The East Carolinian, April 16, 1981






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APR 16 198!
�he Itaat Carolinian
DICALS
LASI CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 N S& &)
10 Pages
Thursday, April 16, 1981
Greenville, North C arolina
Circulation Hl.lMM)
Delta Sigs Lose Out
Fraternity Robbed
Bv KAREN WENDT
WMant News tdilor
The Doha Sigma Phi fraternity
was the victim of a larceny Saturday
night. n estimated tour thousand
dollars worth of goods are missing.
According to fraternity president
Kvle Schick the larceny took place
about i 1:30 p.m. on Saturday night,
April II. At the time most of the
brothers were attending a beach
weekend and only a few brothers
were in the house.
According the Schick the remain-
ing brothers had left the house for a
few hours and when they returned
the) discovered the theft.
Schick said that during the
previous week a caller, identifying
himself as a reporter for the campus
paper, called and questioned one o
the brothers concerning the size of
the house, how many people it hous-
ed and other general information.
However, no one at The Last
Carolinian or The Buccaneer is con-
ducting a housing survey. Schick
said that he believes that the call and
the larceny may have been con-
nected.
The case is being handled by the
Greenville City Police rather then
the campus police since the theft oc-
cured off campus. A detective from
the Greenville police department
said that they have not yet com-
pleted their investigation.
Missing are a Yamaha 200 watt
amplifier,various pieces of stereo
equipment, electric typewriters,
desk calculators and other things
described by Schick as being easily
pawned. No cash or jewelry were
stolen.
Schick felt that if the merchandise
were pawned in Greenville they
might have a chance of recovering it
but said that if it were taken out of
the area he had little hope of any
recovery.
"This was done for the monetary
value said Schick. "This is the
first time we've ever been burglariz-
ed
Schick also said that he believes
that the theft was perpetrated by
"somebody that has been at our
house before. Somebody who was
aquainted with a brother He did
not state why he had (his belief. He
did say however that he felt certain
that it was not a prank by another
fraternity.
One brother estimated that his
loss alone came to $1700.
The fraternity does not carry in-
surance, due to the high cost, but it
is believed that the parent's o the
victims who have homeowner's in-
surance will be able to regain their
lossses.

PtiOto By J'LL ADA.V
Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity House
Run�Off Decision Stalled
Pending Official Decision
East To Hold Conference
John last will give a short press conference at the Ramada Inn. Ban-
quet Room A, at 12 noon today.
Government Plan
Called Illegal Act"
WASHINGTON, D.C. as yet unwilling to agree to all the
(C PS)-In what some"called a com- cuts, has agreed to stiffen eligibility
promise and others an approval of requirements for Pell Grants
"an illegal act the critical logjam (lormerly called Basic Educational
of some federal financial aid ap- Opportunity Grants). In response,
phcations has been broken. the Education Department has
In late March, U.S. Department agreed to start once again process-
of Education Secretary Terrel Bell ng Pe" Grant applications,
announced he was halting the pro- The Reagan administration
cessing of aid applications for 45 �a�ed to make students trom
davs, or until Congress agreed to the families that earn more than
Reagan Administration's plans to $25,000 per year or that don t con-
cut student aid tribute much toward their children s
The halt came at the time most education ineligible for Pell Grants.
financial aid packages are normally The House subcommittee, while
assembled for the next academic failing to fix a strict income cutoff,
year Students who would usually did agree in principle to lower the
discover if they had enough money amount a family can earn and in-
in Mav or June wouldn't find out crease the amount it must contribute
until August or early fall. in order to 9uallfy for Pdl Grants-
The delay in awarding aid, many The Congressional Budget Office
administrators warned, threatened estimates the moves will disqualify
to throw everything from fall, 1981 100,000 - 154,000 college students
enrollment to academic year from the Pell Grants program,
budgets into chaos. The subcommittee, however,
Now the House Subcommittee on refused to lower the maximum grant
Postsecondary Education, though from $1750 to $1200, as the ad-
����;��mm� ministration had requested.
"2T" ��t I �-�J'iffc The subcommittee went as far as
OH HG inolUt: It did, says Rep. William Ford
aaBHMHHHiMaMaMM (D-Mi), because it had "a cocked
Announcements2 gun pointing at its head " Further
Editorials 4 delav in processing the 1.5 million
Classifieds�� aid applications already on file
Features 5 w�"ld wreak havoc.
SporT ' ' � � � � 7 See GOVERNMENT page 2
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student affairs, will decide either
Friday or next Tuesday whether or
not to grant Angela Pepe's appeal
for a second run-off.
The University Honor Board had
decided earlier this week to grant
Pepe's appeal for a run-off in the
race for SGA treasurer. Kirk little,
incumbent treasurer, appealed the
decision to Mever.
According to Pepe, Mever has
asked that she submit a legal briel to
him explaining why she should be
granted a second run-off. Pepe lost
in the first run-off by eight votes.
Pepe said of the pending decision.
"1 haven't the vaguest idea o!
what's going to happen. 1 guess
everyone is going to have to wait
and see
"All 1 can do is wait on his deci-
sion little stated. "There's no
need to rush him. I'm just Filing an
appeal. There's reallv nothing else
to say about it right now
Charlie Sherrod, tormer SGA
president, dropped slander charges
against Kirk little vesterday. Sher-
rod explained, "1 dropped m
charges against Kirk little because
the time of the trial conflicted with
my political science honor society
banquet. People urged me not to
come down to his level
Hazing Occurs Despite Laws
By SUSAN CALHOUN
(CPS)-When the Alpha Phi
Alpha chapter membership at the
University of Pittsburgh "severely
paddled" one of its pledges, the
pledge was hospitalized with kidney
damage, and APA was ultimately
kicked off campus.
A month earlier, the University of
Southern California also kicked one
of its fraternities off campus, also
for hazing.
The expulsions are indicative of
an increasingly tough stand by ad-
ministrators against the sometimes-
brutal initiation procedures of their
fraternities and sororities. But
against this background of tougher
stands, proliferating policy
statements, national sanctions, and
even new criminal laws, most
observers agree hazing is not only
continuing, but increasing nation-
wide.
Written university prohibitions
against hazing and even previous
warnings did not prevent the Pitt-
sburgh incident, for example.
Similar prohibitions existed when:
� The Alpha Phi Alpha chapter
at Southern Illinois at Edwardsville
was indefinitely suspended by the
national APA when a pledge was in-
jured during a December
"fraternity activity" of undisclosed
nature.
� Delta Tau Delta members were
expelled from USC-owned property
after repeated warnings about initia-
tion practices. A "series of rituals"
during January Hell Week caused
the expulsion, say fraternity
members.
�Three pledges of Kappa Alpha
Psi a. Tennessee felt "fear for their
lives" when three actives� one
brandishing a gun� kidnapped
them and paddled them. The case
reached a grand jury.
� Two pledges of a frat at the
University of Oregon were hit by a
car while returning to campus after
members "dropped them off miles
from town" seven weeks ago. One is
still in the hospital.
In the last two years, at least three
students have died from smiliar in-
itiation activities. Administrators
and legislators fear hazing is not on-
ly on the upswing, but becoming
more secretive.
"I've been hearing second-hand
reports that fraternities are pushing
for rougher and tougher initiation
rites relates Roger Howard,
associate dean at the Universitv of
Wisconsin-Madison. "We haven't
had any formal complaints in ten
years, but that certainly doesn't
mean it isn't going on. People are
just pressured not to report it One
reason may be that in Wisconsin,
people convicted of hazing are sub-
ject to a jail term.
"Initiation rites aren't as brutal
as they used to be argues the
University of Oregon's Bill Boland.
"But there is an increase of more
mentally abusive hazing, like de-
m'eaning skits and public humilia-
tion
The solution to it all has eluded
most administrators, however.
"I got the feeling hazing was
coming back around 1977 recalls
Fred Yoder o Sigma Chi's national
headquarters. It wasn't a "big pro-
blem" in the early seventies, he
says, because "students were more
of a mind to question things then
"But when student activism calm-
ed down, fraternity membership
started rising, and students were
more inclined to accept things" like
"painful initiation rites Yoder
says.
In 1977, Sigma Chi sent an anti-
hazing statement to all 177 chapters
to emphasize its "commitment
against hazing Similarly, the Na-
tional Interfraternitv Council made
its 60 member houses sign a state-
ment, and send it to its chapters.
Most schools also have anti-
hazing regulations on the books.
Many publish annual reminders
about them, Pittsburgh's Smith
adds.
But many administrators com-
plain other forces hamper their ef-
forts to prevent hazing. A recent
USC report blamed "active
members and alumni" for
perpetuating hazing traditions.
Mike Wittern. former fraternity af-
fairs director, wrote in the report
that many pledges won't report haz-
ing "because the active chapter
holds the all-powerful promise of
membership over their heads
"The biggest problem is the in-
credible group pressure not to
report a violation agrees Wiscon-
sin's Howard. Indeed, a pledge at
the University of Alabama was
dismissed from Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon after telling his father than an
SAE active had hit a pledge with an
axe handle during initiation.
Alumni tolerance of limited haz-
ing further frustrates efforts to stop
it. "There's an attitude of T did it,
so they should, too Yoder says.
Most anti-reformers, he adds.
See HAZING, page 3
Unpaid Parking Tickets
Can Raise Towing Fees
Towing Fees
Pay your tickets or else.
Pfiofc By JON JORDAN
B KAREN WENDT
There has been a change in the
campus towing procedure from last
semester according to the ECU cam-
pus police.
In the present policy the towing
company can charge different rates
dependent on whether or not the
student has paid for their outstan-
ding tickets.
According to ECU police officer
Jay Pennell if the student has been
towed and has not paid their
outstanding tickets it will be marked
on the release form.The release
form must be obtained from the
campus police before the towing
company will release the car.
If on the release it is marked that
the student has not paid for their
outstanding tickets then the towing
company can charge city rates. City
rates are $25 while normal campus
rates are only $20.
According to Pennel the towing
company keeps the difference.
Pat Gertz, another ECU police
officer, said that the change was
authorized by police chief Joe
Calder. She said that the change was
made "in an effort to get students to
come in and pay their tickets
The difference in towing fees for
campus and city vehicles was a re-
cent innovation. But according to
Pennel, with the towing companies
"Whatever they charge they get






