The East Carolinian, April 21, 1981






�Ire lEafit daroltntan
1
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 u.fi4
X Pages
Tuesday, April 21. 19H1
(Greenville, North Carolina
( irculation KUNMi
Panel Decides No Run- Off;
Kirk Little Named Treasurer

i � :�
Kirk Little
B Dr.BOKAII HOI Al INC
It s finally ovei.
Aftei almost three weeks ol ap-
peals, comments, honor council
charges being made, honor council
charges being dropped, a run-ott,
talk ol anothei run-off, etc. etc.
ek.
and decided.
Kirk I ittle, I
race, emei
special panel, I
second run-ol
run-ol t was sul ficieni.
1 he special panel met Friday
afternoon at 2 p.m. in Room 208
Whichard Building and prepared a
statement explaining their decision.
the
lion of SCiA treasurei is ovet
tie
incumbent in the
as victoi aftei a
ormed to considei a
, decided that one
Before the panel met, however,
both Kirk I ittle and ngela Pepe
signed statements which, in effect,
contended that no mattei what the
panel's final decision was, that deci-
sion would end the debate on the
issue.
I he special panel's statement, tit!
ed "the decision rendered by special
panel on second i �n
concluded thai according to rticle
, section 4, B, 1 ol the election
rules, "I! the rei hows a i
jority ol two perceni i 0200) 01 less
. il the total vote ; ten all
didates thai are v� I
will be eligibh
lion. 11 mphasi'
I he stai
"Provisions ol the elections -
imposing the .0200 margin are cleai �
1 applicable to elections and not to
run-ott elections I he special panel
only conclude that the candidate
receiving the most votes in the run
oil election should be declared
elected.
�"It is true thai ceilain provisions
of the election rules make reference
run 'it jusl as certain provi-
sions ike reference to
"elections When read in context
rticle X, section 4, B, I,
however, it seems clear that the use
� the plural in these othei provi-
sions refers to one run-ofl tor
various offices rathei than multiple
run ol Is foi one ol fice
I he statement was signed by 1):
I hri Howell, chairperson; Dr.
finsley Yarborough, profess
political science; Jennifei Ki .
dent; Douglas ox. student; and
lames Mallory . associate de I
orientation and judiciary
Kuk 1 ittle was officially sworn in
late Friday afternoon I �
council member Drake Mann.
"I'm very ready to get bad
work 1 ittle said. "I'm very I
py and I'm looking forward
next yeai. v e're goii
to gel SGA in the best final
shape evei
"In the next two weeks, the
met legislature and 1 are ,
down and draw up some new .
I'm hoping we'll get a lot done
Angela Pepe wa unavailabU
comment.
Kirk 1 ittle
treasurer.
general ele
ha�
1 ittle
ction
officially been declared the winner in the race for SG
tlu incumbent, lost to challenger ngela Pepe in the
but managed a narrow victors in a subsequent run-oft.
Gun Control
Would It Reduce Violent Crime
Or Take Away Civil Rights?
i)l RHAM, N.C. (I Ph
reduce the ,
people - Dum
profess
ends,
"Gun conuol may be ireating the symptoms,
doesn't mean we shouldn'1 I
�k said recent
vv- i '� p H thai many people on the wrong
� he - aid.
He oted tl at North . arolina has had a gun permit
919 ing sheriff's issue permits foi the
Ig . V hat application, a
shen gets the chano imine the prospective ;
chaser's criminal and mental health record.
lid be en-
tities it is hard
is. while in others the process is
�. ortnw tin
ol a In so
tor
� he
c ook pro
e ones now in
learne
he sa
"Bi
-calihet
thetw i
p r o t e i
"drain shop" laws similar to
bartender I nder such a law ,
it a dealer sells a gun without
a permit and thai buyer then uses
( C Ontrol may be the gun to harm someone, the seller
ould be sued.
leir home
"( ivil liability makes the law self-
would be .
u a gun. particularly
w how � i die a
said his research
j him the sheer breadth
mwide makes the
treating the symptoms
but that doesn 7 mean we
shouldn 7 do something. " forcing he said.
-Dr. Philip Cook
has t
� . in
outlawing ol weapons impractical Hall ol the
in America own some type ol firearm, he
i and now al least a fourth ol the households own at
least one handgun.
C ook also basked bans on sales ol
concealable guns, adding that no
honest person would want one as it
already is illegal to carry a concealed
tmbh������ weapon.
He also said police should be encouraged to become
more active in seeking out concealed guns and con-
fiscating them. Giving them magnetometers that can
detect metal hidden a person is a big help. Cook said.
Stamped
En v elopes
deeded
Because ol the recent increase in
the postal rates the office olareei
Planning and Placement will be
making life a little more com-
plicated for ECU's seniors.
Normally the office mails listings
of job opportunities to seniors that
are currently enrolled at EC1
However the office is requesting all
seniors to stop by and leave three
stamped, sell-addressed em elopes
in order to receive the mailing
According to a statement released
by the office this move was made
necessary in order to "provide the
necessarv services for the remainder
ol this tisal vear
Any student who will be living in
Greenville this summer can pick up
the listings themselves.
Clarification
In the ruesday. pril 14 issue ol ihe Easi
c arolinian, an article appeared titled Rape
Prevention Ruks to Remember rhe arti
cle as written bs I wine Singleton and
originally appeared in a rape prevention pam
hlei written bv Ms. Singleton We regrel no'
phlei �-
giving I ynne Singleton due credii ana
apologize tor ihe oversight
Booze and Pills
can cause serious problems.
More help may soon he available.
S(, President Lester Nail
was administered the oath oj office at the Si, 1 banquet last neck.
Atlanta Count Now 24
All 1 (I PI Ihe 24th aftei he disappered, on March 2. He missing,
young Atlanta black to be slam in � md no sign ol sexual Investigators close to the task
the past 21 months was asphyxiated abuse. 1 he youngstei was clad only force probe have speculated that the
" uist' like 12 others before him, a in undershorts when found, as were killer or killers responsible tor most
medical examiner said Monday. 'he corpses ol five other victims in of the homicides may be stripping
n autopsy showed thai 15-yeai the baffling case. the victims and dumping them in a
old loseph Bell whose bodv was 1 here were al least two other river as an additional safeguard
founc in the South Rivet Sunday, similarties n n the Hell death, against detection. That p
seven week- he vanished. V in mo I the cases, there was parently began materializing m
'probably" was smothered, little or no indication of a struggle. lanuary after reports ous
DeKalb Counts Medical Examinei nd, two other victims, 13-year-old material and othei trace evidence
loe Burton described the cause ol Curtis Walket and 9-year-old Aaron police had found with some ol the
de Uh is "suffocation oj a combina lackson, also were found in or near victims' bodies.
lion ol suffocation and smothei - uth River, southeast of Atlan- V had happened so often these
ine" ta. rhree othei victims were found past months, a numbing sadness
' gul . ; there was no sign of in anothet suburban Atlanta river. gripped a home in southwesl
"ligature strangulation such as the Chattahoochee. ta Eddie Mayes, the Bell youi
would be the case with a rope But. In addition to the 24 victims 23-year-old halt brother, said he
he said the bodv was too decompos whose deaths are undei investiga- wished he could "dress uP like a lit-
ed foi him to he certain. tion by a special police task force. tie kid and jusl hang out" on the
Burton said that Bell apparently another black youngstei 10-year- See ATLANTA, page 3
had been in the rivei since shortly old Darron Glass is still listed as
Alcohol And Drugs Subject
Of New Student Organization
either in their own lives or, ning how to recognize and deal with
BvPAULWHITl vicariously, through the lives of intoxication and problem drinking
suftwrito their family or friends he con- behavior, according to Matthews
A new student organization con- tinned. He added that during the summer
cerned with the prevention ol "Our organization accepts the the organization will participate in
alcohol and drug abuse among ECU reality of alcohol use as a pan ol the treshman orientation with a pro
students was officially approved by social behavior of the university stu- gram called "Responsible Drinking
the SGA lst week Ihe new dent Tom Savidge said. "But we Behavior as a University Student.
organization, called the Campus also realize that some of out fellow "We encourage any student who
Alcohol and Drug Program students get into serious trouble has an interest in this area to come
(C D P is the outgrowth ol a with alcohol or other drugs which and work with us Matthews said,
major research study which was negatively affeel their pursuit of "The experiences as a student
conducted in 1978-1979 to deter- educational goals he continued, volunteer in this program are ex-
mine the extent of chemical abuse in "By promoting the responsible use cellent preparation for future
the ECU community. of alcohol, we feel we can reduce the careers in health or social science
The new program is operated bv negative consequences which some programs he continued,
volunteer ECU students, according students who use alcohol ex- Anyone interested in joining the
to lerrv I otterhos, faculty advisor perience Savidge said. program may call 757-6793 or at-
to the organization and chairperson The organization's office, called tend one of its meetings which are
of the ECU Alcohol and Drue the Campus Center tor Alcohol and held on Thursday afternoons,
Education Committee. 1)ru� Information, is located in 3:30-5:00 at the second floor con-
The officers of the new organiza- rooms 301-303 Erwin and is open terence room, Frwin Building,
tion are Alan Matthews, chairper- from 9 a.m5 p.m. Monday ,
son; Laurie Austen, scribe; and through Friday .The office phone fho InQlftP
Tom Sav,dee. treasurer. number is 757-6793. The center ot- J IR IHblUtT
There are two primary goals ol fers confidential peer counseling, in- ���
the organization, according to Alan formation concerning the use ol Announcements2
Matthews "First, we hope to pre- alcohol and drugs, and reterral ser- Editorials4
vent alcohol use Matthews said, vices, according to Laurie Austen. Classifieds6
"Secondlv. we will provide treat- The program has recently com- Features5
men! tor' students who experience pleted a series of training exercises eUers4
alcohol or drug related problems with residence hall advisors concer- Sporls





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIl 21, 1981
Announcements
SOULS
Graduating seniors o� the spr
inq, summer or fall ot 1981, and
who are members ot SO U L S
are asKed to pay $5 00 tor the
senior social to be held April 25 at
Lake Ellsworth Club House trom 9
until Each senior is allowed two
guests who are not seniors
Seniors will also have a voice m
deciding the menu Your coopera
tion is of utmost necessity
Signatures and fees will be taken
m the lobby of the Student Store
trom 10 until 1 on Tuesday.
Wednesday and Thursday
MEDIA BOARD
The Media Board 'S now accep
ting applications tor day student
representative to serve on the
Media Board Applications can be
picked up in the Media Board Of
fice Monday Friday Pub Blag 8
am 1pm and 2pm 5 p.m
COOP
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base, Goidsboro, NC will have a
Co op position m recreation open
for Fall. '81 Interested students
should apply to the Co op Office,
313 Raw! Building, 757 6979 before
the end ot this semester
The Department ot Energy Co
op positions available tor Fall, '81
tor the following majors
chemistry, physics, qeoloqy, com
puter science, health sciences,
biology business administration,
and lournalism Contact the Co op
Office today!
