The East Carolinian, April 14, 1981






�he
(ftarnltman
Serving
the I aslarolina campus community since 1925
ol. 55 No. -
r
10 Pages
luesday, Vpril 14. 1 ��l
(.rttHMllr. Northarolins
( iniilatiun 10.000
Second Run-Off Looms
Little To File Appeal
H I'M I Ol I INS
i in-1
.1 h
Hoard
(,�!s. Jim Him' toured
Milt rhursda. Hun(
Minm's t oliseum.
II Oraj Vrt Cial
caused quite a stir
ler as purl ol nis isii to l�reen-
when Ins helicopter landed at
1 he I niversity 1l
voted Monda to g nj
Pepe's appeal foi a �nd run oil
in the race foi s iA treasurei
1 he board decided by a 3 2
that though the lang i I SO A
election rules is ambiguous, a se-
cond run-ofl is in ordei. accord
to Kevin McKenie, the boat
iirn an.
Kirk 1 ittle, the in
treasurer, has announced his deci
sion to appeal the decision to I Imet
Mey� � � - � hancelloi lor stud
1 ittle won the oi ij
eight col iftci Pept outdistai
him b 49 in tl
"We just l 'he rul
undei run offs in rticle 10 (ol the
ules). and we iusi det
.i mea
said McKen.ic, �
����
SOA Pi
d to influence meml
: . meml I la B � � ant
illia . voted i l tht
�' I
re the
Briggs -aid
"Ht iched

gri : Dodd "1 know them,
Jt;irr: ! '�
i � i i i, , t �� �a ire vsntten.
with Charlie bherroa. the board
i i, �� . � i rhai ��� ti : � its decision, me otwu
she a so nuisateu tnai sin. .
. . a ven guidelines bv Dean James
notified ol the meeting three hou
it began and that she was noi N'
sure ol ihe hear,ne's subject until 20
, k t it h, M i oi ked thai the board
mimiie : it Degan.
"Bui 1 did feel like I was able to I �'� (lA
makeafai. decision die said. el VI p Genera
Williams said when she asked that there were
Sherrod aboul the ease he expressed
the opinion that a econd i m ol
Brigi
proa
aid be held �� Pepc wo
be a certain winnei
"He made I �
have to be cray to vote again
:� V illiams sai
� �v. � � the deci-
Pepe said. "I'm
a second
. . day
i I
1 he othei membei
were not available tor coi
SI . denied
�� i hey're i �us he said.
He said ol his discussions with
. already m-
intention I
ii doesn't surprise
he decision.
i lefinitely
. al
Students Continue To Drink
Despite Increased Age Limits
i

w to

I : � rexas
� nkii iusl went y students tend t
� , i i i th(
i
i liverts th
ental he
Massac
I ,lin

tl
i
R .
� strai
Legislative Year Closes
For StudentGovernment
B I'M I l Oil INs
-
h s
iexas d
K. m, I'Ma
rhe nu
able

� 11 ' B

1
.seel l Ht
moi
I) (iarvev istanl
studem affairs al the Li
New Hampshire,
violence definitely inert
the drinkii
n 1979
"It (raising the ace) has had a rea
ba l on the university h(
students are getting
I Y esiampus is a prim
Rape Prevention
, ri foi wouW-be rap sine Its dorms h�e all-female populations.
Rules To Remember

s.s(i

thy
ontro
� ot
I; m attempt to tie up loose end-
slature suspended its rule
.�- during tl e �
Sher- Jims. Mo
j byetoth( 1 ej letL
rsbeen i ,
as on campus, Vmhersi
( hiel Donald Maia reports adrastK
praised his I rllow increase in the numbei ol
members ol the SOA Executive bances and arrests for possess
. Presideni Lvnn alcoholic beverages in a
month period aftet Massachust
C a
lea-arc- Kirk I ittle.
s( , tradition, Senioi
Rapt
. . not a sex at
tills
I lowevei I
iy Police 1 �
interested m tie
and
.sibility ot way s exists
o! the pas d We
fact'
1 ai
� ol � �
ng single women; easy access to
kec
h
� Dasha
I , . ts need
a M Patrick closed time, 65 stud
meeting, the I egislature's 22nd
ol the veai
no sinaie women, un j1 � ��
da variety ,
ne scenes (doi i tones, emptv �
lss ,ms, oded and isolated
� : r- -

police aectu.es the
ssdSTf ru
areas, fhey also agree that the vast u
majority ol campus rapes involve i
strangers oi slight aquaintances Ua
compar-ed to 17 in the preceding 12 Umvers, .puses servt as V,h,le th, ,s and .ndMcdiv a
months. unds fo' thc rap7s a large numbe, ol rapes in-
1979. During thai thai woman should know
n.
i V er
if An
II, 1 d v tilers
all
seen
i 1
i
e ��. o t
i he 1
d
Mr
the
. :
� iblish
dudent
�11) olol-
ege Hill Mendenhall and West
campu ns
heldWedi
Polling p a
Belk buildini
because ol
I, gislati � Hunter
' rhe 1 egislature als i appropnatec
$761 2 '�� the 1 l nandball team.
rhemone will ard i tying
entry tees in two tournaments and
purchasing uniforn
In a tl min ous vote.
legislai 5595 to the Campus
Alcohol-Drug Program.
puMshinTllrmaL; � � M , m, ,� , ,��
volving persons known each
othei probabh go unrepoi - tl
Most frequently involved is the
, livisl oi habitual Keef
Japist meaning one rapis, would ail times. Do not open your a
be responsible for several rapes on . q .
"Mou'raDes do no. occut in dot habit Vary vour routine -
JJXs Tapists are no, fond ol trc
areas which have large populations time every
o1 people moving around. Rapists � � '� &�r
runTess chance of detection in dark �ho are unknown to
wok oi open areas, where there -
au no witnesses, than in dorm Rape is one o! the majoi violent
rooms. Still it is a very good idea to crimes in the I nited States. One
keep vour dorm room locked at all which also has the most potential
times, even it you are jusl going dangei of any crime other than
down' the hall or to the showei murdei Rape has the potential lor
room 1 his will aKo help prevent
lhef1 See RAPE, Pajje 3
Other universities report that ���
most campus rapes occui outdoors 1 IZI.
in open areas at night, while othe. Q fg InSlUB
police agencies report that there is
no likely site on campus.
program,
students.
Rape can aKo happen to you Announcements
while you are ot! campus Iheie are 1 ditonaU
some common sense rules that will C lassifieds
help Keep you from becoming a vie 1 eatures
1 etters
, should nevei � ' sP�rls
(�rtvk NHeek.