HI I M (. kil ll
M'KIl 16, WM
Announcements
DOG DAY
POETRY
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Yes the
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info
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HONOR COUNCIL
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SCOTT HALL
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CATHOLICS
� . � - � �
��� � East
l Monday -�.
om tor a pit-nn A. � � � � I
SCHOLASTIC SEARCH

ICtiVI
enter's
in
i , a k yoi
isl ot bowl
: ' table tennis at
mall Bov ie third
from 3 00 until
5 30 b m and billiards an.i I
� an
- �"� '� ' IV0 p.n untii
ELDERHOSTEL
.
� . . week on a
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v.teo ' �
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phasis on r. .
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MANAGER

SUMMER JOBS

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ARTIST
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Government Plan
May Face Lawsuit
( ontinued I mm Page i
lise
non
move a : "
Rep �� l) sn
. R
gered by
termed an illegal
i suing the ad
�. �. if the sub-
� -mise. 1 he I S
ation (I SSA) and the
Independent ollege
and University Student- (cal
c OPl Si assert the revised schedule
how much money a family must
� ribute I - liege educa-
Hi :
Reauthorization Act ol 1980, pa
ei.
anges in the
edule had to be published bet ore
July 1. 1980, to give Congress
enough time ' t emplate them.
Mexican merican Legal
� i ducational Fund
i l 1 )M tnsidering til -
on the same grounds.
Bui the three groups' resolve to
a mpered by their
tear an injunction to stop the terms
npromi.se might hah
ing altogether.
dela -ing
iosi cei tainh pose even
e problem idents figuring
ere they can afford to
�ol in the fall.
Nevertheless, COPUS' Steve
1 iefman is determined to get a legal
gmeni on the matter.
"We warn to sei the precedent of
not allowing the Dept. ol Education
lo hat they've done he told
Higher Education Daily.
Students are equally upset over
Senate approval ot drastic student
aid cuts three weeks ago.
Ihe Senate approved measures to
make students with Pell Grants con-
tribute $750 in "self-help" money
to qualify for a grant, to drop in-
iooI interest rate subsidies for
Guaranteed Student 1 oans, and to
raise the interest rates on parent
loans.
The Senate I abor and Human
Resourses Committee, however, still
must tit the programs into the target
federal budget. That means the
policies� though not the
numbers�- ol the budget can be
altered, according to Sen. Robert
Stafford's office.
Stattord hopes to introduce a bill
to preserve the "critically important
payment ol interest for students
while in school
-
-
. �


SCJ
Then . lamzational
meet � " � � ety tor Cot
IS at 7pm 1 yes
day April 21 in Austin room 301
All members an persons in
embers
are urged to attend Plans tor the
coming school year will be
ssed
COOP
�jut Johnson An Force
Base, Goldsboro NC w.li have a
Coop position in � real on open
tor f- an 81 in ludents
should apply to the Co op I
iwl Build.nu IV 697V : . I
� end ot this
I tepai tmenl I I .
oppositions i. � tor Fan 81
tor the following ma
( hemistry, i � . , com
bioioay. businev � In
and lournalism Contact thi
��� . �
LIBRARY
Due to the recem
hours innot pro
. . .
week : v81
. . .
week � I la Vpi I 2t. 6
am 9pm. Saturo.i. �'�.
p m Tui
Thurs - . ' 8 am
i- riday �
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pn "
Way a
PERFORMANCE
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Eight Pieces I
C a r i e �� � ilioi

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Ni
it I
. � � student l fa
WORK
Part t.me wort
position is open tor a student to
work on Sundays in a n
church w.th a teen age group The
salary is a minimum ot $100 per
month The position begins im
mediately and continues through
the summer If interested contact
Dan Earnhardt at the v
Student Center
GAME ROOM
The i ege ime Room.
� n the Aycock bas
. �
ball, pool, ping pong and!
Hours aii' Mon rhurs 15 11
p.m. Friday ind iun r
11 p m All pro, eeds ai
' " � students through the Student
Residence Asso
support the game roi
DISCOUNT DAYS

discount ci
and Fridays Evi
� ' wling.
biliiat
Bowling
- -
5 30
tenms a
I 00 p.n
Don � i
ART
two il art won
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will beond
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Mr: �
WORSHIP
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WORKSHOP
' . ! � � rta Camei
is sponsoring a
�leld at the
y.liis Bu'it: t First
rtiu; u,� Street
evening Apt i i6 at � 30 i
� � �
and open to an individua
nave slides and h sh '
ticipati
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lo part
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elected tor �
and otl
A "
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A critique pannei
to oft� �
and or to ' ' � � �
Comments

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the slidi " � .