CAMELOT
"Camelof" an idyllic place m a
chivalrous time where the "ram
may never fall till after sundown
and the climate must be perfect all
the year King Arthur, Merlyn
Guenevere, Sir Lancelot and the
Kn.ghts ot the Round Table they
all come to vivid lite in the Ayden
Theatre Workshop's current pro
auction The cast, chorus and or
t hestra are deep into rehearsal tor
what promises to be an extremely
engaging evening of musical
entertainment
Three performances are
scheduled. Thursday and Satur
day. April 23rd and 251h at 8 p m .
and Sunday. April 26th at 3
o'clock Don't miss this exciting
presentation performed tor your
pleasure by the fine cast members
of the Ayden Theatre Workshop
Admission is J2 00 per person
SCJ
There will be an organizational
meetina ot the Society for Col
leaia'e Journalists at 7 p m Tues
day April 21, in Austin room 301
All members and persons m
terested m becoming members
are urged to attend Plans tor the
coming school year will be
discussed
PBL
Ph. Beta Lambda will meet on
Tuesday April 21 at 4pm in Rawl
103 Nominations tor next year's
officers will be closed, and voting
will be held during the meeting
All members are urged to attend
this meeting
DISCOUNT DAYS
Mendenhall Student Center's
discount days are Wednesdays
and Fridays Every week you can
save one third on the cost ot bowl
ing, billiards and table tennis at
Mendenhall Bowling is one third
oft each Friday from 3:00 until
5 30 p m and billiards and table
tennis are one third off each
Wednesday trom 3 00 p.m until
5 30 p m Don't miss it!
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na
tional Honor Fraternity will meet
at 6pm Wednesday m 132 Austin
DOG DAY
DOG DAY A new program of
fered at the Methodist Student
Center will be lunch on Thursdays.
Hot dogs (50 cents) and soft drinks
from 1130 until 1:30. Address: 501
East Fifth Street.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Applications arc now available
m the Psychology office for the
Nancy and Clinton Prewetf
Memorai Scholarship and the
Carol Faulkner Wray Scholar
ships AH psychology maiors may
apply Deadline is April 30
MANAGER
Anyone wishing to apply tor
Retrigera'or Manager for the
1981 82 school year may do so by
coming by the SGA Office, Room
228. Mendenhall Student Center
SUMMER JOBS
The Wake County Employment
and Training Office is accepting
applications from rising senior
college students and graduate
school students for summer
employment as youth coor
dmators College graduates who
are interested in summer employ
ment only and not actively seeking
full time employment are also en
couraged to apply For more infor
mation. contact Linda Gaddis at
the Carec Planning and Place
ment Office, extension 6393
SCHOLASTIC SEARCH
The Scholastic All American
Selection Comm-Mee is now r� cop
ting applications for the 19S1 Sp'
mg Semester Students who are
active in schoias'ic organizations
and who perform weit in class are
asked to iom
The Scholastic All American is
an honor society founded to
recognize tn s country's top
CATHOLICS
Catholic Students come to the
Newman Center. 953 East Tenth
Street Monday April 27th at 3 00
p m for a picnic We have food,
beer, volleyball, and more! Come
and have a good time1 Bring a
friend
ELDERHOSTEL
Persons over 60 years old who
wish to spend a summer week on a
university campus and enroll in
non credit college courses, are in
vited to participate m an
"Elderhostel" program at East
Carolina University June 28 July 4
or July 5 11
"ELderhostel' students, who
will be housed on campus, may
enroll m these special courses
"Descriptive Astronomy a
non mathematical approach to
studying the universe, with em
phasis on recent discoveries m the
solar system and current theories
on cosmology.
� Folk Traditional America an
introduction to tolklife as an im
portant aspect ot American
culture w.th a sampling of trad,
tions trom American regional, oc
cupationai and ethnic folk groups
"Cultures in Collision The Ar
chaeology and Early History of
the Carolina Coast a detailed
study ot English exploration here
between 1584 and 1587 and the
eventual "cultural collision" bet
ween European settlers and the
Carolina Algonkian Indians
No previous background m any
of the subjects to be taught Is re
quired Each course will be
enhanced by the use of films and
slides, artifact displays or live
performances Instructors are
ECU professors No formal
homework" is necessary
"Elderhostel inspired by the
youth hostels and the tolk schools
of Europe, is designed to qive
retirement aged persons the ex
penences and intellectual stimuia
tion of on campus life
Further information about the
program and application
materials are available from Dr.
Ralph Worthmgton. Division of
Continuing Education, ECU
Greenville, NC 27834
LIBRARY
Due to the recent cut in student
hours. Jovner Library cannot pro
vide extended hours during exam
week ot spring semester 1981
The library hours during exam
week will be: Friday April 24, 8
am 9 pm. Saturday April 25, 9
am 5 pm . Tuesday April 28
Thursday April 30, 8 a m 12 mid
night Friday May 1.8am 9
p.m Saturday May 2. 9 am 5
p.m . Sunday May 3. 2 p m 12
midnight, Monday May 4, 8am
12 midnight
SIGMA TAU DELTA
Omicron Theta Chapter of
Sigma Tau De"a National English
Honor Society will celebrate its
20th anniversary at 7 30 pm
Wednesday m 221 Mendenhall
The program will consist of
poetry, prose and slide presenta
tmns by 'acuity and student
members. Several charter
members are scheduled to talk
about the history of the society
Refreshments fitting the occas.on
Ail; be served Photographs tor
the yearbook will be taken, so all
87 current members should at
tend
undergraduate and graduate
students Students are selected
trom over 1 280 schools covering
an 50 states Members participate
in various nationally organized
service projects each year
Students are selected for con
si.ir-ratior based on the extent of
their academic and scholastic per
lormance both m and out of the
classroom No one factor .s weigh
ed heaviest when a new member is
considered A student's best asset
must be his or hers "well
roundedness "
interested students are asked to
send a stamped, self addressee
envelope to Application
Scholastic All American, Ao
mmistrative Offices. P O Box 237
Clinton. New York, 13323
All students are encouraged to
submit an application regardless
ot their grade pomt average
AtOTIOlL"Te
immtiKM
P�a�NANCY
pragrtancr test, Wnf can
rot. �na probtrm �r��nn
cy covfttrting For twrltwr
information coll �?�)$
(toll ' Iroo nwmtor
�oe Ml-SMN botwoon t
A.M.r M �ttul�n
oMft �����-�
HoMWOrfMMioftM
�IT Wool I
I St.
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force scholar-
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The
scholarship provides for tui-
tion, books, lab fees and
equipment, plus a $400 mon-
thly allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
the high cost of medical
education.
Contact:
TSgt. Bob Payne
U.S.A.F. Health Profes-
sions Recruiting
Suite Gl 1, 1100 Navaho
Dr.
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
(919)755 4134
PUR FORCE
SOCIANTH
The SociologyAnthropology
Club is holding its end of the year
business meeting and tareweii
party for its loyal following. All
members are urged to attend, and
it is suggested you bring your
brown bag to add to the festivities
We are meeting on Wednesday
n.ght at 7 30 m Brewster D 302
(April 22) If you nave any ques
tions or would like to bring some
special refreshments call Anna at
752 0826
LAW SCHOOL
Are you interested m attending
law school? The ECU Law Society
will sponsor a "get together" tor
all interested persons on Thurs
day. April 23 m room 244 ot
Mendenhalt Student Center from 7
p m to 10:30 p m Your favorite
beverage will be served! Anyone
interested is urged to attend1
CHESS
We have moved! Yes the
Greenville Chess Club is now
located in the basement of the
Senior CM zens Center on the cor
ner ot 4th and Greene We meet
regularly at 7 15 on Monday
nights its iust a short walk trom
campus Jom us1
CORSO
There will be a Corso meeting on
Tuesday, Apr! 21st in Mendenhall
Student Center room 242 at 5 p m
This is the last meeting for this
semester All corrections and
social work majors are urged tc
attend!
PAGEANT
Applications tor contestants for
Miss Black and Gold Pageant are
now being accepted If interested
contact any member of Alpha Phi
Alpha fraternity or calll 752 9875
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Gamma Sigma Sigma s
cosponsering a Spring Carnival
with the Association tor Retarded
Citizens on Saturday. April 25,
1981. at Elm Street Gym from 10
am to 4 p m There will be lots ot
fun and games as well as a BAKE
OFF For more information call
752 9723 or 752 9228
PHYSED
Students planning to declare
physical education as a maior dur
mg this semester are required to
satisfactorily complete a motor
and physical fitness test prior to
change of major m the fall
semester This test will be given in
Mmges Coliseum at 10 00 a m on
Tuesday, Apr.i 28 The test is
designed to measure agility, ab
dommal strength shoulder
strength and endurance, leg
power, flexibility, and aerobic
fitness Additional information is
available by calling 757 6441
SU ARTIST
Apply now for the Student Union
Artists position and get work ex
penence with pay while still m
school
Active m all phases of produc
tion designing, submitting roughs
for approval. preparing
mechanicals, setting type, coor
dmating projects with commercial
printers.
Responsibility include designing
calendar brocures newspaper
ads and posters
DISCOUNT DAYS
Mendenhall Student Centers
discount days are Wednesdays
and Fridays Every week you can
save 13 on the cost of bowling
billiards and table tennis at
Mendenhall Bowling is 13 oft
each Friday from 3 00 p. m. until
5 30 pm and billiards and table
tennis are 13 oft each Wednesday
from 3 00 pm until 5 30 p.m
Don't miss it!
SCHOLARSHIPS
Phi Eta Sigma, freshman honor
society, will award book scholar
ships to a rising junior and a rising
senior in the amount ot S100 each
to be used during the 1981 82 school
year Applicants must be
members of Phi Eta Sigma
Qualifications emphasize par
tiopation in the ECU chapter of
Phi Eta Sigma and high academic
achievement Interested students
should see Dr John D Ebbs. Pro
lessor of English, at 214 Austin
HILLEL
Come to the Hillel Passover
Brunch at 12 00 on April 26 at the
synagogue, 1420 E 14th St We will
hold elections for next years of
ticers It you wish to run for an of
fice, want a ride, or more info .
call Jerry at 752 5942
GAME ROOM
The College Hill Game Room,
located in the Aycock basement,
features electronic games, pm
ball, pool, pnq pong and toosebaii
Hours are Mon Thurs 12 11
p.m Friday 12 5pm and Sun 8
11 p m All proceeds are returned
to the students through the Student
Residence Association, please
support the game room
FACULTYSTAFF
AH ECU faculty and staff
Mendenhall Student Center
members take advantage ot your
discount day at the Bowling
Center m Mendenhall Every
Wednesday from 5 00 p.m until
8 00 p.m faculty and staff MSC
mefWjW may bowl two (2) games
ano get a 3ra game FREE Don t
forget Wednesday is savings
day at the Bowling Center
The Fast Carolinian
Serving tht- CVMQM3 t ,mimum!
� . iv;
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday curing the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, ana published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rates
Business S35 yearly
All others S25 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville. N.C.
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville N C
Telephone 757 636.637.6309
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nightly 5:00-9:00pm
Tuei. Fish Fry- All I .He Fish You Can tat With A Mug
Of Your Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shnmp With French
Fries, Cole Slav and Our Famous Hushpuppies$3.99
Thur. Family Night A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp, Fried Fish, Oysters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tues,Wed,Thur(Oyster Bar Only) 1 Doz. Halfshell
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Of Your Favorite Beverage
$2.99
Ph. 756-2011
MBffl-tod g
aLiifiaauLitt
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday PJ"S tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuetday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wedneiday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thurtday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink

ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily av
!below the advertised price in each A&P Store, except as
in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, APRIL 25, AT AAP IN Greenville, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
ivailable for sale at or
specifically noted 1
Highway 264 By-Pass Greenville Square
Shopping Center Greenville N.C.