2 THE HAS I" CAROLINIAN APRIL 14,1981
?
Announcements
CHESS
We have moved! Yes. the
Greenville Chess Club is no
located m the basement ot the
Senior Citizens' Center on the cor
ner ot 4th and Greene We meet
regularly at 7 15 on Monday
nights It's lust a short walk from
campus Join us'
PASSOVER
Community Passover Sarer at
the Rotary Club Saturday April
18 SS 00 per person Call Mrs
Warshauer at 7S2 57�6 or Mrs
ResniK at 756 5640 tor more into or
reservations All are invited to at
tend
HILLEL
Come to the HiHel Passover
Brunch at 12 00 on April 26 at the
synagoque. U20 E UthStWewill
hold elections tor next years ot
liters It you wish to run tor an ot
tice. want a ride, or more into .
call Jerry at 752 5942
DISCOUNT DAYS
Mendenhaii Student Center's
discount days are Wednesday
and Fridays Every week you can
save one third on the cost ot bowl
no billiards and table tennis at
M- ndenhall Bowling s one third
ott each Friday from 3 00 until
5 30 p m and billiards and table
tenms are one third utt each
Wednesday trom 3 00 p m until
5 30 p m Don t rr.ss it'
WORKSHOP
1 he East Carolina Camera Club
is sponsoring a "slide photc I
que workshop to be held at the
Willis Building, corner ot First
and Read Streets on Thursday
evening. Apr 16 at 6 30 p m
The program is tree ot charge
and open to all individuals wtio
have slides and wish to par
ticipate The category is open as to
subiect matter
Those wishing to partic ipate are
encouraged to br ng up to ten
slides with their name written on
the boarder ot the slide tor iden
titication Some ot the ten will be
selected tor the cr 'ique workshop
and others will '� selected to be
used m a general slide show im
mediately following the critique
program
A critique pannel will be on hand
to otter constructive suggestions
and or to point out excellence
Comments will be made on com
position, exposure and the overall
general photograph! ava
the slide The obiecv. � rtnept
gram is to improve awareness ot
elements that make tor better pic
tures
Members ot the East Carolina
Cam'era Club are exhibiting
photographs at the Willis Bu ld.no
through Apr,I 16 The exhibit m
eludes landscapes, still life and
abstract photographs in black and
white as well as color prints
This event is being scheduled m
connection with the Eastern
Carolina Arts Festival The
festival is made possible by an ap
propr.ation trom the Pitt County
Board of Commissioners, an arts
development grant trom the N.C
Arts Council, funding trom cor
porations and individual contnbu
lions
ELDERHOSTEL
Persons over 60 years old who
wish to speno a summer week on a
university campus and enroll in
non credit college courses, are in
vited to participate in an
Elderhoster program at East
Carolina University June 28 July 4
or July 5 11
ELderhostel' students who
wll be housed on campus, may
enroll m these special courses
Descriptive Astronomy ' a
non mathematical approach to
Studying the universe, with em
phasis on recenl discoveries in the
solar system and current theories
on cosmology
Folk Traditional America an
introduction to tolkhfe as an im
portant aspect of American
culture, with a sampling ot trad
tions from American regional, oc
cupational and ethnic folk groups
' Cultures m Collision The Ar
chaeology and Early History of
the Carolina Coast a detailed
study ot English exploration here
between 1584 and 1587 and. the
eventual "cultural collision" bet
ween European settlers and the
Carolina Algonkian Indians
No previous background in any
of Itie subiects to be taught is re
quired Each course will be
enhanced by the use ot tilms and
artifact displays or live
performances Instructors are
ECU professors No formal
"homework' is necessary
"Eiderhostel " inspired by the
youth hostels and the folk schools
vt Europe is designed to give
retirement aged persons the ex
penences and intellectual stimuia
lion of on campus life
Further information about the
program and application
materials are available trom Dr
Ralph Worthmgton, Division of
Continuing Education. ECU,
Greenville, N C 27834
WORK
Par' time work available A
position is open for a student to
work on Sundays in a near by
church with a teen age group The
. s a minimum of S100 per
month The position begins im
mediately and continues through
the summer it interested, contact
Dan Earnhardt at the Methods!
Student Center
DOG DAY
DOG DAY A new program ot
tered at the Methodist Student
Center will be lunch on Thursdays
Hot dogs (50 centsl and soft drinks
trom 11 30 until 1 30 Address 501
East Fifth Street
PAGEANT
Applications tor contestants tor
Miss Black and Gold Pageant are
now being accepted if interested
contact any member ot Alpha Phi
Alpha fraternity or calll 752 9875
TWIG
We strive to make the Bible a
real part ot life, that can be en
joy able (II Tim 6 17' Check it out
Thursday. Apni 9 and Tuesday
April 14 at 12 noon Monday. April
13 at 7 30 p m at Mendenhali Stu
dent Center, Rm 212
CHEMISTRY
The American Chemical Society
Student Afto ate wll hold a
business meeting on April 14. at
6 30 p m m Flanagan 202 The
plans for the picnic will be finalii
ed All members and other in
terested persons are urged to at
tend
SRA
There wll be a very Tnportan'
SRA meetng Tuesday April 14
1981 in 130 Rawl Building at 5 00
p m All members are urged to at
tend
HONOR COUNCIL
Anyone wishing to apply for the
1981 81 Honor Council may do so in
the SGA Office, Room 228.
Mendenhali Student Center
Decline tor applications Friday.
Apnl 17, 1981
MANAGER
Anyone wishing to apply tor
Refrigerator Manager tor the
1981 82 scno .y oo so by
com.n, by I GA Office, Room
228. Mendenhali Student Center
IVCF
inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship will meet this Thurs
day night at 7 30 m the Methodist
Student Center This week we will
have a special Easter Service
Everyone is welcome
BINGO
Tonight is the night tor bingo
and ice cream at Mendenhali Stu
dent Center Mendenhall's mon
thly BingoIce Cream Party will
be held at 7 00 p m in the Mult,
Purpose Room Play bingo, win
priies and eat delicious ice cream
absolutely free This is the last
party ot the semester so don't miss
it1
FACULTYSTAFF
All ECU faculty and staff
Mendenhali Student Center
members take advantage of your
discount oay at the Bowling
Center ,n Mendenhali Every
Wednesday trom 5 00 pm until
8 00 p m faculty and staff MSC
members may bowl two (2) games
and uet a 3rd game FREE Don't
forget Wednesday is savings
day at the Bowling Center
YARDSALE
The international House at ECU
is collecting materials tor a yard
sale fund raiser if you have any
books, clothes, costume iewelry
household articles, or pieces ot
furniture you would like to donate
please deliver to the international
House at 306 East Ninth Street by
Friday, April 10
ART
Two dimensional art works by
Allen Jones McDavid ot Santord
will be on display April 12 19 in the
gallery ot the Baptist Student
Center on Tenth St.
The exhibition will include
woodcut and intaglio prints
photographs illustrations and
mixed media items
McDavid is a candidate tor the
BA degree in communication arts
at ECU and the son ot Mr and
Mrs Phihp H McDavid ot Route
1 Sanford
PHYS ED
Students planning to declare
physical education as a maior dur
ing this semester are required to
satisfactorily complete a motor
and physical fitness test r.nor to
CO OP
Seymour Johnson Air Force
Base, Goldsboro NC will have a
Co op position ,n recreation open
for Fall '81 Interested students
should apply to the Co op Office
313 Rawl Building, 757 6979 before
the end ot this semester
The Department ot Energy Co
op positions available tor Fall, '81
tor the following maiors
chemistry physics, geology, com
puter science, health sciences,
biology, business administration,
and lournalism Contact the Co op
Office today!
DELTA ZETA
There s a very -mportant
meeting ot all Delta Zeta big
brothers Wednesday night Apr,l
!5at9pm at the nouse MiSStt
one and you'll miss the end of the
year exam iam
HOLYTRINITY
"Holy Trinity United Methodist
Church, located at 1400 Red Banks
Rd in Greenville, directly across
from Aycock Junior High School
will be hosting The New Direc
tions" Apr.I 11 12 "THe New
Directions" is an mter racial, n
terdenommational group ot young
adults head quartered in Bur!
ingfon, N C Their specialty s con
temporary Christian Music
"The New Directions will be m
concert at Holy Trinity, Saturday
April 11, at 8 00 p m Then the
wnl be m charge ot the worship
service. Sunday, April 12. at 11 00
a m Come early to assure
yourself a seat ano plan to stay
after the worship service on Sun
day tor the covered dish dinner
SUMMER JOBS
" � � - i . � �. E mpl . - , '
and Training Oft . � . I
applications from nsmq
college students ano graduate
school students for summer
employment as youth coor
dmators College graduates who
are interest, employ
ment or actively see
full time employment are also en
ipply For more mtor
natio � � . � m Gaddis at
� � . and Place
ment Otf � � ' 6393
SCHOLASTIC SEARCH
Scholastic All Am,
now accep
� nq rU ; �' ' (tie 1981 Spr
mu Sen identi ho are
active ; � ations
. � �
ked to iom
� , �
an honor �. founded to
recognize this country's top
undergraduate and graduate
students Students are selected
from over 1,280 schools covering
all 50 slates Members participate
,n various nationally org
each year
Students i ted tor con
Sideration based on the extent of
�nic ana scholastic per
tormance both m and out ot the
classroom No one factor is weigh
ea hea. rtber Is
considered A student's best asset
must ' I ' well
rou
�� � � ted students arc asked to
' tmped, self addressed
envelope to Application
Scholastic All American. Ad
ministrative Offices, P O Box 237
Clinton. New York. 13323
All students are encouraged to
� an application regardless
of then �� cioint aver a
GAME ROOM
The College Hill Game Room
located in the Aycock basement,
features electronic games, pm
ball. pool, ping pong and fooseball
Hours are Mon Thurs 12 11
p m , Friday 12 5pm and Sun 8
11pm All proceeds are returned
to the students through the Student
Residence Association please
support the game room
DISCOUNT DAYS
Mendenhali Student Center's
d.siount days are Wednesdays
and Fridays Every week you can
save 1 3 on the cost of bowling
b-lliards and table tennis at
Mendenhali Bowling is 13 ott
each Friday trom 3 00 p m until
5 30 p m and billiards and table
tenn.s art' 1 3 off each Wednesday
from 3 00 p m until 5 30 pm
Don t miss if
SCHOLARSHIPS
Phi Eta Sigma, freshman honor
socety, will award book scholar
ships to a rising iunior ano a rising
senior .n the amount ot SlOO each
to be used dur.na the 1981 82 school
year Applicants must be
members of Phi Eta Sigma
Qualifications emphasize par
ticipation m the ECU chapter of
Phi Eta Sigma and high academic
achievement Interested students
should see Dr John D Ebbs Pro
tessor ot English, at 214 Austin
POETRY FORUM
In Mendenhali room 248 anyone
wishing to get feed back tor your
poem bring an extra copy
SCJ
The Society tor Collegiate jour
nahsts will hold a reorganizat.onai
meeting Tuesday. April 14. at 7
Austin 301 AH members
are urged to attend
Harvard Endowment Soars
Cambridge, Mass.
(I.P.) � Harvard
University's Financial
Report, prepared by-
Treasurer George Put-
nam and Financial Vice
President Thomas
O'Brien. recently
reported that the
market value of the
University's endow-
ment rose $176,710,000
to SI,491,060,000 dur-
30, 1980.
The Harvard
Management Com-
pany, which handles
the investment port-
folio of the University's
SI.7 billion endow-
ment, concluded
another banner year in
which the Harvard
portfolio increased by
approximately 15.2
percent, according to
dent of the company.
A major thrust of the
Management Com-
pany's investment
strategy has been a
move away from bonds
and into common
stocks, a move which
has paid oi successful-
ly in terms of the
overall market; the
Standard & Poor's 500
stock index for corn-
rose by 17 percent this
year, while bonds
declined by 2 percent.
Harvard's common
stocks are heavily posi-
tioned in energy and
energy-related com-
panies, according to
Cabot. I his resulted
from decisions made
five years ago, during
the sharp increases in
the price of oil, when
ing the year ended June Walter Cabot, presi- mon stocks nationwide major oil investments
Disease Affects Thousands
were made. " 1 h e
reason we bought
energy stocks says
Cabot, "is that we
believed the price of
energy on a world-wide
basis would continue to
git up, and that the
price o' U.S. energy
would be deregulated.
Therefore, those com-
panies that had the
assets would rise in the
market
By OTIS ROBINSON
Stuff V� nlrr
More than 15,000
people in the United
States suffer from a
genetic disorder of the
central nervous system
known as Huntington's
Disease.
Neurologists say that
of those correctly-
diagnosed, there are
from 25,000 to 50,000
people who have the
potential for develop-
ing the disease because
a parent had the illness.
Dr. Frank Fleming
of the Eastern Carolina
Neurological Associa-
tion said that though
there is no cure for
Huntington's Disease,
there are cases where
the disease stabilizes
and progresses no fur-
ther. He added that cer-
tain medications con-
trol the movements and
emotional problems
that arise from the il-
lness.
Involuntary
movements such as
twitches or facial
spasms are physical
symptoms of the il-
lness. There are
noticeable personality
and emotional changes
such as irritability, loss
of memory, and lack of
concern for personal
hygiene.
The hereditary
disorder usually ap-
pears at 35 to 45 years
of age and progresses
gradually. According
to Oscar Jet Webb, an
ECU pre-medical stu-
dent, "some persons
have been diagnosed as
early as 20 years old
and as late as 70 years
old. If one parent has
the disease, there is a
50-50 chance the child
may have it
Webb said that one
of the problems
associated with Hun-
tington's Disease is that
persons are viewed as
schizophrenics or
drunkards.
"The people who
have the disease shy
away from being public
because their
movements are
misinterpreted as
drunkenness he ex-
plained. "When thev
try to walk down the
streets, they're often
picked up
People unable to
handle family members
that have the illness
need to be informed,
according to Mary
Cannoning, an ECU
biology major and
member of the Alpha
Epsilon Delta Pre-
medical Society.
Educating the family
on how to take care of
the patient is the impor
tant thing she said.
Glossy or silk finish
is available
COME TO THE STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
FOR FAST. QUALITY PHOTO FINISHING fIT
EVERY DAY LOW PRICES
12 exp. color film 2.99
20 exp. color film 4.55
24 exp. color film 5.46
36 exp. color film 7.84
We offer complete film processing services:
Black & White, Color Slides, Movies, Enlargements, Reprints
Satisfaction Guaranteed
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
owned and operated by East Carolina University
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
below the advertised price in each A&P Store, except as specifically
io this ad.
sale at or
noted 1
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT . APRIL 18, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE. NX
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS.
Highway 264 By-Pass Greenville Square
Shopping Center Greenville, N.C.
Aa&p quality
Butter Basted
Turkeys
(10 lbs. and up)
Built In Pop-Up
Timer In Every Pkg
WHOLE
Smoked
Ham
(16-19 lb. avg.)
A&P QUALITY
Pork
Sausage
MARKET STYLE
Sliced
Bacon
Sunbalhrrv arl
Kap
A&P MEDIUM
GRADE "A"
White Eggs
63�
dozen
only
Grade "A" 2 Lovvfat or
Homogenized Milk
OR
ANN PAGE
fc LOWFAT
MILK, -75 llon
83
IN QUARTERS
Parkay Margarine
2 I00
TATER BOY FROZEN
French Fries
Crinkle
Cut
0 1

ANN PAGE
Mayonnaise
79c
32 02.
jar
CHICKEN OF THE SEA�LIGHT
Chunk Tuna
In
Oil
6Va OZ
can
79
c
WHITE � YELLOW � BLUE
White Cloud
Bath
Tissue
4J9
c
SAVE 50
Super Suds
99c
Laundry
Detergent
40 oz
pkg-
Schlitz Beer
399
Ctn.of
12
12 oz. cans
GOOD ONLY IN GREENVILLE. N.C
A SUPERB BLEND RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES
Eight O'clock
.1"
Bean
Coffee
ANN PAGE
Potato Chips
8oz.
twin
pack
79
c
Coca-Cola, Mello Yello
Tab, Orange Crush
Grape Crush
R No return WW
bottles
1
�&�&!&
FOft n�fMss �o SAVINGS
ED RIPE SWEET JUICY
Strawberries
Jane Parker 6ct. -
Shortcakes Pk9 59 1
ggc
quart
box
CALIFORNIA SWEET JUICY
Navel Oranges
15,100
FARM FRESH
Asparagus
ftftC
Low In
Calories

them a;

tuna ;

