The East Carolinian, April 9, 1981






Shz 3Ea0t Carolinian
Sen ma
the East Carolina campus community since 1925
8 Pages
(Thursday, pril�. 1981
Greenville, Northarolina
Circulation Hi.ooo
Sherrod Not Guilty
Barnes Cites Insufficient Evidence
Bv 1VU 1 COL1 INS
, I diKM
1 ittle claimed thai Sherrod was
responsible foi switching
photographs so that the advertise
ment showed him wearing an ROT
unifoi m.
�� l he Bo.nd found thai Mi Lit-
tle's evidence was nol sufficient
enough to find Mi Sherrod gu
ol the charges ttorney General
c lini Barnes said ol the hearing.
In response to 1 ittle's claims,
Sherrod ha- filed charges that I ittle
violated sections oi theodeon
duel dealing with lying and giv
false information to the univei ity
Since these charge? are til! pen-
harlie Sherrod
st, Presidentharlie Sherrod
was found nol guilts Wednesday ol
COn mining torn violations ot the
I asi t arolina Code ol t onduct.
I . niversitv Honoi Board
round Sherrod innocent after three
nours �t testimony and delibera
tions in a closed session.
Board's vote on the mattei
was nol 'm public.
d was charged by SGA ding, Barnes declinec
rcasurei Kirk 1 ittle with altering a on specifics ot the case c
campaign advertisement that Little say, s mam piece
placed in the March 3 edition ol The was
ta the picture.
is thai Mr. Sherrod did pick up
According to I ittle, Sherrod ad
nutted in the hearing thai he did
handle the picture in question. "But
he (Sherrod) -aid he put ii right bad
down 1 ittle added.
I he photograph was one The Last
arolinian had received from the
II News Bureau.
Aftei the hearing Sherrod refused
to comment on whethei oi not he
I handled the picture. "I can'i
,av anything about that with the
charges pending
1 he preliminary hearing on these
irges will be rhursday afterm
according to Barnes. -V tin- I
I utle will be formally presented
with the charges
I he actual hearing will held April
15.
"I'm not worried about them.
1 ittle a
�� teh like we did a good job
presenting e tonight he
! avid Fox (who represented
�.id an excellent job. I fell lil
more than sufficient
evidence (to ind Sherrod guilty) '
��y ou just n'l go around -aymg
people did In without I
n Sherrod, who deb limself,
-aid ot 1 utle charj
"1 think thai I'm . m
chai ' him he conclu I
I � who normally serves
public defender, prosecuted the case
since he is one ot only two students
connected with the judiciary
pointed bv an SGA member. I ox
was appointed by Dea
ot orientation av6 u
WZMB Will Receive
New General Manager
Bn kARI N l MM
v M
MB He e
ic w
i
B irwick. v

-port- covera Ioi
: lans foi V 2MB will be
md soul.
Despite 11 ' epeated
-
ms, "II ay to pui the
- ; : do
I
1
ii mcr- ���
nearby C.ril
, . currently h-ieel a- letcr.
SS��; Ashman . and a mI �
more
Hi an a
Barw - tys his t ech i
kn t "adequate" b �' d
nut- 1 undei stand Jol letei was
thi not J �hn
his third
familai ith
i
Old equipment may be utitid if new
WZMB General Manager sam Barwkk is snccessfnl.
Student's Comment Institutes Secret Service Investigation