HOLLY FARMS BAGGED
Whole Fryers or
Mixed Parts �.
m
A&P HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Full Cut
Round Steak
Bone-In
$ Allgood
Hot Dogs
12 oz
pkg.
79
Market Style
i Sliced Bacon
98
lb.
SAVE 54 ON 2
Margarine
In
Quarters
Mrs. Filbert's
2 � I00
HOMESTYLE OR BUTTERMILK
A&P Biscuits
U cans 9jP
GOLD MEDAL OR
Red Band Flour
Plain
Self-Rising
Unbleached 5 D
bag
79c
CONTAINS RICH BRAZILIAN COFFEE
Eight OCIock
� ICMT
0-CLOC
'NSTANT
COFFEE
Instant
Coffee
FROZEN
Ann Page Pizzas
10 oz.
jar
2
99
ANN PAGE FROZEN
Hamburger
Pepperoni
Sausage 12oz
Cheese pkg.
� Salisbury Steak
� Meat Loaf
� Chicken 11 oz
�Turkey pkg
Coca Cola, Mello Yello
Qrange Crush Grape Crush
16oz no return Bottle ctn
$199
jTide Detergent
49
Extra
Action
49 oz.
box
Scottowels
59c
� Arts n' Flowers
� Decorated
Save 20c big
roll
470C Coupon).
PURE CANE GRANULATED
Dixie Crystals
1
1
1
1
I " 675
LIMITONEWITHTHISCOUPON GOOD THRU SAT, APRIL25, AT A4P IN Greenville N.C?
Sugar
4&&S&L
FOR FRESHNESS AND SAVINGS
FLORIDA CRISP SOLID
Head Lettuce
large
heads
WASHINGTON STATE RED
Delicious Apples
m t 49c
FRESH, RED, RIPE
Strawberries
99c
Jane Parker
Shortcakes
6 pkg. 59 ctn.
i. kj id
trustees
Pr
Dr.
I
I
legislatic
"greatly!
mJ
hav I
an
w hen
I
tran-p.
j
ed
an
1
Maiol
the
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hardshij
olinl
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ire
C arolinj
minimi!
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���

Sr
I
19
I
I
I
I
0
�5
Photo By JON JORDAN
Nick Francis, left, receives a commendation from Chancellor Ihomas Brewer, center, and board of
trustees member Ashle Futretl, right, for outstanding service to the university.
Professor Studies Problems
Issues affecting
North Carolina's sea
scallop fishermen
(shellstockers) and pro-
cessors will be studied
bv an Fast Carolina
I niversit) professor, as
part oi the I NC Sea
Grant Program.
Dr. John Maiolo,
chairman of the ECl
Department of
Sociology and An-
thropology, has been
awarded a $5,460 grai I
for the study, which
will involve investiga-
tion of impending
legislation which will
"greatly affect the op-
tion many shrimpers
have to switch to sea
scalloping in the mid
and North Atlantic
when shrimping is
poor
"These fishermen
stock the scallops in
their shells for
transport to North
Carolina for process-
ing Maiolo said.
"About 1,000 North
Carolinians are invok-
ed in the industry,
main of whom are
women
Maiolo will examine
the effects of different
policies, designed to
improve the total
economic yield by
restricting harvesting to
larger scallops
One of the policies
will "clearly create
hardship" for North
Carolinians, he said.
His objective is to
discover the point at
which the yield will in-
crease bui economic
hardship to North
Carolinians be kept at a
minimum.
"There is no ques-
tion that something
must be done to im-
prove the sea scallop
stocks Maiolo says.
"But to create a policy
where all of the benefits Carolina shellstockers designed to develop a
go to New ngland and processors. total picture of North
fishermen, while all the The research is part Carolina fishing oc-
hardship falls on the of a series ol projects cupations.
shoulders ol North which Maiolo directs.
Opinions Voiced
Against Tuition Hikes
With a flair fot the dramatic, the
comical and the ridiculous, students
across the country are registering
their opposition to almost universal
tuition hikes
About 35 Cornell U. students
tried to voice their disma) over a
tuition hike b turning in checks
printed on Pshirts to the school
treasurer's office. I he students, in-
cluding two women wearing only
brassieres undei their protest shirts,
marched into the bursar's office and
symbolically stripped the specially
printed shirts off their backs, c or-
nell officials gave each student a
receipt acknowledging the protest,
but said students would have to turn
in regular checks to avoid paving the
extra SI5 needed to process each
shirt at a bank. Protest leaders
say then goals, which included
media attention, were accomplished
even if the T-shirts weren't ac-
cepted.
Media attention was also the goal
of students at nine campuses within
the State U. ol New York system as
they protested in-state tuition rates
ol $1,050 bv symbolical!) seceding
from SI N and joining the C alifor-
nia universitj system. The protest
was led bv the Student Association
of State I niversities (SASU), which
chose California as a new home
because that state "has a real com-
mitment lo higher education says
SAM President Jim Stern. One ol
the seceding schools, SUNY-
Binghamton, announced the U. ol
Wisconsin as its preferred foster
parent.
More traditional protest marches
took place on many campuses, in-
cluding North rexas State I where
200 students marched to chants of
"No more and "Impeach
(University President) Alexander"
as part of Students Against Tuition
I ax Day.
-t the U. of Pennsylvania,
however, students bypassed noisy
protests for a more reasoned ap-
proach. The student government
there launched two separate efforts
to identify areas where tuition
money is being misspent, in hopes
of keeping down future costs, says
1 ee Brown, a member of the
University Council Steering Com-
mittee. One such effort. Operation
Golden Fleece, is modeled after
Wisconsin Sen. William Proxmire's
national efforts to eliminate waste.
The other examines how university
money is spent, or misspent, says
Brown. For example, students
discovered that faulty sump pumps
are causing extremely dangerous
conditions in the basement of a dor-
mitory . "Our investigation points to
a general problem� that the univer-
sity makes an investment in equip-
ment, but too often buys cheaper
materials and doesn't follow
through on maintenance says
Brown. "In the long run, that ends
up costing a lot more money A
report on the dorm conditions has
been filed with the administration,
which has not yet responded. Brown
says.
Not all anti-tuition hike efforts
pit students against administrators,
though. At Western Kentucky U
more than 200 students braved
1 1 -degree temperatures to attend a
"Back Zack" rally expressing sup-
port for University President
Donald Zacharias' efforts to get
more money for higher education
from state government. The ram-
bunctious crowd marched to the ad-
ministration building, looking to
some like a lynch mob, but broke in-
to cheers when Zacharias stepped
out of the buildine.

��p v v M�v, 5iop,K
� l��. CM( k fl ' ;��
t' � �
? S'�
����?�.1
BENNIES
crrco
WRECKER
SERVICE
Atlanta's Death
Count To 24
THE LAST CAROLINIAN APRII 21. 1981
Continued From Page 1
street because he felt
sure "he's (the killer or
killers) going to strike
again
Burton said there
was no evidence of ex-
ternal trauma to the
body other than it be-
ing snagged on debris
in the river. The body,
discovered by a couple
test-driving a motor-
bike, was lodged
against a tree on the
river bank, forming a
dam.
He said the autopsy
did reveal something of
what the youth ate
before he died. He
declined to elaborate
but said "it is the kind
of thing that will be
helpful in tracing the
(boy's) last steps
He said he found no
evidence of sexual
abuse on Bell's body
nor in those of the
several other victims he
has examined.
"There have been a
lot of rumors about the
genital organs in the
children that have been
found dead Burton
said. "Of all those
(autopsies) that I have
personally done and
been completely intact
as in this case of Joseph
Bell
He did say, however,
that the decomposition
prevented a determina-
tion as to whether there
might have been other
abuse.
"The body had been
in the river for such a
long time, it is not the
kind of case that lends
itself to a lot of
evidence he said, ad-
ding that the tissue
from the body would
be more closely ex-
amined.
Meanwhile, about
200 volunteers
recruited by the United
Youth Adult Con-
ference, which
organizes weekend
searches, began their
neighborhood patrols
Monday in hopes of
preventing any more
children from benim
killed.
Eddie Dodson, an
organizer, said about
50 volunteers were
trained and cleared by
police about two weeks
ago and and the re-
maining 150 began
their patrols Monday.
it HI &
ill' IJII
Buffet Specials All You Can Eat
MonFri.
MonTues.
Sunday
11:30 - 2:00 Soup-Salad-Pizza
6:00 - 8:30 Soup-Salad-Pizza
12:00 - 2:00 SpagSalad Pizza
Wednesday Spaghetti Day 11.00 - 11:00
Spaghetti-Toast Coffee or Tea
All You Can Eat $2.49
Thursday Lasagna Day 11:00 - 11:00
Buy One Lasagna At Regular Price Get
Second One For A Dollar
Phone 758-6266
1840 E. Greenville Blvd.
OPTICIANS
optjoars
�K
ofi
10 Discount to Students & Facualty
Over 1,000 Frames to choose from
Single Vision-White Glass Lenses$19.50
Bifocal Lenses � White Glass$30.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Lenses$26,50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra$32.50
Bifocal Lenses Photo GrayS38 SO
Soft Contact Lenses
$79.95
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
aMINVH.il C 8'WniWl t�tt OW)y grncmoMM
�rr�ieiiito�o�Ai.OLt m-n -�'t�V�ZJ1 ,
WHSMSt nw-i�w mm jvn rnm '
tMaw nun tbfwr�lM' �� "�
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
ZT SHIRT
Reg. $20.00
Now
$16.99
Lacoste Your favorite
look. The famous
v alligator shirt in lots of
fabulous colors of the
rainbow.

t i
MONTUC5. - AVAILABLE FOR
PRIVATE PARTIES - PAPA KATZ WILL
CATER ANY PARTY OR FUNCTION. WE
ALSO HAVE A MOBILE D.J FOR ANY
PARTY ANYTIME.
WfcCL - "ORIGINAL LADIES' LOCKOUT"
- 8.30-10:00 - LADIES ONLY - GENTS
IN AFTER 10:00.
THURS. - "SUPER COLLEGE NIGHT-
SPONSORED BY THE SrG EPS - DOORS
OPEN FROM 8:30 to 1:00 - NOW WITH
THE BIGGEST SHAG CONTEST IN GREEN-
VILLE. COME OUT FOR THE DANCE OFF
MAIN DANCE OFF ON MARCH 19th
WITH OVER $300 00 IN CASH & PRIZES.
FRI.
SUPER CHICKEN PICKIN' at
The KATZ. Doors open at 3:00
p.m.
COMING MAY 12th
The Band Of
Oz"
There's More
Elbow Room in
Our Attic!
River Bluff Rd.
Behind putt Putt
758-7912
"A Touch
Of Class
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
All member j will be entitled to 1 guests per evening Neat dress
and proper identification wilt be required of ail members and
guests
This special INTRODUCTORY MEMBERSHIP is only $1.M.
All applications and dues mutt be returned to this address: P.O.
Box lMl, Greenville NX I7U4. NX Slate Law requires a thirty
day membership waiting period from dele el application lor
clubs with brown bagging permits
MEMBERSHIP -��
AoMtrm
� Occupation.
I �J-VaVl
I nofvfti ,
I
I
DAT!
SJCNATUM
!





n
19
1
0
�5
Photo By JON JORDAN
Nickj Francis, left, receives a commendation from Chancellor I homas Brewer, center, and board of
trustees member Ashlev Kutrell. right, for outstanding service to the university.