photou- aphs at tl

Witt
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test

IVCF
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OFF
SUGG
�FTAlL
I Ml I S!AKOI IMAN
AFRII 16, 1981
Students' Reactions Questioned
Carnival Sidewalk Sale
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
gives Wanda Westbrook and Linda Harkand a chance to clown around. Both
are employees of the Student Supply Store who was sponsoring the sale.
Hazing Dangerous Practice
Continued From Page 1
no 11 I'm older
pters d from
nni. We feel we
make a little progress
ith the cur-
students,
here's a
tss sha! we need
. woid uk It's
like talking to a
W ith the relative in-
veness ol univei -
nal gi oup
sanctions, more states
i resorting to legisla-
te stop the annual
. imidations. I ight
ites now have passed
anti-hazing laws. Haz-
ing is a misdemeanor
carrying a 30-da jail
sentence in Wisconsin.
. the Othei extreme.
New Jersey makes ii a
1on. �it h a
18-month prison term
and $700
ier ot the
( alifornia State Stu-
dent Association hopes
lo persuade legislators
in his stale to up the
irrent hazing penults
from a six-month
ten a one-yeai
lorn sentence with a
I tine. Glazei
les the cur rent law
"wasn't effective in
tnting hazing
People are unwill-
ing to prosecute under
the present penal code
because people call haz-
ing 'accidents and
therefore the) have no
criminal responsibili-
ty
Under the new law.
"there will be no way
to sa hazing was an ac-
cident
"Fraternity member-
ship is steadily increas-
ing, and these non-
accidental accidents
must not be con-
tinued argued bill
sponsor Jim Cramer at
a March press con-
ference. "Students
have the right to be tree
of this outrageous in-
dignity
New Jersey enacted a
ar law January 12
after intense lobbying
by the Committee to
Halt I fseless college
Killings (CHUCK).
CHUCK, organized
by Eileen Steens o
Sayville, N.Y. alter her
son died in a 1978 haz-
ing incident, is also
credited with getting
stilt penalties approed
in New York, where an
Ithaca College student
was killed during initia-
tion last spring.
But the usual protest
of campus ad-
ministrators against
any kind of govern-
mental interference in
regulating, stud e n t
behavior hasn't been
heard in hazing cases.
Indeed, one New
York administrator
calls the law "a great
relic because it
disciplines hazing
without putting the
onus on ad-
ministrators, who
generally don't like to
offend alumni in an
way.
"Insofar as the law
seres as a deterrent,
the Wisconsin lavs is
probably effective
sas Howard. He
thinks the law works
"probably because it
calls such 'pranks' as
kidnapping and assault
what they are� kid-
napping and assault-
instead o' hazing
"1 think anything is
helpful Yoder com-
ments, "laws add
more reinforcement to
university and national
fraternity positions thai
really need it
Most opposition to
the new laws come
from local fraternity
chapters. But. says
Cilazer, "The courts
will decide guilt or in-
nocence, regardless of
whether fraternities
support the decision
(CPS)High schol
students at different
locales around the
country drew
widespread attention
for their questionably
cheerful reaction to the
March 30 attempted
assassination of Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan,
but a few college
students are also fin-
ding themselves in trou-
ble because of similar
responses to the news.
At the University of
Pennsylvania, a student
newspaper columnist
wrote "I hope he
dies"two days after the
shooting. Senior
Dominic Manno, ex-
pressing what he calls
liis "frustration with
the political system
wrote in his Daily Pen-
nsylvaman column,
'My first reaction to the
assassination attempt
was 'too bad he (the
gunman) missed
In the column, Man-
no suggested that peo-
ple as frustrated as he
might have sufficient
motive to use "a bullet
to cancel out the
ballot
Hundreds of angr
readers telephoned the
paper to protest the
comments, according
to Executive Editor An-
drew Kirtzman.
Manno wouldn't
change his mind about
his sentiments in the
column, but confessed
he was "suprised by the
magnitude and the
vehemence of (the pro-
mts)
The column also
caught the attention of
the Philadelphia office
o the Secret Service,
ISA ADS SHOE
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where special agent
Kevin Tucker announc-
ed an investigation was
underway.
Tucker says he want
to determine "whether
Manno has a propensi-
ty to carry them (his
sentiments) out, or
whether he has a pro-
pensity for violence
University President
Sheldon Hackney says
he was "appalled" by
the column, but sas
the university plans no
disciplinary action.
"He has a right in
our s o e i e t y - -a nd
especially on a universi-
ty eampusto speak his
mind, no matter how
abhorrent his ideas
Hackney said in a state-
ment to the press.
University ot
California-Berkeley.
political science
students also spoke
their minds although
more spontaneously.
Some clapped and
cheered when news of
the shootings was an-
nounced in class, accor-
ding to junior David
Hartman, one of the
student sin the class.
Hartman says he also
overheard cheering
from other locations on
campus through an
open window. But one
woman in the room
who laughed at the an-
nouncement was hissed
at by other classmates.
At the I niversity ot
Denver. students
crowded in a basement
io drop and add classes
reacted to the news
"unsv mpathetically
according to campus
newspaper reports. One
woman commented.
"The shock hadn't
sunk inI'm too busv
just hoping that he
dies.
Denver student
Janice Thomas at-
tributed the lack of
sympathy to anger over
Reagan's proposed
budget cutbacks in stu-
dent aidWith so
much violence in this
country added Mar
na Regehr ot the
University of Illinois,
"the attempted
assassination was not
really shocking
In Palo Alto,
California, reaction
from the editors o!
Stanford University's
humor magazine, the
Chapparral, was less
calculated. An issue
featuring a mythical
storv about a "Reagan
assassination" hit the
newstands just two
hours before Reagan
was in fact shot in
Washington, D.C.
I he storv, called
�'Who Shot R.R?" was
written three months
ago, but appeared in
the March 30 issue by
"sheer coincidence
says business manager
lames Gable.
The magazine's
parodv describes a tiv.
tional shooting o the
president during a
"White House
Rodeo Suspects in
the case were various
"welfare recipients
"poor people and
Tarrv Hagman and
Nancv Reagan
Ciable savs he has no
plans to take the issue
off the stands. "We
recieved no flak about
the article he says. "I
think everyone realized
tht it was just a really
strange coincidene, and
there was nothing at all
malicious involved
Can You Write
Then we have a job for
you.
The East Carolinian
needs writers in all areas. No
experience necesary.
ATTIC
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tttije lEaHt Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Pai i C ui : ins.
Jimmy Dupju i .
Paui LlNlKl , ,�
Dave Severin, ���,�� ��,�,
Al ISON BARTH , Produaw, Mi
1)1 BORAH HolAl INC. ��
CHARI is CHAND1 IK v,� e
Dv in Norris.
April 16. 19SI
Opinion
Page 4
Round Three
SGA Treasurer Run-Off Appearant
Following Monday's decision by
the Review Board to grant Angela
Pepe a second run-off in the race
for SGA treasurer, the final deci-
sion on the matter has fallen upon
the shoulders of Chancellor Thomas
Brewer and Vice Chancellor Elmer
Meyer. The decision they will make
is an important one, to sa the least.
and could affect student govern-
ment at East Carolina University
for years to come.
The situation surronding thd
treasurer's race is so twisted that it
defies understanding. Pepe won the
general election by 49 votes. But in-
cumbent Kirk Little was within two
percent, a margin that qualified him
for a run-off. So he filed for the se-
cond election, and the fur began to
fly.
In quick succession Little filed
charges against Pepe, and she filed
countercharges. He claimed she had
violated elections rules bv not sub-
mitting a list oi nei campaign
workers on time. Angela claimed
Kirk had slandered her reputation
I ; 11!
he charged that one oi her campaign
workers, SGA President Charlie
Sherrod, was responsible for alter-
ing his campaign advertisement that
appeared in this newspaper.
Already heads were spinning, but �
as the saving goes � the best was
yet to come.
Both candidates dropped their
charges against each other. But Lit-
tle decided to press his claim against
Sherrod, who filed charges that Lit-
tle had slandered his reputation.
Amid all this furor the SGA
managed to hold the run-off; Little
won by eight votes. It was finally
over, everyone thought. But that
would have been too simple. The
elections rules did not clearly
specify what would happen if the
candidates in a run-off were within
two percent of each other. Run off a
run-off? At first it seemed absurd,
but the election rules were am-
biguous enough to permit such an
interpretation. Our soap opera
takes another turn.
Sherrod was cleared of the
charges against him and later drop-
ped those against Little. All that
was left to determine is whether or
not to grant a second run-off. Both
sides can find reasonable arguments
for their points o view. Tho situa-
tion lias diagged Oil o n. 11v
thai many bitter feelings have
developed,
the aii and erase these bitter feelings
is to hold another run-off. In effect
both candidates could start from
scratch, run a clean campaign and,
win oi lose, know that they had
done their best.
No decision can satisfy everyone,
but holding a second run-off is the
most equitable solution available.
DOfr FEEL 6AP.3 OOfT THINK THEY KNOW WHCT5 GOING OM EITHER
r Campus Forum
'Petty Polities' Causes Problems
Many people who are in SCiA,
whether it is the judicial or legislative
branch, are mostly first termers. The
problem is that now we have that ex-
perience that is needed to effectively run
the SGA the students involved are leav-
;ng. Some of you may be wondering
'HV 1 he ANSWER: Petty Politics,
ivfudslinging, abuse of POWER and
playing games that bring back memories
of my childhood. Some people change
when they get into power and forget who
elected them to office, but not everyone.
The vast majority of the students in
SCiA care for the population that they
represent, but for the FEW who don't, I
wonder how they can live with
themselves. It the shoe fits an) of your
feet then 1 suggest you wear it and watch
where you step.
For those of you who are wondering if
I am going to be back along with the rest
of the rebels, you BETTER believe it.
We will not hide our heads or stop talk-
ing until the petty bickering done in the
name of helping the students is stopped.
1 hope that with the ushering in of
1 ester Nail and his Cabinet the trash
that has been building up will be burnt
down.
MARINA P. ZIGOVSKY
Junior, Corrections
Article Praised
l just wanted to thank you greatly for
the article on stress and anxiety that you
printed in The East Carolinian last
Thursday ("Classroom Phobias Can
Cause Crippling Effects on Students").
Your article proved to me that there are
others besides myself plagued by stress
and the horrible symptoms that come
with it. 1 thought 1 was the only
"weirdo" walking around campus simp-
ly because I have the normal anxiety-
produced feelings. I am now suffering
from depression (mostly caused by anx-
ieties). Other than the professional help
and the support from my family and
friends, your article was my only other
consolation.
The article did a great deal to relieve
me of the misery of stress by helping me
to understand what my anxiety and
depression is and what the inevitable
symptoms are that come with it. Because
of your concern for students under so
much pressure (those like myself)i my
faith in people who sincerely caie for the
welfare of others has been confirmed. I
began to wonder if The has! Carolinian
could ever be informative and helpful in
the interest of students. I have been con-
vinced that your newspaper staff cares
about more than just Student Govern-
ment meetings, elections, and the other
usual events that were never of much in-
terest to me. Your article proves that
you real!) care about the students on this
campus.
MARTI BABB
Humanitarian Venture
1 wish to compliment you on the
feature article by Katharine Kimberly in
the April 2 edition of your paper. The
need for organ transplants is all too
comomon. 1 heartily endorse the organ
donor drive on April 8. This is a
humanitarian venture which I would en-
courage all to participate in. I would
also remind people that as they re-
register for their driver's license that
they will have the opportunity to in-
dicate on their driver's license that they
are a potential organ donor.
CARL R. MORGAN, Ph.D.
Professor and Chairman
Department of Anatomy
Banner Complaints
I would like to formally complain
about the campaign banners that so
wonderfully adorn our campus. Now
that the election is long gone, do the can-
didates who so ardently claim to care
about the university agree that it is time
to remove these atrocities? Not to
SINGLE any one out, but there are a
TON of the things hanging OVER this
MAN'S campus.
SPENCER K. STEPHENS
Senior, Psychology
Clarification
When 1 was sworn in as a member oi
the Appeal Board, it was with the
understanding that it 1 felt 1 could not
act as a fair and neutral parts on any
case 1 would withdraw from that case. !
have lived up to that expectation. Tins is
wh) 1 feel i! is necessary to del
tinsel I concerning printed statements in
the Tuesday, April 14. WSl edition ol
the East Carolinian The article ap-
peared on page 1 oi the paper and was
entitled "Second Runfl I ooms; 1
to File Appeal
In the article I was quoted as saving.
"I saw Charlie before the meeting but he
did not try to tell me how to vote He I
didn't mention ngela or Kirk's names,
but we did discuss the ambiguit) ol the
rules. Dodd latei denied having spoken
with Sherrod. 1 did not converse with
Charlie Sherrod Whal I did sa)