� ;
ing
ol
one
:
It
few peop
� . . the tensior
te was momenta
is remembers.
. was the last bit ot
i in the epi-ode. Within one
moi ;kson was being grill
� by universil
en by the I N Secret Service
is feelings tow aid- Reagan.
.lie didn't kn
business office, which .
M : icted a preliminary inv
� ig about when it call.
February 17 Jackson asked
H ��,� assistant to ISl 's
president, to solve the mystery
Pi Ronald
Ian
Hen; y, in i urn. confessed
lackson's "case" had already made
it through several levels ol universi-
ty bureaucracy Soon aftei Jackson
had spoken the infamous words,
associate union directoi Roger 1 ei
ii- allegedly reported them to union
directoi Bruce Hudson. Hudson
then allegedly fed the news to
Henry, who passed it along to cam-
pus security. and finally the business
:e, which contacted Jackson.
Campus security also reported the
incident to the Secrel Service, genl
Dave Noznesky says he conducted a
"routine bui serious investigation.
1 he union hoard member- he inter-
viewed, Jackson says, agreed the
statement "could not be con-trued
as a threat against the president ol
the United State
Noznesky asserts that any state-
ment threatening or implyini
threaten the presideni oi vice presi-
dent violate- tedeial law.
I he subsequent controversy peak-
ed the same week as the March 30
assassination attempt on President
Reagan. It's the second known
Secret Service investigation of
assassination "threats" emanating
from college campuses.
Soon aftei Reagan November
election, the Secret Service probed
the origins and intents of a classified
a d in the University of
Massachusetts-Amherst student
newspaper. 1 he ad requested
volunteers for a "hit -quad" to at-
tack Reagan, and was signed "J-
( alter No charges have been filed
m the case.
- hether the statement is serious
or innocuous is not ours to decide
Noznesky says. "All we are suppos-
ed to do is report our findings to the
U.S. Attorney's office, and it's up
to them to determine guilt
By the time o the Secret Service
visit, Jackson was worried the inci-
dent could hurt hi- career. He wants
to go into politics, and fears the ex-
istence o a Secret Service file on
him could stop him.
So. after hiring a lawyer from the
Iowa Civil liberties Union to heir
him retrieve his file, Jackson charg-
ed Noznesky with misconduct
because of his incriminatory ques-
tioning mannei.
The Secret Service has -ince
agreed to return the file to Jackson.
� was verv lucky that I'm political-
ly active enough, that 1 knew who to
get in touch with to -top this thing
Jackson says. "Otherwise my file
would be in Washington right
now
The "thing" is not exactly stop
Ped yet. Steve DeProsse, student
government office manager, says
the affair has "turned Iowa State's
govern m ent upsid e d o w n .
Everyone's complaining about
ev eryone else
see si I DENT'S, page 3
Classroom Phobias Can Cause
Crippling Effects on Students
Western Revival � "Hi
Wen In the Sky " wilt appear today at 'Barefoot On the Malf from 8-9:30
CLEVELAND, OH (CPS)
Some students love college, some
hate it, and some dritt through it in
apathy. Then there are those who
are afraid o it:
"Ever time 1 sit down in a desk
and look at all the people around
me. 1 get sweaty palms and feel like
running away says Michael Streep
of Cleveland State University. "It's
all 1 can do to sil there and pay at-
tention to the professor instead of
my anxiety
Streep is not unique. One out of
every one hundred students suiter
sometimes-debilitating fears about
college life, says Michael 1
Freeman, director of Cleveland's
Terrap, an organization that treats
severe anxiety problems.
"It could be due to workload or
peet pressure that causes students to
withdraw from normal life adds
Jean Kummerlm. coordinator of the
Cleveland office. "Sometimes it's a
death in the family. But we don't
press the point of why it happen-
ed
Whatever the reasons students
develop phobias � inappropriate
fear reactions triggered by harmless
stimuli � they seem to be par-
ticularly prone to them. Virginia Ar
tru of Terrap's Menlo Park. Ca. of-
fice says people as young as 14 and
as old as SO come in for therapy, but
that the average age is 2?. Many ol
the college students, she says, are
afraid o making "fools ot
themselves in a classroom situa-
tion
Some of the phobias that com-
monly interfere with student life are
acholophobia (fear of crowds), an-
throphobia (fear o people), and
xenophobia (fear of strangers).
The physiological symptoms ol
the phobias range from a feeling ol
warmth to sweaty palms to but-
tertlies, from tremors to heavy
heartbeats. Other common symp-
toms include dry mouth, weak legs,
hvperventilation, inner feelings of
doom, and urges to run, scream,
and flee to an area of security.
"A trapped situation causes
panic Artru summarizes
freeman suvs the reaction can be
so severe that a student can develop
a phobiaphobia, meaning a feai of
the fear reaction.
When that happens, the cycle of
tear only deepens. I he reason tor
the fear reaction. Freeman explains,
becomes "less apparent, and the at-
tacks then seem to come out of
nowhere. It is frightening to have
something happening to your mind
and body over which you have no
control
Slreep's problem is tear of
crowds. After his tather's death a
few years ago. Streep withdrew
from normal activities, and spent
more and more time in his room.
See PHOBIA, page 3
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds8
Features5
Sports