Professor Studies Problems
issues affecting
North Carolina's sea
scallop fishermen
(shellstockers) and pro-
cessors vull he studied
by an last Carolina
I niversitj professor, as
part of the I NC Sea
Crant Program.
Dr. John Maiolo.
chairman of the ECU
Department of
Sociology and An-
thropology, has been
awarded a $5,460 gran:
tor the studs, which
will involve investiga-
tion of impending
legislation which, will
"greatly affect the op-
tion many shrimpers
have tii switch to sea
scalloping in the mid
and North Atlantic
when shrimping is
poor
"These fishermen
�k the scallops in
their shells tor
transport to North
Carolina for process-
ing Maiolo said.
"About 1,000 North
C arolimans are involv-
ed in the industry,
ni.m of whom are
women
Maiolo will examine
the effects of different
policies, designed to
improve the total
economic yield b
restricting harvesting to
larger scallops.
One ot the policies
will "clearly create
hardship" for North
Carolinians, he said.
His objective is to
discover the point at
which the vield will in-
crease but economic
hardship to North
Carolinians be kept at a
minimum.
"There is no ques-
tion that something
must be done to im-
prove the sea scallop
stocks Maiolo savs.
"But to create a policy
where all of the benefits Carolina shellstockers designed to develop a
go to New 1 ngland and processors. total picture of North
fishermen, while all the "The research is part Carolina fishing oc-
hardship falls on the of a series of projects cupations.
shoulders ol North which Maiolo directs.
Opinions Voiced
Against Tuition Hikes
With a flair for the dramatic, the
comical and the ridiculous, students
across the country are registering
their opposition to almost universal
tuition hikes.
About 35 Cornell U. students
tried to voice then dismay over a
tuition hike by turning in checks
printed on T-shirts to the school
treasurer's office. 1 he students, in-
cluding two women wearing only
brassieres undei theii protest shirts,
marched into the bursar's office and
symbolically stripped the specially
printed shirts of! their hacks. Cor-
nell officials gave each student a
receipt acknowledging the protest,
but said students would have to turn
in regular checks to avoid paving the
extra SI 5 needed to process each
T-shirt at a bank. Protest leaders
sa their goals, which included
media attention, were accomplished
even if the T-shirts weren't ac-
cepted.
Media attention was also the goal
of students at nine campuses within
the State U. ot New York svstem as
they protested in-state tuition rates
of $1,050 h symbolically seceding
from SUN and joining the (. alifor-
ma university system. I he protest
was led by the Student Association
of State Universities (SASU), which
chose California as a new home
because tha' stale "has a real com-
mitment to higher education savs
SASl President Jim Stern. One ot
the seceding schools, SUNY-
Binghamton, announced the I . ot
Wisconsin as its preferred foster
parent.
More traditional protest marches
took place on man) campuses, in-
cluding North I exas State U where
2(H) students marched to chants ol
"No more and "Impeach
(University President) Alexander"
Atlanta's Death
Count To 24
HE EAST AKOI 1NIAN
APRIL 21. 1981
i in: .
as part of Students Against Tuition
lax Day.
-t the U. of Pennsylvania,
however, students bypassed noisy
protests for a more reasoned ap-
proach. The student government
there launched two separate efforts
to identify areas where tuition
money is being misspent, in hopes
ol keeping down future costs, says
lee Brown, a member of the
University Council Steering Com-
mittee. One such effort. Operation
Golden Fleece, is modeled after
Wisconsin Sen. William Proxmire's
national efforts to eliminate waste.
The other examines how university
money is spent, or misspent, savs
Brown, lor example, students
discovered that faulty sump pumps
are causing extremely dangerous
conditions m the basement of a dor-
mitorv . "Our investigation points to
a general problem� that the univer-
sity makes an investment in equip-
ment, but too often buys cheaper
materials and doesn't follow
through on maintenance says
Brown. "In the long run, that ends
up costing a lot more money A
report on the dorm conditions has
been tiled with the administration,
which has not vet responded. Brown
savs.
Not all anti-tuition hike efforts
pit students against administrators,
though. At Western Kentucky U
more than 200 students braved
ll-degree temperatures to attend a
"Back Zack" rally expressing sup-
port for University President
Donald Zacharias' efforts to get
more money for higher education
from slate government. The ram-
bunctious crowd marched to the ad-
ministration building, looking to
some like a lynch mob, but broke in-
to cheers when Zacharias stepped
out of the buildine.
Continued From Page I
street because he felt
sure "he's (the killer or
killers) going to strike
again
Burton said there
was no evidence of ex-
ternal trauma to the
body other than it be-
ing snagged on debris
in the river. The body,
discovered by a couple
test-driving a motor-
bike, was lodged
against a tree on the
river bank, forming a
dam.
He said the autopsy
did reveal something of
what the youth ate
be! ore he died. He
declined to elaborate
but said "it is the kind
of thing that will be
helpful in tracing the
(boy's) last steps
He said he found no
evidence of sexual
abuse on Bell's body
nor in those of the
several other victims he
has examined.
"There have been a
lot of rumors about the
genital organs in the
children that have been
found dead Burton
said. "Of all those
(autopsies) that I have
personally done and
been completely intact
as in this case ot Joseph
Bell
He did say, however,
that the decomposition
prevented a determina-
tion as to whether there
might have been other
abuse.
"The body had been
in the river for such a
long time, it is not the
kind of case that lends
itself to a lot oi
evidence he said, ad-
ding that the tissue
from the body would
be mine closely ex-
amined.
Meanwhile, about
200 volunteers
recruited by the United
Youth Adult Con
ference, which
organizes weekend
searches, began their
neighborhood patrols
Monday in hopes of
preventing any more
children from being
killed.
I ddie Dodson, an
organizer, said about
50 volunteers were
trained and cleared by
police about two weeks
ago and and the re-
maining 150 began
their patrols Monday.
Buffet Specials All You Can Eat
MonFri. ll:30 - 2:00 Soup-Salad-Pizza
MonTues. 6:00 - 8:30 Soup-Salad-Pizza
Sunday 12:00 - 2:00 SpagSalad Pizza
Wednesday Spaghetti Day 11:00 - 11:00
Spaghetti-Toast Coffee or Tea
All You Can Eat $2.49
Thursday Lasagna Day 11:00-11:00
Buy One Lasagna At Regular Price Get
Second One For A Dollar
Phone 758-6266
1840 E. Greenville Blvd.
OPTICIANS
10 Discount to Students & Focuolty
Over 1,000 Frames to choose from
Single Vision-White Glass Lenses $19 iO
Bifocal Lenses � White Glass$30.SO
Single Vision Photo Gray Lenses$26,50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra$32.SO
Bifocal Lenses Photo Gray$38.50
Soft Contact Lenses
$79.95
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
QrwrnW tier Oitfy
SMiNVKlC m c
nrrsiciAai ouAO�uieii
�VHOMIO �
�?� fur
wapi
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
17&
m shirt
Reg. $20.00
Now
$16.99
Lacoste Your favorite
look. The famous
k alligator shirt in lots of
fabulous colors of the
rainbow.
a
MONTUfi - AVAILABLE FOR
PRIVATE PARTIES - PAPA KATZ WILL
CATER ANY PARTY OR FUNCTION. WE
ALSO HAVE A MOBILE D.J. FOR ANY
PARTY ANYTIME.
WfDL - "ORIGINAL LADIES' LOCKOUT"
- 8:30-10:00 - LADIES ONLY - GENTS
IN AFTER 10:00.
THURSx - "SUPER COLLEGE NIGHT"
SPONSORED BY THE StG EPS - DOORS
OPEN FROM 8:30 to 1:00 - NOW WITH
THE BIGGEST SHAG CONTEST IN GREEN-
VILLE. COME OUT FOR THE DANCE OFF
MAIN DANCE OFF ON MARCH 19th
WITH OVER $300 00 IN CASH & PRIZES.
FRI.
SUPER CHICKEN PICKIN' at
The KATZ. Doors open at 3:00
p.m.
COMING MAY 12th
The Band Of
Oz"
There's More
Elbow Room in
Our Attic!
River Bluff Rd.
Behind Putt Putt
758-7912
"A Touch
Of Class"
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
All members will be entitled to 1 guests per eveninf. Neat dress
and proper identification will be required ol all members and
guests
This special INTRODUCTORY MEMBERSHIP is only H 90
All applications and dues must be returned to this address: P.O.
Box 141, OreenviMe N.C. ?7fM. NC. State Law requires a thirty
day membership waiting period trom date el application tor
clubs with brown bagging permits
MEMBERSHIP -�
� OCCtnKrtKMt.
I nOBVIil ,
I
I
MutK
DAT!
StONATUm
T
I
fc.ei�
m dp. �� .ml
s





3Uj iEaat (Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
PAUl LlNCKE, Dvtctoro) AdhMttamtt
Chris Lichok, Busmen t
Ai ison Baku 1. .�� � �
Pahi Coi i ins, gmmmj mmmh
Jimmy DuPREE, mmcvmheo'
Deborah Hotaunc�, e�tdmr
C'HARl I S CHANDl FR S.rH �,l.r
David Norris, ?�(�� ��
April 21, IWI
Opinion
Page 4
Charlie Sherrod
Former President Leaves
A Trail Of Controversy
Now that SGA President Charlie
Sherrod's year in office has come to
an end, the students, faculty and ad-
ministration of East Carolina
University can hardly be blamed if
they breathe a collective sigh of
relief. In recent weeks Sherrod's
name has been mentioned again and
again in connection with a list ot
dubious achievements.
During most of his term oi of-
fice, Sherrod purred happily along,
apparently keeping his nose clean.
But he seems to react to SGA elec-
tions the way a werewolf does to a
full moon, there are few specifics
that can be held against Sherrod,
but a cloud of suspicion has never-
theless hung over his administra-
tion.
Take for instance his alleged role
in altering Kirk Little's campaign
advertisement that appeared in The
East Carolinian. Though the ECU
Honor Council found Sherrod not
guilty of substituting one picture for
another in the advertisement, he did
admit to handling the picture that
appeared in the ad. He also joked
with several staff members that it
might be funny if Little were shown
wearing an Air Force ROTC
uniform.
Neither of these actions is a
crime. But as SGA president, Sher-
rod should never have placed
himself in such a compromising
situation. He should never have
been at the newspaper office for so
long that night (more than two
hours), especially since he was a
campaign worker for Little's oppo-
nent, Angela Pepe.
He was at the office to deliver a
letter for the "Campus Forum" but
stayed long past the time necessary
to accomplish such a task.
Then in a related event last week,
two members of the Review Board
accused Sherrod of trying to in-
fluence their decision on whether or
not to grant Pepe's appeal for a se-
cond run-off in the the treasurer's
race. Sherrod said he discussed the
matter with several board members
in a "public conversation" but
denied .trying to influence their
votes. But as a partisan member of
Pepe's campaign team, he should
have refrained from discussing the
case with them at all. His position as
SGA president carries great in-
fluence whether he used it con-
sciously or not.
