
The Pirates will be taking on their
first Big Eight opponent ever in the
'82 game with the Tigers.
Handball Tryouts Set
fourth and fifth innings
and added three in the
seventh and two in ihe
eighth to breeze by the
Pirates.
The Pirates scored
two in the seventh when
Mark Shank scored on
an error and Mike Sor-
rell crossed home plate
on a fielder's choice.
The Bucs added one
more run in the ninth.
ECU had no extra
base hits in Sunday's
game, which dropped
its overall record to
28-13. The Seahawks
moved to 29-14.
One of two tryouts
for the south all-star
handball teams will be
held at ECU's
Memorial Gym this
Saturday from 8 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Both men and
women's tryouts are
being held.
The other location
where tryouts for the
south squad are being
held is in College Sta-
tion, Texas. Players
selected will represent
the south against the
north, east and west in
the 1981 National
Sports Festival, to be
held in Syracuse, N.Y.
July 23-29.
ECU Intramural
Director Wayne Ed-
wards noted that the
tryouts were not just
for members of the
Pirate handball team,
that any student was
welcome to tryout.
Edwards added that
several members of the
two ECU handball
teams had received high
marks from coaches
before and that they
have excellent chances
of making the south
squad.
"1 think we have a
real chance of having
some last Carolina
students to represent us
in New York he said
"Many of our players
have been looked at
real closely
Among the men who
are rated high chances
of making the squad
are Stan Reams,
Gerald Hall and Carl
Kopinski. Graduates
Joe Daas and Mike
Swart have also drawn
raves.
l.CV women who
have been impressive
include Ginger Rother-
mill, Maureen Buck
and Shirley Brown.
Graduates Stuart Briley
and Gail O'Bnant also
will tryout with better
than average chances ol
making the squad.
Edwards explained
that the third National
Sports festival would
include 32 sports and
over 2,600athletes. The
festival, held twice
previously in Colorado
Springs, Colo is held
every non-Olympic
year and brings
together the finest
amateur athletes in the
country.
Edwards noted that
the 1980 U.S. Olympic-
hoc key team was
chosen from the
athletes participating at
the 1979 festival.
"This is a very
prestigious event Ed-
wards said. "It would
be a great honor for
anv of our students to
be selected to com-
pete
Coaching the south
men's team at the
Festival will be Jim
Thome, a major in the
Air Force. The south
women's coach is also
the 1984 Olympic head
coach for women's
handball, Harry
Windier. Both coaches
are expected to be pre-
sent Saturday
Among the popular
coaching names to be
present at the festival is
Georgetown head
coach John Thompson,
who will lead the east
basketball team.
Kimery's
Home
Sprint Medley Team Wins
dWS
WE BUY ANTIQUES
AND
GLASSWARE
ph. 752-3223
PRE
I1.1.IAM
El K
last Carolina's
sprint medley con-
tinued its fine perfor-
mance this outdoor
se tson by capturing
first place in the C ol-
lege Division of the
Penn Relays this past
weekend
'You're always
pleased when you win
something a! the Penn
Relays. We beat some
fine teams up there
said a proud Coach Bill
c arson. His squad w on
with a time ol 3:23.3,
! inishing ahead ' ol
Mary land
Mat
and N.C
A not her sprint
medley was run, the
Championship of
America Series, con-
sisting oi teams who
had taster times on Fri-
day. The Mustangs of
SMI captured first
place with a time of
3:16.9
I he Pirate coach also
had praise for medley
runner Bill Miller, who
deteated a competitor
from 1 astern Kentucky
who had already
qualified for the na-
tionals.
I he Bucs turned also
ran well in the mile
relay, capturing third
place with a time of
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 28, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 28, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.130
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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