Ult l M t Rui IMW
M'KII ��, ItM
Announcements
ELDERHOSTEL
54 is L vi- �: �aai s old r
tronon v
appi � �
FIELDHOCKEY
1 here - .in WPOR IAN'
� on 1 tHJ' Sdav Apr .I V ,it
.x1 Plea '�� '
103 We we
. �.
BKA
� . ��
� � �
v i ���
IVCF
� a-
' .
� age
STUDENT UNION
SCOTT HALL
si . n Hall residents can get
- is now to the Spring Pis Pic
n � i held on Apm is
( oon Han Represen
tatives win nave them in Ihetf
rooms or v ��. - � ' " em in the
lotJtiy Iron- II a.m 1 pm on
Thursday or I-1 ida� '�� " � ' ' '
tan be made you must act before
r,da� at t 00 p m
SU ARTIST
Apply now tor the Student Union
� sts pos ' � n and gel .� r � �
perk ��� " pay ���' � still in
Active m ait phases ot produ
�� iting roughs
. ,pp, , i prepar i nu
mechani, als sc " coor
ng projects with commi
pr intets
Responsib '� ledesigning
: � � � - newspapei
GRADUATION
semt � iraduates
lefoi ind gowns
B . � ,�- Announcements
There are
CHEMISTRY
Dr Peter Kissinger ot the
Department of Chemistry at Pur
due University ana Bioanaiytn'ai
Systems inc will present a
seminar on ' Electrochemical aim
Liquid Chromatographic Studies
of Phenols and Aromatic ��
ot Biomedical and Environn i la
Interest Friday April 10, at 2 oo
pm m room ?oi Flanagan
Budding
WORK
Par' t m m � �� � al l
position is - i student 1
work on Sundays in a nt
church with a teen age group The
salary is a ' !
month
mediati 1 and
, .
Dan Earnhardt at the '�'� "
Studei ' i
DOG DAY
DOG DAY A m � ;
It "n "
SOULS
Graduating seniors Of the P
ing summer or tali ot l�8i and
who are members ot SOULS
are asked to pay Ji 00 for the
SCK ial It lie held April ?S al
Lake E llswoi th Club House from 9
until Each senior is allowed two
UI Is Who arc not SCI
Seniors will also have a voice in
. ng the menu Your coopera
tion is ot utmost necessity
Signatures ana tees will b taken
the lobby ot the Student Store
from 10 unt.i 1 on Tuesday
MEDIA BOARD
eMi i Board
ting appln atioi I lay . 'udent
. -�
. i . on the
pplicahons can be
L Media Board Of
r.day Pub B
id 2 P m S p m
YARD SALE
lay Apt il II trom 8
. . n Ihe I- ' ends ot the
lahonai House at 306
Stt eet at e pt i ng a yard
. . . .
ks t set l an
.
AWARENESS
FILM
partmilistory
perat �� " the Studenl
. . � � � � � Ass �- ation and Prv
�. � i pii ised to an
. the showing ampus ot
. �� , -ifai Japanese war
� -
movie
TWIG
18
10 Apr
SOUTH
� at is happen ng n the !
.ind what pi blen ind oi
portunities � changt :
will be studied a' a confen
the Changing Sout'
- sity on April 13
invite
YARD SALE
al H � at ECU
. tn matet � tot a ard
If you have any
ewelry
��s, or pieces ot
� i � �
lehver to tht
�� : �
Friday
-
unt y D
id Tm
. Dr
"
�� i
� �
e wh
. �� hand i ai p
�� � iuest
PHYS ED
� uOI dur
� i'd to
' . . thi tali
Mendei h
'�'
I. 2-5:0
lav A �
topn Ot a' � �
ector ot
the Southeri Gi ����� P
Boar- At �
' �'
� � . rnq-nu t
Structure of 'he Sou by Dr
Clyde BR owning pi l(
geograoh, Un vers '� ' N i It
Carolina Chapt H
The event is Ihe ft rd I
lerence sponsored bv "�
Department ' � ' �
Planning
HOLY TRINITY
Methodist
itedat Banks
ectly aci