thro
Rt
V
rep
old

obje
chost
Supj
that we
youi
ma
tie ph

rape,
be
ATi
South
RockNI
Tues
3n
Annl
SPRll
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Wl
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tof sale at or
liy noted
re
0
0
IOZEN
ries
139
U�LIGHT
ma
IC
9
luds
kAZILIAN COFFEES
Clock
I89
lllo Yello
Crush
ish
9
barker 6c,
:akes NO�
I HI I SIAkOl.lNlAN
APRIL 14, 1981
tKU&E?
Sunhalhers are a common sight on campus now that spring and warm weather are here.
Rape Prevention Discussed
Continued From Page 1
death, serious injurj and severe psychological
damage.
A rapist is trying to vent his hostility. Some of
them apparently premeditate their attacks in the
sense of imagining various opportunities and
developing approaches for each. 1 he actual at-
tack is a case of opportunity and occurs when the
rapist realizes that this is a suitably low-risk situa-
tion. 1 he victim is selected through an unfor-
tunate coincidence. Any woman displacing high-
risk behavior, such as walking alone each night
through a deserted area is more likely to be a vic-
tim.
Realizing that you could be a victim ol sexual
assault is the first step in protecting yourself.
Anyone can be a victim. Rapes have been
reported in which the victims were three months
old to 86 years old. Remember, sex is not the ob-
ject. I he venting of rage and hostility is the
object-the human bodv is the weapon and the
chosen object of hostility is another human body.
Suppose you should take all the precautions
that we have talked about so far and you still find
yoursell in a rape situation. What do you do to
maintain control of the situation and suffer as lit-
tle physical harm as possible?
Firsl of all siav calm 50 that you can be obser-
vant and try to maintain some control of the
situation. If you stay calm enough to think clearly
you might seize on an opportunity to prevent the
rape.
Remember that your attacker is another human
borne and trv to establish some line of com-
munication with him. Talk to him. It may not
prevent the rape but it might save your life or br-
ing you through the ordeal without bodily injury.
Do not try to use force or to physically fight
your way clear. There is little hope of being able
to achieve that goal and you will set the tone of
violence that will surely cause your attacker to use
more violence. He wishes to dominate you and
will use the amount o' force necessary to achieve
that end.
If you have become a victim of rape, then what
do you do? First ot all get lo a safe place. Do not
wash or change clothes.
I he evidence needed to successfully prosecute a
rapist, if you should decide to prosecute, is verv
fragile and should be taken immediately.
Call someone to help you. Call the campus
police or the Greenville Police Department ol the
Real Crisis Center. Calling the police department
does not obligate you to prosecute. You can make
that decision "later, but it does give you someone
to help you with the medical and legal details that
should be taken care of immediately.
the emergency room personnel are especially
trained to take evidence from a rape victim and
will also give you any emergency treatment that
you might need as well as giving you protection
against venereal disease and pregnancy.
Reporting a rape is very important for your
protection. Most rapists are repeat rapists. Even
if you do no prosecute your report mav give
police information needed to apprehend a rapist
and protect others from rape and possible death.
ATTIC
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightclub
Tues. 14th
3rd
Annual
SPRING
ZING
WING
DING
FLING
THING
with
Super
Grit
75C
Admission
LIMITED
50
Beverage
WED.
SUPER
GRIT
CHICK�FIL�A
SANDWICH SPECIAL -
ALL YOU CAN EAT
FOR $1.09 EACH.
Here's real special treat for you and your friends or family. You can
get all the delicious Chick-fil-A sandwiches � the original boneless
breast of chicken sandwich � for only $1.09 each with the coupon
below. That's a deal that's hard to beat on the sandwich that's fun to
eat.
SAVE
Juslf.
CHICK-FiL A SANDWICH
SPECIALCOUPON $1.09 each
SAVE
, she uumsVi
I
sandu ii tit mi wai !
wii o i r
ihe rest.
One cou- !
pon per L
SAV E tMftr good �l ItK toHcmt�tt kk'fH�A rnUuraiU
person p . ��. -it
OthTCN .n-�: 4-30-81
Cto�d Sund���
(kM
THE TASTE WORTH SHOPPING FOR.
t OlPON
THURS.
BRICE ST.
DELTA SIGMA PHI
�PRESENTS�
THE 2ND ANNUAL
MISTER LEGGS CONTEST
ATTHEELBO
Tues April 14th
GRAND PRIZE - S100.00 CASH!
2nd Prize - S25.00 Dinner For Two & Haircuts
3rd Prize - Dinner For Two & Haircuts
Plus T-shirts For 1st, 2nd, & 3rd Place Winners
Judges will include one Representative from
each Sorority and Former Miss N. C. USA and the
reigning Miss ECU 1981
�SPONSORED BY-
PIZZA INN SHIRLEY'S CUT & STYLE
JUST PANTS TREE HOUSE
T-SHIRTS PLUS SWEET CAROLINES
AND THE ELBO
Registration Tues. Night - Must be registered by
9:30
MON. TUES. - AVAILABLE FOR
PRI �Ti PARTIES - PAPA KATZ WILL
CATER ANY PARTY OR FUNCTION. WE
ALSO HAVE A MOBILE D.J. FOR ANY
PARTY ANYTIME.
WED. "ORIGINAL LADIES' LOCKOUT"
- 8:30 10:00 - LADIES ONLY - GENTS
IN AFTER 10:00.
THURS. - "SUPER COLLEGE NIGHT"
SPONSORED BY THE SIG EPS - DOORS
OPEN FROM 8:30 to 1:00 - NOW WITH
THE BIGGEST SHAG CONTEST IN GREEN-
VILLE. COME OUT FOR THE DANCE OFF.
MAIN DANCE OFF ON MARCH 19th
WITH OVER $300.00 IN CASH & PRIZES.
FRI ESCAPE THE DOWNTOWN
CROWD & INFLATION - JOIN THE
CROWD AT THE KATZ FOR AN AFTER-
NOON AND EVENING OF ENJOYMENT.
DOORS OPEN AT 3:00 & NEVER STOP.
TOP 40 COUNTDOWN FREE ADMISSION
TILL 7:00
SAT. - "LADIES' LOCKOUT II" - LADIES
ONLY FROM 8:00 to 9:30 - GENTS IN AT
9:30.
SUN. - SUPER SUNDAY
AT THE KATZ. NO ADMIS-
SION CHARGE ALL NIGHT
LONG. DOORS OPEN 8:30
P.M. TO 1:00 A.M.
There s More
Elbow Room in
Our Attic!
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
All members will be entitled to 1 guests per evening Neat dress
and pruper dentilication will be required ol all members and
guests
This special INTRODUCTORr MEMBERSHIP is only SI 00
All applications and dues must or returnedTO 'bis address P O
Bo� !9J3 G - - N C Sta'c Law requires a thirty
day membership waiting period from date ot application tor
dubs Aith bfowr bagging permits
MEMBERSHIP
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MeSW Uf rt.co to.AH �
I





2tlE East Ear0liman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
PAUl f INC kl , Snoot o) Arnam
Daw Si i rin. mm itar
Anita Lancaster, ���� � m
ChrisLk hok, v
Jimmy DuPREE, �-�� e�
PAUl COI I INS. wm -
Chari is Chandj IK v ��"� ���
David Norris. J(��-
April 14, W81
Opinion
Page 4
30
"All good things must come to
pass Famous words aren't they?
It is tradition that every general
manager of the newspaper write a
farewell editorial and being a good
conservative, I will not break with
tradition.
1 suppose it would be appropriate
to first go over the accomplishments
of the last six months, but actually
nothing was done differently during
these last six months than in the
preceding six months when Richard
Green was in charge, something that
1 am very proud of.
Richard was one helluva guy and
filling his shoes was no small task.
He and numerous others have forg-
ed a newspaper out of near
nothingness, into something which
has never been seen on this campus,
or in this county before.
It was, in the words of Sir
Winston Churchill, "blood, sweat,
toil, and tears That is what our
employees r " 'mo tVis r er and 1
am proud to vatry. on in uieii hard-
working tradition.
Producing this newspaper is a
team effort that requires above all
loyalty and a dedication to a com-
mon purpose. Many people have
contributed to that team effort and
that purpose: Robert Swaim,
Richard Green, Terry Herndon,
Paul I incke, Ric Browning, George
Hettich, Bill Shipley, Waverly Mer-
ritt, Dave Severin, Jimmy DuPree
are' the names that come to mind
right now.
These people were and are hard
workers possessing a tremendous
espirit de corps. They worked
tirelessly in the cause to produce a
quality product and to make the
paper as profitable as possible. Effi-
ciency was their chief goal, which
thev achieved consistently.
The people who made this place
tick were known among friends as
"the old guard They were the
ones who slaved for years to lay the
foundations of what is today the
finest college newspaper in North
Carolina. Long time employees, like
Steve Bachner, Robert Swaim, and
Anita Lancaster devoted untold
hours to the paper. Their devotion
was slave-like and incomparable in
student affairs.
It is sad to say that their breed is
gone and there does not appear to
be many successors who will devote
the time and energy to this place as
in the past.
There is no way to compensate
them for the missed classes and the
sleepless nights that they put in here
in the publications center.
Five years ago this student
newspaper was an unattractive high
schoolish "rag" that more closely
resembled a newspaper version of
Mad magazine than anything else.
Thev transformed it into a respec-
table and professional newspaper. It
took people with strong wills, ambi-
tion, pride, and a desire to ac-
complish something significant in
transforming this paper into what it
is today.
They never backed down and they
always did what was in the best in-
terest of their paper and thei pecs.
1 am very proud to have been a
part of that group. 1 was trained
�md enlightened by the "old ��'ard"
ui the technique and as oi
newspaper work the way they had
learned it. They came up through
the ranks over a period of years,
nobody handed them anything on a
silver platter, they earned what they
got. They arc the essense of the
American work ethic.
Many frivolous and air-headed
people over the years have come
through the front doors of the
newspaper pretending to be
newspaper people, but only the
strong survive, and the gifted. The
core, the hard core, are the
backbone of the paper. They didn't
live in the idealistic world of "hold
the presses they were realists and
dealt shrewdly and effectively with
every problem and crisis that came
up.
They represent a proud tradition
that is coming to an end. But, 1 and
my colleages have high hopes that
one day some promising freshmen
will come along and once again
plow the rows that were once the
pride and joy of "the old guard
This is not, I hope, the end of an
era, but just a temporary pause,
that will pass in the not too distant
future.
CHRIS LICHOK
General Manager

7W BACK. yOU CAN STOP TAKING CHARGE N0U,AL.
Paper Guided Through Troubles
As was the case last December when ,
Richard Green retired as general manager
of this newspaper, the task, or maybe 1
should say the privilage, of writing a
farewell column honoring our out-going
general manager has fallen to me probably
because 1 have seen nine, count 'em. nine
general managers come and go. 1 suppose
after that many 1 should know their ups
and downs.
rhris I ichok, our fearless leader about
depart, shares main common
characteristics with his predecessor.
Richard Green. Both loved this place and
constantly sought ways to protect and im-
prove our lot, the paper and the people.
Chris rose through the ranks and work-
ed two years to become the general
manager. He started out as an aide in the
advertising and business department later
being promoted to business manager and
finally to the position ot general manager.
He worked hard to get there, he paid his
dues and served his time.
"To those upon whom much is bestow-
ed, much is expected Chris lived b this
motto and worked with it. He was tireless
! devoted to the people who worked under
him and looked after every one of them,
even those who really did not deserve it in
m opinion. He would even be gracious to
a Democrat.
If he has a fault it is probably that he is
too nice to people and doesn't put them in
-i
Robert M.
Swaim