Another of Sherrod's dubious
achievements in recent weeks has
been his preferment of charges
against Little. Sherrod had claimed
that Little had slandered his reputa-
tion by accusing him of altering the
advertisement Sherrod spoke
repeatedly of his intention to "clear
mv good name But when it came
time to heat the charges, Sherrod
suddenly dropped them. He later
said, "I dropped my charges against
Kirk Little because the time of the
trial conflicted with my political
science honor society banquet
After hearing this statement one
wonders just how serious Sherrod
was about "clearing his name
Furthermore, such a cavalier state-
ment shows little respect for the
judicial process or the people who
run it.
But perhaps Sherrod's most
cavalier act was his attempt to name
Robert Swaim to the Media Board
as the SGA representative. (Swaim
was not able to take the position
because the provision allowing such
a change has never officially passed
the Media Board.) Sherrod said he
named Swaim as his proxy to the
board as a protest of its actions. But
whatever the reason, the move was a
perfect example of the petty politics
Sherrod has been chastised for
recently.
Such a move was obviously not
made with the best interests of the
student body in mind. And after all,
it was the students whom Sherrod
was elected to serve.
t
f
-mi i
"Ml FATHER PKSSED IT ON TO ME, 50 I SUESS I LL HAVE TO W�o
rr on to you and you'll have to pass it on to your kids.
WHO WILL PASS IT ON TO THEIR KIDS. WHO WILL
Club Attempts To Prevent Mining
By RICHARD REEVES
I'nitenal Press sndlc�lc
WASHINGTON � The Sierra Club is
suing the federal government in an attempt
to prevent mining in a wilderness area in
northwest Montana. The plaintiffs, accor-
ding to papers filed in U.S. District Court,
include 12 grizzly bears.
Sounds like more snail-darter
foolishness to me. But then so do a lot of
things being said these days around
Washington by the new guardians of our
natural resources, the appointees of
Ronald Reagan; the same Mr. Reagan who
once said if you've seen one redwood tree
you've seen 'em all.
Take James Watt, the new secretary of
the interior. He spoke last month to an en-
thusiastic conference of the companies that
run concessions in national parks. The
subject, at that moment, was horse trails,
but Secretary Watt expanded the discus-
sion to include his own opinion of the
mistake God made in putting together the
great outdoors.
"You folks will quickly understand why
I bring so much controversy and flak
Watt said. "I don't like to paddle, and 1
don't like to walk
Well, Mr. Secretary, we could build a
freeway through Yosemite National Park.
It would make it more convenient for the
lumber company trucks.
What trucks? The ones they are going to
need to get out all the trees that John
Crowell is apparently ready to let the com-
panies cut down on public lands. Crowell
is Reagan's nominee as assistant secretary
of agriculture for natural resources and en-
vironment, the official in charge of the
U.S. Forest Service.
The Forest Service now allows private
companies to take between 10 billion and
12 billion board-feet a year from public
lands and has projected that in 50 years
perhaps 16 billion board-feet could
reasonably be taken out per year. During
his confirmation hearings. Crowell said he
thought 35 billion board-feet could be
taken out each year.
The largest of those private lumber com-
panies working on private lands, inciden-
tally, is the Louisiana-Pacific Corp. of
Portland, Ore. Crowell was an attorney
for Louisiana-Pacific before his appoint-
ment.
There is going to be a tremendous battle
over the national parks and other public
lands during the Reagan years. These are
very tough, development-oriented people
who have ,pent years talking up the
"Sagebrush Rebellion" � the Western
movement to return millions of square
miles in federal lands to state control. But
there always has been a dark side to that
revolt: It's the oil companies, the mining
companies, the lumber companies and the
developers who want the use of that land.
Reagan has always sided with the
developers � or, depending on your view-
point, the exploiters � against responsible
conservationists � or, again depending on
your viewpoint, crazed environmentalists.
Now the administration and its friends in
Congress, particularly Sens. Jesse Helms,
chairmain of the Agriculture Committee,
and James McClure, chairman ot the
Energy Committee, are pushing ahead on
all fronts to open public lands, waters and
parks to saws and drills and trucks and.
probablv, McDonald's, too.
One of the first indications was the new
budget appropriation to purchase land foi
parks already authorized by Congress. Ihe
total for the new acquisitions, zero.
That, with continuing rising land prwev
could effectively destroy all or parts ol a
half-dozen parks 1 can think oi. Gateway
in New York and New Jersey, the Santa
Monica Moutains, Redwood National and
Golden Gate in California; Padie Island in
Texas; and the Cape Cod National
Seashore in Massachusetts
Maybe some of tKul is right and
necessary. But how can we tell whether
Reagan and his merry men are sensibh
opening public lands to reasonable ex-
ploration and development, or are just tur-
ning millions and millions of acres over to
greedy environmental rapists? Well, one
way is to pay attention to organization
like the Sierra Club and the Sierra Club
Legal Defense Fund.
"We won't stop them said Tim
Mahoney, the club's Washington represen-
tative. "But we will be there, and if we
think that they are overstepping the law,
we'll see them in court
1 decided not to laugh about the grizzlies
in Montana, and 1 sent another S25 to the
Sierra Club. Watch those guys tor me. will
you?
False Prize Winner Teaches Lesson
By CLAUDE SITTON
The liar, that thief of truth, is always
with us. For Janet Cooke, now formerly of
The Washington Post, the horrible truth of
drug abuse in the slums of the nation's
capital was not horrible enough. So she
took it and gussied it up.
This reporter, and it hurts to link that
word to such a dishonorable venture, peck-
ed around among the scraps of informa-
tion that she had gathered from social
workers. And from these scraps, she
created a fictional family.
There was momma, the junkie pro-
stitute, momma's lover, the dope pusher
and Little Jimmy, the 8-year-old tyke who
needed his daily fix of heroin.
The world knows the rest, that the
editors of The Post overcame nagging
doubt about the story's authenticity,
displayed this fiction on Page One and the
submitted it for and won a Pulitzer Prize.
All of this while city officials and the
police were protesting that no such family
existed.
Now, the fame that came with the prize
had unmasked this fraud and turned to
notoriety for its perpetrator. The Post has
accepted Miss Cook's resignation, publish-
ed a front page admission of error and an
editorial page apology and begun inquiry
aimed at developing safeguards that would
help to prevent a recurrence.
So where does this leave Mr. and Mrs.
North America and their newspaper?
Undoubtly, all newspapers will suffer.
When a great tree of the forest falls, all
others quake. However, readers would
deceive themselves if they looked on
Cooke's deception of her newspaper and
her readers as typical or commonplace in
the reporting process.
The Cooke story was not the first news
feature woven out of whole cloth and, un-
fortunately, it will not be the last. But they
are thankfully rare.
The far more common problems that
erode reader confidence in the press arise
mostly from transgressions made in ig-
norance and thoughtlessness. Most involve
failure to adhere to that Golden Rule of
journalism, which holds that reporters and
editors must treat themselves with ac-
curacy, fairness and balance.
There are reporters who, in their
eagerness to report not only the fact but
the truth about the fact, let opinion slip in-
to the news. There are those who become
too friendly with their sources, be it the
desk sergeant of police or the governor.
Then, there are editors who nod over
their pencils. There are others who no
longer can muster the courage to say what
needs to be said. And there are still others
who have to accept their special view of
reality and recognize no other. There are
publishers who fall victim to the same
habits and who stray across the thin line
that divides community service from a
more active role that has the appearance at
least of a conflict of interest.
The press sees these pitfalls and is con-
cerned by them. As chairman of the ethics
committee of the American Society of
Newspaper Editors, 1 have been working
during the past year with other members to
produce a book on ethical practice-
"Playing It Straight The book was writ-
ten by John Hulteng, a former editorial
page editor and now a professor of com-
munications at Stanford University who is
considered one of the nation's authorities
in this field.
The book comes at an opportune time
for newspapers, which have been shocked
into new awareness that they must guard
against both the liar and those more subtle
theives of press credibility.
EDITOR'S NOTE: Claude Sition is the
editor oj The News And Observer in
Raleigh. This column appeared in the Sun-
day April 19 edition oj that paper.
Assassination Attempt
Sparks Control Talks
By PAUL COLLINS
Inevitably, the attempt on President
Reagan's life has brought renewed talk of
the need for gun control. Each time a
famous person is the victim of gun-related
violence the issue is brought up with
renewed vigor, but after the initial shock
and indignation have died down it fades
once again into obscurity.
When John Lennon was assassinated
last December Reagan deplored such
violence but said he did not feel the need
for stronger gun control laws. Perhaps he
will feel differently now that the issue has
hit a little closer to home.
John Hinckley, the president's alleged
assailant, provides a perfect example of
why gun control is necessary.
Hinckley was allowed to purchase the
gun he allegedly used to shoot Reagan and
three others despite the fact that he was a
former mental patient. He had also been
arrested several months earlier with a suit-
case full of weapons in a city where Jimmv
Carter was scheduled to appear.
Does the Constitution guarantee the
right of someone like Hinckley "to keep
and bear arms"? Hardly.
Contrary to what the National Rifle
Association would have us believe, most
advocates of gun control do not endorse a
total ban of private ownership of firearms.
But the use of firearms is potentiallv
dangerous and should therefore be
regulated.
The present crazy-quilt of state laws is so
ineffective as to be worthless. What is
needed is a single federal law requiring that
all owners of firearms be licensed. If we
can license hairdressers we can cer�ainlv
license owners of lethal weapons.
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THl t AS1 C AROl IN1AN
Features
AI'KII 21. iyxi
Page 5
'Peppermint Soda 'Illusion'
Comprise French Twin Bill
Fleonore Klarwein. Odile Michel and Anouk Ferjac in a scene from
Diane Kurys' award winning "Peppermint Soda The film will be
shown this Wednesday night at 9 p.m. following Renoir's "Grand Il-
lusion Both films will be shown in the Hendrix Theatre.
This Wednesday night. April 22,
in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix Theatre, the Student Union
Films Committee will present a
French Double Feature including
Jean Renoir's classic film of 1937,
"Grand Illusion" (rescheduled
from April 1) beginning at 7 p.m.
Following "Grand Illusion at 9
p.m is Diane Kurys' award winn-
ing "Peppermint Soda" (1978).
Admission for both films is by ID
and Activity Card for students and
MSC Membership Card for faculty
and staff.
A war film without a single battle
scene, "Grand Illusion" focuses on
French prisoners during WW1 and
the cultured German commandant
(Erich von Stroheim) in charge of
their prison camp.
Von Stroheim respects one of his
prisoners, an aristocratic French
career officer (Pierre Fresnay). as
his equal, and Renoir examines dy-
ing codes of chivalry and
disintegrating class structure
through their relationship in this
classic drama.
In his essay on Renoir, Cierald
Mast (A Short History of the
Movies, pages 250-256) discusses
the cinematic technique in "Grand
Illusion
"Music is one o' the film's leit-
motifs. The musical trifle, 'Frou,
I-rou, Frou,1 recurs several times.
Another unifying tune is Tl etait un
petit navire which we hear for the
first time as Boeldieu's ruse to help
MarechaJ and Rosenthal escape.
"Boeldieu plays the song on his
little toy flute; the tune diverts
Rauffenstein's attention, but leads
to the French captain's death.
I ater, on the icy road, when the
crippled Rosenthal and the impa-
tient Mareehal quarrel and threaten
to separate, Rosenthal starts sing-
ing, Tl etait tin petit navire in de-
fiance and anger.
