The East Carolinian, April 23, 1981







Mht Sast (Earnltntan
.
1
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55NoM
e a
8 Pages
Thursday April 23. 1981
(ireenville. North Carolina
Circulation 10.000
Refrigerator Rental Manager
Questioned On Discrepancies
B PAI I WHJII
.lie auditoi has indicated
SGA refrigerator rental
: need ol a complete
o -ihaul,
In a bulletin addressed to st,
Advisei Paul Breitman,
S � e uditoi 1 d Renfro expressed
al problems
bu i
a copy ol the letter
were SGA freasurei Kirk little.
formei SGA Presideni Charlie Sher-
and his appointee, SGA
Kigei ati : Man igei Ed
Walt
"We have rep ttedly stressed
agei the
s: 11 c!
n tracts,
�ed asset
odic physical
venttrie V do nol
'less has been
SGA Refrigeratoi Manager Ed
Walters assured "he last Caroli-
nian that a pre-numbered contract
system is now in effect but the
results of the new tag system can not
be reviewed until the 1981 audit is
taken this summer.
Walters contended that it vub im-
possible to take a physical inventory
until all refrigerators were turned in
this summer.
In response to a previous State
Auditor's report sent this past
November, Walters stated. "An in-
ventory should be complete by the
middle of spring semester
Walters was asked why he had not
submitted a periodical inventory
report. He responded, "The SGA
doesn't have to comply with the
Mate Auditor's report it the SGA
doesn't want to. State Auditors are
only concerned with taxes
I he position of Refrigeration
Manager is under the auspices of the
st, President The SGA President
appoints and is held responsible tor
the Refrigerator Manager's actions.
Walters was reluctant to provide
1 he East Carolinian with informa-
tion regarding the business' fixed
assets claiming that, "You're just
trying to mess up Charlie's
(Sherrod) and my careers He later
provided the copies of rental con-
tracts and outstanding contracts
aftei being presented a formal re-
quest.
Financial accounts pertaining to
the refrigerator office are handled
through the Student fund Accoun-
ting Office. Accountant Joy Clark
said that copies of rental contracts
and deposit slips were not kept or
stamped by the si (Student Fund
Accounting) office.
Walters said that the office undei
his leadership had enjoyed a good
year. "We have recovered 63 miss-
ing refrigerators since 1 took over as
manager he said.
said that copies of rental contracts
and deposit slips were not kept or
stamped by the SFA (Student Fund
Accounting) office.
Walters said that the office under
his leadership had enjoyed a good
year. "We have recovered 63 miss-
ing refrigerators since 1 took over as
manager he said.
The State Auditor's report of
August 6, 1980 was checked to
verify Walters' statement. The
report stated that "63 refrigerators
are assumed to have been found
The recovered refrigerators were
not verifiable by outstanding con-
tracts.
The 1980 Auditor's report in-
dicated that the 63 recovered
refrigerators were included in the
reported storage count of 924
See REFRIGERATOR, Page 3
Students shown are picking up their rental refrigerators. The SGA
is currently being investigated by the state auditor.
?rioto By JON JORDAN
business
Energy Conservation Leads To Campus Ideas
ti M s W l HOI
colleges
espond the
adically-available,
Plagued by old.
buildings oi new
eaply,
could only
� relief ft
is with
ley to make their campuses
;nl
I $1.5
mi � i � ida's SI million energy
deficil pay raises.
George Washington tacked a $50
surcharge on . k nt's
I
Bui ne
become the
rhese days,
colleges are leading the way in pal
clung together innovative,
sometimes-bizarre strategies to keep
themselves warm in the winter, and
now that the seasons have changed.
cool in the summer.
The University of Alabama, for
. plans to become one of the
world's leading producers oi
methane ga I c l is considering
drilling tor oil under one o its park-
ing lots. Several schools arc resor-
. i i re-using cool i � til, lopping
down trees around campus, install-
ing different showerheads, and im-
posing all sorts of other conserva-
tion measures.
Colgate University in the heavily-
wooded area oi upstate New York is
the one planning to feed its new
wood-fired boiler with wood scraps
from nearby mills. Ohio State's
buses have been com cried to run on
a fuel developed from used cooking
oil gathered from dorm kitchens.
Idaho and Illinois are planning to
re-cook student garbage into
various forms ol energy.
And SO it goes.
The reason is that the stakes are
high. Administrator James Morrow
predicts Colgate will save at least
1250,000 per year from its new
wood-burning scheme. It the price
of fuel oil goes up, Moorow predicts
"our savings could be halt a million
dollars a year, or more
At Welis College, a rig drilling in-
to the New York soil since
September recently hit a pocket of
natural gas under the campus that
has already returned much of the
school's $100.(XX) original invest-
ment.
Success like that helped convince
the University oi Alabama to invest
$75.(XX) m a drilling rig, which was
set up a month ago.
tlanla Toll Reaches 25
Another Body Found
w
v ic
21 .
(I l'h 1 he killer the children) the source said "ues-
�Xtlanta's black day. "The only thing is that they're
witched to a little older, rhey've just been at
e last three the wrong place at the right time
Mclntosh, whose name was add-
ed ruesday to the official police
task force list of 25 murdered young
blacks, was never reported missing.
Dan on Glass, 10, is still missing.
Police said Mclntosh lived behind
the seafood restaurant that
employed Joseph Bell. 15, and the
two regularly played basketball
ut the same size (as together. Bell's partially-clad body
Transportation Report
Criticizes Department
21, a source close
t ictims
r 1 hen two retarded
at d the
Micl a I amei on
� - tted. All
Mclntosh wa
was discovered Sunday in the Smith
River, one dav before Mclntosh's
body was found nude in another
suburban river, theChattahoochee.
Five ol the last six victims have
been dumped in rivers, a procedure
the killer or killers adopted after
news reports oi fibrous evidence be-
ing found on bodies, the source
said.
He said the killers mav be
destroying the clothes and throwing
the bodies in rivers "so there won't
be any trace evidence on them
The rig is now probing into sab-
campus coal seams that university
officials think may hold enough
methane gas to make the school a
world leader in methane gas produc-
tion.
Though Alabama is withholding
its application to OPEC, Everett
Brett of the university's School of
Mines and Energy Development is
confident the seams will meet all the
campus' natural gas needs for the
next 30 years.
Cash-short administrators are
even viewing students as energy
sources.
The universities of Florida and
Maryland, for example, have put
engineering and architecture
students to work to evaluate campus
buildings for energy efficiency, and
to propose changes in lighting,
heating systems and building uses.
Carter Smith, Maryland's
physical plant engineer, estimates
student solutions will save the
university 10 percent of its $10
million 1980-81 energy bill.
But most administrators are more
interested in the gunk and waste
students produce as energy sources.
The University of Idaho, for ex-
ample, plans to start converting the
heaps of student garbage produced
in dining halls and classroom
buildings to energy this year. The
aim is to become self-sufficient in
steam energy. Idaho paid $4.27 for
enough natural gas to produce 1000
lbs. of steam heat last year, com-
pared to $2.75 under the new
system. The figures don't reflect
how much Idaho saves in waste
disposal.
The University of Illinois is plan-
ning to build a giant incinerator� at
a cost of $15-17 million� to burn
some 400 tons of waste daily. It will
supply steam to the campus' main
power plant.
Though such projects might have
seemed eccentric just five years ago,
the price of energy has pushed just
about all schools toward ways of us-
ing alternative forms of energy,
observes David Waite, Skidmore
College's energv conservation con-
sultant.
Waite, whose school has won two
awards for energy conservation pro-
jects and has become a clear-
inghouse for campus energy ideas,
says he's received inquiries from
about 250 colleges about how to
employ alternative energies.
Consequently, he has plenty of
examples� from the simple to the
outrageous� of campuses struggl-
ing to cope in the new era. Iowa
State, he says, bought a fleet of
small, fuel-efficient cars for campus
use. Stanford installed low-flow
showerheads (and saved $100,000 in
hot water heating). Skidmore is now
honing a plan to burn horse manure
to produce methane gas.
Skidmore first got into the
business when it started buying used
crankca.se oil from local garages for
use in its heating system. The used
oil now meets half of the campus'
heating needs. Waite pegs the sav-
ings at $1500 daily over conven-
tional, new oil.
Despite high initial costs to con-
vert to a furnace that could burn the
crankcase oil, Waite brags the
system paid for itself in just 42 das.
Though the "payback" has "just
been incredible he says it's not
unusual.
"Usually it is six to nine mon-
ths he says.
The pace of change, Waite notes,
has actually picked up since Presi-
dent Reagan junked President
Carter's thermostat guidelines and
decontrolled the price of
domesticallv-produced gas.
But the new systems are not cure-
alls. "Cpmmon sense" conservation
measures at San Diego State
decreased natural gas and electricity
consumption, but the university's
total energy bill still jumped by
$243,000. Robert Downen, campus
energy coordinator, promises next
year will be "even more brutal
Similarly, Ohio State's six-year
energy conservation program pro-
duced a 34 percent decrease in
energy use per square foot, but
didn't prevent a doubling of total
energy costs over the same period.
Wesleyan closed buildings over
intersession, and saved $86,000 in
December. The bad news was that
burst pipes and the costs oi fixing
them amounted to $18,000.
Moreover, campuses using alter-
native energy sources risk becoming
polluters in the process.
Illinois recently petitioned, as
Yale is considering petitioning, state
governments for waivers from
sulfur dioxide emission standards.
Illinois' coal burner was cited for
violating sulfur regulations.
(I I'll A special
lative committee investigating
the state Department oi I ransporta-
tion Wednesday began preparing a
replarshly criticizes the
trtment's activities since 19
The committee approved a draft
report charging the DOT continued
a "business as usual" road con-
struction program even though ol
ficials have known ol a projected
shortfall in road funds since 1977
Members proposed a number oi
changes to the draft and agreed to
meet Thursday to review a revised
version,
In the first draft, the committee
called for a majoi shifl m DOT
policy that would establish
maintenance ol existing roads as a
top priority over construction of
new highways.
I he committee was created earlier
this year to review the operations oi
the DO! in light oi a crisis in the
state Highway fund. A sharp drop
m gasoline tax revenues, the major
money source for the fund, have
resulted in little money for
maintenance and construction of
roads
Oov. lames B Hunt Jr. will make
a statewide television speech next
week to outline his proposals for ad-
ditional funding. There has been
speculation it will include a two-cent
increase in gasoline taxes, increases
in liquor taxes and other fee in-
creases to provide about $200
million a year in additional
revenues.
During Wednesday's committee
meeting. Sen. Marshall Rauch,
D-Gaston, said the panel's report
should be issued Friday Of held back
until next Wednesday, so it will not
be overshadowed bv Hunt's speech
on Monday.
I he preliminary report said the
Hunt administration pushed for
passage oi a S300 million highway
bond program in 1977 rather than
seek an increase in gas taxes.
But n said a two-cent gas tax in-
crease, deteated in the 1977 and
1979 sessions of the legislature,
would have generated as much
money and would have saved an
estimated $190 million m interest
payments on the road bonds.
The draft report also criticized the
DOl spending over $41 million for
ousiide consulting work when that
money could have been allocated to
road maintenance.
'Slave Auction' Held To
JS Raise Money For Fund
By DEBORAH HOT AUNG
Nt� Idiior
"This afternoon. . .you have the
privilege of purchasing the men of
Omega Psi Phi the girl on the
stage annnounced to the cheering
crowd on the mall yesterday.
At 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, a slave
auction was held on the ECU cam-
pus. The proceeds, however, will go
partly to the Omega fraternity and
to the United Negro College Fund.
"It's all in fun explained Willie
Everett, Omega vice president. A
slave auction in fun?
Several Omega fraternity brothers
and two Pearls (female affiliates)
put themselves "up for bid" to the
crowd. The bidders could buy
(actually rent) the auctioned people
for a minimum of $2 for a period of
about four or five hours, ending at
midnight last night.
Omega Psi Phi President Jeffrey
Parker explained the purpose of the
auction, "We'll be giving a percen-
tage to the United Negro College
Fund, probably about 30 or 40 per-
cent. We had an auction a couple of
years ago and decided to do it again
because it was something different
.putting himself on display at the "slave auction" yesterday. t0 aise money
Approximately $105 was raised in
Omega Psi Phi Member
Photo Br JON JORDAN
a period of an hour of auctioning.
Sometimes the bidding was slow at
getting started. It took a little prod-
ding from the Pearl officiating, but
she usually got the price going up
well above $4.
"Come on now, ladies. We've got
some fine looking gentlemen up
here. Who will give me $2.25?"
I inda Baker, a freshman here at
ECU, bought a gentleman for
$5.75. "1 had a lot of work that
needed to be done she explained.
"No, really, 1 wanted to support the
United Negro College Fund. It's for
a good cause
"Noone gets offended here
Everett said. "The only time we ever
had trouble was when some guys
from the city came and misinter-
preted what we were trying to do.
Most people know it's to raise
money
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifiedsg
Features5
Letters4
Sports7
t
�m w m �� � ommpi
f
It.