their place when they need it. He was more
o an Eisenhower than a Patton.
He was fiesty and didn't give an inch
when the cause was just and he was right.
Seldom did he get riled up but when he did
there was no compromising, even i! it
meant jeopardizing his own security and
well being.
He possesses a quality that cannot be
bought with gold or riches; loyalty. I hat is
a quality that is prized and valued among
men and a quality which few people
possess, its value is untold.
1 can count on one hand the people that
1 genuinely trust and have faith in, the) are
so rare. Perhaps that is why Chris will
always stand out in my mind as an outstan-
ding individual. There will alwavs he a
warm spot in all our hearts for him.
With a tew possible exceptions, no one
has ever devoted so much of themsehe
and their time to furthering the cause
this campus paper than Chris.
He worked nights and weekends doing
the things that nobody else would d
cleaning the office, gathering cinder blocks
to anchor down the newspaper rack- a
going around to emptv out the racks
Saturdays.
He was alwavs m the trenches, on the
front lines fighting the battles for the paper
right along with the old timers. He t
the barbs and felt the heat right along w
the rest o us who looked after this plac
He was one hell ot a captain on a ship
that has sailed some verv storm) seas tl
semester. Alwavs cool and calm, nc
panicking, he kept his head when all at
him were losing theirs. Indeed, these las-
tew months were "the times that try mens'
souls
Enough .anno! be said for Chris an
tremendous devotion and hard work
he has put into this place.
It Cod was giving out awards foi
best human being on Earth, undoubu
Chns would be the recipient this vear.
Without his leadership 1 have doubts
about the future o this newspaper beca
the talent he has is not common among
men.
No doubt he will go tar in life and will be
success, that is his destiny.
Sherrod Notes SGA Improvements
By CHRIS UCHOk
Tomorrow SGA President Charlie Sher-
rod will turn the, reins o' power over to
Lester Nail.
After three vears in student government,
Sherrod says that he is glad to be moving
on.
The outgoing president reflected on his
year in office in a recent interview citing
the accomplishments of his administra-
tion.
Sherrod considers the revamping ot the
transit system a major feat. This year tran-
sit maintenance costs were reduced, there
were no accidents, a new bus was purchas-
ed and a transit advisory board was
established.
By creating the transit board Sherrod ef-
fectively eliminated the politics so long
associated with the system. The position ot
transit manager had long been a prized
political patronage plum handed out by-
each incoming president. Now the transit
manager is appointed by the advisory
board.
Last summer Sherrod consolidated the
printing of all SGA documents into one
publication. This resulted in a $2,000 sav-
ings to the SGA.
A major crusade that Sherrod and the
SGA embarked upon was for the establish-
ment of a fall break. Although they came
close to getting the break on the university
calender, the proposal got bogged down in
the faculty senate and was never approved.
Sherrod said that the defeat of the break
proposal was his biggest complaint of the
year. He said that he was very disap-
pointed with the faculty senate's action
considering that the students voted 93 per-
cent in favor of a break.
Sherrod had contacts with many impor-
tant university officials as a member of the
Board of Trustees. He says that meeting
and working with many fine people was
one of his most rewarding experiences.
Sherrod said that the administration can
be very helpful, but some administrators
have been a hinderance to him during his
term of office.
Sherrod said that a major problem he
had to deal with was the uncooperative at
titude of Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student life.
"Brewer seems to delegate a lot of
authority to Meyer said Sherrod. "The
chancellor should realize that students will
not always be as passive as they are now,
he should deal with students more himself
rather than dealing with them through
Mever
Sherrod added that he feels Meyer is
misrepresenting Brewer.
"I received absolutely no help or
cooperation this year from Elmer Meyer,
he always takes the other side said Sher-
rod.
Sherrod had high praise for other ad-
ministrators.
"Cliff Moore is one of the finest ad-
ministrators at ECU. Mr. Moore has
always offered advice and assistance to the
SGA. The students of ECU are fortunate
to have him as vice chancellor for business
affairs. He has been a positive influence
during my tenure as president
Sherrod described Dick Blake, assistant
to the chancellor, as "a super talentone
of ECU's most capable administrators
Rudolph Alexander, director of the stu-
dent center, was described by Sherrod as
"a fine gentleman who has helped me since
my days as vice president
Of the students Sherrod has worked
with, Sherrod gave high marks to Nicky
Francis, Charles Sune, Danny O'Conner,
and Lynn Calder.
"I thoroughly enjoyed my relationships
with these people. They have always been
very loyal to me and they are first class
people said Sherrod.
Sherrod says that he sees lot of room for
improvement in the SGA.
"In my three years of SGA involvement
I have noticed that superior students tend
not to get involved in student government.
1 have been disappointed with the majority
of the legislators said Sherrod.
Sherrod said that the legislature has
become nothing more than "a giant ap-
propriation committee.
"They are only concerned with how
much money to give some special interest
group said Sherrod.
Sherrod was also critical of the media
board. . .
"There are some class people on that
board but it has been ruined by poor
leadership said Sherrod.
He went on to say that he feels that the
Charlie Sherrod
delay in getting WZMB on the air is the
fault of the media board.
Sherrod said that after three years in
SGA he sees some flaws in the way campus
organizations, boards and committees
operate.
"1 leave ECU with a lot of great
memories but I feel like I got overinvobed
The SGA and Student Union took me out
of the gym and off the tennis courts too
much. All the hours I spent in meetings
became very frustrating. Most of those
meetrings were completely worthless. It
there is one thing 1 learned from my ex-
perience, it is that the comcept of commit-
tees and boards making decisions is fatal to
productivity and itr stifles good ideas
said Sherrod.
Sherrod says that he may return to
television and film as a career. Before col-
lege Sherrod was a film and television pro-
ducer for the United States Army. After
he returned from the service he worked
with WITN in Washington, N.C. and with
WCPS-WKTC in Tarboro. For his pro-
ducing career in the army Sherrod received
the Thomas Jefferson Award from the
producers of 60 Minutes. He also received
the Gold Screen Award from the National
Association of Government Com-
municators.
Sherrod doesn't rule our the possibility
of a career in government. "I am always
facinated with the government. Working
in Washington is a possible goal
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I HI l AS I C AkOl INIAN
Features
APKII 14. 1981
Page 5
Science Fair Brings
Memories Of School
Photo by CHAP GURLEY
Playhouse Presents 'Julius Caesar'
rite ECU Playhouse production of 'Julius Caesar" was presented last week. For a review of the plav see the
V n terrain men l Section, page 6.
Kids and science. Now that's a
combination that brings back
memories of growing up, and of a
little creek in Warren County and
the crayfish we used to scoop out of
it and inject with a-fluid concocted
from a deluxe model Gilbert's
Chemistry Set. They just swelled up
and died. Instantly.
Well, so much for a career in
medical research.
Here at the Eastern Regional
Science Fair at East Carolina
University there is not a single pro-
ject involving crayfish. Come to
think of it, I haven't seen a crayfish,
dead or alive, in years. Pollution got
'em, I suppose.
Speaking of pollution, there are a
lot of projects on that subject. Holly
Baker of Windsor, N.C. is studying
pollution on the Chovvan River.
John Gamble of Pikeville has one
on the "Effects of Insecticides on
Aquatic Animals" and Scott Dean
of Raleigh studies the pollution of
Crabtree Creek. 1 wonder if there
are any crayfish in Crabtree.
Ah! "Innoculations with a Wilt-
Causing Plant Disease Bacterium
Try Baking Cakes A nd Bread
By KATHY WEYLER
stuff Wnirr
Bake sales are virtually an
American way of life. If you belong
to an type of organization, the
chances are that one day, sooner or
later, you're going to be called upon
to produce baked goods. Even if
you're remarkably lucky and this
never happens to you, the chance is
still there that you'll have to furnish
baked noods for a family dinner or
company picnic one day. Rather
than rushing to the closest bakery in
a panic, why not try your hand at
home-made breads and cakes? They
can be surprisingly easy to make, as
the following recipes demonstrate.
Quick breads are a good choice
for beginning breadmakers since
they require no yeast. BANANA
NUT BREAD is a tasty, simple type
o quick bread. You'll need: three
mashed bananas, 34 cup sugar.
two beaten eggs, 12 cup liquid
shortening or melted Crisco, two
cups sifted all-purpose flour, 1 2
teaspoon salt, one teaspoon baking
soda, one cup chopped nuts. Sift
dry ingredients together. In another
bowl, gradually add sugar to
shortening and beat until creamy.
Add dry ingredients to shortening
mixture alternately with mashed
bananas, then add nuts. Stir just
enough to combine thoroughly, but
That's an interesting project by Billy
Daughtry ol Clayton. Billy gives the
plant a little dose of poison and it
shrivels up. Dr. Frankenstein would
love it. So do the judges. An
Honorable Mention Award is not
bad.
Down the long rows of science
fair exhibits there are model
rockets, solar furnaces, weather
machines, fossils, plants, animals
and a working model of the human
circulatory system. There are others
that go beyond my science
background.
"Response of Isopods to En-
vironmental factors by Fred
Hampton of Greenville. "You mean
a 7th grader did this?" I asked. Im-
pressive! A first place winner for
certain.
Now here's one 1 can understand.
David Rubright of Mebane is in-
vestigating glues (or call them
adhesives which is the more
sophisticated way to describe the
white stuff that Elmer makes) and
the epoxies, contact cements and
even the so-called super glues that
will, in a split second, attach your
forefinger to your thumb so effec-
tively that you could end up spen-
ding a couple of days waving the cir-
cle and three fingers sign to your
friends which means okay but is a lie
because your finger and thumb have
ECU Symphony Orchestra,
Symphonic Band To Play
Saxophonist Kenneth Hubbard of
Raleigh and soprano Anne Gunn of
Durham, winners o' the 1981 Fast
Carolina University Concerto Com-
petition, will be featured soloists
with the ECU Symphony Orchestra
in a Tuesday, April 14, concert.
The program is set for 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Robert Hause
is conductor of the orchestra.
Hubbard, a graduate student, w ill
be soloist in the Villa-Lobos Fan-
tasia for Soprano Saxophone and
Orchestra. Miss Gunn, a senior, will
sing Samuel Barbaur's "Knoxville:
Summer of 1915
The program will conclude with
the orchestra's performance of
Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 5 in
E Minor.
Winners in the annual concerto
competition arc selected from
junior, senior and graduate level
sinners and instrumentalists in the
ECU School of Music.
Hubbard is an alumnus of ECU
and a saxophone student of Brad
Foley. He will graduate this spring
with the Master of Music degree in
performance. The son of Mr. and
Mrs. B.K. Hubbard of Raleigh,
Hubbard was also a winner in his
category at the N.C. Music Teachers
Association compeition last October
and the winner of the annual ECU
Young Artists Competition earlier
this spring.
Anne Gunn, a senior student of
Gladys White of the ECU voice
faculty, will graduate next
December with the Bachelor of
Music degree in voice performance.
During her freshman and
sophomore years at ECU, she won
the state and regional divisions in
her category in contests sponsored
by the National Association of
Teachers of Singing and, last fall
took first place in the vocal category
of the N.C. Music Teachers
Association auditions.
She is the daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Bill Gunn oi' Durham and
plans to continue her studies next
year at Indiana University,
specializing in opera. She has been
an active performer in ECU Opera
Theatre productions, local oratorio
performances and the annual ECU
Madrigal Christmas Dinner series.
The ECU Symphonic Band will
perform in Wright Auditorium on
Wednesday, April 15 at 7:00 p.m.
Among works to be performed
will be "Flourish for Wind Band"
by R. Vaughn Williams, "Mazoni
Requiem" (excerpts) by G. Ver-
di Mollenhauer and "March for the
Sultan Abdul Medjid" by
Rossini Townsend.
The Symphonic Band is con-
ducted bv Tom Goolsbv.
do not beat. Turn into a well-
greased loaf pan and bake at 325"
for one hour.
Muffins, too, are simple to make,
particularly if you use a packaged
mix. Or you can make your own
from scratch. In either case, you'll
need one or two well-greased muffin
pans, or eliminate greasing and line
the pans with paper baking cups.
For MUFFINS you'll need: one and
three-fourths cups sifted all-purpose
flour, 34 teaspoon salt, 1 4 cup
sugar, two teaspoons double-acting
baking powder, two beaten eggs,
two to four tablespoons melted but-
ter, 34 cup milk. Sift dry ingre-
dients together. Add the butter and
milk to the beaten eggs. Combine li-
quid and dry ingredients. Fill muf-
fin cups two-thirds full. If you don't
have enough dough to fill every cup,
put a few tablespoons of water in
the empty cuts. Bake A 4008 tor
twenty to twenty-five minutes. Muf-
fins are easier to remove from the
pan if left in the pan for a few-
minutes after removing from the
oven.
Perhaps you'd prefer to bake
something sweeter. PUDDING
CAKE is a delicious cake recipe sim-
ple enough for novice cooks. You'll
need: one two-layer size package
yellow or white cake mix, one four-
serving size package Jell-O Instant
Pudding and Pie Filling (vanilla,
lemon or banana makes a tasty
cake), four eggs, one cup water,
one-fourth cup oil. Combine all in-
gredients in a large mixing bowl.
Blend; then beat with an electric
mixer at medium speed for four
minutes. Pour into a greased and
See TRY, page 7, col. 1
Test Your Memory:
TV Cartoon Trivia
B DAVID NORMS
and WILLIAM YET VERTOV
1. Who is Jonny Quest's East In-
dian companion?
2. Name the only cartoon
character from Tasmania.
3. 1 George Jetson works for
Spacely Sprockets. What is the
name of his company's major com-
petitor?
4. Name Space Ghost's twin
teenage sidekicks.
5. Who was the voice of Under-
dog?
6. What was the name of the Jet-
son's dog?
7. What was the name of Fred
Flintstone's boss?
8. What town does Archie An-
drews live in?
9. From what country are Rocky
and Bullwinkle's adversaries Boris
and Natasha?
10. Speaking of Boris and
Natasha, what was their boss known
as?
11. Name Secret Squirrel's
sidekick.
12. Name the sinister oriental
villain who is the arch enemy of
Jonny Quest and his father. (This
villain was the one who built that
giant robot spider, among other evil
stuff.)
13. Who was the little pet monkey
who accompanied Space Ghost and
his friends on their adventures?
14. In what town did the Flint-
stones live?
'5. Who was Dudley Do-Right's
girlfriend?
16. From what company did the
coyote buy the raw materials for the
traps he built for the Road Runner?
17. What was significant about
Frostbite Falls, Minnesota?
18. Name George Jetson's kids.
For a bonus, name the handyman in
their apartment building.
19. In what park did Yogi Bear
live in his old cartoons?
20. Name the members of the
Fantastic Four (from their old car-
toon show, not the recent one.)
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Photo by GARY PATTERSON
New Cheerleaders Chosen
Pictured above is Jennifer Cooper, another of the eight newly chosen
1981-82 ECU Cheerleaders. She served last year on the J.V. cheerleading
squad at ECU and has had six years of formal training in gymnastics and
sixteen years of training in dance.
been welded together by the stuff.
Stick with the right glue and use
white glue, concludes Rubright. It is
strong, fast and easy.
There's more for consumers.
Angela Bass of Wilson compares
Favoris and Lisierine on bacteria.
You'll have to guess the results of
that one.
Maybe science doesn't need
crayfish to experiment with. It still
has mice and rats.
Harold Moses Jr. of Smithfield
:nes to determine if the sense of
direction of mice is affected by a
magnetic field. It is.
There are also intelligent mice ac-
cording to Billy Warren of Green-
ville. Nobody could argue with that.
There are intelligent people too
such as Michael Boyd of Fumberton
who studies rhizoctonia antagonists,
whatever they are.
But I guess I still enjoy the more
basic, or call it simpler, subjects of
scientific investigation. Take Tam-
my Irwin of Bethel. Her project was
"The Benefits of Horse Manure"
and included a big pile of it, which
was a real attention getter.
There is something for everyone
at this science fair and Vernice
Royal of Newton Grove makes my
day. "Does Freezing Dull the
Memory of Cockroaches?" You
better believe it does!
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
On The Run
The Intramural Cross-Campus Run was held last Wednesday.
Survey Indicates
Some Interesting
Student Statistics
Ye shall know them by their pro-
ducts. And yea. those products shall
multiply.
Take, for example, the fact that
three out of four college students
own hand-held calculators. Half
have 10-speed bikes, and six out of
ten own tennis rackets. What with
calculating, biking and tennis play-
ing, you'd think students would be
kept pretty busy. But lo � 38 per-
cent of college students say they
own a backgammon set.
This is only a sampling of the fin-
dings from two recent surveys, one
by Monroe Mendelsohn Research
Inc. and the other by Communica-
tions & Advertising Services to
Students (CASS). Together, the
surveys are a veritable Who Buys
What among college students.
Herewith, some of the more in-
teresting tidbits:
The "natural look" not withstan-
ding, cosmetic use is booming on
campus. Eight out of 10 female
undergrads use mascara and
blusher, and nearly as many (72 per-
cent) use eye shadow. Two-thirds
use nail polish. And � here's a '
puzzler � lipstick is most apt to be
used in the South and least in the
West.
Next to the calculator, the most
popular appliance is the blow-dryer.
Eight out of 10 women own one; six
out of 10 men.
Here's encouraging news: only 18
percent of students smoke cigaret-
tes, and 65 percent of those
undergrads who do smoke, smoke
low-tar brands.
Playboy is the leading magazine
among men on campus, reaching an
astonishing 43 percent of all male
students. The leader among women
is Glamour, reaching one in three
female students.
"School spirit" is high, with 83
percent of students saying they
drink alcoholic beverages. The most
popular inebriant is beer, with 70
percent of students drinking it.
Among liquors, vodka is the
favorite, used by 49 percent. Rum is
a close second at 46 percent.
In the soft drink department,
students rank their favorites in this
order: Coke, Pepsi, Tab, Dr. Pep-
per and 7-Up. Least favorite are
Fresca, Vernors, Schweppes and
Diet-Rite.
Favorites in domestic beer, in
order, are Miller High Life,
Budweiser, Lite, Michelob and
Coors. Among imports, the clear
favorite is Molson Golden Ale.
?