"1 saw Charlie before the meeting b i
did not try to tell me how to vote. He
didn't mention Angela or Kirk's names.
1 did discuss the ambiguit) ol the rules
with another person who appeared on
the scene at the same tune. I did not con-
verse with Charlie Sherrod
Charlie and 1 exchanged greetings but
if this can be warranted a conversation. 1
stand corrected.
It il becomes necessary to provide a
witness to the truthfulness of mv
statements, I can do so. My roommate
was awake and attentive during this mid-
night phone conversation. She can
testif) that b) the omission of a period
and some not so insignificant words, the
paper added a touch of sensationalism
to its siorv.
In closing. I can say that 1 acted on
this case by examining the rules in Arti-
cle of the SCiA Handbook. This was
mv onl) consideration. 1 must question
the impartiality o Miss Briggs and Miss
Williams considering that they cannot
channel their negative feelings toward
certain parties into the appropriate ac-
tions. If the internal discussion of the
Appeal Board is going to be made public
then why does it take place in private
behind securely closed doors'
CATHY I. DODD
'Reconciliation Resolution' Causes Lengthy Debate In Senate
WASHINGTON � On the day that
President Reagan was shot, the Senate was
deeply involved in its consideration of
what is called the "budget resolution" for
the fiscal year beginning October 1. Ac-
tually, its proper name is "reconciliation
resolution" � but, by whatever name it is
a fairly complicated procedure in terms of
rules for debate, time limitations, etc.
I suppose all of us remember precisely
where we were and what we were doing at
the time of momentous events that have
occurred during our lifetimes.
If you are old enough to remember Pearl
Harbor, chances are you vividly recall your
reaction when you learned that the
Japanese had attacked. The same is true,
I'm sure, concerning the assassination of
President Kennedy in 1963, and other
events.
REAGAN � 1 had just walked off the
Senate Floor into a cloakroom when the
message came that there had been a
shooting involving President Reagan at the
Washington Hilton Hotel. A Senate
employee hastily turned on a television set;
Jesse
Helms
one of the television reporters was on the
screen saying that the President had
escaped with no more than a "bump on the
head" after having been pushed into the
presidential limousine by a security officer.
From that point, the whole confusing
episode began to unroll. Perhaps an hour
elapsed before it became certain that the
President had not escaped the gunman's
fire, and that Jim Brady, the President's
press secretary, was near death. (In fact,
one network reporter stated that Jim
Brady had died.)
FACES � I shall never forget the ashen
faces of Senators as they crowded into the
cloakroom to listen to the latest news
reports. There was great fear, which I
shared, that the President's condition may
have been worse than reported. The news
reports were so confused that it was dif-
ficult to place great confidence in the bab-
ble of news reports being filed by the
various news people.
The Senate stopped its work on the
budget resolution and went into recess for
most of the remainder of the day. Not until
the following day. when it was apparent
that the President was out of danger, did
we resume work on the budget.
GUN CONTROL � Immediately there
came a deluge of telegrams and telephone
calls to our office, some demanding that
Congress not be stampeded into ill-
considered action.
Interestingly enough, the attempt to
assassinate President Reagan occurred in a
city with perhaps the toughest gun control
law in the country. The debate between
those who favor gun control and those
who oppose it became increasingly shrill �
as it always does. By the end of the week,
however, it began to taper off. It is not at
all likely that a federal gun control law will
be enacted by Congress. It is not likely that
even President Reagan will change his
stand in opposition to gun control.
FORD � Former President Jerry Ford
was among those who contended that the
solution to the rising violence in America
lies with the courts, and with laws that per-
mit violent people to commit crimes, often
with very little risk of stern punishment.
Jerry Ford perhaps shocked some when
he voiced the opinion that it should be a
capital crime to attempt to assasinate a
President or other prominent figures. One
report, in fact, indicated that the former
President included all violent crimes in-
volving the use of guns.
1 do not have at hand precisely what Mr.
Ford said, but many believe he is on the
right track. If it is ever made clear that
quick and stern punishment is in store for
anybody engaging in criminal violence, I
am confident that there would be a
decrease in such crime.
Too many excuses have been used to
avoid throwing the book at criminals. As a
result, the streets of W ashington and other
cities are no longer safe. What is needed, in
my judgment, is criminal control � not
gun control.
Forum Rules
The Last Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop (hem by our office in the Old South
Building, across Jrom Joyner Library.
For purposes oj verification, all tetters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj tie author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
davs.
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I HI t AM l A KOI INIAN
Features
AI'KIl lh. ls�Kl
Page
Patti Smith's Guitarist Steps Out
By LORENA ALEXANDER
l�8l National Nt� Hurrau
While rock poet Patti Smith con-
tinues to enjoj her current hiatus
from the rigors of the music
business, her sidemen (collectively,
the Patti Smith Group) are all keep-
ing bus developing projects of their
own. In particular. Patti's No. 1
Glimmer Twin, 1 ennv Kaye, has
begun an ambitious venture that has
paid off in the form o hot music
and hot gigs.
I he I enny Kay Connection plays
rock V roll, and they're catching
on. No great surprise, considering
Kaye's renown both as lead guitarist
with the Patti Smith Group, and as
longtime collaborator with the punk
poetess.
Bv December. 1979, Smith
followers had grown restless over
her inactivity. I hen. with the start
o a new decade, word spread that
the Patti Smith Group was taking
off the entire year, and that an-
nouncement has met with continued
speculation. In our recent conversa-
tion, Kay set the record straight, ex-
plaining, "Patti decided to take this
year off and get her personal life
together and find some new direc-
tions because she felt in a large part
that she'd done what she'd set out to
do when we first began, and she
doesn't like to repeat herself and
didn't want to scale down her ideals.
She wanted to keep a forward-
looking posture.
"In 1971 when we did our first
reading (initially Kaye was the music
part o Smith's early poetry recita-
tions), we had no conception of
what we wanted to do or where we
wanted to go. We just got it started
and built it up, and when it ended in
1979, it was like our '70s movie he
said. "Now 1 think she wants to br-
ing it back to that beginning and
start it all over again, build it up
again and see exactly where it takes
us, say over the course of the next
ten years. She's not really in any
hurrv. Rock 'n' roll is the kind of
field where people feel if you're not
touring or you don't have a record
coming out in a month, nobody
remembers you. Patti's an artist.
She feels she has her whole life to
make art and it doesn't have to hap-
pen according to some artificial
timetable. I'm a little more oriented
towards rock 'n' roll and its whole
biological time clock, so I get a little
restless myself
With the now-married Smith in
no apparent rush to return to the
stage, Kaye filled his time with a
new band o' his own. "I love what
Patti does he commented. "I'll
always play with her and the group
is still together abstractly while Patti
undertakes her new directions. But
until she decides what her next move
is, I'm kind of enjoying discovering
things about myself that 1 didn't
know before. (This band) forces me
No bin Lane At The Attic
Warner Brothers recording artists Robin I unc and the (harthiisfers
will perform at dreenviUe's Attic this Naturdas night tor one shov on-
ly . The band plas a combination of new wave and traditional rock
numbers and has recorded three albums to dale including their latest
I P entitled Imitation Life.
Symphony To Perform
1 he North i Sv mphony
will perform in East Carolina
I niversity's Minges Coliseum April
23 at 8 p.m. 1 he performance will
feature the lull orchestra, conducted
by James Ogle.
1 he event is co-sponsored by
WITN-TV, the Greenville Arts
c ouncil, and �( I
Advance tickets may be purchas-
ed at Belk-Tyler, the Book Barn, the
Pitt Plaa Record Bar and ECU's
Mendenhall Student Center in
Greenville, and from the Farmville
and Washington Arts Councils.
Advance tickets are $5.50 for
adults, S3.50 for students and senior
citizens, and S2 for children aged 15
and under. At-the-door tickets are
S6, S4 and $2.
I ickets may also be purchased by
mail from Cheryl Taft, 303
Kenilworth Road, Greenville, N.C.
27834. Checks should be made
payable to the N.C. Symphony.
Carolina Opry House
Presents The Coulters
B DOUG QUEEN
siaft W nr
I his Friday and Saturday night,
April 17th and 18th, at the Carolina
Opry House, the fabulous Coulters
will play in concert. The Coulters,
an fcpic Recording group, are
among the fastest rising artists in the
Carolina area. When Raleigh's
Music City opened last fall, the
Coulters were the first-night act.
Since that auspicious beginning,
they have become the veritable
"House Band And each time thev
play a crowd ot devoted followers
turn out en masse for the best in
original and contemporary music.
in the last couple of months the
Coulters have fronted some of the
hottest acts in modern music. These
include Joe Sun, Alabama, the
Amaing Rhythm Aces, and an up-
coming four city tour in the
Carolinas with Emmy Lou Harris.
I saw them in Raleigh fronting the
Amazing Rhythm Aces. Although
thev performed first, they un-
doubtedlv blanketed the Aces. It
must have been disconcerting for
the Aces when the crowd chanted
"Colters, Coulters. Coulters
after the Aces' concluding set.
Well, who are the Coulters? The
Coulters are John Colclough, who
plays banjo, guitar, and fiddle, San-
dy Colclough on keyboards and
guitar, and Sandy's sister Nancy
Lowe on various percussion in-
into areas which I ordinarily would
let Patti deal with. For instance,
writing lyrics, something 1 never
would do for this music I write for
her, but on my own I find that it
helps my own sense of words. So it
just makes me 'work a little harder
and learn about what my own
possibilities are
Along with bassman Patrick
O'Connor and David Donen on
drums. Kaye serves as lead
guitaristvocalist with his quartet.
Up until a few weeks ago, Richard
Sohl from Smith's band was a
fourth member, but as Kaye ex-
plained, "Richard doesn't want to
play live anymore. He'll help me out
in the studio, but I'll have a new
keyboard player for when we play
gigs. I'm not exactly sure what his
name is yet. It'll be interesting
Describing just what kind of
music the band makes, Kaye ex-
plained, "We mostly play a lot of
my original things, plus a few
selected golden nuggets of rock 'n'
roll historical lore. We're going to
be releasing a single on our own Mer
label called Child Bride, backed
with live version of Tracks oj My
Tears from CBGB's. It'll be my first
recorded product under this new
identity (Anyone who wants to
obtain the single can send $2 plus 50
cents postage to: Radio Fthiopia,
P.O. Box 407, Murray Hill Station,
N.Y NY. 10016.)
The band has appeared live at
most of New York's prime rock
spots, but beyond that, said Kaye,
have done "nothing formal,
because I want the time to tinker
with the engine of this thing on a
gradual basis. 1 think over the past
month or two, I've been starting to
forge my own identity with a lot of
Patti-fans who come to see what I'm
doin' on my own. 1 get the feeling
that they're starting to accept me as
a frontman. I myself am opening up
and getting more relaxed on stage,
seeing what 1 am like up there in a
position of leadership
Kaye expressed much enthusiasm
over being rediscovered by fans who
have followed his career in the Pat-
tie Smith Group. I'm anxious to
show them what exactly this new
stuff is like. I have a long reputation
in rock 'n' roll and when I came out
on my own I tried to make this thing
grow with a sense of quality and in-
tegrity. I'm pretty happy with the
way things are evolving
And how does Patti Smith feel
about Kaye's independent evolu-
tion? "She likes this he revealed.
"She approves of it. She likes the
fact that the Mer label has been
reactivated to put out my first
record. She likes the fact that I'm
busy, because that's one of the
reasons why we took off this time,
not just so she could find a new
direction, but so we could all find
See GUITARIST, page 6. col. 7
struments. The interesting feature
ot this talented trio is the incredible
harmony. Sandy and Nancy, being
sisters, have genetically blended
voices which adds a dimension like
stereo did to mono. To this fine
mixture comes John's clear basso
profundo rounding out this tight
harmony from the lower registers.
You may think from this article
that singing makes the Coulters.
Not so. A fine vocal performance is
equally complemented with their in-
strumental expertise plus the ex-
cellent backup from their band.
I he Coulters, hailing from the
Triangle area, blend a nice selection
of music from original material and
standard classics. On the night that I
saw them at Music City, they played
Eddie Rabbin's Driving My Life
Away; Say You'll Be Mine and Ride
like the Wind, both by Christopher
Cross; On The Road Again by Willy
Nelson, and Blue Bayou by Linda
Ronstadt, which blew me away. I'm
a strong Ronstadt fan and love Blue
Bayou greatly, but Sandy sang it so