be host Nev
He New
� '
nat pot
� � � Bun
.
temporar, Cl
The New Direct
concert at Holy Trinity sa'
they
.
Sunday � it H 00
a m Come ec ' issure
elf a seat a
CHESS
INe nave moved1 Yes the
Greenv.lle Chess Club s now
located m the basement ot the
Senior Citizens' Center on the cor
ner of 4th and Greene We meet
regularly at 7 15 on Monday
nights 't's iust a short walk from
campus Join us!
COOP
The Coop office has Coop air
traffic conlrol spei ialiSf p" '
ava-labi in Ra gh interested
students should contact jane
Maier, ?lo Raw! Building 757 6v;v
or 6375 immediately Acceptable
majors include mathemat
.iphy. computer scienci
11 ns. p h y
Iphy
PASSOVER
Community Passover Sarer at
�ar i Club. Satui da,
18 J5 00 per person Call Mrs
Warshauei at 7S2 S2v6 or Mrs
� at 7S6 S640 tor more '
A at � nvitea to at
HILLEL
Come to the Hillel Pat
Brunch at 12 00 on April 26 at 'he
sy � . IUI U20 E 14th St ���
hold elections tor next years ot
h '0 run for an of
le, or mor-
. 5942
DISCOUNT DAYS
lenl all Studei 1
days I
ana Friday � -� t week you can
save one third on II � � St bowi
,nq r. �� � table t nnis at
�ihall Bowlmg s Of 1 "
H each I from 3 00 until
5 30 p ind mards and table
ne third
3 00 p n
.
HEALTH LAW
Physicians h0S
ministrators ano tri
health law attorneys wil gathei
Greenville April 10 whl M
Carolina university School ot
Medic .np holds its Third Annual
Health Law Forum
The themi I th 1 t
terence is Update on M
lice Ci ' � '
h,i law iftorneys a-i
ians practicing in North Carolina
wil pn
is, doctors ar.
re esrentatives
malp' ' � '
PAGEANT
AppiK a'lons lor conh lai ' I
Miss Black and Gold
now being at - epted 1
(ontact any men ' ' � ; '
Alpha trati' 1 � "
ART
CARICATURES
Inci
Stut



.

GAME ROOM
une F
-

Red Cross
t :T�:V
QN
The Fleming Center has been here for you Blnoe 1974.
providing private, underetandlng health oare
to women of aJQ ages at a reafionable cost
Satwday borticm hour
Tt9 pregnancy te�t
V�ry aarly prnaxMy taU
JBvanlnjJ birth control houn
The Fleming Center we're here when you need ub
Pall 781-6880 in F-aleldh anyttma.
THE FLEMELVG
HvH
Ph
FACULTY STAFF
El � � jity and
tudent
��.� � �

li
8 oe i ly and staff W

Don 1
r1

l
l
I
I
l
l
l
I
I
i
I
I
I
I
I
i
WASH HOUSE
(Acrossfrom Krispy Kreme)
and
KORE-O-MAT
(Across trom University Cor Wosh)
Use one Washer � Get One
FREE
Limit ont- Free sil
Offer Expires April 1, 1981 Valid w Coupon Only '
Fosdick's Seafood Saver
Nightlv rUOrOOpm
Tues. Fish Fry- All Ik ri$h You Can bj With A Mug
Of Your Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Qltbash Shrimp With French
Fries, Cole Siatv and Our Famous Fiushpuppies$3.99
Thur. Family Night A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp, r ned Fish. Oysters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tue,Wed,Thur(Oy�ter Bar Only) 1 Doz HaU hell
Ovsters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Ot Your Favorite Beverage
$2.99
AD ITEM POLICY
Each of thasa adv�rti8�3 n�ms
� required to be 'aadiiy available 'or
sale m each Kroger Sav-on except at speofi-
nToted In this ad if we do run out of an item we will of-
u your choice of a comparable .tern when available reflecting
the same sav.ngs or a r.inchec which will entitle you to purchase the adver
7�i item at the advertised pnee within 30 days
Items and Prices
I ffecttve Thurs April 9
thru Sa! April 11 1981
ht 1981
Ki ;��� s.tv on
tity Right
L
41
tftM 1rtrVyTif
CJLlgLJiftfftffl IP
Ph. 7 56-20H
M
A
� General Nutrition Cent

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V v
-i
i:Tii
500mg gPi Coconut BROWN MTA1U1ILJ
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p
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rsr � ! ���� ��:�� �- i -� ; ����:�- bone meal � V,�;�.tL�� : -71 am
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SENSATIONAL
IRON 2170SEL�NIUM 2470I StfeSS?
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tCATURES
Cross
L974
U US
E
e
I
iD ITEM POLICY
My available (or
�c�pt at tpacHi-
it�m �� will of-
iiabl reflecting
Ichasa the advr-
op
on
to
at
I
SAVE
30
icks
o
0
o
OFF
SUGG
RETAIL
4
snville
Incident Damages
Student's Record
Continued From Past' 1
1 he student union board, for ex-
ample, has accused the two union
administrators who allegedly
reported the remark of "acting in an
irresponsible manner The univer-
sity's board o' directors has called a
special meeting to review the ad-
ministrators' conduct.
Jackson says there's a good
chance the board will fire one or
both men He says he's feuded with
the two before, and that board
director Ferris "told someone he
had 'loaded ammunition' for me
Ferrius, on the other hand, is con-
fident his actions were "correct and
legal He says he has no idea who
reported the remark to presidential
assistant Henry.
"Any one of a number of people
could have pushed it (the incident)
through the channels he says.
Talking Laboratory
till t MAROt IN1AN
APRIL 9, 1981
Box Will Aid Blind
"And whoever did obviously knew
the law had been broken. It's not
for me or anyone else to suppose
that Jackson's statement was a joke.
He didn't say it was at the time
Although agent Noznesky says
Secret Service rules forbid him to
discuss individual cases, he does
observe that it is not uncommon for
an incident to be reported "just to
get someone in trouble Asked if
that described the Iowa State case,
Noznesky said, "We're just not go-
ine to discuss that
Noznesky, meanwhile, is still be-
ing investigated by the U.S. At-
torney's Office for his role in the
case. The Secret Service, Noznesky
mourns, "always becomes the bad
guy in things like this. We in-
vestigate as professionally and im-
partially as possible, and then this
happens
ECU NEWS BUREAU
The functions of a
talking laboratory in-
strument being
developed at East
Carolina to aid blind
chemistry students were
discussed and
demonstrated at the na-
tional meeting of the
American Chemical
Society, March
29-April 3, in Atlanta.
Alger Salt of Cove
City a research
associate in the ECU
Department of
Chemistry and Richard
Hartness of Rocky
Mount, a student, were
among five ECU
representatives who
presented papers about
the new microcomputer
instrument that enables
a blind student to work
alone in the laboratory.
The instrument system,
a Universal Laboratory
Training and Research
Aid (ULTRA) is being
developed under the
direction of Drs.
DAvid Lunney and
Robert Morrison of the
ECU chemistry faculty.
Salt's presentation
on the device was
delivered at a Chemical
Education Division
symposium on teaching
the physically han-
dicapped. Hartness,
who serves as a consul-
tant for the project,
demonstrated how a
blind student might use
the instrument.
The demonstration
was made with a
smaller compact system
referred to as the
"dumb talking box
Salt said the DTB is the
forerunner to the more
powerful ULTRA
system but unlike
ULTRA it contains no
microcomputer, hence
the name "dumb
Phobia Plagues Many Students
Continued rrom Page 1
"I was afraid to go
out in public. Wild
horses couldn'i drag
me to the show oi out
to eat. I'd go to school,
but that was onlv
because 1 had to
"Wo ccn had one
client who was chair
bound Kummerlin
recalls. " 1 his man
couldn't leave the chair
m his dorm room
without feeling ex-
tremelv anxious
rtru remem bers
that the most extreme
case she's encountered
was when a female stu-
dent wouldn't open her
bedroom door. Her
roommates called Ter-
iap, which went to the
room and coaxed her
out to intensive (nine
hours a day) therapy.
Therapy at the
Cleveland office
(1 errap also has offices
in Huntington, N.Y.)
costs J1200 for both the
24-week course and the
intensive, two-week
course.
Streep, who
previously sought help
from a couple of
psychiatrists, has been
at Terrap � which
stands for Territorial
Apprehensiveness �
for several weeks. He
says he's more comfor-
table in crowds and in
dealing with his anx-
ieties, though he still
gets sweaty palms in
class.
"It would be ideal if
they could stay in
school during this
time says Artru,
"but many feel they
have to drop out. Many
fear they'll have a panic
attack
Adds Artru,
"Nobody goes crazy
from this, but the
physical stress is in-
credible
The Fast Carolinian
Vrwnt the cwtipus community
imct 1925
Publisned every Tuesday and
Tnursday during the academic
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The East Carolinian is the ot
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Universe,
Subscription Rates
smess J35 yearly
others $25 veary
Second class postage paid at
Greenville N C.
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville, N C
Telephone 757 4344. 4347, 4309
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday Plus 3X
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
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Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
PRE
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force scholar-
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The
scholarship provides tor tui-
tion, books, lab fees and
equipment, plus a $400 mon-
thly allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
the high cost of medical
education.
Contact;
TSgt Bob Payne
U.S.A.F Health Profes
sions Recruiting
Suite Gil, 1100 Navaho
Dr
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
(919) 7554134
rAIR FORCE
204 E. 5th Street
Actom From
Newby't Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 NighUy
THIS WEEKS SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT .RELEASES
7.98,0,4.99
DAVID SANBORN
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El VIS COSTE1 1 O
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8.98 for 5.99
SAM ANA
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UFO
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PHIl COLLINS
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ALL PARAPHANAUA ON SALE
MOST IS 50 OFF
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$3.99 WITH COUPON