Ml I M . K(�I IM W
Entertainment
Lew
Xl'kil 14, lSl
.
Capra Movie, Swedish Epic
Showing Wednesday Night
1 Ins Wednesday night at 7 and 9
p.m. in Mendenhall Student
(.enter's Hendrix Iheatre. the Stu
dent Union Films Committee will
present two fine films including
Frank Capra's classic film of 1934
"It Happened One Night
rescheduled from an earlier date
Also playing is the Swedish epic
"The 1 migrants" (1972). "It Hap
pened One Night" will ran al 7 p.m.
followed h "The Emigrants" at 9
p.m.
Admission is by ECU ID and
tivity Card for students and MS
Membership Card for faculty and
stall.
rhere are a few serious moments
in "It Happened One Nigh (Best
Picture winner ot 1934). and it there
is a welter ot improbable incidents
these hectic doings serve to generate
plenty of laughs. I he suspense is
kept on the wing until a tew seconds
before the picture ends, but it is a
foregone conclusion that the pro
ducers would never dare to have the
characters acted b Clark Cable and
Claudette Colbert seperated when
the curtains close.
In tin merry romance, which is
an adaptation of a magazine story
b Samuel Hopkins Adams, Pet
Warne (Mr. Cable) and Ellie V
drews (Miss Colbert) enjoy the
discomforts ot a long-distance bus
ride. they also experience the pain ot
hitch-hiking and the joys ot tou
camps.
Besides these glimpses, i
beholds Alexander Andrews sea
ching for his daughter in an
airplane, expostulating
secretaries and sleuths because he is
unable to find the missing girl, in-
cidental!) an heiress.
Warne is one ot those u.kk
new spapei men frequently
Max Mm Sydow and 1 i I llmann
in "The Emigrants
discoverd in Hollywood's spacious
stlldlOs.
He does not hesitate to tell his
sup m outbursts of slang
precisely what he things ot them,
even though his finances at the time
ate at a low ebb.
1 llie is an obstinate young per-
son, who to spue her lather, has
become the wife (in name only) ot a
dashing young man named King
Westley.
She finds hersell virtually a
prisoner on her father's yacht and,
in the introductory scenes, she is on
tungei strike
Soon afterward she darts from
hei cabin to the deck, leaps over-
board and smis tor Florida and
freedom.
It i� � t ; on hei way from
Miami to New York that she en
counters Warne, an audacious per
si n
To t � matte: s more in-
the producers oi the
decide thai the fiery Ellie
must have hei suitcase stolen.
C days go by, Warne and Ellie
expei ence the pangs ol hunger and.
at one . the) havt to content
themselves with a meal of raw car-
's.
"It Happened One Night" is a
good piece of fiction, which, with
all its feverish stunts, is blessed with
bright dialogue and a good quota ot
relatively restrained scenes.
I he immigrant experience is the
great appealing myth ot American
society, the common theme on
which its disparate peoples played
their ethnic variations.
The history ot very nearly every
American family traces itsell back
to an ocean crossing. " 1 he
Emigrants" tells this same storv
from the other end, following the
flight of the Swedish peasantry from
the bottom rung ot a stratified
society to the open promise o Min-
nesota.
lhis two-and-a-half-hour saga
was an enormous hit in its native
Sweden but it also speaks to us
about our own origins, making us
see our country through the eyes ot
our antecedents America, the
egalitarian dream, a mecca ot in-
finite promise and illusion, the land
ot new beginnings.
Jan Troell's intelligent, thrifty
direction does more than animate
historv without vulgarizing it.
Taking the classic novel by
Vilhelm Moberg, he harmonizes its
scope and demand tor sweep with
the more refined, detailed re-
quirements of personal cinema.
The predicament o tenant farmer
Karl Oscar (Max von Sydow) and
his wite, Kristina (1 iv Ullmann), is
set out clearly in social terms.
1 he exigencies ol his immigration
emerge from sequences ot Karl
Oskar breaking the stubborn
Swedish earth with a handcrafted
plow and a pair ol oxen, the
malevolent seasons that cover his
earth with snow in spring and burn
his crops with drought in autumn;
the futility of fighting a caste sstein
enforced bv landowners, sheriffs
and deacons, and the inevitable per-
sonal catastrophes � a burned barn
and the earlv death of a daughter.
But 1 roell also follows the
adolescence ot Karl's brother
Robert, whose sacrifice to social in-
equity is nothing less than his youth
� he must work another farmer's
land from dawn to dat kness, dream-
ing fantasies , sofl hair and pink
bodies as he stares from his wooden
bunk at the ceiling, his thoughts
ultimately turning to an America he-
knows only from an immigration
booklet.
As Eddie Axberg plays him with
charm and shy reserve. Robert is
Troell's vehicle tor those little
scenes and moments that humanize
historical narrative.
I roell spends a few poetic
moments with, Robert at the edge of
a stream as lie loses a wooden shoe
in the water, makes a boat of the se-
cond shoe, then sails his hat
downstream � his carefree years
compressed into a few vagrant
moments of irresponsibility.
We watch his eyes glow as he
reads his book ot dreams about
America to his brutish but kind
hunk mate, and we sense what
America must have meant to each
voting man and woman who saw no
hope elsew here.
I he middle panel ot this triptych
captures the horror o the crossing,
hundred- ol peasants jammed in the
hold for ten weeks, vomiting on
each othei during sionns, picking
lice o!t each other, dying by the
dtov es.
1 hen America the tin ill ol
sighting land, the tortuous overli
trek to Minnesota and the final
triumphant staking ot a claim.
(lark Gabk andlaudette olberi in fin- famous hitchhiking scene
from "It Happened One Night" Hup photo). Below: "The V alls ol
Jericho I he film will be shown this Wednesday at 7 p.m.
'Julius Caesar'
'New Meaning Infused Into Play'
Photo by JON JORDAN
'All You Can Eat This Thursday At The Rathskeller
(.reenvilles hottest new band "All ou (an hat" will he performing this Thursday night at 9:43 p.m. in
The Rathskeller located on fifth street in downtown Greenville. This assemblage of "moderns" tore the
proverbial house down last Vednesda and Thursday nights at 1 he Rat with their patented blend of
traditional and progressive rock. The foursome have been called back to play for another paeked house.
Pietured above are Oft. to rt.) bassist Bruce Hall: lead vocalist Stacy Heller; drummer Gregg Boykin,
and guitarist Henry White.
Robin Lane Performs
At Attic This Saturday
By KAlin WEI LER
staff Wnlrr
from Aprii 7 to April 1 1.
Mendenhall's Hendrix Theater
reverberated with the immortal lines
o Shakespeare during the East
( arolina Playhouse presentation ol
Julius Caesar. This production had
an interesting twist, however, as it
was enacted in modern dress. All
too frequently modern dress pro
ductions o Shakespeare seem to be
living loo hard to relate to contem-
porary life and simply appear
ridiculous. Expecting a mutilation
of a classic play, 1 was pleasantly
surprised when, with the skillful
direction ol Edgar R. I oessin and
the contemporary costumes bv
Patrice Alexander, the production
not only worked but infused
Shakespeare's play with new mean
ing.
The story o ambition, power,
and the rise and fall ol demagogues
in ancient Rome was lifted into the
realm ot the universal bv I oessin
and an excellent cast. Caesar the
power-hungry became Any Man m
Any Country. Perhaps because our
own times have been marked bv the
rise and v iolent tail ot na
1 e a d eis t he au sc e 11
unusually attentive. As . assius says
in cl 111: "How ma lj s hence
shall this our loitv scene be acted
over in states unborn and accei
yel unk now n?"
Gregory Buch's spartan scet
provided selling for the action with
mottled, multi level platforms. Ad-
ded to this was an inventive idea
a movie screen as a backdrop. The
production began with an explicit
film sequence by Carlton Ben,
graphically depicting the horror;
man pitted against man in the name
o ambition. The iscd
periodical! � ut the plav to
project storms, colors and stills with
live a:o - producing a silhouette el
feet.
I ighting was designed bv David
F. Downing and was creatively used
to suggesi moods.
Violence, an element ever-present
in Julius Caesar, was dealt with
through creative lighting m this pro-
duction. Instead of a tvpis.il
melodramatic si age death. C aesai
met his fate with the use of red lights
and red cloves to mar k his assassins.
I oessin, Buch, Down
ander truly deserve a standii i
lor turning the
the inventive.
I anally deserv i . landing
o.ation (though they did not receive
one the night this writer viewed the
plav i was the . . Julius C aesai
1 ach and everv member exhibited a
high degree o! professionalism and,
for the most pan, recited
Shakespearean blank verse as
ugh they had been doing it all i
their lives Several members,
however, were particularly outstan-
ding. Among those were Gary
Carter as the coollv calculating
v assius. who delivered his lines with
azing naturalness, and Bill
Roberson as Marcus Brutus, who
created great sympathy and
understanding for his more
cerebrally-inclined character.
McCoy Baugham also gave a
powerful performance as t aesai
himself, depicting the man like an
ordinary Joe who has achieved
greatness and with it. a stupendous
ego and sense of elitism.
see NTH. page 7, eol. 1
By Bll I KAKIOII
Staff W tftr
This Saturday night, April 18, at
The Attic in downtown Greenville,
students will have a rare opportuni-
ty to see one of the best new rock
bands touring today when Robin
Lane and the Chartbusters take to
the stage tor one night only.
After a solid debut album which
featured their top-ten single "When
Things Go Wrong and a
devastating extended play effort en-
titled Five live, the band began
work on their latest album. Imita-
tion life which they are currently
touring to promote. Their sets for
The Attic will include material from
the new album as well as old
favorites and even some unrcleased
songs. As for the new album . . .
Imitation Life is for real. Robin
Lane and the C hartbusters' second
Warner Bros, album is an
astonishing melding ot new wave
and mainstream stylings, a giant
step forward tor one o this
decade mosl exciting new bands
and a breathtaking exercise in the
mechanics ot modern rock and roll.
The emotional resonance o Im-
itation 1 ife's ten tunes reveal a
songwriter at the peak of her powers
and a performance-tested group ful-
ly equal to translating that power to
vinyl.
Produced bv Gary I yons, the
album ranges from the mounting
cyclical tensions o "What The Peo-
ple Are Doing" to the anthemic
chimes ot "Solid Rock" to the
lilting melodic turns of "Pretty
Mala
It is a work that reasserts the
blood and thunder of basic rock
while reaching forward in new and
articulate ways.
I m e r g i n g from Boston's
burgeoning music scene in the late
'70s, Robin Lane and the Chart-
busters comprise some of the city's
most luminous talent.
Guitaristsvocalists Leroy Radcliffe
and Asa Brebner first appeared in
the music limelight as members of
Jonathon Richman's Modern
Lovers.
Bassist vocalist Scott Baerenwald
served time in the locally renowned
Reddy Teddy while drummer Tim
Jackson has been connected with
many of the bands comprising
Boston's vast floating talent pool.
As for Robin, the California born
singer began her career in folk
music, garnering recording time by
singing backup with a variety of
established acts including Neil
Young. She moved to Boston in
1976 and, fired by the exploding
new wave scene of that year, formed
the Chartbusters.
Try
( onto
New
Into
( on tin
Captured above at The Pier in Raleigh by Spectator Magazine photographer Chris Seward, New Wave artists
Robin Lane and the Chartbusters will be appearing in Greenville this Saturday night at The Attic. The Boston
based band has released three albums to date including a five-song EP that features a live version of their
smash single "When Things Go Wrong The band is currently promoting their new IP Imitation Life
5l
Sol