purely that she made it hers,
Ronstadt notwithstanding.
The Coulters, produced by Larry
Gatlin, have released two singles,
Tor Me You're All There Is and
Crazy Old World which reached the
Top Ten in Austin, Texas. They also
have recorded an album for Epic
although it is not yet available in
this area.
A Sure Sign Of Spring
Bugs Are All Over The Place
Bv DAVID NORRIS
I futures ditnr
It became obvious that spring had
arrived the other night. I hat
wonderful revelation vas not the
result ot the warm temperatures,
fragrant breezes or blooming trees,
but the fact that a bug had drowned
in my drink.
Bugs are a major feature of life
during the spring and summer mon-
ths. 1 suppose thev are around to
keep the warm, sunn) times of the
year from being too perfect.
I here is just no figuring out bugs.
The little varmints constantly zero
in on my glasses o ice tea and then
make their death plunge. On the
other hand, it there is one you really
want to swat, thev tlv around like
crazy to get away .
Many bugs don't do anything ex-
cept flutter around. Moths are the
best example o this. Every night,
they congregate around the lamp
and television, fluttering and soak-
ing up light. When this gets
tiresome, thev just sit on a wall foi a
couple of hours. A nice thing about
moths is that thev are easy to swat
when thev sil still.
Sometimes, large, wierd and
unidentifiable bugs hover around in
the house. I he like to look at and
startle people, I guess.
Dragon flies are pretty neat bugs.
Their double wings make them
resemble World War I airplanes. I
could watch them for hours.
Of all the flying bugs. I think the
wasps are the most sinister and
dangerous. Alter getting stung
once. I've developed a terrible
paranoia about these entirely un-
necessarv homicidal maniacs o the
n
Vw
-t�G( VJieRQ 606S frOVCfc AdOVO The H0US6
insect world. From a distance, they
sort of resemble starships from
some evil space empire. Close up.
they resemble wasps, which is even
more terrifying.
What 1 really hate is having wasps
trapped inside. (An.) bug stupid
enough to gel stuck inside a house
shouldn't be allowed to have
stingers.) They keep buzing
furiously against the windows and
screens so that you can't take aim
and smash them with a newspaper.
Of course, there are many bugs
that can only crawl around, missing
out on the glory o' flight. (They can
walk on the ceilings, though, which
must be kind of fun.)
Caravans of ants begin ransack-
ing our food supplies around this
time of year. Thev make a colorful
sight, patiently plodding along to
their anthills with grains of sugar in
their mouths.
Ants are amaing for their ability
to live almost anywhere, such as
dorm closets, the ground, bags of
sugar, boxes of saltines and pancake
mix and nearly anywhere else that
they are not wanted.
Cockroaches are a year-round
resident o' many rooms around
here. 1 hey are chiefly known for
their ability to pick up and run of!
with food items that are too heaw
tor ants to carry.
Although not biologically
classified as insects, spiders do sort
of fall into the general category of
"bags They appear in huge
numbers during the warm months
of the year, spinning sticky, yucky
webs just about everywhere people
have to walk. Tew things are as
unpleasant as a faceful of spider
web.
Spiders also are good at lurking in
quiet corners of a room, until they
are discovered by a shrieking per-
son.
Anyway, while you are enjoying
your summer and worrying about its
inevitable end, you can at least con-
sole yourself with the thought that
winter will at least wipe out most of
the bug population, giving us a little
rest from them.
Lecture On Haiti
Planned Next Week
The Department of Foreign
languages and Literatures is spon-
soring a lecture entitled
"Educational Reform in a Bilingual
Situation: The Case o Haiti ' by
Dr. Albert Valdman of Indiana
University.
The lecture will be held Wednes-
day, April 22 at 3:30 p.m. in the
Nursing Building Auditorium,
Room 101.
Haiti, the poorest nation in the
Western hemisphere, is embarking
on a reform of its primary education
system featuring the use of the ver-
nacular, Creole, as primary
classroom language instead of the
official language, French. The lec-
ture will review the complex rela-
tionship of French and Creole in
Haiti and present the arguments pro
and con on the educational reform,
touching on some of the underlying
socio-political issues.
Albert Valdman is professor of
French and Italian and of
Linguistics at Indiana University. A
graduate of the University of Penn-
svlvania (A.B. 1953) and of Cornell
(M.S Ph.D. 1960), he has written
extensively on problems of second
language acquisition, French
linguistics, and Creole languages. He
is currently conducting a socio-
linguistic survey in Haiti aimed at
describing the linguistic environ-
ment of rural Haitian children.
Today's Trivia Quiz
Tests Knowledge
Of Famous Sidekicks
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
Dunn Chosen For '8182Squad
Susan Dunn has been chosen as one of the eight new ECU
cheerleaders who will serve during the '8182 schoolyear. She has had
two years of formal training in dance and attended the C Summer
( heerleading (amp in 1978 at UNC Charlotte.
B DAY ID NORRIS
and
WILLIAM YELVERTON
Sidekicks. You know, the other
guy. The one who always had to do
the dirty work but never received
much credit. Batman had Robin,
Sherlock Holmes had the faithful
Dr. Watson. These are the only
freebies you'll get because from now
on you'll be on your own. Twenty-
five names will be listed below and
your job will be to name the
sidekick. If you name all 20, you'll
be deserving of your own sidekick.
1. Matt Dillon's old partner
(before Festus)
2. Don Quixote
3. Cisco Kid
4. Napolean Solo
5. Jim West
6. Green Hornet
7. Ralph Kramden
8. Sgt. Joe Fridav
9. Shari Lewis
10. Yogi Bear
11. Peabody
12. Rocket J. Squirrel
13. Avery Shriver
14. Dan Rowan
15. Rosencrantz
16. Capt. Binghamton
17. Edgar Bergen
18. Col. Wilhelm Klink
20. Lucy Ricardo
21. Quick Draw McCiraw
22. Oliver Hardy
23. Barney Google
24. Laverne DeFazio
25. Bud Abbott
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IHtfcAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 16, 1981
LfMOMGfiour Cocct6TMt NK0 (AJty
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( ontinued from page 5
new ways ot expressing ourselves.
Then in the final analysis when we
come together as a group we're only
more solid. We've never been the
type of band that says 'well, it's all
for one and one for all and nobody
can do anything else because that's
the easiest way to create a sense of
frustration
Yet, once Smith is ready to
reunite her group, what will become
of the Kaye Connection? "1 don't
want to put any carts before the
horse he answered. "1 think that
both bands will co-exist. If the
don't, my first loyalty of course is to
Patti. She knows that and I know
that. But I suspect, given Patti's
current profile, that it will be possi-
ble to have both of them. Maybe my
band could open up for Patti and
solve the problem we've always had
with opening acts
That would be a lot of work for
Kaye, but a treat for Kaye's fans
While the followers of the Patu
Smith group anxiously await a reu-
nion, there is the Lenny Kaye Con-
nection for them to explore and ex-
perience.
Happenings
Campus Events:
Thursday 16
� 1:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: VM1 (2) Harr-
ington Field
� 7:00 p.m. Gamma Beta Phi Student Center
Aud. 244
Friday 17
� Good Friday
� 5:00 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Horseshoes,
(Singles & Doubles)
� 7:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: Baptist College,
Harrington Field
� April 17-18 Women's Softball: Appalachian
State Invitational, Boone, N.C.
� April 17-20 Student Union Sponsored Myrtle
Beach Trip
Saturday 18
� 7:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: Baptist College,
Harrington Field
Sunday 19
� EASTER
� April 19-20 Library Closed
� April 19-26 Passover
Monday 20
� State Holiday
� 1:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: Campbell, Harr-
ington Field
Tuesday
� 8:00 a.m. Classes Resume
� April 21-23 Intramural Horseshoes (Singles &
Doubles) College Hill Courts
� 2-10:00 p.m. Faculty Senate Meeting, Student
Center 221
� 4:30 p.m. Intramural Council Meeting.
Memorial Gym 104
� 5:00 p.m. Young Home Designers League,
Van Landingham Room
� 7:00 p.m. Student Nurses Association, Nurs-
ing 101
� April 21-23 Intramural Horseshoes (Singles &
Doubles) College Hill Courts
Wednesday 22
� 2-10:00 p.m. Faculty Senate Organizational
Meeting, Student Ctr. 221
� 3:00 p.m. Women's Softball: N.C. Wesleyan
College, Home
� 6:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: Atlantic Christian,
Harrington Field
� 9:00 p.m. Small Ensemble Concert, A.J. Flet-
cher Rec. Hall
� 9:00 p.m. Peppermint Soda, Hendrix Theatre
� 7:00 p.m. Grand Illusion, Hendrix Theatre
School of Art
April 19-April 29
� Annual Undergraduate Show � The very best
undergraduate student work of the year from the
School of Art.
� April 16, 8:15 p.m. Young Artists Honors
Recital, Fletcher
School of Music
� April 20 Percussion Ensemble Concert, 9:(K)
p.m.
� April 21 Young Artist Winner's Recital, Ken-
neth Hubbard, saxophone
� April 22 Small Ensemble Concert, 9:(X) p.m.
Movies
Buccaneer
� "Scanners" (R) Shows at 1:10, 3:10. 5:10,
7:10, & 9:10 p.m.
� "Hardlv Workin" (PC.) Shows at 1, 3. 5, 7, &
9:00 p.m.
� "Ordinary People" (R) Shows at 2:00, 4:30,
7.00, & 9:20 p.m.
� Starting Friday: "Inside Moves"
Plaza
� "Going Ape" (PC.) Shows at 3:30. 5:20, 7:10,
& 9:00 p.m.
� "Nighthawks" (R) Shows at 3:20, 5:15. 7:10,
Upsilon Zeta Week Planned
& 9:05 p.m.
� "The Postman Always Rings Twice" (R)
Shows at 2:30 , 4:45, 7:00, & 9:15 p.m.
Nightlife
Attic
Thursday BR1CE STREET wRecord Bar
Break Out
Friday LARRY RASPBERRY & THE
H1GHSTEPPERS
Saturday ROBIN LANE & THE CHART-
BUSTERS
Sundav CTRKUS wEaster Special
Tuesday BONNIE BRAMLETT & JOE
ENGLISH w3 PM BAND
Wednesday GOOD HUMOR (Mug Night)
Carolina ()pr House
Thursday GOLD DUST
Fridav COULTERS
Saturday COULTERS
Tuesday JIMMY GYLES & FIDDLE
MAGIC
Wednesday JIMMY GYLES & FIDDLE
MAGIC
Chapter X
Thursday Pi Kappa Phi "Lucky Ladies Nite"
-10 p.m.
Friday Alpha Delta Pi "End of Week Party"
-7:30 p.m.
Saturday Best in Beach Music
Sunday Kappa Alpha "Nickel Nite"
Tuesday Pi Kappa Phi "Lucky Ladies Nite"
adics Lockout 8-10 p.m.
Wednesday Sigma Nu "50.50 Beach Nite"
I I bo Room
1 hursday 1 he Original College Nite yy Lamb-
da Chi Fund Raiser 7:00-9:30 p.m.
Friday End o Week Party
Saturday Dance Music At Its Best
Sunday Ladies Nite
Tuesday Crazy Tuesday
Wednesday Hump Nite!
f you have anything you would like put in
Happenings, please send it to Nancy Morns. The
Fast Carolinian, Fast Carolina University,
Greenville, N.C. 27834.
The Upsilon Zeta Week from Tuesday,
chapter of the Omega April 21 til Saturday,
Psi Phi fraternity is April 25.
presenting its first an- On Tuesday, there
nual Upsilon Zeta will be a basketball
Senior Show Held
Two-dimensional art
works by Allen Jones
McDavid of Sanford
are on display April
12-19 in the gallery of
the Baptist Student
Center on Tenth St.
The exhibition will
include woodcut and
intaglio prints,
photographs, illustra-
tions and mixed media
items.
McDavid is a can-
didate for the BA
degree in communica-
tion arts at ECU and
the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Philip H.
McDavid of Route 1,
Sanford.
game in Memorial Gym
to benefit the Heart
Fund.
A slave auction will
be held on the Mall
Wednesday. There will
also be a D.J. and
music.
Thursday, a
brotherhood cerepiony
will be held on the cam-
pus of N.C. Central
University.
A step show and
special ceremonies will
be held Friday at
Mendenhall Student
Center.
On Saturday, the
fraternity will hold a
car wash. There yvill
later be a party at the
L e d o n i a Wright
Cultural Center to top
off the week's eyents.
"W
BENNIES
crrco
WRECKER
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Prwllnd
AHanmwit
All Typ�s of
Auto Rapatr
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COPIES
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ic 1T0 99
cn�f Caw ��
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Audio,Video,
& 2 Wiv
Communications
Maintenance
(Preventive to
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Str�kei directed b a 1st
Umn Kl licensed lechni-
cian. A Mudenl of Applied
Phsic at Fast Carolina
I niversil.
C'onvenielelv Located
S 2 Block Off Campus
Pick-Lp and Delivery
Available
90 Da Warranl
Period
THE
EXPERIENCE
OF A
LIFETIME.
Now that you"ve got it, put
it to work. Share it with
poor people in Peace
Corps nations who need
your experience in teach-
ing, electronics, farming,
family skills and many
other areas. Help make a
difference Call Peace
Corps
Recruiters On Campus Apnl 2) 22 (9 am 4 pm )
Sign Up Now For Your Interview At The Career
Planning ana Placement Source Office
ftell
want
Your ArtCarved representative will be on campus soon to show you the
latest in class ring designs. With dozens of styles to choose from, you'll be proud to select
your one-of-a-kind design. Just tell us what you want. And be on the
lookout for posters on campus to get you where you want.
April 22, 23, 24
ECU Student Store Lobby
.ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you Blnoe 1974 providing private, understanding health oare to women of all ages at a reasonable oost Saturday abortion hours Ft� prananoy taste Vary wurlv praf&anqy taste Bw suing birth control hour The Fleming Center we're here when you need us. Oafl781-MeOtoFj0elghanytW
lw:i:t:jri,MiOieIwiOHM�;l
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Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday PS tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
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Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos n Cheese - Small
Drink