1 HI k M l KOI 1!
M'KIl 23, IM
Announcements
CHESS
�v
nave moved! Vrs the
� � � �� oil iS flow
a in the basement ol the
NzenS c enter on fttt
Itt tnd Greene v. neel
i- . at 7 IS on M
it s iust a shot' .ii
i us'
JAZZ
�� Rose Hioti sir Band
lirection ot Jim
. a � esent its annual
concert on Wednesday
May 6, at 8 00 p m . in the Rose
gymnasium Tickets will be
IbiC at the door tor S! 00 All
ui aut5 to aT
LAW SCHOOL
avs n hool ' '��
. sponsoi a

on T hurs
� n room 244 of
- tei trom 7
m Your M, � '�
HILLEL
me Hillei Passover
It . 00 on April 26 at the
je 1420 E 14th St We .s
- tor next years ot
v Oil Wish to run foi an Ot
ide. Or v
DISCOUNT DAYS
� hial tudenl Center s
nl days are Wednesdays
and Fridays Evf . weefc .oucan
save one third on the cost ot bovvi
ai cts and taoie tem
Menai � �� is � " ' 0
It ei � � � � m 3:00 until
LECTURE
COMMITTEES
Applications are now bemci at
� epted tor students wishing to
serve on University Committees
tor the 1981 82 school year Student
positions are open on University
Administrative Committees.
Faculty Sena' Committees and
� Com mission I asK
Application blanks have
the na � � - I - m.ttees on tnem
Applications may be picked up at
the following locations
Ottu e ot the Vice Chant eilor tor
Student Lite. 204 Whichard
Mendenhall Student Center Intor
mation Desk SGA Office.
Mendenhall Student Center Ot
lite ot Intramural Recreational
Services. Memorial Gym
Residence Hall Directors Offices
The University greatly ap
preciates the efforts ot those
students who nave served in the
cms! ano hopes that students will
continue their interest and par
ition Questions about
University committees and
membership may be directed to
the OH,ce ot the Vice Char
for Student Lite i7S7 6541l
DOG DAY
DOc DAv a ���. program of
tereo at the Methodist student
i '� � tie lunch on Thursdays
Hotdou- S �� ind soft drinks
from n 30 until I 30 Address 501
PAGEANT
�'�. , .� ons tor contestants tor
(old Paueant are
� eo it inter ested
contai ' � . � pha Ph.
rateri sill 752 V875
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Gamma Sigma Sigma s
ser.nq a Sprmj Carnival
��� " tin Association tor Retarded
" � rw en Satu'oay April 25.
111. at "om 10
- rhere will be lots of
� IS we I as a BAKE
OFF Foi � ition call
FACULTY STAFF
BLOCK SHOW
Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority
Inc will present a block show Fri
day, April 24 at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center. 5 00 p m
ONA
The Organization For Native
Americans cordially invites you to
attend a reception Tuesday. April
28 1981.2 30 pm m the Van Lan
dmgham Room located m the
Home Economics Building
LOST
1 lost a gold ladies WEIKO
watch near on the tennis courts at
Minges PLEASE be decent and
honest enough to turn it m to the
lost and found, or call 758 98'5
(keep trying) id be very
grateful'
PHYS ED
Students planning to declare
physical education as a maior our
ing this semester are reguired to
satisfactorily complete a motor
and physical fitness test prior to
change of maior m the tali
semester This test will be given m
M nges Coliseum at 10 00 a m on
Tuesday. April 28 The test is
designed to measure agility, ab
dommal strength, shoulder
strength ana endurance, leg
power, flexibility, ano aerooic
fitness Additional information is
available by caliina 757 6441
SU ARTIST
Apply now for the Student Union
Artists position and get work ex
perience with pay while si
school
Act.ve in all phases ot produc
tion designing, submitting roughs
for approval. prepar ng
mechanicals, setting type
omat.ng prefects with com mi
printers
Responsibility mclude designing
calendar brocures. newspaper
ads ano posters
SOULS
Graduating seniors ot the spr
ing summer or fall ot 1981, and
who are members ot S O U L S
are asked to pay $5 00 tor the
senior social to be held April 25 at
Lake Ellsworth Club House from 9
until Each senior is allowed two
guests who are not seniors
Seniors will also have a voice m
deciding the menu Your coopera
tion is ot utmost necessity
Signatures ano fees will be taken
m the lobby ot the Student store
trom 10 until 1 on Tuesday
Wednesday and Thursday
ELDERHOSTEL
Persons over 60 years old who
wish to spend a summer week on a
university campus and enroll m
non credit college courses, are in
vited to participate in an
( Iderhostel' program at East
Carolina University June 28 July 4
or July 5 II
ELderhoster students whe
will be housed on campus n
enroll in these special courses
Descriptive Astronomy g
non mathematical approac It tc
studying the universe, a th em
phasis on recent discoveries in the
solar system and c urrent theories
on cosmolo �
Folk Traditional America ai
ntroauc t.on to folklife as an ,m
portant aspect of Americar
culture with a sampling of tradi
tions from American regional, oc
i upationai and � �� I � � ps
Cultures m Collision Tne Ar
chaeoloay and Early History 0
'he Carolina Coast a deta �
study of English exploration I
between 1584 ana 1587 ano " �
eventual cuiturai col s bet
ween European si Itlei ���.
ria Algonkian lr
No previous backgroi
of the subiects to be taut t is
guired Each course will bi
enhanced by the use ot f �� � 1
slides art i � plays Ol
pertormano�
ECU professors No
'homevi �� m ssan
� a
Ralph rtl
1 "UiflQ
s desig � 1 .
led persons �� , , .
lual stimuli
1 n c; a PI
availat
. sion c
ind statt MSC
- �
saving
CATHOLICS
� � . � tei � � Easf Ti
tret ' Monday Apt . " at 3 00
i m tor a picnic A' have food.
� � Come
havi 1 good ti mi Bi .
LIBRARY
the recent 1 1 �� �
� ' er Library canno' l �
tended hours du- � . �

brar h urs flui rg exan
lay ��: �
. ' itui 1 Api
p m . Tuesda Apt
�� Apt 1 30 B a -
COOP
Seymour Johnson A.r Force
Base, Goldsboro NC will have a
Co op position m recreation open
tor Fall. '81 Interested students
should apply to the Coop Office
313 Rawl Building. 757 6979 before
the end of this semester
The Department of Energy Co
op positions available for Fan BI
for the following maiors
chemistry physics, geology
puter science, health si 1
biology business administration
and lournalism Contact the Co Of
Office today'
MANAGER
Anyone wishing to apply toi
Refrigerator Manager tor thi
1981 82 school year may do so b�
coming by the SGA Office, Roon
228 Mendenhall Student Center
SUMMER JOBS
The Wake County Employment
and Training Office is accepting
appitations from ris,nu senior
� students and graduate
school students for summer
employment as youth coor
e � ciraduat.
are inti rested mer employ
ment only and
I
c our aged to apply Former.
mahon, rontact Lmda Gadd
me Career Plani
ment Of 1 � nsion 6393
SCHOLASTIC SEARCH
rtM Scholastic All Amei
� � 'on Committee is now .i e
ting applications tor ��
ing Semesti � Is wi
acttvi n si holastic organizations
and who perti rm we
tsked om

an I ly founded 1
, . ,
undergi .�. ano graduate
I
Iron v" 280 I
all SO statei vtembei 1 � �
vl �' .
. - . ects each
Students ari
the 1 ent of

ind out of the
etaci ��� .
��
lered. A student � �
must � � � � . . .

is are ast
GAME ROOM
The College H.ll Game Room
located m the Aycotk basement
features electronic games, pin
ball, pool pmj pong and foosebaii
Hours are Mon Thurs 12 11
p m Friday 12 5pm and Sun 8
II p m All proceeds are returned
to the students through the Student
Residence Association, please
support the game room
DISCOUNT DAYS
Mendenhall Student Center's
discount days are Wednesdays
and Fridays t ver y ween you can
save i 3 on the cost of bowimg.
billiards and table tennis at
Mendenhall Bowling is 13 oft
each Friday from 3 00 p m until
5 30 p m and billiards and table
���� I 3 oft each Wednesday
from 3 00 p m until 5 30 p m
Don f n
SCHOLARSHIPS
Phi Eta Sigma treshman honor
society, will award book scholar
ships to a r.s.ng iumor and a rising
senior in the amount of SI00 each
to be used during the 1981 82 school
year Applicants must be
members ot Ph Eta Sigma
� 'cations emphasize par
ticipation in the ECU chapter of
� 1 Sigma and high academic
achievement interested students
i id set Or John D Ebbs. Pro
� � I 214 Austm
CAMELOT
Camelot an idyllic plat �
where the ram
���er sundown
ana me oust be perfi � �
'� � , � Ai �� � Mer Is
Sir Lancelot ano the
- und Tabi� �
all come to vivid lite in the Ayden
workshop's current pro
ducfion Tt.
chestra �� � � -ehearsai for
what pron I e an exti
engaamg evening of mus.cal
perl � - - -� � � ,i �.
and Satur
it Bp m,
and Sunday. April 26th at 3
DOI � no
formed tor your
pieasur � � . " 1 lint as1 n
I the fheatri workshop
Adn 5S2 00 per person
Fr
ll
�� es P O Bo- . �
York 13323
.id to
MEDIA BOARD
he Mi
'or day " '
repres. I H �
I Board Applications can be
" � '��� ' a Boaro CM
iv ub Bldg 8
' " � ' ind 2 o n 5 o m
DEODORANT
Secret
Solid
$467
2-Oz. jf
Btl. B
REGULAR OR
12-Oz.
Btls.
Outdoors!
TAB, SPRITE, MELLO
YELLO. MR. PIBB OR
Coca-Cola
2-Ltr.
N.R.
Btl.
SAVE
30
U.S. GOVT INSPECTED
QUALITY CONTROLLED
Ground
Beef
$4 28
c&ukt
AYONNAI
RICH, CREAMY
Duke's
Mayonnaise
FRESH
32-Oz.
Jar
Ripe
Tomatoes
0
Lb.
BAGGED
Records Tapes
Chips & Snacks
�H
1 ik. .
v�rt
nx�'
,0
tt 1.11"
OFF
SUGG
RETAIL
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 8 AM TO 10 PM
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031
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were in rl
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4b
Refrigerator Business Under Investigation
I HI I SIAROI.INIAN
APKII 23, IWi
Continued From Page 1
refrigerators. The
Auditor's report was
checked for August of
1979.
It was Found that a
storage count of 924
refrigerators was
reported for that year
also. ECU'S Audit
Supervisor, Marvin Lit-
tle, was asked about
this coincidence.
"This means if 63
refrigerators were
found that 6 3
refrigerators were also
lost I ittle said.
" 1 hat is a very big
coincidence
Fourteen outstan-
ding contracts are
reported on the 1979
audit, whereas a total
of 77 outstanding con-
tracts were reported on
the 1980 audit. This is
an increase of exactly
63 outstanding con-
tracts.
Walters was asked
about this alarming in-
v tease in outstanding
contracts.
Walters replied,
"There are just that
main more dishonest
students who don't
return the refrigerators.
We also rented more
refrigerators this
year
alters denied thai it
was more than coin-
cidence thai the in-
crease in outstanding
contracts equalled 63 in
number, the exact
amount ol refrigerators
that he said he had
found.
He said he w as
presently unable to
verif) the 63 recovered
refrigerators b v
outstanding contracts.
' There is no way of
telling who t he
recovered refrigerators
belong to he said.
v alters also said that
the auditor's figures
were not his figures.
"The auditors could
have made a mistake
he said.
Walters indicated
that he had his own in-
ventorv records but
when asked about them
he replied. "I can't tind
them I don't know
how many retngerators
were in the warehouse
when 1 took over
hen asked if it
could have been more
than coincidence that
the refrigerator storage
count was the same for
both the 1979 and 1980
audits, Walters replied,
"1 think I did a damn
good job.
"In previous years,
the management never
hid as m a n v
refrigerators at the end
of the year as they had
in the beginning of the
year
After recovering 63
refrigerators and losing
78, which are
represented by outstan-
ding contracts, the in-
ventory count should
be 14 iess in 1980 than
the 924 reported in
1979.
However, the 1980
audit reported 924
refrigerators in storage,
not 910.
Walters was asked
about this discrepancy.
"The auditors must
have made a mistake
he said.
After reviewing
Walters' file of
outstanding contracts,
onlv 66 contracts were
counted � not 77 as
was stated � a dif-
ference of 11
refrigerators.
Walters was asked it
it was safe to assume
that 11 m 0r e
refrigerators should
turn up in the 1981
audit.
1 guess he
replied.
Commenting on the
outstanding contracts,
Marvin Little said.
'You can't p I a c e
reliance on these con-
tracts. They are. essen-
tially, nothing but
pieces of paper
Little added,
"Noone has ever sat
down and drawn out
operating procedures
tor the management oi
the refrigerator office.
As of now, the entire
system is incompetent.
"Proper checks and
balances are not being
1 in p I e m en t ed. s
representative to the
State Auditor. I suggest
controls that 1 feel
necessary to protect the
interest of the students.
SCiA refrigerators are
student assets he
said.
There mav be as
man) as 349 missing
retngerators. Ren fro
and his stafl recom-
mend that: 1) a daily
cash repot t accompany
all deposits to the Stu-
dent Fund Accounting
Office; 2)a faculty ad-
v 1 s o r oversee
refrigerator manage-
ment; 3)a copy oi ren-
tal contracts be placed
in the SI A ofticc; 4) a
more thorough inven-
tory system be install-
ed; 5) refrigerator
deposit refunds be
handled under the SI A
office; and 6) an
operating policv be
established in the form
Lighting Wells Blues Band
at THE BACK DOOR
In Winterville Behind Depot.
FREE ADMISSION for ECU
Students with this
Coupon and ID
204 E. 5th Street
Actom From
Newby'i Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEK'S SALE ALBUMS
ALL C I RRENT RELEASES
7.98 lor 4.99
8.98 (0, 5.99
II OU I I'KK I
STYX
I'Hll C Ol I INS
HI s I 01 DAVI
1 s()
(AMI S rAYlOR
W II ! II M I SON
KK HOI I IDA
pot U I
NAZARI IH
I HI W HO
tilNO INt I 1 I
ISI I V. BKOI HI KS
HKKV VVHIll
IONI S OIKI S
St PI K OKI I
1 OWBOI BAND
13.98)0.9.99
tiM I K I IOK I HI
I'l OPI I ol KAM
I'lHI
OKI Mill HI M
I IVl
IOIKNI V 1 IM
15.98 lor 10.99
HKU(
SI'KINOSH IN
ALL PARAPHANAUA ON SALE
MOST IS 50 OFF
APPLE RECORDS T-SHIRTS
Refularly S4.50
$3.99 WITH COUPON
WEBUY USED ALBUMS
of a procedures manual
tor the SCiA
Refrigerator Manager.
Walters sid that these
control steps will be im-
plemented.
In a related incident,
Barry Byiand, this
v ear's B u c cancer
editor, has written a
tormal statement to
Dean Mallorv concern-
ing Walters' business
practices.
By I a nd and her
roommate, Carol
Mart ell, contend that
Walters offered to give
Byiand a refrigerator.
"1 asked Ed to come
and get an SGA
refrigerator that a
former roommate had
lett in my room
Byiand said. "And Ed
told me to tear the tag
off the back of the
refrigerator. He told
me it was just a little
present
"This is not true
Walter said when con
trouted with Bvland's
accusations. "I thought
my assistant had picked
up the refrigerator.
"If anyone has a free
refrigerator, it is not to
my knowledge he
said.
Walters later admit-
ted to loaning
refrigerators to campus
organizations such as
the Buccaneer office
and the photo lab.
"This has been com-
pany policeWalters
said. "I could give
away 50 refrigerators
and there would be
nothing legally wrong
with it
Walters threatened
to have Byiand arrested
for withholding public
property if she didn't
return the refrigerator
but in a later interview
he said that he would
let the f 111 u r e
refrigerator manager
handle the matter.
One other source,
who chooses to remain
anonymous, said that
he was offered a free Last Carolinian staff,
refrigerator. No of stealing the
charges have been tiled retngerators.
against Walters, "I will accuse you of
however.
Concerning the re-
cent break-in at the
SCIA warehouse,
Walters lias threated to
accuse Byiand, as well
as a member ot I he
si call tig the
refrigerators it you
keep this slut up
Walters told an in-
vestigating repoitei "I
consider you a
suspect
Meeting Scheduled
On Friday, April 24, the Student Finan-
cial Aid Staff will conduct two informal
sessions concerning financial aid tor the
1981-82 school year. The sessions will be
held at 10:00 a.m. and 2:(X) p.m. in the
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student
Center.
The purpose of the sessions is to inform
students ot the current status oi the
various aid program- and to answer ques-
tions pertaining to financial aid foi the
19S1 82 year.
All students applying for Guaranteed
Student 1 oans as well as those applying
for campus-based federal financial aid are-
urged to attend.
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you alnoe 1974 providing private, understanding health oare to women of all ages at a reasonable cost Saturday abortion hours Free pregnancy tests Very early pregnancy tests Mveiilng birth control hours The Fleming Center we're here when you need us. CaJDTSl-aeSOtnFAleigh any&ne.
THETLVaclH-t.Ml
f
f
f
f
BEST PRICES AND
SELECTION IN AREA
ON ALLIGATOR LACOSTE
SHIRTS FOR MEN, WOMEN
& CHILDREN
see GORDON FULP
LOCATEDAT
GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
OPEN: 8:00 A.M. UNTIL DARK
756-0504
i
i
i
i
1��aatfMCfci�
(