1





1 HI t S1 I K() IM

yv Wave artists
tic. t he Boston
ersiofl of their
tuition 1 ife.
M'KIl 14, 19X1

L�tisnjG Akjt CocctG The Hp Way
N fcOOW I GOT TO S��
r

7Vy Baking Bread, Cakes
Continued from page 5
floured 139 inch pan.
Bake at 350' for tons
to forty-five minutes,
or until cake springs
back when lightly
pressed and begins to
pull away from the
sides of the pan. Cool
in the pan for fifteen
minutes before remov-
ing. Sprinkle with con
fectioner's sugar, if
desired. (Or bake in a
ten inch tinted tube pan
foi fifty to fifty-five
minutes).
It cookies are your
cup of tea, you'll find
PIXIES a lot of fun to
make. You'll need: 1 4
cup shortening, four
squares unsweetened
baking chocolate, two
cups sugar, four eggs,
one teaspoon vanilla,
two cups sifted all-
purpose flour, two
teaspoons baking
powder, 12 teaspoon
salt, 34 cup chopped
walnuts (pecans are
good, too). Melt
shortening and
chocolate together over
low heat. Remove from
heat and cool. Blend
sugar into shortening-
chocolate mixture, then
add eggs (one at a
time), blending well
after each addition.
Add vanilla and blend.
Sift dry ingredients
together and stir into
New Meaning Infused �"
Refrigerate for two
Into 'Julius Caesar'
Continued from page 6
I he only two major
women characters in
the plav, Patricia
Peters and Sails Nell
Clodfelter, who por-
t rayed Calpurnia,
c aesar's wife, and Por-
tia, Brutus' sv i f e,
respectively, handled
their small parts well.
Ms. Clodfelter's ac-
tions cons meed one ol
her deep lose and con-
cern for Brutus but, un-
fori u nately, s he
delivered her lines in a
rather stilted manner.
Ms. Peter- brought a
regal grace in addition
to fine acting to the
part of tormented
Calpurnia. All in all,
each cast member did a
fine job of bringing
Julius Caesar to life.
With Julius Caesar
the East Carolina
Playhouse succeeded in
making its iewers a bit
more ass are of the shit-
ting sand- oi fortune
on which the mighty
luxuriate. Perhaps this
was their purpose in
presenting the play. In
any case, the obvious
hard ssork of all con-
cerned definitely suc-
ceeded in producing a
'professional presenta-
tion. 1, foi one, eagerly
await future presenta-
tions of an equally high
caliber.
hours. After dough is
chilled, shape it into
long rolls about one
inch in diameter by
rolling the dough with
your hands on a lightly
floured surface. Cut
off one inch pieces and
shape into balls. Roll
balls in confectioner's
sugar, place on a lightly
greased baking sheet,
and bake at 350� for ap-
proximately fifteen
minutes. Cool before
storing. Makes about
seven dozen cookies.
If putting together
anything from scratch
gives you chills and
sweaty palms, do not
fret. Your cooking ven-
ture may still be a suc-
cess, thanks to the
many packaged mixes
now available. There is
absolutely no reason
why you shouldn't
make a proud contribu-
tion to your bake sale,
family dinner or com-
pany picnic when
preparing baked goods
can be so simple, and
yes, even fun.
JTues. April 14
Where Bands make it Rock Roadies makes it
Roll! 200 W Walnut St Downtown Goldsboro ph.
734 4551
Presents
"In Concert"
Capitol Recording Artist
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
"DELBERT
McCLINTON"
with special guest "Steve BdSSett
and Virginia Breeze"
Doors Open At 7:30
Showtime At 8:45
You are only 45 miles from the Rock n Roll ai
Roadies
WESTERN
SIZZLIN
STEAKHOUSE
"The Family
Steak House"
&& item
Salad Bar
TAKEOUT
SERVICE
2903 E. 10th St
758-2712
2M By-Pass
756-0040
20 OFF
ALL MENU ITEMS
3:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ONLY
MON.thru FRI.
PLUS
FREE TEA
with college I.D.
20 OFF ALLMENU ITEMS;
MON. thru FRI. from 3:00p.m. to6:30p.m.
FREE DRINK with college I.D.
UJ)5 SO
Guess
REtfemez amh cf it !
r
tc
ft
Emergency
Meeting
Scheduled
There will be an
emergency reorganiza-
tion meeting for the
Society of Collegiate
Journalists on Tues-
day, April 14. The
meeting will be held in
Austin 301.
The Media Board is
presently accepting
applications for
Media Board
Day Representative
Applications may be picked
up in the Media Board of-
fice in the Publications
Bldg. from 8-1 and 2-5
Monday thru Friday.
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force scholar
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The
scholarship provides for tui-
tion, books, lab fees and
equipment, plus a $400 mon-
thly allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
the high cost of medical
education.
Contact:
TSgt. Bob Payne
U.S.A.F. Health Profes
sions Recruiting
Suite CM, 1100 Navaho
Dr
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
(919)755-4134
AIR FORCE
( )nt metric
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nightly 5:UO-9:UOpm
Tue. Fish Fry- All The Fish You Un bat With A Mug
Ot Your Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shnmp With French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Our ramou' i iu.snpuppies$3.99
Thur. Family Night A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp. Fried Fish, Oysters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tue,Wed,Thur(Oy�ter Bar Only) 1 Do rUhhefl
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Oi Your Favorite Beverage
$2.99
EYE CARE
CENTER
OF GREENVILLE
P.A.
Budget Kyewear 39.95 complete
Frames, lenses and lint in
plastic bifocals only 59.95
Contact Lenses
149
complete
Ph. 736-2011
: � exam, fitting, heat disinfectioi and all
A 'Mill.
SPRING SPECIAL
Ray-Ban Sunglasses
20 Off
10 fcOJ student & staH discount
on all materials excluding
specials and contacts.
Tipton Annex
228 Greenville Blvd.
7 56-4404
Dr.PeteHolhs
iff

'
A
ti

ATTENTION
SENIORS
MARK YOUR CALENDARS!
3rd Annual
SENIOR SOCIAL
Sponsored by
THE ECU ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
Thursday, April 16, 1981
5-7 P.M.
A
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
MUSIC
BEER
SOFT DRINKS
SNACKS
t