"As Mareehal stalks away from
his lame comrade he unconsciously
starts to sing the same song. I he
Diane Kurys' "Peppermint
Soda" is an effervescent concoction
with a surprising kick to it. An
unheralded first film by an
unknown 29-year-old director, it
went on to become the biggest gross-
song ultimately brings Mareehal ing film in I-ranee and winner of the
Prix Louis Delluc (Best Picture),
followed by an equally unexpected
success in the U S
The film's free-flowing, matter-
of-fact episodic structure has been
back to his wounded comrade; he
will not desert him again.
"Consistent visual imagery is
another source of the film's unity.
Renoir's camera contrasts things
that are hard, cold, and dead with compared to that of a scrapbook.
The Trouble With Glasses
Life Through The Eyes Of The Nearsighted
B DAVID NORRIS
rtalnrt's t dilor
I'm not one to malign eyeglasses-
without them, anything more than a
couple o inches from my face
dissolves into what looks like im-
pressionist painting. Still, wearing
glasses can have some annoying side
effects.
The world occassionallj has a
tendency to turn slightly foggy to
me. since 1 forget to clean my
glasses until thev block out nearly
all the light.
I requenl cleaning can become
necessarv, since glasses attract dust
prettv easily. Windy days that raise
lots o dust or a vvalk through a
wood-working shop leave an im-
mediate film of gravness on the
lenses.
It would seem like glasses would
keep dusi and stuff out of my eyes,
but they don't. Dust particles are
pretty smart, and can easily sneak
around the lenses. Another odd
thing about my glasses is that rain-
drops always fall on the inside of
them.
Rain doesn't wash glasses, as the
uninitiated might think; it just sort
of leaves spots and streaks. (Water
fountains that spray in people's
faces also leave spots and streaks.)
Some day, I want to get a hat with a
large enough brim to catch rain-
drops. 1 don't know if there are any
hats large enough to stop fountains
from splattering on my glasses,
though
Another thing that gets glasses
dirty is loaning them to people. It
seems like everybody who wants a
cheap thrill wants to try on your
glasses, or they like to switch glasses
and compare stories about bad vi-
sion.)
The problem with loaning glasses
to people who aren't used to them is
that they leave fingerprints all over
them. Sometimes, they realize this,
and wipe them o' which usually
just smears the fingerprints all over
them.
I osing your glasses can be a
traumatic experience. I've lost mine
only a couple of times, and only in
my own room, but that was bad
enough. The whole tiling boils down
into a "Catch-22" situation: I can't
see well enough without my glasses
to be able to look for them.
The first time I lost my glasses
was during my freshman year. After
functioning haphaardiv in a blurry
world for a whole morning, a guy
who lived in my hall dropped by the
room, sat down, and said. "There
they are They had fallen o' my
desk and were hung up in the wire o
the telephone beside the desk.
I lost them again this year, but
this was because my room is in such
a mess that anything could get lost
in it.
Breaking glasses is almost as bad
as losing them. Once, I had to get
the hinge on the frame of my glasses
fixed. If you think waiting in an of-
fice is bad, you should try it without
being able to see anything. There
was a table full o interesting
magazines like "Lensgringer's
Review and I couldn't even see
them, since my glasses were being
worked on.
Another problem with glasses is
that it's hard to wear 3-D glasses on
top of them, so you miss out on 3-D
movies.
There are alternatives to wearing
glasses, the cheapest of which is to
get used to walking into things.
A somewhat more exotic idea is to
wear a monacle. Ever since I saw
Colonel Klink on "Hogan's
Heroes I have always been
curious about monacles. Questions
like "How do they keep them from
falling oi'T' and "Why don't they
just wear glasses?" came to mind.
Contact lenses are a popular alter-
native to glasses, but I worry too
much about losing them. About the
only way to detect a lost lens is the
little crunch it makes you step on it.
things that are soft, warm, and
vital.
"The story is set in winter; the
consistent pictures of snow and
frozen ground throw their cold,
damp shadow over the entire film.
The two escaped prisoners must
struggle across an immense meadow
of snow to reach safety in
Switzerland. Vet ironically, the
Swiss border, the place of refuge, is
invisible. It is impossible to
distinguish different nations
beneath a common blanket of snow .
"Only the German officer's an-
nouncement that the two have made
it informs us where the snow of Ger-
many ends and the snow o
Switzerland begins. That one can
make such nationalistic distinctions
between things that are really the
same is one of the film's grand illu-
sions, an illusion that freezes the
human heart and condition to
death.
"In a film so full ot disastrous
political illusions, it is difficult to
determine which is the 'grand' one.
That war can resolve political
issues? That national boundaries ex-
ist? That national boundaries do not
exist? That class distinctions do not
exist? That national distinctions are
stronger than class distinctions?
"Whichever of these intentionally
paradoxical illusions is the grander.
"Grand Illusion" pointedly con-
demns the decadent, wasteful ar-
tificiality of the ruling class that has
caused the very war that will kill it.
"With World War I. the
aristocracy of Europe committed
elegant suicide. To turn life into a
cold murderous game with a series
of artificial rules is ultimately to
turn life into death
The story centers on the friends,
family, classes, vacations, sulks,
misconceptions, pop records, bad
grades, adventures, and misadven-
tures of a Trench-Jewish schoolgirl
from summer to summer in the
epochal year of 1963.
The originality and accuracy of
Ms. Kurys' vision of adolescence
immediately moved critics to place
her in the company of Jean Vigo
and Francois Truffaut, and, indeed,
her announced intention to film a
sequel, "Molotov Cocktail" (which
has already been completed), has
aroused the film's admirers with the
anticipation ot an autobiographical
series on the level o' Truffaut's An-
toine Doinel films:
Janet Maslin of The New Vork
Times calls "Peppermint Soda"
"an expert, utterly charming
movie Film critic Andrew Sarris
of The Village Voice says, "the
nymphet-watcher in me was
shamefully stirred by the grace and
energy of all these extraordinarily-
attractive young females. There is
something marvelously matter-of-
fact about the movie as it scatters its
insights with a very casual in-
telligence that one does not see on
the screen very often these days
As far as Kurys' technique is con-
cerned, she shows that the cinema
has now developed far enough to do
without all the props that have been
used to help the audience unders-
tand what is happening.
She shows that audiences can
follow jumps in the story and are
not worried if finally she docs not
tie up all the loose ends. Her inten-
tive use of what can be done with
images and sounds is also masterful.
Trivia Quiz For Western Fans
B DAVID NORRIS
and WILLIAM YELVERTOIN
It. see it you varmints have been
pay in' attention during all these TV
westerns over the years, we've
rounded-up a list of questions for
you. Score; 0-4 - Go East, Young
Man: 5-9 - even a dumb dude
should've done better than that;
10-14 - Good work, Kemosabe 15
or more correct - fastest memory in
the West.
1. What was the name of the
ranch on "The Virginian"?
2. Name Ben Cartwright's three
sons from the early days of
"Bonanza
3. Who played Doc Adams on
"Gunsmoke"? Tor a bonus, what
was Doc's real first name?
4. Who was Matt Dillon's
deputy on "Gunsmoke" who also
ran a gun shop and dabbled in
medicine?
5. What was the name of the
Indian chief in "F Troop"?
6. Who played Tonto on "The
I one Ranger" I V shows (and some
movies, too)?
7. What company was famous
for sponsoring "Death Valley
Days"?
8. What well-known president
of the United States once hosted
"Death Valley Days"? (We thought
we'd throw in an easy one.)
9. Who was Captain
Parmenter's girlfriend on "F
Troop"?
10. Who played Bart Maverick?
11. What famous country singer
sang the theme song to "The
Rebel"?
12. Peter Graves' brother played
a marshal on TV for many years.
Who is he?
13. Name the actor who played
Doctor Loveless on "The Wild Wild
West
14. What town was closest to the
Ponderosa Ranch on "Bonanza"?
15. Who were the two more-or-
less reformed outlaws on "Alias
Smith And Jones"?
16. On "Kung Fu Caine was
looking for somebody. Who was it?
17. Tim Matheson and Kurt
Russell starred in a short-lived
western a few years ago, about two
men searching for their sister who
had been kidnapped by Indians.
What was the name of the show?
18. Chuck Connors starred in a
series about an army officer unjust-
ly kicked out from the service for
cowardice. Name the series.
19. Who played Hec Ramsey?
20. Who played Paladin on
"Have Gun, Will Travel"?
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Robin Lane Rocks The Attic;
Bramlett And English Tonight
B STEVE BACHNER
"Thanks. You've been a swell au-
dience. We've had a swell time.
Everything's been just swell- really
swell One could detect that Robin
Lane had rendered these lines with
more than just a touch of sardonic
responsiveness. The Boston rocker
appeared with her"Chartbusters"
last Saturday at The Attic looking
disheveled and a bit on the weary
side. The five-piece band has been
touring for nearly two years now
without any extended break.
But despite the exhausting effects
of the road and a rather insensitive
crowd, The Chartbusters delivered
an energetic, if a bit abbreviated,
set. The assurance and continually
surprising power of Robin Lane's
voice was always in evidence. She
pranced and strutted through the
band's twelve song set with her
endearing tough-girl stiffness, and,
donning her guitar, threw in an oc-
casional riff. During the band's an-
them, "When Things Go Wrong
Lane was riveting. Backed by four
guitars and some hydraulic percus-
sion work, she sang of emotional
con fusion in a husky, resonant,
uncertain voice that was far more
honest and moving than anything
else she did.
To cap off the evening the band
chose the title cut from their new
album. Imitation Life, pushing it
home with the strength and grace of
a veteran group. Lane sang it well
enough to hit you straight in the
heart and to stun those in the crowd
who had been standing idly for the
better part of the performance. It
was a gutsy display, part of a far
gutsier evening than expected.
Refuge recording artists Joe
English and Bonnie Bramlett will be
performing tonight at The Attic in
downtown Greenville. The two solo
artists have been brought together
for a massive tour that marks their
Attic appearance as the only North
Carolina date for the pair.
Bramlett @ English:
New LP's On The Hay
The first two albums on the
Refuge label, English's newly releas-
ed "Lights In The World" and
Bramlett's soon-to-be-released LP,
show a new direction in two well-
established artist's solo careers.
The combination of Joe's jazz-
rock drumming and vocals with
Bonnie's powerful R & B vocals
have produced an exciting stage
presentation of two world-class per-
formers.
Joe English has been a predomi-
See ENGLISH, page 6. col. 7
Clockwise from top: Warner Brothers recording artists Robin Lane and the t
English; singer Bonnie Bramlett. Lane gave an exciting performance Saturday n
have teamed-up for a tour that includes the only North Carolina date for the
hartbusters; drummer Joe
ight. Bramlett and English
Juo tonight at The Attic.