Fri. - Sat. April 24 & 25
Sidewinder
-�f���-�j - - �. ��- � �it� � �
Souths No. 6 Rock Niqhtclub
ATTIC ATTIC
Skeet Kelly
Wed. April 29th
FREE! ECU Students
Sat. - Sun May 2 & 3
Street Talk
8th Annual
PEGASUS PLUS
Exam Jam
Thurs. April 30
"V
fl
Reading Day
Eve Concert
With Ziggarut
Mon. April 27th
���.
3
IN CONCERT
Sun. April 26
oHoAtf
3 (Hrmed
w-
Attic
T-Shirt
Sale On
April 27th
$1.92
Plus Tax
)
IN CONCERT
Tues. April 29
Atlantic Recording Artist
U?UiL!UL!LJ!CBgBgP!
Mercury Recording Art
IN CONCERT
Fri. May 1st
I sdA4
!� til
C5"
3S�
?5
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
Weekend
Special!
Thurs Fri Sat.
All
Junior and Missy
Swimwear
20 off
Sleek, sensational suits eye
catching second-skin fit
vibrant colors mixed for
graphic impact easily some
of the choicist looks under the
sun. We've got all kinds in all
colors, one or two piece suits
that are sensational looking,
figure enhancing and comfor-
table as can be.
V-
v-
V-
J
J
1st Annual
Of The
1 st prize
$500.00
Second place $300.00
Third place a keg of Stroh's
Saturday April 25, T981
On The Central Mall
Rain location: Wright Auditorium
Admission is FREE 12:00 noon - until
FREE beverages and munchies for Dorm residents with SRA
card and ID only
Bands competing are:
"GLISSON" "BUFFORD T BAND" "CAHOOTS"
"NO VACANCY"
"SNAKEBITE"
"DOUBLE RUM"
"LeMAJI"
Sponsored By The ECU Student Residence Association