1 HI i s! i k� �l :
Sports
Al'kll 14. ivm Page k
ECU Is Ranked Best In Nation
No. 11
Sporting a 30-3 record and
coming off the championship
of the N. C. State Invitational
last weekend, the 1 ad) Pirates
are now the number one-
ranked collegiate slow;
team in the country, according
to Mike Ricciardi oi Women's
Collegiate Sports Rankings
inc.
"I certainly feel we are
deserving of this ranking"
coach Ahta Dillon said. "I
just hope we can maintain it
The Lad) Seminoles ol
Florida State, the team I
lady Bucs defeated for '
weekend's crown, are ranked
second, in front oi 1 lorida, a
team the Pirates also defeat
at the Carolina Pines tourna-
ment.
The Wolf pack oi N.C
State, a team the Pirates havt
defeated six times this sea
are ranked fourth, and Pfiel
fer is number five. Roui d
out the top 10 arc 1 Ion. V
thern Kentucky,
Florida Southern ai d
Carolina.
Ranked teams arc ail I)ii
sion I schools thai have
slowpitch softball
There are some division 1
schools playing womei
ball, but it is of the fa
variety, such as on the esi
Coast.
1 ast year the 1 a
were Region 11 Champ-
that being as tar as a �
could go because oi no
tional tournament. 1 hi
however, there is a A! W
tournament, to be held a
be-named site Ma) 14 16
The Lady Pirates have
MOT-W
�Ml
MMSr
Wins NCSU Tourney
YX i - pitcherJeannene K�th
lenri. on the weekend of May
aI he national competition
will be held the following
weekend.
I he l ady Pirates' number
one-ranking was determined
�when their record was 23-2
:before their double-header sweep of Campbell last
Wednesda) and prior to their
11tournament championship last weekend.
B WILLIAM YELVERTON
WMunl Spurs rdilur
Refusing to be deterred by a 12-0
shellacking at the hands of Florida
Stale, East Carolina's I ady Pirates,
the top-ranked women's slow-pitch
softball team in the nation, gritted
their teeth and defeated the Lady
Seminoles twice on Saturday to win
the N.C. State Invitational at
C arolina Pin -s.
The lady Piue defeated Nor-
thern Kentucky ana Florida Frida)
to move into the winners' bracket
semifinals oi the double-elimination
tournament. Florida State then
handed the Lady Bucs their third
loss oi the season b scoring 10 runs
in the third inning to wrap up the
ictor later in the afternoon.
The loss put the Pirates in a tough
position by having to play arch-rival
N.C. State in the losers' bracket
finals. The Pirates defeated State
6-2, and then moved into the finals
against the 1 ady Seminoles. To win
the crown, the Bucs defeated FSl
twiee, 9-4 in the first game, and
came back to win the second, 5-3, in
eight innings.
"Our girls were just super said
a proud Coach Ahta Dillon oi her
30-3 Pirates. "Overall, the most im-
pressive thing was our consistent
defense. We did have a breakdown
in the first game against Florida
State since the) scored 10 runs in one
inning, but there was no way the)
should have scored that many runs
againsl us. Alter that game, 1 just
told our girls to forget about it
The Lad) Pirates opened the
tournev cm Frida) with a 7-0 whipp-
ing ol Northern Kentuck) behind
third-inning homers by Cynthia
Shepard and Kathy Riley. Shepard
drove in three runs while Rilev's ac-
counted for two. The Bucs added
two more in the fourth inning.
Oil ensue stars were Shepard.
who was 3-3, while Jo Fanda
Clayton and Miti Davis chipped in
with two hits each.
In the second game against a
Florida team that had handed the
Bucs one of their two losses this
season, the Pirates took a 7-3 lead
on a Shepard grand slam, and stop-
ped a Ciator rally that accounted for
two runs in the bottom of the
seventh that finished the scoring at
7-5.
The Florida game, Dillon said,
was a "real pick-me-up. .After that
game, we didn't have to play unto
the next morning. We real!) came
through in that game
On Saturday, FSl was sparked
by a Darby Cottle homer in the third
to defeat the Pirates. Ginger
Rothermel was 2-2 at the plate tor
the Lady Bucs.
The I ady Pirates, facing elimina-
tion, bounced back to beat State 6-2
on homers by Shirley Brown and
Clayton in the seventh to spark a
tour-run rally. The Wolf pack had
tied the game with runs in the fourth
and sixth innings before the Pirates'
assault.
The victory over State led to a
showdown against the Seminoles.
and the Pirates needed two wins to
take the championship. I he Bucs
scored twice in the top of the first,
but I SL bounced back to score once
in the bottom of the inning. Rile)
put the I ad) Pirates up b two with
a homer in the third, but the Lad)
Seminoles took the lead bv scoring
three more on a Charlotte Cates
round-triper.
Once again, the 1 ad) Pil
would not quit, as Rilev belted her
second homer ol the game and third
oi the tournev in a six-run tourth in-
ning to give the Pirates a V-4 win
and force a do-or-die championship
game.
I ach team scored in their halt ol
the first. East ' arolina held a
run lead until the seventh when the
Seminoles pulled even 1 lorida Si
took the lead in the top
eighth, but the Pirates stormed back
in the bottom halt oi the inning on a
Shepard homer to score three runs
and win 5-3.
Rothermel was three-for-f(
while (lav ton and Shepard had
hits each. Rile) added a double.
"The) didn't have
weaknesses Dillon said oi No-
State. "You can'l make en
against them like we did in the I
game and win. 1 he had a loi
good hitters, and to heat them ,
have to do everything well
Rilev was named MVP in the
tournev. and she had to fight ofi a
minor injur) to perform. "She had
a good all-around tournament. I
ly Saturday, she twisted her ankl
practice, and she didn't plav the
first time we played Florida State
We put it on ice, and she tried it.
She played ver) well
Dillon also praised Shepard,
Rothermel and Roth, who pitched
the majorit) t the games in I
tournament.
I he 1 ad) Pirate- travel to C hape!
this afternoon louble-
tder with North t arolina. "We'll
have to come down out oi the
clouds for these games Dillon
noted.
Mike Hawkins Ruled Ineligible
Kathy Rilev (standing ai left) wuits another turn ai bai on the
bench of the top-ranked Lad) Pirates.
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sprK t dilor
I he hast Carolina football team
suffered a blow yesterda) when it
was announced thai the Pirate's
leading rusher from this past season
would not return as had been ex-
pected for the W81 campaign.
Mike Hawkins, a 5-10 halfback
who would have been a fifth-year
senior, was ruled ineligible bv
E 1 s NCAA representative. Dr.
Earnie Schwarz.
Hawkins and Pirate head coach
Ed 1 morv had called on Schwarz to
determine the eligibility ol the
Henderson native, hoping that he
would receive another year's
eligibility. T hev claimed that he had
not particpated in am games Ins
t res lima n season and was.
therefore, redshirted.
N A rules state that a player
can receive an extra year's eligibility
if he plays in no more than three
games before the halfway point ol a
season.
Statistics from Hawkins'
freshman season � 1977 � show
him carrying the ball twice and par-
ticipating in five games. Hawkins
and Emroy denied this and went to
Sehwar for a final say-so.
Emory said on several occasions
that 1977 game films had been ex-
amined and that no trace ol Mike
Hawkins could be found. There was
another Hawkins on the '77 team �
senior running back, Willie.
Schwarz took over the issue about
two weeks ago and came through
with a decision yesterday.
"In my opinion, from the records
I have, he's not eligible for another
year Schwarz said.
"Facts are tacts. 1 told Mike I'd
do all I could to get him eligible and
1 did. There is jusl no way that is
possible from all I've been able to
find
Emory could not be reached for
comment but Hawkins expressed
quiet disappointment.
"It's a pretty big blow he said
solemnly. "But there's nothing I
can do about it
Hawkins now joins fullback
Theodore Sutton and halfback An-
thony Collins as graduating
members oi the '80 starting
back field that will now be eyed in
the May draft of collegiete players
by the National Football league.
"I've begun to make some con-
tacts Hawkins said of his sudden
forced interest in making himself
more known among the pros.
Assisting him is local agent and
ECU halfback Mike Hawkins, seen here running against
Richmond this past season, will not return to the Pirates in
I "o 1 .
former ECU assistant coach Ken
Hutcherson.
The loss oi Hawkins coupled with
the losses oi Sutton and Collins
make a clean sweep of the team's
starting running back from a year
ago.
Seahawks Get Best Of Bucs Twice
a errors
ina's
ECU'S John Hallo
this weekend I t
basebal Iropped
i I N V
!
.id not
allow run bin saw his
as 1 � I committed
nun losing 6-3.
On Sunda) the Hues simply could
t was needed
ts loaded with
onl) one out oi �cca
sions, onl) to come awa) empty
each time. ITie Seahawks won thai
one 3 1
rd fell to 18-9 with
the losses while Wilmii . im-
�ed to 24-11
1 t i assistant i ver-
ton said the losses were disappoin-
ting but did not necessarily mean
that the Pii :
poo:
"1 don't think we have an) real
problems Overton said. "We only
made a few mistakes. Thev jusl
came at the wrong times. They were
not bad mistakes but they certainly
came in crucial situations
1 he Buc aide added that things
went exactly opposite over the
weekend for the Seahawks.
"Not taking anything away from
Wilmington because they played
great � but things seemed to fall
right into place for them in both
games he said.
In the first game, the Seahawks
used a big fourth inning to pave the
way to victory. UNC-W scored five
times in that stanza.
John Milkovts led off the inning
and reached first base on an error.
He advanced to second on a passed
ball and to third as Doc 1 awing
reached first via yet another ECU
mistake.
Roger Hudson then singled in the
inning's first run, Milkovits scoring
to get things rolling. Kelly
O'Donnell sacrified the remaining
two base runners up one base. Paul
Murr then tripled, scoring both
I awing and Hudson.
Second baseman Tim Whitehead
contined the surge, singling to score
Murr. Whitehead then stole second
and rounded out the inning's scor-
ing, crossing home plate thanks to a
single by right fielder Tom Jones.
The highlight of the day for the
Bucs was first baseman Mike Sage's
solo home run in the sixth. Todd
Hendley was the top Pirate batter,
going two for five with an RBI.
Sunday's second game was, of
course, the game of missed oppor-
tunites for the Bucs and one of just
enough for the Seahawks.
Whitehead got things going for
UNC-W in the first, leading off with
a double and scoring on a doouble
by Jones.
The Pirates tied it at one in the
top of the third when Kelly
Robinette singled, stole second and
eventually scored on a wild pitch.
The Seahawks wasted little time
reasserting themselves, scoring in
the bottom of the third to go up 2-1.
Kelly O'Donnell singled and scored
on a sacricifice fly bv none other
than Jones.
Jones hit the Bucs hard in both
games, finishing the weekend going
four of six against Pirate pitching.
All four hits were singles as the
Seahawk rightfielder had four
RBI's.
Bill Wilder took the loss for the
Pirates, falling to 5-4. This marked
the second tough loss in a row for
Wilder, the other coming in a heart-
breaker to North Carolina last
week.
Robinette was the top Pirate bat-
ter in the Sunday game, going three
of five.
The Bucs now look ahead to a
long stretch of 15 consecutive home
games before their regular season
draws to close on May 3 at North
Carolina.
ECU has doubleheaders schedul-
ed for this Thursday against V'MI
and Friday against Baptist. The
VMI opener begins at 6 p.m. while
the Friday afternoon twin bill gets
underway at 1:00.
Fi
IM
i
Race 11
r
f
t
f

�9
�HSR3















T;
Dance
Music
Citiens ol I
are free of �
Pirate pitcher Bill Wilder
Buffel
MonFn,
MonTu
Sunday
Wednl
Thui
Buy
?
!





I HI I AMAROl INIAN
APkll 14, 1981
n
ble
ininy, against
Ilu- Pirates in
White
Wins
� � �
Miler
Controversey Envelopes Success Of Parker
1M Sports 'N' Shorts
By Dwayne Grooms
� and�
Gregg Mellon
CROSS CAMPUS RUM
Bill White, a 31-year-old school teacher
from Washington and former ECU
irackster, led throughout the Intramural-
Recreation "Run for the Sun" Spring Cross
Campus five-mile race Wed April 8.
White set a new course record on his u
to victory running the challenging five-mile
course in 2T mins 12 seconds. Rusty
Jenkins took the 2.5 mile race in 13 mins. 54
seconds.
1 he two races were run under almost ideal
racing conditions. The course was dry and
the vMiid light on this beautiful spring day.
Jenkins led the entire distance and uas never
seriously challenged.
1 amm Fletcher of the ECU Team Hand-
ball Club was the first woman to cross the
finish line with a time of 18:56. Fletcher was
closely followed b Donna Eason, also of
the team handball club.
In the five-mile race White and freshman
Jim I ippitl of I instead Dorm battled
throughout the race until the 4' ; mile mark.
at which point experience paid ofl tor
W hue. Lippitt was not more than two strides
behind at the 2 : mile mark when he fell.
Almost in a continuous motion Lippitt
rolled, came upright and kept running, los-
ing only the two strides.
The first woman to finish the five mile
race was Mars Alison Smith in 42 minutes.
2s seconds, followed b Michelle 1 yons.
Although the number of runner was low
Race Director Gregg Melton termed the race
a access and expressed his hopes that main
more runners would run in the fall C ross
Campus Run during homecoming weekend.
VKI.VKRTON
vMvHnl Sport t dilur
East Carolina's
Russell Parker cap-
tured first place in the
high jump by tying his
own record of seven
feet, but the 1600 meter
relay team finished a
controversial second in
action at the Carolina
Relays Saturday in
Chapel Hill.
The 1600 meter relay
team of Carlton Bell,
Craig Rainey, Shawn
Eaney and Tim Cephus
was just nipped at the
finish line, having run
3:10.3. "We really won
that relay- 1 couldn't
believe they gave it to
the other team Coach
Bill C arson said. "Our
times were the same,
but Cephus crossed the
line just ahead ot the
other guy. He moved
really well on the guy
from Richmond (who
finished third) and St.
Augustine's (first).
��We were about five
yards behind when he
started
Bell ran a 47.6,
Rainey a 47.5 and
Laney added a leg of
49.5. Cephus' 47.5 leg
was the second fastest
split ever run at ECU.
Otis Melvin has run
45.6.
The Pirates also ran
a "B" team in the 1600
meter relay, finished
with a time of 3:16.6.
The team was made up
of Keith Clarke, Ray
Dickerson, Bill Miller
and Russell Parker.
Parker's jump was
the second straight time
he has tied his own
school record. He
previously tied his
mark at the Colonial
Relays in Williamsburg
April 3-4.
The only other run-
ner from East Carolina
to place in the competi-
tion was Bell, who
finished second in the
400 meters in a time of
47.1 seconds.
Bill Miller captured
seventh place in the 800
meters for the Bucs,
clocking in at 1:50.6.
Carson said Miller was
in good shape to finish
second, but he just gave
out at (he end of the
race.
"W'e went there this
weekend to work our
quarter milers out, and
that's exactly what we
did. They ran well in
the open 400 meters. I
think we'll have the
45.0 splits pretty soon.
At the Penn Relays
(this weekend), no one
should be able to get
near us
Golf Team Finishes Seventh In Tar Heel
nRadio haekT"
The last Carolina
golt team fashioned a
54hole total of 1154 to
finish seventh in the
tough ten-team far
Heel Invitational this
past weekend on
Chapel Hill's 1-mlcy
Golf Course.
North Carolina won
the event with a three
das total of 1091.
South Carolina finish-
ed just behind at 1094
while Southern Florida
was third at 1099.
The low individual
scorer in the tourna-
ment was Duke's
Charlie Boiling, who
lathed a 209 total.
lhiee ECU golfers
finished as the Pirates
top finishers. Carl
Beaman, Don Gafner
and Don Sweeting all
carded a 227.
I he Pirates end their
spring schedule this
weekend, participating
in the Old Dominion
Invitational. The
36-hole tournament
will be held at the
Seascape Golf Course
in Nags Head, N.C.
Jackson Gymnastic MVP
Elizabeth Jackson
was presented the Most
Valuable Gymnast
Award at East
Carolina's women's
gymnastics banquet,
held Sunday at I he-
Beef Barn.
Awards were also
presented for MVP's in
each of the four events.
I ouise Matthews was
awarded MVP in the
vault, Jennifer Bell was
MT
in
the uneven
M P in the beam, and
Joanie Ford was MVP
in the floor exercise.
Ford also received an
award for Most Im-
proved Gymnast.
In a final addiess.
COPIES
Copy Center
Copies4.25
100 OR MOPE
coach Jon Rose en-
couraged the team to
continue their gym-
nastic careers if possi-
ble. Women's gym-
nastics has been cut
from the athletic pro-
gram for next vear.
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4



















Eastern Carolina
Arts Festival
April 1-16,1981
85 Events Including
Dance Theatre Photography
Music Art Exhibits Art Show & Sale
Otiens of Pitt Count are encouraged to participate. Man events
are free of charge.
For schedule information, call 757-1194.