NWMWMIMMM





1 HI i S! CAROI IN1AN
APRI1 21, 11
LEHZrJiNG A sour Coll�G� Tht tijgg V?y
j5v Pvit? AAtfis
Bonnie and Joe At Attic
( 5ooghT You �)
Efr�H f(L�S�rri swpy
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Snare drum Pearl
top ot the tine Extra deep Ex
cond Call 757 3210
FOR SALE Jensen Tri Axial 6 bv
� m speakers New. still in box
S80 Call 75 6136
FOR SALE 1971 Fiat 124. needs
transmission less than 3 000 miles
on overhaul Call 752 4400 alter
t 00 p m $800 firm
FOR SALE Rotel 60 watts stereo
ver with 4 channel
capability �'25 Soundesign
8 track player recorder S50 BIC
beltdrive turntable 575 Marantz
75 watt 3 way speakers, 2 years
eld shqht cabinet damage, ex
cellent sound 5200 tor set Call
Dave at 756 6455 or come by M 2
Oakmont Squat u Apts after 5pm
FOR SALE Siamese kittens
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FOR SALE Stereo Opton.ca
tuner Optomca integrated amp
Also. BIC �60 turntable and BIC
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STEREO RECIEVER Nice 60
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FOR RENT
HOOM4TES WANTED 2 male or
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sir, -urfcious 3 bedroom house
Ounnq summer and( ortall
Convenient location to Carolina
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580 month during sum
met one third utilities and 56C
month ore fourth utilities during
the fall Can 756 9011 after 5 pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE
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pus 5145 mo plus one half
utilities Call 752 9194 after 4 30
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ask for Becky Beth or Susan
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summer from May to September
River Bluff Apts Call 758 6728
WANT TO SUB LEASE 3 respon
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Air near campus ECU bus Call
752 4989
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plus one sixth utilities Suave kit
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575 plus one third utilities Must
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758 4259
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baths appliances. waher dryer
hookups, cable TV hookups,
secluded area Regular monthly
rent is $280 Call for details offer
limited JL Harris and Sons.
Inc , Realtors, 204 W 10th. St
758 4711
ROOMS FOR RENT May to Aug
$75 month Call 758 4140
NEED TO MOVE IN WITH
established female roommate
beginning August 15 Will share
half expenses. Call 637 5521
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED For summer 3
bedroom duplex 5 blocks from
campus $58 00 per month plus one
half utilities 758 0267
FOR RENT 2 bedroom
townhouse apts One and half
baths appliances, cable TV
hookups, washer dryer hookups
very near ECU 5300 per monih.
lease and security deposit re
quired J L Harris and Sons. Inc
Realtors 204 W 10th 7584711
FOREST MANOR APTS FOR
RENT includes pool facilities for
the summer Call 757 6824 during
the day or 756 5577 during the
evening
FOR RENT Spacious 3 bedroom
elegant house Suitable lor 3 or 4
persons Hail a block from the
campus $400 plus deposit Call
756 0788 after 3 pm
ROOMS FOR RENT 2 rooms in
house located at 1009 Forbes St
available for summer or all year
round One block from campus
Rent plus one fourth utilities Pets
are allowed Male or female
758 2446. ask tor Rudy
PERSONAL
BANDS UNLIMITED BOOKING
AGENCY: Is now booking bands
for the spring, summer, and fall
We cater to every different
musical need and price range We
provide bands thai range from
Beach, Top 40. to easy listening
and country The quality of a band
can insure the success ol your par
ty Let the Pros at BANDS
UNLIMITED get the right band
tor your next party Call 757 3210
ROADIES Where bands make it
rock ROADIES makes it roll!
200 W Walnut St Downtown
Goldsboro, phone 734 4551
GUITAR PLAYER WANTED
Money making Top 40, Beach
band Vocal ability a must Call
757 3210
YOUR CAREER What are you
doing this summer to prepare lor
it? Find out why IBM, Xerox, Pro
ctor and Gamble Uptohn and hun
dreds ot others want students that
have worked with us
NEED PROFESSINAL TYPIST?
Will do term papers, thesis,
manuscript, etc Call Susan Byers
758 8241 or 758 5488
NEED ENTERTAINMENT' Con
tact Eastern Music Services And
Production Agency Large vane
ty ol bands available, all styles
Call 758 5676
ELBO ROOM The best time in
town! The great Wednesday Night
HUMP NITE SPECIALS
Thursdays are always SUPER!
Friday alternoons are still ROCK
ING and ROLLING Sunday is
Still LADIES NiTE'
LOST A silver colored diamond
shaped, small ring II found
PLEASE call 757 3155 Has sen
timental value
YOUR CAREER What are you
doing this summer to prepare lor
it? Find out why I BM Xerox, Pro
ctor and Gamble. Upiohn and hun
dreds ot others want students that
have worked with us For inter
view call 758 4513
HAS REAGAN S BUDGET CUT
CAUGHT�YOU SHORT' Then
get a high paying summer Ob with
a good Ob recommendation For
interview call 758 4513
WANTED TO BUY Used
lightwieghl 10 speed Call
758 9469, leave message lor Gary
OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
round Europe, S America
Australia. Asia Ail fields
$500 $1200 monthly Sightseeing
Free information write IJC Box
52 NC 4, Corona Del Mar, Ca
92625
DISCOS We have the best soun
ding disco in Eastern N C
Reasonable rates. Let us supply
the music at your next dance or
party Call BANDS
UNLIMITED
LOOK GOOD ON PAPER
Resumes, term papers applica
tions, etc Professionally typed
WRITE RIGHT 756 9946
KEYBOARD PLAYEF
WANTED Top 40 crossover coun
try. Serious inquiries only Call
758 8772
ARE YOU MOVING soon and
need help with a truck and labor (w
We specialize in college moves lor
students on a budget! Call 758 3684
tor more intormation
SEEKING EMPLOYMENTS. Our
computer can match your skills
and interests with local 0bs
Thomas and Thomas Vocational
Assessment 753 4995
TO THE PERSON who took the
empty keg and tap from the party
Saturday night on Elm Street you
have a choice A) Return it and no
questions will be asked B Call
758 3684 and I will pick it up C) Do
nothing and I will turn your name
over to the police and press
charges! Try me and see! Bubba
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DAY BEFORE PUBLICATION
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PRICE $100 lor 15 words. 05 lor
each additional word
Make checks payable to The East
Carolinian
Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and
hyphenations
Continued from page 5
nant force in rock 'n
roll for almost fifteen
years, from his day's
with "The Jam Fac-
tory" (on Epic
Records) to "Paul Mc-
Cartney & Wings" to
"Sea Level" (on Ar-
tista Records); and now
as a solo artist with
Refuge Records.
He has played and
sung on over twenty
gold and platinum
albums and was part ol
the Wings Over
America tour which set
national attendance-
records (over three
million) and an indoor
attendance mark at the
Seattle Kingdome.
B o n n i e B r a m I e 11
started her professional
career as one of 1 ina
Turner's back-up
singers in the early six-
ties. She went on to
Mail to
East Carolinian
Classified Ads
Old South Building
Greenville NO 27834
The
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Technical
Electronics
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Pick-l p and Deliver)
Available
90 I)a Warrant)
Period
marr) Delaney
Bramlett and they
became the famed six-
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& Bonnie
heir band consisted
oi and tosteted many
great rock 'n roll ar-
tists, including Dave
Mason, Eric Clapton,
Leon Russell, Duane
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of Bonnie's back-up
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recorded albums tor
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ATTIC ATTIC
South' No. 6
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BONNIE BRAMLETT & JOE ENGLISH
Capital Refuge Recording Artists Tue , April 21
VAed.A Ihurs.
GOOD HUMOR BAND
(K I FREE! on Wed.
The Media Board is
presently accepting
applications for
Media Board
Day Representative
Applications may be picked
up in the Media Board of-
fice in the Publications
Bldg. from 8-1 and 2-5
Monday thru Friday.
E
V hC rVWW "
I hai
last Frid
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the
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At Bi
B CHAR1
rhe ! �
hall team lo
tan! .
with lh
morn ,
athletu
moni
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past
1 -el;
.
Cren
rech.
true
coach Dave (
in a morning
to replace Bv
1 he new
mentot said H
take the new
ed that he w
Pirate.
"1 am
assume the j
Abbey' he
statement
represents a
ward in I
career I ht
athletic ti
lege are well
well deserved!
"1 hae h;
fruitful vears
continued.
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work with C
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t A ttic
son, Eric Clapton,
ell, Duane
and Rita
m fu was one
Bonnie's back up
&
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for
v t I 1H! U I I ol-
& M
TiTIC
fOE ENGLISH
rHE I-AST CAROl 1N1AN
Sports
APRll 21, 1981 Page
ECU Wins 14th Straight Over Pack
IS
ng
r
ive
picked
lard of-
ications
bid 2-5
Wheww w
1 hat's the best way to describe
last Friday's double-header between
East Carolina's lady Pirates and
N.( . State at the ECU Softball
Field. I he number one-ranked
Pirates prevailed, however, as they
swept two games from the
Wolfpack bv scores ot 4-3 and 1-0 to
pick up their 33rd and 34th victories
lj the season against three defeats.
1 he Pirate were trailing, 3-1, go
into the bottom oi the sixth in
the first game when Cynthia
Shepard belted a three-run homer to
give the team the m.
In the second game, ECU pitcher
leanette Roth limited State to just
one single as the Pirates picked up a
run in the bottom ot the first to nip
Pack.
"We came through offensively
when we had to said a relieved
coach Alita Dillon. "I wasn't overly
pleased with our defense, though
The Pirate coach said she wasn't
surprised by the closeness of the two
games. "1 was surprised at the 1-0
game, though she added. "I
thought it would be at least 6-5, or
something like that, because State
has been playing well, plus they
have some good hitters
The Lady Pirates jumped ahead
o the Wolfpack 1-0 in the bottom of
the first when catcher Fran Hooks
walked and moved to second on a
Mary Powell single to left. Hooks
later scored when Mitzi Davis singl-
ed to left.
1 he) held that 1-0 lead until the
State half of the fourth when the
Pack scored two runs o two Pirate
errors plus a couple of kev hits.
Pirate outfielder Kathy Riley made
a nice play on a hard hit ball to left
to end the inning.
State upped its lead to 3-1 in the
top of the fifth when the Pirates
committed a two-base error, and the
Wolfpack came through with a key
hit to left.
Powell opened the Buc half of the
sixth by rapping a base hit to left.
Davis hit a roller down the left field
line to advance pinch-runner Pillion
Barnes to third. That brought up
Shepard, who belted a three-run
homer to give the Pirates a 4-3 lead.
State threatened for the last time
in the top of the seventh when they
had runners on first and second. A
double-play bv the lady Pirates
ended the game.
Roth was the winning pitcher for
the Pirates, who have beaten State
14 straight times during the last two
seasons.
1 eading hitters for the Lady
Pirates in the first game were
Powell, who was three-for-three,
and Davis who was two-for-three.
The Lady Pirates scored the only
run of the game in the first inning of
the nightcap. Maureen Buck opened
the inning with a base hit to left.
Powell then lined out, but Davis
followed with a hit to right to put
runners on first and third. Shepard
came through again, as she drove in
Buck with a base hit to left, and the
Pirates were up 1-0.
State threatened in their half of
the first, but second baseman
Ginger Rothermei went far to her
right to take a base hit away from
the Wolfpack. Riley ended the inn-
ing by making a fine running catch
on a long drive to deep left field.
The rest of the game proved to be
a defensive struggle. State opened
their half of the seventh with a walk,
but the rally was killed by a ground
ball the Pirates turned into a double
play (pitcher to second to first).
Roth also hurled the second game
to pick up her 20th win against only
one loss.
The Pirates now travel to Graham
for the NCAIAW Qualifying Tour-
nament this Friday and Saturday to
vie for a berth in the Region II com-
petition.
"We will benefit from the ex-
perience we gained in last year's
tournament Dillon pointed out.
"That will help our confidence.
We're prepared, and we're healthy,
but you have to execute to win. If
we don't win, then there must have
been a major breakdown
Dillon also commmented on the
large crowd at the double-header
with State. "It could have been
larger she added, "but the Easter
break kept a lot of students away
The Pirates' sweep of State mark-
ed the end of the regular season and
gave the team a 21-0 record against
intra-state competition.