Milt Eaat (Earnltaiatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Collins, m. �
Jimmy Dupree. mmim
Paul Lincke, am�&! Deborah Hotaling, v,iW,��
C hris Lichok, Bus,� M.naitr, Charles Chandler v.�� td��r
At ISON BARTEL, Hr,HlM�on Man, DAVID NORRIS, leo.ure, EK�
April 23, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Ambiguity
SGA Election Rules Need Scrutiny
Six weeks after they began SGA
elections are finally and officially
finished for the year, much to the
relief of students. Whether one
agrees with the decision or not,
there has to be a certain amount of
relief that a final decision has been
made in the treasurer's race, the last
to be decided.
The elections committee now has
one week to make its report to the
SGA and recommend changes in the
rules governing the elections. The
committee's first problem will be in
keeping the report from running
longer than War and Peace. Al
Patrick, the committee chairman, is
the first to admit that the rules are
full of loopholes and that somebody
managed to slip through most of
them this year.
The first and most obvious
change that needs to be made con-
cerns run-off elections. The current
rules are so ambiguous that it took
three weeks this year to decide
whether or not to hold a second run-
off. It should be stated clearly,
simply and emphatically that only
one run-off will be held in any race,
and that in a run-off only a simple
majority will be needed for victory.
Logically there is no reason to run-
off a run-off, but the rules should
make that clear.
The rules should also be amended
so that no run-off is held in a two-
man race. The purpose of a run-off
is to ensure that no candidate wins
office with a minority of voter sup-
port. Since this is impossible in a
two-man race, there is no need for a
run-off.
Another problem is holding elec-
tions the Wednesday before spring
break. This is a hectic time for
students, and scheduling an election
at this time almost guarantees pro-
blems in finding poll tenders. Simp-
ly holding the election a week earlier
would alleviate this problem.
Overall, this year's general elec-
tion did not seem to run very
smoothly. A lack of poll tenders
was certainly a major part of this;
the people scheduled to tend the
polls in Minges Coliseum never
showed up. Consequently the poll
never opened. Several other polls
opened late, and some ran out of
ballots. The problem here is a lack
of workers.
The rules provide for a five-
member committee, but do not
specify who should tend the polls,
except to say that candidates and
campaign workers cannot. In past
elections, the SGA has paid a group
to tend polls, and it seemed to work.
This practice could be reinstituted,
or the legislature could add a provi-
sion to its rules that groups receiv-
ing appropriations be required to
tend polls. This way specific groups
could be charged with the respon-
sibility of running the polls.
The SGA has already voted to
have one elections chairman for the
entire year instead of one in the fall
and one in the spring, and this move
should bring a certain continuity to
the position.
In choosing a chairman the
legislature should think long and
hard to ensure that the person
chosen is qualified and willing to
make the effort necessary.
A major flaw of this year's elec-
tion was a lack of communication
between the candidates and the stu-
dent body. This may have been
reflected in the voter turn out; bare-
ly a quarter of the students voted in
the general election. Candidate
debates or some similar forum
might serve to heighten student in-
terest and focus the campaign on
issues.
Before approving a new set of
elections rules, the SGA would do
well to seek the advise of someone
with expertise in the field, perhaps a
political science professor, to assure
that no new loopholes have been
written in and that all eventualities
are covered.
Running a smooth and fair SGA
election is not an insurmountable
task and, with a new set of rules,
will hopefully be a reality next year.
and you thought tones dorta
WAS 6AD
Cooke Wasted 'Rare Combination'
By DIANE ANDERSON
To be young, talented, attractive and
possess the bravery and ambition necessary
to become a success in the field of jour-
nalism is a rare combination. Janet Cooke,
author of the controversial "Jimmy's
World which appeared on the front page
of The Washington Post in September of
last year, seemed to possess all these
desirable qualities. Her ambition, along
with her superior's respect for her talents
as a writer, however, overshadowed good
sense. Her Pulitzer Prize winning article
about an eight-year-old heroin addict nam-
ed Jimmy proved to be a complete fabrica-
tion.
There seems to be a general tendency
towards sensationalism in modern jour-
nalism. The stories that sell are the ones
with exceptional, exciting topics. Accor-
ding to Bill Green, Ombudsman for the
Post, in his follow-up story about the
episode with "Jimmy's World there is a
great deal of pressure on reporters to make
the "front page In an effort to impress
an editor, it is easy for an ambitious writer
to embellish a story to make it seem more
newsworthy and eye-catching.
It is this type of exaggeration that
editors must be wary of. The Washington
Post has a system of checks that are
designed to prevent this sort of story from
being printed. A great deal of emphasis is
placed on the authenticity of facts and
sources in an article, and an attempt is
made to see that reporters stick to the story
in their writing, not swerving off the
mainstream onto some tangent, or exag-
gerating any of the details.
The question raised here is, do the
pressures put upon reporters to provide ex-
ceptional news stories encourage this sort
of polishing-up of the facts? Janet Cooke's
reaction to these types of pressures, coupl-
ed with her own strong ambitions, seems to
indicate that this is a possibility.
Impressed by her talents as a writer,
Janet's supervisors encouraged her a great
deal and gradually increased her freedom
and responsibilities, and she thrived in this
atmosphere as any young journalist would
with such a strong-willed ambition to suc-
ceed. Presented with an abundance of facts
about an urban drug problem, she created
a moving and excellently written account
of one family and its abuse of heroin,
centering around a child named Jimmv.
Exhibiting a great deal of trust in her judg-
ment, Janet's supervising editor allowed
her to keep her sources confidential even
from him. Although the article won a
Pulitzer Prize, and was masterfully written
bv a talented journalist, it was nevertheless
a fictional account, and should never have
been printed as a news story.
The most sacred vow of a journalist is
that of honesty and truth. Without this
assurance, there is no credibility in repor-
ting. Strong ambitions towards recognition
and success in the field of journalism are
necessary to compete in any newsroom.
However, the ambition should not be so
overwhelming that the truth gets lost in the
competition.
The incident which occurred at The
Washington Post serves as a warning to
everyone involved in the field of jour-
nalism. Strong-willed ambition and
talented reporting are necessary attribute-
for a competing journalist, and to combine
these qualities with an exceptional storv
can certainly be a catalyst to success
However, the strive for recognition should
never override the most important aspect
of credibility in journalism� the truth.
EDITOR 'S NOTE: Diane Anderson is a
junior English major, minoring in political
science.
� Campus Forum
Dealer Clarifies Firearms' Laws
On Tuesday, April 21, two articles ap-
peared in The East Carolinian on the
subject of gun control. I do not wish to
express my views on the topic, instead 1
would like to clear up a few points which
were stated in each article on the pur-
chasing of handguns.
As a licensed firearms dealer by the
federal government, I would like first to
clarify a statement made by Paul Collins
about John Hinckley purchasing a han-
dgun, although Hinckley was once a
mental patient.
Under Title 18, United States Code,
Chapter 44, Section 922 (d)(4), it is
unlawful to sell firearms to a person who
"has been committed to any mental in-
stitution Also under Section 922
(a)(6), in the same title and chapter, it is
illegal for any person to knowingly make
a false statement, oral or written, to a
licensed dealer when buying a firearm.
These same provisions can be found
under Title 27, Code of Federal Regula-
tions, Part 178, Subpart J.
When a person buys a firearm of any
kind he or she must fill out a "Firearms
Transaction Record" which the pur-
chaser signs after reading a statement
which says, "I hereby certify that the
answers to the above are true and cor-
rect. . .1 also understand that the making
of any false oral or written statement. .
.is a crime punishable as a felony
The second point I would like to make
is in regards to-Dr. Phillip Cook's pro-
posal to write a "dram shop" law for
firearms dealers. The Bureau of
Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms
(BATF) has made a provision dealing
with such a law after a 1977 Arkansas
Supreme Court ruling, 547 S.W. 2d 91.
The case involved an action seeking
recovery for wrongful death and per-
sonal injuries brought against a store
owner who sold a pistol to an ex-convict
without completing the Form 4473,
Firearms Transaction Record. The
BATF provision states that a dealer may
be subjected to civil suits by victims of
crime involving firearms if the sale of
the weapon was in violation of federal
laws. The sale of a handgun without the
proper permit is illegal.
I hope that this letter has cleared up
some misunderstandings about the
firearms laws within the United States
which some students may have about the
purchasing of handguns.
Thank you very much for your atten-
tion to this letter.
RALPH MENDENHALL, JR.
Junior, Corrections
Correction
The article on Huntington's Disease in
the April 14 edition of The East Caroli-
nian is a questionable piece of jour-
nalism. I was misquoted, and the article
dealt only with the negative aspects of
Huntington's Disease. There were no
references to Alpha Epsilon Delta's
Huntington's Disease Symposium that
was held at Duke University on April 11
for the health professionals and families
directly involved. It is hoped that the
positive steps this symposium provided
will overcome any adversity that will
result from The East Carolinian's arti-
cle.
I felt the necessity of educating the
public on the disease; so 1 went to The
East Carolinian over a month prior to
the symposium to discuss an article on
the subject. I was told I would probably
have to write my own article to be sure it
would be printed, but a reporter with
some free time in his schedule would be
sought in the interim period. Five days
before the symposium, I submitted my
article out of fear that no publicity
would result. Three days before the sym-
posium, a reporter called me to learn as
much as possible in a ten-minute inter-
view so he could write his story. This
was a last-minute effort to cover the
event, but I felt any publicity at this
point would be beneficial. The
haphazard article leaves a blemish on the
years of quality research by experts on
Huntington's Disease.
I found it difficult to finish reading
your article. I am angrv that I was so
misquoted that the Huntington's
Disease patient and familv seem helpless
and pathetic. With all the tremendous
advances in the research of Hun-
tington's Disease, these patients have
more opportunities and a brighter future
than could have been hoped for a few
years ago. This article does all Hun-
Mngton's Disease patients and families
m untorgiveable disservice. It will also
hamper our efforts as a premedieal
organization (Alpha Epsilon Delta) in
the future.
OSCAR JET WEBB
Graduate Student
H.D. Symposium Publicity Chairman
EDITOR'S SOTE: The East Caroli-
nian would like to ojjer its apologies J or
any inaccuracies or misquotations that
appeared in the article "Disease Ateels
Thousands which appeared in the
April 14 edition.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
"(ood-tjuv
courtroom
satire on oi
c
LI F
Hou
thundc
town like C
be remembc
ferns wheel
There-
Dallas
v:ewhere i
someone wr
tlesnake
start
The tr
there is
folk
ample. �
and n I
than the i.
Bob B I
executh
offers :
You a Hen Dj
comes from
to boast of hii
you a hen j
under h
be a tis j
unlikeh a- 1
sider thj
states that
a reaction. I
tion is: '� I
mon 'cepi
it
Bowman'
t rv nn
under j
� follow e
monlv
Alu
Thirteen
Carolina I
will show exai
a special exhil
ni Art Inv
26-Ma;
The evhir
public at
Center.
The evhbr.i
Bass. Ann ii
McPhail oi f
M
Apl
B JOl
This Sundai
"Babv Jean
"No N ic k n
guitarist Gary
bassist Jerry '
and drummer
Borden. or
they are knowi
giving Greenvi
Runch.
What is Rur
own term for
music. Kennedj
"New MusicaiJ
explain the Nil
"You've got "f
show; then
"Commodores!
showtime and
then you take "
who have more
with the showtil
the Who with
1





Features
v l.tvs i r ! Pacino is sh�
n the i lnn.u ii s� uuciu v
in Sunn
nd .hi
limn I In
h i ii�
I hi t liitt
will h� shown this Krida and Saturday night al v 7 15 and '� Ml p m. in
Mendenhall's Hendri I heatrc mh i- being sp hi- Mudent
I mini I ilmsommittet
Country Speech Put In Book
Colorful Metaphors Make Fun Reading
Alumni Exhibit Art
Weekend Free Flick:
AI Pacino Stars In
And Justice For All
l 11 ;
y.M) p.n
I
"Ai M
MS M

'�

i �

issau is
M i
-




V
.
I

II s. I
Yet More Trivia To
Baffle Western Fans
B lW ll� NORKI-s
ami
VnilIKII)S
They're III You Can I at
Ml ,�u an I at lead singei Stacy Hellei belts i�u� Blondie's "Hanging
on tin lelephone" al dreenille's Rathskeller I he area west and
most promising "progressie' band is breathing liU1 into tin stagnant
melangt ol mush that has characterized the loeal scene thus tar. I he
nip �ill be featured in an article on recent trends in rock music in the
luesdav pnl IX edition ! I he I asiarolinian.


M

.

st w
V ales"i

. � '
12 �
1 K '��� �� � w i r 11
Mother's Finest To
Appear At The Attic
Bv JOHN M M I K
si.ff Writti
"M
Mi
M
. I standal
. oung lady has a
costumes
� i v i i � She
performii
� ten yeai s, stai
p p ! ield,
. tuxedos "I Lett
I leat I in Sai I i ancisco" as she's
Ciradua .broke
leu own way, ad
ind growing in
the veais
I1
I
Ml
i

1 at ih V i
Vl
Ml
populai in
laving

eeral I I concert
here at the ttk Sunday
loubi pi omoting theii
l ge" Included
a surprise, as
then formei keyboardist Mike K
en replaced In an as yet
awn musician
in
Recording artists Mother's Finest will bring their powerful blend of funk and rock to lhe tl.c in downtown
(.reenville Ihis Sundae night. I ead singer Joyce kenned has been called tin performer that (.ran Slick
could haw been (I sin onh been black I he band has a nen label and is once again touring the countn