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10
1 HI t S1 CAROLINIAN
APRIL 14, 1981
Two New Marks Set
Classifieds
ByCANDICE
MATHKWS
Staff Writn
Last Carolina's
women's track team
traveled to Chapel Hill
this weekend, setting
two new varsity records
at the Carolina Relays.
Eve Brennan, runn-
ing the 5000 meters for
the first time, captured
fifth place with a time
of 18:18.1. This time
Net a new ECU varsit)
record, as well as being
a personal best for
Brennan. Brennan also
took fifth in the 1500
meter run with a time
Ol 4:44.6.
Lisa Gray set the
other varsity record in
the discus with a throw
ol 139 ft 2 inches.
1 Ins throw captured
third place. Gray also
took third in the shot
with a throw of 42 ft
5 ; 2 inches.
Ro Major took
third place in the long
jump with a leap of 18
ft 8! : inches.
"I was overall pleas-
ed with the team's per-
formance this weekend.
SJ
Technical
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Audio,Video,
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Piik-l p and Deliver)
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M0 l)a v arrant)
Period
especially with our con-
sistency said coach
Laurie Ar rants.
"Setting two varsity
records and several per-
sonal bests, we couldn't
come away feeling too
bad
The Lady tracksters
travel to Appalachian
State University this
weekend.
Lady Netters Take 2
BvCANDICE
MATHEWS
Sl�ft Writer
East Carolina's
women's tennis team
played at home this
weekend, coming away
with two wins. The
Lady Netters met Pfeif-
fer College on Satur-
day, winning easily,
7-2. Then on Sunday,
ECU narrow lv defeated
UNC Charlotte, 5-4.
In Saturday's match,
the Lady Netters won
their second through
sixth singles spots.
Debbie Christine, in the
no. 2 position, took her
match 6-1, 6-3. Tracey
Eubank won her match
6-2, 3-6, 6-2. Karen Jef-
freys won her match by
forfeit. In the no. 5
spot. Kellie Adair took
her match 6-0, 6-0.
Chris DeSantis claimed
her match with a final
score of 6-0, 6-1.
In doubles, ECU
won the no. 2 and no. 3
positions. The no. 2
spot of Laura Redford
and DeSantis won by
forfeit. Jeffreys and
Adair easily won their
match 6-1, 6-1.
In Sunday's match
with UNC-Charlotte,
Jeffreys again won her
match'2-6, 7-5, 6-0. In
the no. 5 position,
Adair took her match
6-2, 6-2. Carmen
Greene, playing the no.
6 spot, claimed her
match 6-4, 6-7, 6-4.
The doubles team of
Jeffreys and Adair,
playing the no. 2 posi-
tion, again won their
match 6-2, 6-3.
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Wilson Acres. 4 blocks from cam
pus SMS mo. plus one half
utilities Call 752 9194 after 4 .30.
FOR RENT 3 bedroom
townhouse apts , 1 and half baths,
appliances. cable-TV hookups, 2
locations. River Bluff and E. tlth.
St. No pets. $280 and S300 units,
lease and security deposit re
quired. JL Harris and Sons, Inc
REALTORS, 304 W. 10th St
758 4711
APT. FOR LEASE 600
Georgetown Runs from mid May
to Mid August Call 7S8 0333
ROOMMATES WANTED Nice
house on 4th St near campus and
downtown. From mid May to mid
August Call 752 2659
BEDROOM AVAILABLE Large
air conditioned bedroom
Available May 8th Across from
college 7S8 2585
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: 2 bedroom apt in
Eastbrook. S73 a month plus one
third utilities Call 7S8 3344
ROOMMATE NEEDED For
summer to share 3 bedroom Tar
River Apt SI IS month plus one
half utilities Call 7S8 8051
ROOMMATE NEEDED: 3
bedroom apt. Sublease May to
Aug. 1 block from ECU. One half
rent. For more info, call 758-4755.
APT. FOR LEASE : Village Green
Apts $195 per month Call
758 9315 or 752 8763
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Furnish
ed apt. One half rent and utilities.
Summer. Call 7S7 1581.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: Only S77 per month
plus one third utilities Private
room, air condition Within walk
ing distance of campus For sum
mer only Call 752 -9151 or 752 6105
ask tor Becky, Beth, or Susan
PERSONS NEEDED 2 or 3 peo
pie to sub lease apt tor summer
Located on E 3rd. Street 3
bedrooms, part furnished Water
included in rent For more infor
mation call 758 7755
FOR RENT: Furnished 3 bedroom
apt available for summer mon
ths. On ECU bus route Call
758 4438
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: N Summift St S83 SO
plus one third utilities Washer
and dryer Available May 1st.
Call 758 56 "2
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom beginning
May 7th. 2 mi from campus Very
low utilities S335 month Call
753 9537.
SUBLEASE FURNISHED APT
For summer 3 bedrooms Air,
near campus and ECU bus Call
752 4989
ROOM FOR RENT S75 month
plus one sixth utilities Suave kit
Chen and bath Call 758 3545
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED
3 bedroom furnished apt 3 blocks
from campus $100 month Call
7S2 7190.
APT FOR SUBLEASE 2
bedroom Call 7S8 4640
PERSONAL
BANDS UNLIMITED BOOKING
AGENCY: Is now booking bands
for the spring, summer, and fall
We cater to every different
musical need and price range We
provide bands that range from
Beach, Top 40, to easy listening
and country. The quality of a band
can insure the success of your par
ty. Let the Pros at BANDS
UNLIMITED get the right band
for your next party. Call 757 3310
ROADIES Where bands make it
rock ROADIES makes it roll!
300 W Walnut St Downtown
Goldsboro. phone 734 4551.
GUITAR PLAYER WANTED
Money making Top 40. Beach
band Vocal ability a must Call
757 3210
YOUR CAREER What are you
doing this summer to prepare for
it? Find out why IBM, Xerox, Pro
ctor and Gamble, Upiohn and hun
dreds of others want students that
have worked with us
FULL OR PARTTIME HELP
WANTED Report to HL Hodges
752 4156
NEED PROFESSINAL TYPIST?
Will do term papers, thesis,
manuscript, etc Call Susan Byers
758 8241 or 758 5488
NEED ENTERTAINMENT? Con
tact Eastern Music Services And
Production Agency. Large vane
ty of bands available, all styles
Call 758 5676.
ELBO ROOM The best time in
town! The great Wednesday Night
HUMP NITE SPECIALS
Thursdays are always SUPER!
Friday afternoons are still ROCK
ING and ROLLING Sunday is
still LADIES NITE!
ALL YOU CAN EAT at the
RATHSKELLER Thursday night
at 9:43
OK SPORT Fers it was a good
weekend. The B's threw a good
party and everyone had plenty of
oysters for some better springtime
WALK We all hope Cobb is feel
mg better' And sorry Jaws had to
miss out Saturday It'saVerner!
Where's his date! Big John, how
was the late nite sport surfing and
are you going to tandem soon or
will we all have to bust loose on the
Wolf tickets? And don't forget
good ole HEAD! YEA!
AMANDA: Things lust didn't
seem to work out the way it could
have I guess tha's my fault.
What we had was great and maybe
the future holds something for us.
But remember your kiss is still on
my list. D.S.
QUALITY WORKMANSHIP
on
HI FI and CAR STEREO

JVC
SO III
� I 1
OHM O I II
See Jim or Cifeg
JIM'S SERV-A-SET
5 3103 South Memorial Drive
$ (Beside Parker's Barbecue)
SpoOoooooooooo8
JltlAMMC
LOOK GOOD ON PAPER
Resumes, term papers, applica
tions, etc professionally typed
WRITE RIGHT 756 9946
HE S MADE IT THROUGH
MOSER'S FARM! HE'S CON
QUERED THE BARS WITH LOW
FUNDS! ROBERT S LOOSE
FOR A NEW ESCAPADE
LOST: A silver colored, diamond
shaped, small ring It found
PLEASE call 757 3155 Has sen
timental value
YOUR CAREER What are you
doing this summer to prepare tor
it? Find c t why IBM, Xerox. Pro
ctor and Gamble, Upiohn and hun
dreds of others want students that
have worked with us For inter
view call 758 4513
HAS REAGAN'S BUDGET CUT
CAUGHT YOU SHORT? Then
get a high paying summer Ob with
a good Ob recommendation For
interview call 758 4513.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Snare drum Pearl,
top of the line Extra deep Ex
cond Call 757 3210
FOR SALE Scuba gear Tank,
regulator with psi, weights, 2
spearguns, depth guage with com
pass. BC S2S0 Call 758 6946
FOR SALE Siamese kittens
seven weeks old. chocolate point
Call 752 7218 after 5pm
FOR SALE Labrador Retriever
puppies, yellow, AKC, ready May
llth Nice graduation present
Chris Smith, 793 9205. keep trying'
FOR SALE Yashica Mat 124 G
twin lens reflex camera Great
lor art student Asking S90 Only
used twice Call Lmdi 758 4445
FOR SALE 73 Yamaha l7Scc
street trail bike S375 73 Yamaha
250cc street bike S425 Call Chris
at 753 1082
FOR SALE 1971 Fiat 134, needs
transmission, less than 3.000 miles
on overhaul Call 752 4400 after
6 0C p m $800 firm.
FOR SALE Rotel 60 watts stereo
receiver with 4 channel
capability $125 Soundesign
8 track player recorder $50 BIC
beltdnve turntable $75 Maranti
75 watt 3 way speakers, 3 years
old, slight cabinet damage, ex
cellent sound $200 for set Call
Dave at 756 6455 or come by M 2
Oakmont Square Apts after 5pm
FOR SALE Jensen Tn Axial 6 by
9 in speakers New. still in bo
$80 Call 752 6136
FOR SALE Black 1980 440 LTD
Kawasaki negotiable price, good
condition Call 753 9403 ask lor
John G
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED FROM 2 00 3 00 M F
ONLY AT THE EAST CAROL!
NIAN OFFICE OR BY MAIL
Coupon
$12.00 Value
Coupon
Better Health Brings Better Grades
Special Membership Offer
Present This Coupon With $1.00 Cash
WHOLESALE BUYING CLUB
Natural Food Supplements and Nutrition
Counseling
CLINICAL NUTRITION CENTER
608 Arlington Blvd. Phone: 756-7075
Hours 2:00-5:00pm Monday thru Friday
ECU STUDENTS
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CARNIVAL
SIDEWALKSALE
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Located between
Rawl and Wright buildings
April 15, 1981
8:00 am - 4:00 pm
(Rain day April 169 1981)
UMITITED QUANTITIES AND SELECTIONS OF THE FOLLOWING I
Over 800 Records and Tapes $2.98 up. Art Supplies up to 70 dis-
count. Shirts, Jackets, Jerseys, up to 50 discount. New Bargain
Books up to 40 discount. Old editions and out of print books up to
90 discount. Racks of Greeting Cards valued up to .80 on sale for
15c
�1J" NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES
�tu(iert �tpp


. 10c Pep sis
CANDIED APPLES
COTTON CANDY
POPCORN
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Owned and Operated by
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 14, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 14, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.126
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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