ATTENTION
SENIORS
MARK YOUR CALENDARS!
3rd Annual
SENIOR SOCIAL

Sponsored by
THE ECU ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
Thursday, April 16, 1981
5-7 P.M.
A
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
MUSIC
BEER
SOFT DRINKS
SNACKS
I mU
Prepar
HsH VR
a e
star

Jan .
Feltl
Joi
B l H KI

I
I
I
I s
I
B01 I
High S I
N
gradu.t
Both als
lege ball
under Fj
Cremins
assistant
junior and
When C
coaching
palachian
t





lit
HI i M I K( �1 l
Sports
I' k 11
Top-Ranked Lady Bucs
Score Sweep Of Heels
i ad Pirate Cynthia Shepherd fakes suino
B WI1 1 I AM H. YE1 l RION
sMslnnt SpOtlS (HlOt
After her top tanked 1 ad)
Pirates captured the championship
of the prestigious N. . State Invita
tional last Saturday, coach. Ahta
Dillon hoped hei team would
"come down out ol the clouds" so
the) wouldn't be overconfideni in
playing arch-rival North Carolina
I uesdav afternoon.
1 he onl thing thai came out ot
the clouds, though, was the Space
Shuttle, because the Lad) Pirates
are still up there, especiall) after
sweeping the Heels 6-1 and 16
" I hese games were easiet than we
expected Dillon said. "Carolina
had a bad day, but oui defense had
a lot to do with thai We knew these
games wouldn't be pushovers
1 verybodv on the team got to play,
and we wound up scoring more runs
in the second game
1 he I ad) Bius pushed ovei -
i uns in the fit si two innin
ded two more in th hen
Kath) Rile) belted a two i un
homer I he Pii � itfieldei
had tw o hits i ii a a . in
lentionalh walked I the
at let no
Kilos's homei a extra
base lut the 1 ad) I the
tus! game -
the cau , at
the plate in th 6 .
la: I leeh' me m
the bottom ol ! he
tough Buc del
ly fou hile
the far Ht
to non . an
outstan - on.
1 !u Bu
in tl
the erupf 1 i
c ai olina ad
to up the k
"he I ai
the bot
! hen the game was called bet I
the Pirates' huge lead
Pitchei Jeanette koth. who also
bulled the first game, was the offen
sive star tor the Bucs in the second
ie b) going tw I � three
chet 1 eslie Bunn added a triple, and
Mai v Powell chipped in w it
ble tot the Pirates.
koth had an
-
six Hies in the two games.
I he two losses dropped I
ranked lar He - i 16
m said hei team tiled
death" ov
number one "It wast
iurpi i -
there ma be a in not
:ful. I'm gl
I he regu ;
will enable us
. L'ommui
in the state
I he Pii ate
looking foi wai d to Frida
Prepares For Fall
Nelson Gets O.K.
11 RI ' M) II R

I
1 las

1







� � more

1
-N -

i �1
ill OUIrehabilitation pro-
am on
;
"Ik is
'
Hlittle
Vmhs
' him

ween

.
Nel - coui se. be 11;
ting to
volved � port. I
that this . lcm
� � ' � a
t �; "motivated"
Mea
hores fo
t w o .
I
It a hough,
ednesda) N
mage, Hn he Buc
: thwai
the hopes ol the iI ofl
crew .
I speciall) impressive on defense
vtere cornerbacks I reddie Jones
Gerald Sykes fime aftet time the)
mac ic k les ol both i un
nei s and em tcks.
1 oda I hut sda i the 1
vs ere l vis,
coache �� foi : ht
25 Purpli � ime
will be divided u
: w , � gi� ip i � .nips w ill : I
drafi the remaining personnel.
arlton NtUon Is On fhe Move Again
finale against the fourth ranked
i ilfpa 1 ol N.C. State in (ireen
ville "They will be good games
she noted "We need to beat then.
to carr) our confidence over into the
playoffs
Dillon said that the top lour
teams in the league advance to the
to see who represents the
the regional. She said there
a possibilit) ol two teams from
North arolina going to the
regionals.
I he National rournament will be
held in Raleigh the weekend ol May
I5-I6. 1 he field will include the top
teams from each region and five
et at large team- "I he tourna-
ment, being in Raleigh, is very im-
rtant tor area fans Dillon said.
' iametime foi the double-header
with State is 3 p m. Seniors Kathy
kile. Lillion Barnes. Mar) Powell
1 ydia Rountree make their last
appear I i ! ad) Pii
uniforn
Big Easter
Lies Ahead
For Pirates
i baseball i
mebacl� aftet I
U N C - W i 1 n
-
i jays
I ht
it Ja
!it (Thursday) as a
Ml gel - und
w.tv at lb 6:00.
bill wiil follow
ting
Baptiit Collej ns at
pin n
Bapt sf tali Han
with a single
;e wet to - 'p.m.
1 C I ha- 1 aitei Sunda) oft
�re coming back to Harringl
anothei doubleheader on Mon
fternoon. Campbell is the foe
ginning at 1:00.
I he seven-game swing is the
a 15-game hon
Pirates have before wrapping up
r regular season on Slav 3 with a
p to North C arolina.
A Pirate Arrives, Another Departs
Felton Accepts Tech Post,
Joins Old Friend Cremins
Byn ri imii m IK
i




pas!