III! ! SI (AROl IMAN
APRIl 23, 1981
LtieOAJG )f3our Couxsc Th ttvep lAMi
LU YOU TO vAfTrTr 4f5M
Bur, R�vie:v6U-
Po?itIajicil
6v Pwip vJohkis
ings
Justice For A11
Photos By GARY PATTERSON
HAPPENINGS
Campus Events
Thursday 23
� 8:15 p.m. Ja Band 11 Concert, A.J. Fletcher
Rec. Hall
Friday 24
� 8:00 a.m11:00 p.m. Library Open
� 3:00 p m. Men's Baseball: UNC-Charlotte,
Harrington Field
� 5:00, 7:15, & 9:30 p.m. Movie: And Justice
For All, Hendrix Theatre
� pi .I 24-25 All Day Women's Softball:
NCAIAW State Tourney, LB.A.
Saturday 25
� 9:00 a.m 1:00 p.m. Library Open
� 5:00, "Is. & 9:30 p.m. Movie: And Justice
For All. Hendrix I heatre
� 7:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: UNC-Wilmington,
Harrington Field
� April 25-26 MI l)a AAJE & Phi Mu Alpha
Ja Festival, A.J. Fletcher Rec. Hall
� 1:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: L'NC-Wilmington,
Harrington 1 ield
� Family Tun Day 12:00 noon-3:00 p.m.
Mondav 27
� Classes End
� 7:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: N.C. Wesleyan,
Harrington Field
Movies:
Buccaneer
� "Scanners" (R) Shows at 1:10. 3:10, 5:10,
7:10, & 9:10 p.m.
� "Hardlv Working" (PC.) Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7,
& 9:00 p.m.
� "Inside Moves (PG) Shows at 1:15,3:15,7:15
& 9:15 p.m.
� Starting Friday: "Cattle Annie & Tittle
Britches" (PG) Shows at 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7; 15 &
4:15 p.m. & "Breaker Morant" (PC.) Shows at 1,
3, 5, 7, & 9:00 p.m.
Plaa
� "Going Ape" (PC.) Shows at 3:30, 5:20, 7:10,
& 9:00 p.m.
� "Nighthawks" (R) Shows at 3:20, 5:15, 7:10,
& 9:05 p.m.
� "The Postman Always Rings Twice" (R)
Shows at 2:30, 4:45. 7:00, & 9:15 p.m.
� Starling Friday: "Pick Up Summer" (R)
Shows at 3:15, 5:10, 7:05, & 9:00 p.m.
Nightlife
Attic
� Thursday GOOD HUMOR
� Friday SIDEWINDER
� Saturda) SIDEWINDER
� Sunday MOTHERS FINEST
� Monda ZIGGURA1
� luesda) 1H1 NIGHTHAWKS
� Wednesday SKEE I KELLY
Carolina Oprv House
� rhursda JIMMY GYLES & FIDDLE
MACK
� Friday JIMMY GYLES & FIDDLE MAGIC
� Saturday JIMMY GYLES & FIDDLE
M NGIC
Chapter X
� I hursday Pi kappa Phi "Lucky Ladies Nite"
7-10 p.m.
� Friday Alpha Delta Pi "End of Week Par-
tv" 4-7:30 p.m.
AMMtTIOHSl-PTO
tmwasKO
P��NANCY
UHMmtmtmtmtmr
prtgnancy tttt, Mr if cw
fro. �ne troturm pr�9nn
cy coumrtlog For furltwr
fntori�tton call UiHU
noli ' If nvniMf
too m-ttm bttwtin �
A.M. S r WMfctoyv
��toNJ HHM'I
�iKJHMtftHm
� I WM M� ��
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force scholar-
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The
scholarship provides for tui-
tion, books, lab fees and
equipment, plus a $400 mon-
thly allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
the high cost of medical
education.
Contact:
TSgt. Bob Payne
U.S.A.F. Health Profes-
sions Recruiting
Suite �1-1, 1100 Navaho
Or.
Raleigh, N.C 27609
(919) 755-4134
AIR FORCE
� Saturday Best in Beach Music
� Sunday Kappa Alpha "Nickel Nite"
� Tuesday Pi Kappa Phi "Lucky Ladies Nite"
Ladies lockout 8-10 p.m.
� Wednesday Sigma Nu "50, 50 Nite"
Klbo Room
� Thursday The Original College Nite
� Triday End of the Week Party 3-7 & 9-11
� Saturday Dance Music At Its Best
� Sunday Ladies Nite
� Tuesday Delta Sigma Phi Mister Leggs Con-
test
Wednesday Hump Nite
Continued from page 5
vesligating Pacino.
The intentions oi this
overstuffed satire are
clear: it wants to do to
the criminal-just ice
system u hat
"Network" did to
television.
But Jewison and his
overly calculating
writers can't always tell
the difference between
genuine outrage and
mere outrageousness.
Sa va g e satires
shouldn't be so eager to
covet their bets.
Cheerers On Parade
Pictured above are Donna Pritchard and Joanne Paul, two more of the
l98182 ECU cheerleading squad chosen to serve with a total of six
others.
WASH HOUSE
(Across from Krispy Kret )
and
KORE-O-MAT
(Across from University Cor Wash)
Use one Washer � Get One
FREE
Limit one Free Wash per visit
Offer expires April 22, 1981 - Valid w Coupon Only
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nightly 5:UO-9:OOpm
Tuea. Fish Fry- All 'I"he r-ish You Clan bat With A Mug
(H Your Favorite Beverage$3.9V
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash bhnmp With Trench
Tries, Cole SlaVv and Our Famous Hushpuppies$3.99
Thlir. Family Night A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp, Tried Tish, Oysters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tue,Wed,Thur(Oy�ter Bar Only) 1 Doz. HaUshe.l
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Of Your Tavorite Beverage
$2.99
on s. cwcsT. ixT.
Ph. 736-2011
� General Nutrition Centers
America's Best Nutrition Values are at GNC�Ovef 800 Stores from Coast to Coast
500mg g� "�r" AT� BROWN 1400 'U
VITAMIN BRAN �SSS& RICE : VITAMIN
99 ! 29 'I291 39 I
�� a f ip.Qfi s i I f PPBLS S 4-�l ' EXPIRES 5 S �1 �
100
L '�' I wt I EXPIRES i 4-8' J EPIRt-Sii �1
C.NC QUALITY AT LESS THAN CHEAPEST CUT RATE MAIL OROER PRICES1
JuponT Rnyr. MCAI' I STORE COUPON I
WHi ALFALFA Vtamin , "Mi �grfmi ZINC
-89c; 1-49 I?2? I 69 I; ss ,39
�PRES i i-1 EXPIRES i ill EXPIRES Si e
r)SE
.EXPIRES Sill 1 EXPIRES ii n � EXPIRES ii 6'
SENSATIONAL
PENNY SALE
UNDER
Urn
STYLEX
� Contwni banxocatna
whkh it approwid
by Ut Oovt
panel oi a&pant
(of appatfta contfo
QUAfcftHTf f
IRON 2170SELENIUM 2470
'��(('���; � I rtiiTs�mtf �1 �
inrwL "2"aww 243�
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22W RELAX with 2796
ABBS -OAli! COMWtl � ��� �
MULTI-
MINERALS
IIHNTOI HI�IIM�I ��� 'MS j MO��lM�lI m�VOU� TfMiON IH)I'�
Stress?
� Combat Strets
� Maintain Encryy
Rasatwtt
B-COMPLEX
B SO Balanced
Formula
?64?
CLIP THESE COUPONS FOR OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES
KIP IfCITMtH I STORE COUPON I STOPE COUPON I STORE COUPON I STORE COUPON 1 STORE COUPON
oin pun I gRaa I FLOUR gfr" feffi. soybeans
sltiCflC ' I SAVI AQ: 1 '�� CflC NtQC ! SAVE
901 (Kf I �c Kl I �� OCf .1 KJ �" -
EXPTJie?Vb-�t � EXPIRES SSI � EXPIRES 5 Sl I txCIRES S 4 11 � EXPIRES !�1 I txPtsie.
49� I: 89 ! 39
STORE COUPON
STORE COUPON
STORE COUPON
LOWFA7
YOGURT
� 802
15
p: FRUIT
r JUICES
It � SAVE 39c llff i ! SAVE 19c
EXPIRES S-S 11 EXPIRES SS41 � EXPIRES SS �t
15
cl
POTATO YOGUR
OR CORN
I CHIPS
15
Ci
STORE COUPON S STORE COUPON
�At!D JDeodorant
UAlo stick
EXPIRES SSI! EXPIRES 5 ill
�������������a
STORE COUPON
4 VARIETIES
HONEY
STORE COUPON
JOJOBA
MOKTUIUnC
$09
EXPIRES S-S-S1
SAVi
60�(
STRESS TABS ; GEKTOL?
git turn wWiA.
m A�t w�oi� I CCDIftFM
SJ79J 59c
100
tlWWIt H-tT
METAKIUCa? OWE A-DAY
orr iami PoaaauL � laaa
aaa-i a a�al I G,T " nsaaiui.
STORE COUPON
WMOt-E WHEAT
HONEY
GRAHAMS
s�v� CO
�( Do
EXPIRES SiC
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(SAVE
� $;� �� u
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STORE COUPON
WHOLE WHEAT
Macaroni &
Cheese Dinner
� STORE COUPON
! WHOLE WHEAT
I FIG BARS
39 j 99
BANANA
CHIPS
l �? 89c
EX
EXPIRES i itl � EXPIRES i Si)
High Blood Pressure'
Hllnil.l SAI I INIAKI
III
XPIRES S i-tl
��������
General
Nutrition
Centers
��� COUPON
NO SALT
Tomato
Julco
29c
S�t
iKpmca 1 � �
iToat coiaoN
WO ftVALT
. !lf . HAP.I l
Mayonnais
IIOMI COUPON
HO s�.
Imwhi Stick
SNACKS
MM
30c
ii,i,ii v �
49
froac coupon
�0 Salt
VEG-IT
srST
It vou havt .1 S10.00C nb waitinj; tor you,
yiHl could have an Anuru .in I pri���� L .irJ
right now,