"
Lady Pirate
Head Coach
Alita Dillon
A�W�t �

vi
VoV
33MPW!
Suffer Unusual Shutout
Pirates Split Doubleheader
ECU Coaeh Hal Baird
Photo By DREW RUVBLEY
The Last Carolina baseball team
split a doubleader with Campbell
yesterday but lost much more than
just one ball game.
The Pirates took the opener, 2-1,
but lost the nightcap, 9-0. marking
the first time in 75 games that the
team has been shutout.
In the opener, the Pirates fell
behind in the top cf the sixth when
Campbell's Herb Williams walked,
advanced to second on an error and
scored when Camel second baseman
Kelly Hoffman lashed an RBI dou-
ble
The Bucs tied it up quickly,
though, in the bottom o the sixth.
With one out, Mike Sage doubled,
moved to third on a ground out and
scorred on I odd Hendley's RBI
single.
The Pirates won the game in
dramatic fashion in the bottom of
the seventh, the final regular inning
in an doubleheader in NCAA
baseball.
Designated hitter Charlie Smith
singled and was replaced on the base
paths by pinch runner Mark Shank,
who promptly stole second.
Centerfielder Robert Wells at-
tempted to sacrifice Shank to third
but ended up with an RBI instead
when Campbell pitcher Parrin Clon-
inger threw the ball away in his at-
tempt to nail Wells at first base.
Shank went all the way home as
the game ended with the Pirates vic-
torious by a 2-1 margin.
Rick Ramey got the win for the
Pirates, hurling an impressive three-
hitter to up his record to 5-2.
"Rick pitched a great game
said ECU coach Hal Baird. "I think
he was geared up for this one
because of his last outing (Baptist
scored four runs in the top of the
first against him
The win marked the third in a row
over the Camels for the Pirates. An
error aided the Buc cause in the win
but many of them certainly proved
an undoing for ECU in the second
game.
In the nightcap the Camels
jumped off to an early lead, scoring
seven runs in the second inning
alone.
Of those seven runs, only one was
earned. Those seven crossed the
plate via only three Campbell hits.
Two walks by ECU pitching and
two errors by Pirate fielding were
the difference.
For the game the Camels collected
ten hits, six of which were doubles.
Bob Patterson took the loss for
the Pirates, dropping his only deci-
sion against tour wins despite pit-
ching only one and a third innings.
Joe Stephenson checked the
Pirates with a four-hitter, going the
distance to up his mark to 5-2.
The Pirates, still carrying faint
hopes of a post-season bid, moved
to 24-10 with the split while Camp-
bell now stands 19-22.
ECU coach Baird was obviously
disappointed with the surprising
shutout of his club.
"We didn't get good pitching and
didn't score many runs he said.
"There's not much you can say
about that. We probably took
ourselves out ol it with some bad
defensive plays Still, if you don't
score you're not going to win many.
The Bucs now must take on Davis
& LIkins. a team that sports a 15-0-1
mark, in a 7 p.m. contest tonight
(Tuesday) at Harrington field.
Buc Shortstop Kelly Robinette
Instant Replay
Odom Loses A 2nd Aide, Signs 4th Recruit
Pay ton Named Coach, AD
At Belmont Abbey College
B CHAKI.KS CHANB1.KR
sport tdtior
The Last Carolina basket-
ball team lost its second assis-
tant coach in less than a week
with the announcement this
morning of Pirate aide Eddie
Payne as the new head coach
and athletic director at Bel-
mont Abbey College.
Just last Wednesday the
other ECU assistant of the
past two seasons, George
Felton, was named the top
aide on Coach Bobby
Cremins' staff at Georgia
Tech.
Payne, who came to ECU
three years ago with head
coach Dave Odom, was named
in a morning press conference
to replace Bobby Hussey, the
new head coach at Davidson.
The new Belmont Abbey
mentor said he was pleased to
take the new position but add-
ed that he would miss being a
Pirate.
"I am very pleased to
assume the duties at Belmont
Abbey he said in a written
statement. "This action
represents a positive step for-
ward in my professional
career. The academic and
athletic traditions of the col-
lege are well documented and
well deserved.
"I have had two extremely
fruitful years at ECU Payne
continued. "It has been per-
sonaly rewarding for me to
work with Coach Odom, our
players and the entire com-
munity of East Carolina
University. I will remain much
more than a casual observor,
more like an avid fan
Odom had congratulations
yet sorrow for Payne's new
appointment, much as he did
when Felton's move was an-
nounced.
"Once again our program
has lost a faithful friend and
coach. Eddie's loss leaves a
terrific void on our basketball
staff which will be difficult to
fill. But, as was the case with
George Felton's resignation,
we are happy to see our staff
improve themselves profes-
sionally
Payne came to the Pirates
after serving for one year as a
head coach at Truett-
McConnel Junior College in
Cleveland, Ga. Payne's club
posted a 25-5 record in his on-
ly year there.
Before going to Truett-
McConnel, Payne served as an
assistant at CTemson under Bill
foster.
Before going into coaching
Payne played college ball
himself at Wake Forest, mak-
ing the All-ACC Tournament
team his senior year.
The location of Belmont
Abbey is a real convenience
for Payne. The school is
located jut outside of his
hometown of Charlotte.
Belmont Abbey has one
very well known ex-coach. Al
All-State Guard Peartree
To Bring Abilities To Pirates
Takes Dual Role
ECU assistant basketball coach Eddie Payne was named this
morning as the new head coach and athletic director at Bel-
mont Abbey College.
McGuire, the longtime Mar-
quette coach who led the War-
ners to the 1977 national
championship and is now a
NBC-TV color commentator,
was once at the BAC helm.
There has been no timeline
set for the filling of the two va-
cant assistant's positions at
ECU.
East Carolina basketball
coach Dave Odom announced
the signing of his fourth and
final recruit of the season Fri-
day.
Bruce Peartree, a 6-0
165-pound All-State guard
from Pantego, is the only
backcourt player signed by
Odom this year.
Peartree, a point guard,
averaged 15.6 points, 11
assists and six rebounds per
game this past season for state
1-A champion Pantego High
School.
He has, in fact, led Pantego
to back-to-back state titles.
Coach Al Baker's team went a
perfect 32-0 this year and has
won three of the last four 1-A
state titles.
Peartree received several
honors on the way to the title,
being named MVP in every
tournament Pantego par-
ticipated in.
Even more accolades came
his way after the season was
over. For the thtrd consecutive
year, Peartree was named to
the All-East team by Raleigh's
News and Observor.
He was also named to the
'10-man All-State team by The
Greensboro Daily News and
was named the Area Player of
the Year by The Washington
Daily News for his efforts as a
senior.
Peartree became well-
known at Pantego for his ball-
handling and leaping abilities.
ECU mentor Odom was ob-
viously pleased with the sign-
ing.
"Bruce combines excellent
athletic talent and ball-
handling skills with great court
savvy Odom said.
"Obviously, Bruce is a pro-
duct of his environment. Com-
ing from Pantego High and
being schooled by coach Al
Baker has provided him with
great fundamentals to be a
team basketball player.
"Bruce is from a team and
community that is used to win-
ning and this will bring Bruce
to us with an air of con-
fidence
Odom dded that Peartree
should be able to handle the
big transition from 1-A high
school ball to major college
basketball.
"Although the transition
from high school to college is a
big one, Bruce's background
will allow him to make the step
a smooth one
Odom now has a virtual
overflow roster for next
season, losing only one player
from this year's club and sign-
ing three frontcourt players in
addition to Peartree.
The other signees are center
6-10 D�vid Reichenecker of
Niceville, Fla 6-7 forward
Charles Green of Catonsville
Community College in
Baltimore, Md. and 6-9 center
Al Mack of Hilbert Junior
College in New York.





8
1 Ml- AS! I AROl INIAN
APKIi 21, ls�8l
COPIES
Clemson Wins Title
ci emson, s.c.
(111) li vas nearh im-
possible for Clemson to
lose it- second straighi
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference men's tennis
tournament because it
had so many playei s in
the finals.
ictories h Peter
Pristach, Jean
Desdunes and Rick Ru
deen boosted then team
Sunda to a tourney
total ol bO points and
ensui ed the 1 tgei s'
championship.
c lem-
Kid
loin
singles players and a
doubles team fighting
for nine titles in the
finals.
Pristach ma) have
had the biggest victor)
oi th( ourney for
Clemson in his head-to-
head battle with Wake
est's 1 and Dunlop.
1 he Deacons went
into the finals five
Us behind the
1 iget and Pristach
erased am ake Foresl
chances with his 7-6,
6 ; defeat oJ Dunlop in
the Vs (s flight.
W ake orest finished
nd with 51 points,
wed b irginia
48, North Carolina 4
Duke 45. N.C. State
41, Maryland 21 and
Georgia I ech 11.
Geofl Mcdonald of
irginia was judged
most valuable AC V
tennis playei ol the
year and won the tour-
nament sportsmanship
award.
McDonald won the
No 1 smiles crown
with an easy 6-3, 6-1
match over Clemson's
Pendei Murphy.
Wake Forest's Jim
1 eighton w.is awarded
the coach ol -the yeai
a w a i d.
Desdunes won the
No. 3 flight with a b 4,
6 1 victor) ovei Scott
Fleming ol N.C. State.
It was the 1 leer's third
straight set victory of
the tournament.
Rudeen defeated
I igei Buford of North
Carolina 2-6, 6-4, 6-4
foi the No. 5 singles
crown.
N.C. State's Mark
Dillon won the No. 2
singles title with a 6-1,
6-2 victory ovei Allen
Far four of Wake
forest, then combined
with Andy Andrews to
give the Wolf pack the
No. 1 doubles title.
Dillon and Andrews
beat 1 at tour and lorn
Keiffer ot Wake forest
f 2,7-6.
Dillon was the only
competitor to win both
singles and a doubles
crown in the tourna-
ment.
1 he Deacons' Phil
Raiford won the No. 4
singles title by
defeating Brent Hen
dncks of Virginia 7-5,
2-6, 6-2.
The Duke duo ot
Dubins won the No. 2
doubles title with a 6-2.
7-6 defeat of larheels
Buford and Ron li-
ft Raftjq S4m
Copy Center
Copies
. . . 4.25c
100 OR MORE
1 TO 99
on B��' t Mtaa
wrioi�ui� ��(�! tec S�t�� SO it B�9
Keg 01 k e Detivei , 24 Hrs
ra
Mark llur and Ross skine.
VJ
1 ireenv . h ipel Hit
?b?-B77V -9791
COPIES
:7i
m
The Fleming Center has been here for you slnoe 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all ages at a reasonable oost
Saturday abortion boon
The
early pr
bog mrtto
Fleming Center we're here when you i
Pan W-6650 In Fjdelgfr anytime.
need us
m:i
FLEMING CENTER
Sports Writers Needed
For summer issues of the hast
( arolinian. Apply in person at our
offices in the Old South Building.
An Kqual Opportunity Employer
Dr. G. Robert Vines
Optometrist
Professional Vision Care
Where Quality is Affordable
Complete Visual Examination
Contact Lenses
Call For Contact lens
and Free Information
756-6638
Carolina East Mall
Greenville, N.C.
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
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f
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SHIRTS FOR MEN, WOMEN
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With or Without Mushroom
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 21, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 21, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.128
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57338
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