(B �� - B r e 11 theii olina lire. iamecot k
assis1 e 11 o n' s
an 'tsons.
Wlns gothe head
posi�p
Pilatnanin 1976, 1 elton
� tduate assis-
I ie sta)
ill time assistant's
N . & 1 Next came
ob.
a well-respected
primaril)
team's
. 'liege All-
ies Green this
I yet
"la ited to accept
aid. " I his op-
enls a step foi
.� m profes
11 careei (ieorgia 1 ech is
u4 institution
ition involv -
ademic arid athletic
- ns.
" I his oppoi tunit) ol fers an
illenge and associa
tion with the tlantit oast
inference
I elton added that he had
lied man fond memories
! i I
"I feel the tune I have spent
at 1 t I and especiall) m
association with (. oach Odom
had a tremendous affect
upon mv professional ad-
vancement. Coach Odom ex-
emplifies a strong conviction
to the program and undet his
s' . e. leadership and
tion 1 feel the I l
al program will con-
tinue to flourish and grow to
the optimum
(dom was obiously in
dispair over Felton's depar-
ture, but wished the formei
6-10 Reichenecker Signs,
Becomes 3rd ECU Recruit
New (ieorgia Tech Assistant Coach George Felton
Pit ate assistant the best ol
luck in Atlanta.
"Surelv Georgia lech has
taken the right step in naming
a qualit) pet son like George to
help build its voting pro-
gram (dom said.
Building a program is just
whatremins and 1 elton have
ahead of them, the Yellow
Jackets going 4-23 this past
season
"1 know this is one heck ol
a challenge Felton said. "It
will be a lot ol hard work but 1
don't mind working. 1 just
hope the people and players in
Atlanta will be as cooperative
as they have been here in
Greenville
Felton added that he fell
t ieorgia 1 ech had much to ol
fei a young athlete, naming
several "selling points" Mutt
he would use m all impoitant
reci uiting el foi is
" big selling point is the ci-
ty ol Atlanta 1 elton claim
ed "It is widely acknowledged
as one ol the most progressive
cities m the country.
'I also think Coach
t remins himsell �ill be a big
selling point. He will be the
youngest head coach in the
ACC and 1 think that will be
appealing
With 1 elton's depai mi e.
( kioin has two remaining aides
full-time assistant 1 ddie
Payne and graduate assistant
Dav id Pendei ei
1 asi L'arolin
- h )aedom annout
last night the sigi
seas
David fc. Rt ker, a
! 220-pound .
k e ille, I la , si
.tl letter with the I'
ght at his home.
17
Reichenecket averaged 13.2
points and 9.2 rebounds
Niceville High, School this past
season i
several honors tot his
He was named all-conference,
all county and honorable men
tion all siate.
I he Pirates b a
othei schools in then effoi ts to
sign the youngster. Others
Reichenecket was considering
were Stetson. Jacksom ille and
thwest 1 ouisiana
odom had high praise foi
his reciuit.
"ydid is the epitomy ol an
interscholastic student-athlete
whose best playing days are
ahead ol him said the third-
yeai Pirate coach.
"He has a wealth ol untap-
ped talent. I )av id is a very con
sciencious young man who
craves hard work. It's a good
situation in that David is eager
to learn and we are eagei to
teach
"I agei to learn" would
perfectly d e s c r i b e
Reichenecker, who savs thai is
his mam objective.
"I've been playing basket-
ball since about the fifth
grade he said, "but 1 really
haven't had anybody to teach
me a lot about the game except
; summer camps
I dom noted that his recruit
was blessed with "good
Stands" and added that with
Aork he could become a "real
factor
Reichenecker, who grew in
heighth from 6-1 to 6-8 bet-
ween his ninth and tenth grade
years, said he chose to come
north for a number ol reasons.
" hen I visited 1 left feel-
ing like it was really a nice
school he said. " 1 hey've
got a good business school M,d
1 think 1 might like to get into
business
Reichenecket had reported
lv also been considering atten-
ding Jacksonville but said that
political problems there � two
coaches have been tired for
unknown reasons ruled that
school out ol his considera-
tions.
i wo other recruits have
been signed b the Pirates this
season, a pair ol junioi college
Americans 6 9 -l Mack
ol New York and 6-7 Charles
Green ol ashington.
I he signmg ot Reichenecker
ironically came on the same
dav that ECU assistant coach
George Felton announced that
he was leaving the school to
become an aide under newly-
hited head coach Bobb
t remins of Georgia Tech.