.i. i-� Arm
� �
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'
I he American Expressurd. I
IKm't Umw school uithout it.
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
"The Family Steak House"
Beet Tips
with Peppers and Onions
TUESDAY ONLY
Lunch and Dinner
55 Item Salad Bar and Take Out Service
264 By-Pass 756-0040 2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
Pin
For
Pern
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And C
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State U
pursue ai
physiolol
30-vear-4
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research
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sion for
have elel
love ol el
Arranl
AIAW
field eo
dinator
and th
directoil






8
1 Ml
. k i im
I'K
2� 1981
Classifieds
HOOMATES WANTED 2 male oi
temale roommates wanted to
inate spacious 3 bedioom house
during summer and oi I tail
Convenient location to Carolina
East Mall and Pitt Community
College MO month during sum
mer one thud utilities and s�0
month one lourth utilities during
the tall Call 756 VOll alter S pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED bedioom apt in
Wilson Acres 4 blocks trom cam
pus sus mo plus one halt
utilities Call 752 vl�4 alter 4 30
APT FOR LEASE 600
Georgetown Runs trom mid May
to Mid August Call 758 0323
ROOMMATES WANTED NiCt-
house on 4th St near campus ana
downtown From mid May to mid
August Call 752 2�5v
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Only 77 per month
plus one third utilities Pnya'e
room an condition Within walk
nig distance ot campus For sum
mer only Call 752 91S1 or 7S2 105.
ask tor Becky Beth or Susan
PERSONS NEEDED 2 or 3 peo
pie to sub lease apt lot summer
Located on E 3id Street 1
bedrooms part turmshed Yv.i'ti
'�d in rent For more intor
FEMALE ROOMMATE
AANtfcD Close to campus s'
plus one hall utilities Available
June 1 Call 757 1448
LARGE BEDROOM Foi rent air
conditioned Utilities included
Across trom campus Call
758 2585
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED To share I' bedroom
ap' a' Village Green lot the sum
Completely turmshed
prvate room Pay MO rent and
one h.v� utilit es Call 752 '04'
SUBLEASE FOR SUMMER
NlCi . bedroom turmshed apt
"i,ii , ampus ECU bus Call
752 4�89
FOR RENT Rooms toi 5
month including h � I
privleges Call 756 86s' a
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEfcD
ED To share 3 bedroom duplex
near campus 567 per month, one
third utilities Washer d -�
Available June 1 Ca1
ROOMS FOR RENT 405 A 4th
St Utilities included Share
kitchen semi 'urnshed S'05 ana
l�S Call '58 64C'
RENTAL Nags Head area. j
bedroom house furnished watei
front w,th dock Excellent swim
ishmg and boatinq Pool
tennis court a�aiiable Occupa"
CV 4 S240C for
included I vi�
APT FOR �
'i.shed ar
Great ru .
one half n
utilities, more
(jqh sumn
HI
J campus
'atur e
II
tr
AXirSSHOF
REPAIR
Gi
Qual
.
BENNIES
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front BMI
Alifjrtmtnt
All Typs of
Avto Repair
ForIfjti Ponrntk
t�ato�S�bi� Rattt
IfMI. itthltrtol
��hont TSC-4224
NU D TO MOV I IN V I I If
established U �� mate
beginning Auyuit is Will share
hall expenses Can 61
F E M A LI R O O M M A 1 t
WANTED FOI sum in el
bedroom duplex s blocks
campus SSbOOpi-t month plus fur
hall utilities 7SP
f OP Is' V NOR AP ! s
mini Include!
' '
the day 01 q lh,
� . i-ii.mi
FOR REN1 Spa
elegant housr Suital
per sons Hall .i bloi � �
i. ampus HOC plu . di pos I Call
'S6 0786 attei 3 pm
ROOMS FOR RENT 2 roon
� . �' t "i n, � St
a vaiia: mmei a yeai
� ' i p IJ s
� �
. - ik'
bedroon house. I blocl
pus ll � bh.
� �
di -
PERSONAL

band
ROAP ES Wl
lock ROADIt
band
V O U R
n
i Ml i Belated Happy Easter!
up beautiful in the die
. PS i m generous but
.mm itiing i i an t thai e
A sii, i i colored diamond
d small i tnq If found
PI I ASl i all 757 3155 Has sen
hmental iratue
VOUR CAREER What aie you
i thi ummei lo pi epai e im
I? F ind out why IBM Xcron Pro
it Gambit Upiohn and hun
ninis Aant students that
ki d with us For inter
� M ill '58 4513
HAS RE AGAN S BUDGET CUT
Ml YOU SHORT Then
gi i .1 hicjh pay inq summer Ob with
� inb recommendation For
.s i. .ill 758 4S13
.Id TO BUY Used
lightwieght 10 speed Call
� leave message Km Gary
OV I kl AS JOBS Summer yeai
d e iii ope s A met ica
. . As,a All fields
I . monthly Stqhtsi euiq
nlormation write uc Box
orona Del Mar, Ca
FE� � i � OS vfc Nt� Oin
nal � iui sknis
.sin meat lobs
I Thomas Vot ational
� i I Saturday rviuvinq
alion Booksh. .
bicycle etc No 12
. st Tanqiewood Apts
(Oadtrippers Where's
nthsoman? is it beneath it
on 14th Street? Next time
i D s in Kmston and
Moon Pies' Bttei yet
l" Virginia Beach since we
nadi il there the in st time
. id kisses! C G and J B
FOR SALE PIONEER 880
STEREO RECIEVER Nice 60
watts a channel Only 6 months
old Call 757 3210
FOR SALE 1971 Fiat 124, needs
transmission, less than 3,000 miles
on overhaul Call 752 4400 after
6 00 p m S800 tnm
FOR SALE Rotel 60 watts stereo
receiver with 4 channel
capability 1125 Soundesign
8 track player recorder $50 BIC
beltdnve turntable 575 Maranti
75 watt 3 way speakers. 2 years
old, slight cabinet damage, ex
cellent sound $200 lor set Call
Oave at 756 6455 or come by M 2
Oakmont Square Apts alter 5pm
FOR SALE Yashica Mat 124 G
twin lens reflex camera Great
lor art student Asking $90 Only
used twice Call Lindi 758 6445
FOR SALE Scuba gear, new and
used B C s tanks, regulators,
other gear Good prices package
or seperate Call 758 9775. ask tor
Gene
FOR SALE AM FM Panosonic in
dash radio Very new $55
Umsomc portlble TV with AM FM
radio cassette tape Digital quart
clock. New condition. $75. Call
752 9603
FOR SALE Labrador Retreiver
puppies. AKC registered, wormed
8 yellow males, 4 yellow females
Ready week of May nth Ex
cellent graduation gilt Chris
Smith. Plymouth. N C
793 9205 keep trying. $125 males,
$100 temales
FOR SALE V W Karmann Ghia
1967, body engine in excellent con
dition, new paint, reasonable
price Call alter 6 00 pm 752 1369
FOR SALE 5 cu It refrigerator
Good condition $150 Call 752 8300
Lady Bucs Vie For Berth
j&
111 1AM
VKI.VK
Xssistmil spurts I diltir
hast Carolina's (Dp-
ranked lady Pirates
will be shooting for the
championship of the
North Carolina AIAW
Qualifying Tourna-
ment this weekend in
Graham to see who
represents the state in
the Regional Tourna-
ment.
The number one-
seeded Lady Bucs need
a first or second place
finish in order to de-
fend their Region II
crown at Johnson City,
Ienn, t he second
weekend in May.
Chief competition in
the state tourney will
probably come from N.
C. State and North
Carolina. The Lady
Pirates finished intra
state competition this
season vCh a 21-0
record.
Pirate notes: I he
1 ad Hues, have foui
players hitting ovei
.400: Kathv Rilev.vn
thia Shepard, Mitzi
Davi and freshman l �
I andaI.e.inn Pit
chei Jeanette Rut Is
sports .i 2o i record this
m while teammate
e Humphrey has a
12 2 marl
Kansas City Loses, But Ford Is Back
KANSAS CITY,
Mo. (I PI) Phil lord
was in the Kansas City
line-up Tuesday night
for the first time in
nearly two months but
i! was hardly a trium-
phant return for the
Kings' premier point
guard.
lord, whose lirst
start since Feb. 22 even
surprised a few of his
teammates, managed to
dish oft seven assists
but was also charged
with five fouls and four
turnovers in only 23
minute's ol action in
Kansas City's 97-7K set-
back to the Houston
Rockets in the opening
game ol the Western
Conference finals.
Ford had an eye orbit
shattered when he was
accidentally poked In
I loyd free in thai Feb.
22 game against Golden
underweni "j was hoping Phil
repaii the would give us a spark
Stale. He
surgery to
damage bm had been said Kansas City Coach
bothered hs double vi- Cotton Fitzsimmi
sion as recently as lasl "He's still got a blind
week
1 he Kings were even
hinting � 1 a return trip
operating table for
their formei North
Carolina All-America.
spot
he's g i
floor Bui
a lot ol heart.
I've been watching him
in practice and it's ob-
i wanted to gel
back in there
m
�h ST
S ALESaUir day
a m3 01 p m 408
F ur nituf eclothes.
nthcnak.
�n book Hfdth
uDra m h ft,
Ajt id Dtctionat v
11 Prikniq lot
scl.v mqht east call
ftp Pkc et Pr ok's
?ypinq t'di t inq prv
WRITE RIGHT
NEEDIS'1 �
And

� ,
n
F r i d a �
, .
K . q h' i � 0 .
ou lovi�Vhi-i
-� � s an
'b. ie JP
-
FOR SALE
FG
LE Snarr- di om Pearl
3 ot th, line f��tia di-f'p E
no Can 157 3210
- SALE Jensen To Axial 4 by
" sp. . , A still in box
-
r
COPIES
Tltf Happy ' SMl
Copy Center
Copies4.25c
100 OR WORE
5C 1TQ99
I
Vs. I
COPIES
J
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday PS tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
m
m
riTTTTTTTirTITTTTYTTTririrTr T T T T
m
m
-
M
TI'T?
3ES-
r
Weekdays
11:30-11:00
Fri. & Sat.
11:30-12:00
9
The Best Pizza In Town (Honest)
N
H
I
Game
Machines
BIG
SCREEN
TV
rti
Lunch Specials
Daily Till
3:00 p.m.
M
All Of Your
Favorite Beverages
300 E 10th Street
758 6121
Use Our Convenient
Drive-Up Window Fo.
To-Go Orders
25 Off on any
Mr. Gatti's Sandwich!
s(op b nn
M�mda and I hursda
From 2:00to5:00
You'll He Clad
Vou Did A
it I, i JA
Tethnlcal
Klectronic
And
Maintenance,
Inc.
756-1387
udni, idto.
& 2Wa
( ommumcations
Maintenance
(Preventive to
Overhaul)
Scrvk'CN directed b a l�i
( la� i ImiiMil Uih.u
i ian Mudi "i �l Applied
Phvsio ji ii-i ariiliiui
him rsil
( onvenielelv I ocated
�: Block Dftampus
Pick-I j) and Deliver)
Available
90 Oa Warrantv
Period
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
it you nt�d money (or till clothtt or football tickets, now is a
good tlma to sell your gold and silver vaiusbles. And here's a
good wey to get EXTRA CASH!
SILL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
$
SUMMER SALES
Havi I ol college si d oksaunnq
The m, :� � � ird work, and away I
no A d .ho is lookmq tor sott ,cb But
we do want a tew ijood people wtio are w . �
Touqhest summer proqrams qoinq The can expect hard work
and plenty ot it I they can't hack it we Will I � rbem no it s
ands or buts M th-y can make if MM � l in � � pt � ' quite a sum
mer earmnq more money than most coiieqe iobs qammq f. i
qraduatton benefits traeiinq and hainq great hme Most ot
our students avi 391 it least two summers with Varsity
don t care about you' maior sen or race The most import
quire men ts are hard work and sell discipline and rtiey af � things
you cant major m Last summer vars ' ; students
trom ECU to work in their student proqram and tttey averaged
saving Kpenses ovei sjSOO Pius �h� v ha greal tune
domq it it you want the tacts call ?b. . . - nq tor
tsy Ob don't can IWi
ECU
Dr. G. Robert Vines
Optometrist
Professional Vision Care
Where Quality is Affordable
Complete Visual Examination
Contact Lenses
Call For Contact lens
and Free Information
756-6638
Carolina East Mall
Greenville, N.C.

YOUR MOTHER
WARNED US.
So we knew this college ring sale had to be perfect for you.
She told us you were difficult. "Never ate vegetablesshe said "Never
calls home Preparing for you was a tough assignment.
But we're as tough as our toughest customer. Our rings are custom-
designed and backed by a lifetime warranty
. And if
you're undecided about a college ring, we can make your decision easy
Because you can get a terrific deal when you trade in your 10K gold high
school ring.
You can choose from dozens of styles We've got something for the
most demanding student. Even you.
But don't thank us. Thank your mother.
Almost avsnona has a high school or collage class ring
they don't waar anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man Ware
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
fair prices and good service.
$
Wl Pkt cash oea.TNi.s�ot
FOI letmiVr VAlVABliSMYTMIIt
aUIRDlOii-HK-llR
S GOLD $
� tmes � Mcxum � tcis � oiamows
� CUSS tW�S WIMNK IAMS � OUT Al
69ift ' MKIUTS � M00ONS � lOUITS
� oums � uumts � am yaja � uttucs
PAVING ON.TM-SOT
CASH FOR ITIMB MARRIR
STERLING SILVER
M�ARftU�S 0� COHOITION
� COFFEE SERVICES � GOBLETS
� RINGS � SPOONS TRAYS � KNIVES
� FORKS�NECKLACES�BRACELITB
�FRANKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE
$
April, 23rd, 24th
Student Supply Store Lobby

CW1 oP KEY SALES CO lNHN
401 2. EVANS ST
g � VANS ST UPEN9 30-5 30MUN bAl
iMONYKousf south PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESS.OMAL PERMANENT DEALER
c 1981 ArtCarvert Class Rings. In
I





1 HI
I s i Ki '1 INI VN
Sports
i � w 11 i � i �
lntrasquad Game Set For Saturday


Bins Collide In Spring Drills
BII KI is( HAND1 IK
Spurts I iln.ir
Spring practice foi the Easi
( arolina football team is quickly
drawing to a close, with the animal
intrasquad game set foi this Satui
day in I icklen Stadium
I he annual Purple Gold game
will get underwav al 7 p m with a
picture session open to the public
preceeding the game from 5 until
6 p m. 1 here will be a photographei
on hand with nominal lees being
charged foi prints I he publii will
be admitted to ihe game free ol
chai
leading into the gam Pir;
tensive coordinatoi Wrighi ndei
son said fans should see a much im-
proved club ovei the one that weni
4 7 this past yeai
"We've had a lot bettei spring
in we had last year he said.
" ttei being here a yeai we
. . hii pei sonnel bel
dei
changed quite
Itl he Buc aide sei ed
Pal h. ff foi several years
d returned to seie Midi I d
1 moi eni tafl.
"Th kid
ved tremendously ovei
�ndei son said. ' 1
tak ' more worl hai ii did in
pi luct i �
season and the kids are
well
.letson irh every
the team should be improved
possible excep
�a is the offensive backfield,
able foi -ii P i
where all three starters nthon hv
( ollins, I heodore Sutton a Mike ���
I) a uis ran out ol eligibil
weak spol foi Satu
could be al the quarterba �
tion i a 'ii. whi
most ol thi 1980 a H ��'
recov ei ing from net 1
should be � ! x
tice time.
Nelson's replacement i i
Stewart and I arr Brobst, botl lad M
have theii own aili R� v-
Stewai i has been ii
spring but will pla Sa
though no! ai full strength Bp bst I
i had knee bruise a
. v �
made from th
celleni quk kness and speed
said " ! he
Defei
Satu reasons mal
f offensi
"1 rea
"We've ha
� �. ' I v :
pla ' me be served steal

1 asi w
is done I ' l '
Pirates Set
Tor Tough
Penn Relays
VM . K.RION
Winners Will
Be Announced
Next Tuesday
i
I a
-
Sui
B
�s

a w a rd, t a
i
V
A i

M I v John Hallow On 1 he Basepaths Against Davis & El kins
Wilder, Patterson Superb
S o-xi
Pitching Sparks Bucs To 3 Wins
Arrants
Resigns
IAW
( hi
d 11 up in th
promptly laid a
in
1A fiel
dinai i '
U7S
ht bad
I h e v i s i t o r s i
� iak a mi
rl uallv tin
in the ip, walking
but
I .
with
Kaufman
nine dei r-
ilder,
sc
su
ion
w
�Id
back
fered
s
ho ha?
lm a-
behind him b his teammates all
only season, improved has mark to 7-4.
Following the doubleheadei last
the tiis, night Pirate head coach Hal Baird
hree runs expressed increasing Measure with
Pattei son his team's play
"We're playing real well defen-
sively Baud said. "We'realso get-
. eal good pitching ol late
Ihe second-yeai mentoi did point
out one area that has not been per-
forming up to expected standards
but added that that did not seem to
be presenting a major problem.
"We're not swinging the bats as
well as we were earlier in the year
he said. "But it there's one area of
the game that we'd rather be
substandard in it would be hitting.
hit defense is playing so well that it
is making up foi the hitting loss
Baud said that the great pitching
ol late has come despite some
fatigue.
"Oui pitching stafl is very tired
now. We've played a lot ot games
! t da
up ��� ' the �inn-
m ol the ninth
had already been
I to six luis by
pitchei Ron Kaul
ise came in the
the inning ott with
latet he went to se-
Hendley came
gle. Designated
itli then struck out,
I ran 1 itzgerald to
-ingle
Sage
living lh( Bucs
nsecuti e w ins.
. fell to 15-2-1
I osing pitchei
his tiist lost in
lacked hittinu
with ver little rest. I just hope the
keep responding
Ihe Puates now have a rematch
with Davis and I Ikms tonight to
survive it they are to gam victor)
number 28. The two clubs meet on
Hai rington Field tonight .it 6:00.
Pirate Pitcher Robbie Harper Warms l'p





Title
The East Carolinian, April 23, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 23, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.129
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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