I Ml I SI t A KOI I MAN AI'RIl 16. 1WI
Defender Club
Gains Berth
Due to Loss
Classifieds
North Carolina Soccer
League
The American
Defender Soccer Club
has gained a berth in
the state playoffs even
though they lost Sun-
day to Atlantic Chris-
tian, 1-0. This was
made possible because
their only challenger
for the final playoff
spot, the Wilson, Soccer
Club, also losi.
1 he match between
the two rivals was very
physical and some fine
defensive play b both
seams thwarted some
excellent scoring op-
portunities. 1 here was
no score until five
minutes left when Cobc
of Columbia passed to
Eli as Jacobo of
Paraguay six yards
from the net for the
goal that gave Atlantic
Christian the victory.
The top two teams in
each division of the
North Carolina Soccer
League made it to the
playoffs, and the
American Defenders
finished in second place
behind Atlantic Chris-
tian with a 5-3 record.
The Stroh's Aliens
also tost their final
game of the season to
the Kick Soccer Club of
Wilson b y a 3-2
margin. The Aliens
tallied once in each half
with Robbie Einger
scoring after his penal-
t kick was blocked b
the Kick goalie, but the
rebound came straight
back to him and he put
the ball in the opposite
corner.
Club Sport
Review
BY TIM WILLIAMS
In the second
half the Aliens tallied
again when J 0 h n
Carlson threw the ball
from the touch line into
the penalty area to Tim
Williams who fired in a
left-footed shot.
Women's Soccer
The Women's Soccer
Club played their best
game of the season
against UNC, their
toughest opponent yet,
and lost by a score of
1-0. ECU had a number
of fine scoring oppor-
tunities including a 40
yard shot by Kim
Milner which hit the
crossbar but failed to
go in. ECU's goalie
Margaret Hartley was
the star of the game as
she made ma n
numerous fine saves
and limited the high
scoring Tar Heels to
just one goal although
they took almost 40
shots. ECU closes out
their spring season with
a match against the
Fayetteville Soccer
Club at the ECU soccer
field at 2 p.m. on April
2s
Men's Rugby
The Men's Rugby
Club lost to the
Winston-Salem Rugby
Club b a 12-0 margin.
Their final match of the
season is against Dan
River Rugb Club of
Virginia on the Allied
Health field at 2 p.m.
on April 25.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Snare drum. Pearl,
lop of the line Extra deep Ex
cond Call 757 3210
FOR SALE Jensen Tri Axial 6 by
9 in. speakers New. still m box
180 Call 757 6136
FOR SALE Black 1980 440 LTD
Kawasaki, negotiable price, good
condition Call 752 9403 ask for
John G
FOR SALE 1971 Fiat 124, needs
transmission, less than 3.000 miles
on overhaul Call 752 4400 after
6 00 p m 5800 firm
FOR SALE Rotel 60 watts stereo
receiver with 4 channel
capability SI 2s Soundesign
8 track player recorder 550 BIC
beltdrive turntable $75. Marantz
75 watt 3 way speakers 2 years
old, slight cabinet damage, ex
cellent sound S200 tor set. Call
Dave at 756 6455 or come by M 2
Oakmont Square Apts after 5pm
FOR SALE Scuba gear Tank,
regulator with psi, weights, 2
spearguns, depth guage with com
pass, BC 5250 Call 758 6946
FOR SALE Siamese kittens,
seven weeks old. chocolate point
Call 752 7218 after 5pm
FOR SALE Yashica Mat 124 G
twin lens reflex camera Great
for art student Asking 590 Only
used twice Call Lmdi 758 6445
FOR SALE Stereo, Optomca
tuner. Optonica integrated amp.
Also, BIC 960 turntable and BIC
type 4 speakers 5350 or best offer
Call 758 4259 and ask for Kelvin
FOR RENT
ROOMATES WANTED 2 male or
female roommates wanted to
share spacious 3 bedroom house
during summer and! or 1 fall
Convenient location to Carolina
East Mall and Pitt Community
College 580 month during sum
mer, one third utilities and 560
month, one fourth utilities during
the fall. Call 756 9011 after 5 pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 2 bedroom apt. in
Wilson Acres. 4 blocks from cam
pus 8145 mo. plus one half
utilities Call 752 9194 after 4:30.
APT FOR LEASE 600
Georgetown Runs from mid May
to Mid August Call 758 0323.
ROOMMATES WANTED Nice
house on 4th St. near campus and
downtown From mid May to mid
August Call 752 2659
BEDROOM AVAILABLE Large
air conditioned bedroom
Available May 8th Across from
college 758 2585
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 2 bedroom apt in
Eastbrook 572 a month plus one
third utilities Call 758 2344
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Only 577 per month
plus one third utilities. Private
room, air condition Within walk
ing distance of campus For sum
mer only Call 752 9151 or 752 6105.
ask for Becky, Beth, or Susan
ROOMMATE NEEDED Furnish
ed apt One half rent and utilities
Summer Call 757 1581
PERSONS NEEDED 7 or 3 peo
pie lo sub lease apt. for summer
Located on E. 3rd Street 2
bedrooms, part furnished Watei
included in rent For more infor
mation call 758 7755
FOR RENT Furnished 2 bedroom
apt available for summer mon
ths On ECU bus route Call
758 4438
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: N Summitt St 582 50
plus one third utilities Washer
and dryer Available May 1st.
Call 758 $692
APT FOR SUBLEASE During
summer from May lo September
River Bluff Apts Call 758 6728
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
for 2 bedroom duplex on 1809 E
6th , 3 blocks from campus. Call
758 6599.
WANT TO SUB LEASE 3 respon
sible UNC CM students wish to
sublet spacious nice apt or house
while working at Pitt Co Hospital
this summer Preferred furnish
ed Call 967 2059 or 942 7785
LARGE BEDROOM: For rent, air
conditioned Utilities included
Acres from campus Call
758 2585
FOR RENT 2 bedroom beginning
May 7th 2 mi. from campus. Very
low utilities $735 month Call
752 9527
SUBLEASE FURNISHED APT
For summer. 2 bedrooms Air,
near campus and ECU bus Call
752 4989
ROOM FOR RENT $75 month
plus one sixth utilities Suave kit
Chen and bath Call 758 3545.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED
2 bedroom furnished apt 3 blocks
from campus $100 month Call
752 7190
APT FOR SUBLEASE 2
bedroom Call 758 4640
ROOMMATE WANTED To share
j bedroom house on Chestnut St
$7S plus one third utilities Musi
have bedroom furniture Call
758 4259
ROOMMATE WANTED I or 2
roommates to start fall '81 Non
smoker $99 month, one third
utilities 757 1738
FREE HALF MONTH RENT In
new townhouse apt on River Bluff
Rd 1 bedrooms, one and half
baths, appliances, washer dryer
hookups, cable TV hookups,
secluded area Regular monthly
rent is $280 Call for details, offer
limited J.L Harris and Sons,
Inc , Realtors, 204 W 10th. St
758 4711
ROOMS FOR RENT May to Aug
$75 month Call 758 4140
NEED TO MOVE IN WITH
established female roommate
beginning August IS. Will share
halt expenses. CaH 637 5521
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED For summer 3
bedroom duplex, 5 blocks from
campus $58 00 per month plus one
half utilities 758 0267
FOR RENT 2 bedroom
townhouse apts One and halt
baths, appliances, cable TV
hookups, washer dryer hookups,
very near ECU $300 per month,
lease and security deposit re
quired J L Harris and Sons, Inc
Realtors. 204 W 10th 758 4711
SUBLEASE I bedroom untur
rushed Village Green Apt on 10th
St Leaving school with 7 months
left on lease Asking $145 for
deposit Rent is $190 month Call
nights 758 6784
PERSONAL
BANDS UNLIMITED BOOKING
AGENCY Is now booking bands
for the spring, summer, and fall
We cater to every different
musical need and price range We
provide bands that range from
Beach, Top 40, to easy listening
and country The quality of a band
can insure the success of your $�
ty Let the Pros at BANDS
UNLIMITED get the right band
for your next party Call 757 3210
ROADIES Where bands make it
rock ROADIES makes it roll!
200 W Walnut S' . Downtown
Gcldsboro. phone 734 4551
GUITAR PLAYER WANTED
Money making Top 40. Beach
band Vocal ability a must Call
757 3210
YOUR CAREER What are you
doing this summer to prepare for
it? Find out why IBM, Xerox, Pro
ctor and Gamble, Upiohn and hun
dreds of others want students that
have worked with us
NEED PROFESSINAL TYPIST'
Will do term papers, thesis,
manuscript, etc Call Susan Byers
758 8241 or 758 5488
NEED ENTERTAINMENT? Con
tact Eastern Music Services And
Production Agency Large vane
ty of bands available all styles
Call 758 5676
EL BO ROOM The best time in
town! The great Wednesday Night
HUMP NITE SPECIALS
Thursdays are always SUPER!
Friday afternoons are still ROCK
ING and ROLLING Sunday is
still LADIES NITE!
ALL YOU CAN EAT at the
RATHSKELLER Thursday night
a! 9 43
LOST A silver colored, diamond
shaped, small ring It found
PLEASE call 7573155. Has sen
timental value
YOUR CAREER What are you
doing this summer to prepare for
it? Find out why IBM, Xerox, Pro
ctor and Gamble, Upiohn and hun
dreds of others want students that
have worked with us For inter
view call 758 4513
HAS REAGAN S BUDGET CUT
CAUGHT YOU SHORT? Then
get a high paying summer Ob with
a good 0b recommendation For
interview call 758 4513
BEWARE' The Java Beast will
stalk Myrtle Beach this weekend!
It only big Sue knew You and Bud
nek have a good time without us
307
ATTENTION SPORT F ERS
Little Benny says you re not a man
til ou split a dark oak Cobbicay
is learning to be a matf-ess Bevry
finally found a girl that could
stand him for 24 hrs YEA' Big Al
��hat was the promise you made
last weekendft D D is back on the
loose! GEEP good tongue lashing
you gave the hosebag Sat nite
Doogie are you impersonating
CASANOVA&
NOTICE To all ECBs tor good
fun and fellowship call the
JCB s at 759151
WE SPEAK TURABIAN, Little
Brown APA, PRC. etc Proles
sional typing, editing pro
dreading WRITE RIGHT
756 9946.
M BEAR You make everyday a
golden day! I love you with all my
heart L
ARE YOU MOVING soon and
need help with a truck and labors.
We specialize m college moves lor
students on a budget! Call 758 3684
tor more information
CAR WASH IS AT EXXON AT
CORNER OF GREENVILLE
BLVD & ARLINGTON BLVD
FROM 12 5
SEEKING EMPLOYMENTS Our
computer can match your skills
and interests with local 0bs
Thomas and Thomas Vocational
Assessment 753 4995
TO THE PERSON who took the
empty keg and tap from the party
Saturday night on Elm Street, you
have a choice A) Return it and no
questions will be asked Bi Call
758 3684 and I wilt pick it up C) Do
nothing and I will turn your name
over to the police and press
charges' Try me and see' Bubba
Classified Ad Form
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED FROM 2 00 3 00 M F
ONLY AT THE EAST CAROLI
NIAN OFFICE OR BY MAIL
ADS MUST BE IN BY 2 00 THE
DAY BEFORE PUBLICATION
TO GET IN THE NEXT ISSUE
LADY PIRATE
BASKETBALL
First Annual
Awards Banquet
Help Say Goodbye
To The 17th Ranked
1980-81 Squad
7 p.m. Tuesday April 28
At Western Sizzlin'
For Reservations, Call 757-6384
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i.
WASH HOUSE
(Across from Krispy Krei )
and
KORE-O-MAT
(Across horn University Car Wash)
Use one Washer � Get One
FREE
Limit one Free Wash per visit
Offer expires April 22, 1981 - Valid w Coupon Only
I
f
f
f
f
BEST PRICES AND
SELECTION IN AREA
ON ALLIGATOR LACOSTE
SHIRTS FOR MEN, WOMEN
& CHILDREN
see GORDON FULP
LOCATED AT
GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
OPEN: 8:00 A.M. UNTIL DARK
756-0504
i
i
4
PURDYS
The Premier
Nite Spot
On The Beach
This Summer
Join Us For Our
GRAND OPENING
EASTER WEEKEND
April 17th,18th,19th
� General Nutrition Centers
America's Best Nutrition Values are at GNC�Over 800 Stores from Coast to Coast
CSTO� COUKW i �TOC COUPON STOftC COU�OW E ApsfS I 1 I
� �� : rw�t� : BROWN :400 'u
BRAN j Morons i MCE j VITAMIN
99! 29
EXPIRES S-S41 ! EXPIRtS S-S-il
EXPIRES 5 1 II
$-99
100
GNC OUAUTY AT LfSS THAN CHEAPEST CUT RATE MAIL ORDER PRICES1
mi ALFALFA, jfigniin , TSfflfc L!fnll ZINC
89rl�49 Is.2? I 69 i sv? l�39
EXPIRES ii4l 1 EXPIRES 5 & tl EXPIRES S j-�1
LOSE FAT
Um
STYLEX
Contains btnncHm
�Mch Mi appwwd
byOl Got t
panaf Of �prtt
tor appatMt control
Vi SAC
SENSATIONAL
IRON
TASXf T aiOi
irriROuiaiuCONii 1QD-I'I
PENNY SALE
UNDER
A&D
� KZ2
nmiu io� i u '00 C V
2fTtfi-miEiiiu.Y. 2470
430
2'5E(HH.
2
.
T�siitiM natts
&uhl.Qa.� 2290 RELAX �'�' 2796
�u.�r-u �ui-ic�tNt MM i0Ot.il j ��jiml ��om'l��.o� 0U�
Stress?
� Conbl Slrvts
� Maintain En�rgy
B-COMPLEX
B 50 Balanced
Formula
SR49
CLIP THESE COUPONS FOR OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES
?'�� t
. LECITHIN.
VSMEE.AR 1-6
DIET PLAN
�,� CQc
90c
, STORE COUPON
iCRACKERS
EXPIRES 5 5-8'
STORE COUPON
WHOi-E WHEAT
FLOUR
VBBF .
EXPIRES 5 HI
SI ORE COUPON
BULGUR
WHEAT
ttwiHES 5 5 Si
STORE COUPON
STORE COUPON
YELI.OVY
� ����������������������������������������
STORE COUPON � STORE COUPON
LOWFAT
PURDYS At The Beach. Corner
Of Fort AAacon Road and
Beaufort Blvd. Atlantic Beach
N.C Call 919-726-0296 For
Details.
YOGURT
15
r: FRUIT
u: JUICES
15
EXPIRES 5-511
f
EXPIRES 55-11
��������������������������!
� �����������������MttWI
J COUPON S STORE COUPON i STORE COUPON STORE COUPON
0LLED S HoJClfWant 1
&SL Soy Deans
3? 89 j 39
EXPIRES - 5-11 I EXPIRES 5 5 61
� ����������������������'
STORE COUPON
POTATO YOGUR
OB CORN
CHIPS
SAVE 19c
15
EXPIRES S 5 S1
9"vr 1
SKI 1 u I �
IPIRES 5 5-11 11 E
XPIRES 5 5-31
60�
STORE COUPON
WHOLE WHEAT
STKtSS THIS " SEMTtOL?
800? I o" " ou.a
SJ79J 59c
vel-o-cel' unTcen
MINT JULEP 4 VARIETIES f kftO A
0�nt j HONEY I SP?
"S109 J SAVE
. 5205
I EXPIRES 5-51
�IHHMHHH
. STORE COUPON
j BANANA
GRAHAMS I CHIPS
fin
PIRES 5 541 S
HMHHUI
General
id
!�
B EXPIRES 5 5 �1
!����������������������
� �� .�.� an. �����������
J STORE COUPON � STORE COUPON
WHOLE WHEAT
- WH
OLE WHEAT
: Macaroni & fQ BARS
�Cheese Dinner I
295 r 39 �99
5 �oc
1. J
EXPIRES 5-5-41
EXPIRES 5511
High Blood Pressure.
M! DliCI S Al I IN ! AKf
s�vi
m
EXPIRE
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nightly 5:00-9:OOpm
Tue. Fish Fry- All l"he Fish You Can bat With A Mug
Ot Your Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shnmp With French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Our Famous Fiushpuppie�$3.99
Thur. Family Might A Seafood Sampler With Caiabaih
Shrimp, Fried Fish, Ov�ter� and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tue,Wed,Thur(Oytter Bar Only) 1 Doz Hatfshrll
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Of Your Favorite Beverage
$2.99
� WfQ It!
Ph. 756-2011
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
It you nssd mpnsy for fall clothss or football tlcktts, now la a
good tlma lo Mfi your gold and atlvar valuables. And hsra's a
good way to got EXTRA CA8HI
SILL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN 4 RING MAN!
$
Almost iviryoni his i bigti sxkooi or coiligt class ring
they don t wssr inynort. Chock your drossir draws
sod Bring yoor diss ring Into Coin & Ring Mm. Ko'ro
your orafissioiil buying sorvici ind wo guinntoo you
loir pricts ind good sorvlco.
�t1 AY CASK OM-TMUSaOT
m jflnurv, vaiAi4isummK
�Aim Ml-Ml-MR.
$ COLD $
. inks � axiom � mraas � auaoaat
� cuss hks � wnaass aaats � earm
cats � uauuts � RMS� � looun
� outai � Ljorrm � caw uaat � mtiati
PAYaMoa-TNiaaT
c ash taa rrtaii m mn
STERLING SILVER
t COPFEI tIRVICES � GOBLETS
� KINGS � SPOON! � TWAYS � KMtV�S
� FOMKt � NiCKLACtt � SlUCELltl
� PfUNKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MEWCHANPISt
C���?�� ���� C�� t �-� � Mip c.
& RING
oF KCV SAtES CO tNc
401 S. EVANS ST. "PIN,J,b� �'
.nAi'voNviiiHisf sou.h, PHONE 752-3861
r YOUR PROFESSIONAL PtRMANINT DEALtR
PHONE 752-3866
t





Title
The East Carolinian, April 16, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 16, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.127
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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