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Wll 1 IE NEI SON
13.98 tor 9.99
GRATEFUI Dl V.)
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THE CEASH
15.98 tor 16.99
BRUCE SPRINGS-
II IN
Plan A Hobie Sailing
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Your Summer
Week Long
Stress-Challenge-Adventures
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Beginning May 31
$100.00 COMPLETE!
REGISTER NOW!
FOR INFORMATION
WRITE or CALL:
United Methodist
Outdoor Ministries
Camp Don Lee
Arapahoe, N.C. 28510
(919) 249 1106
1
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11:30-11:00
Fri. & Sat.
11:30-12:00
The Best Pizza in Town (Honest)
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BIG
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i
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Use Our Convenient
300 E. 10th Street Drive-Up Window Fcx
758-6121 To-Go Orders
25 OFF ANY
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Coupon Expires
April 15, 1981

3
JOBS AVAILABLE
(Eire Eaat Carolinian
PLANTERS OIL MILL, INC.
1004 Cokey Road � Rocky Mount, N.C.
442-0193
We have recently completed the renovation and expansion
of our Solvent Plant and are now able to fulfill all your needs
for 44 Protein Soybean Meal.
Any Size Order Accepted.
Available Bagged or Bulk.
No Appointment Necessary for Loading.
Delivery Service Available, Including Auger Trucks.
We are also buying soybeans.
Call (919) 442-0193 For Price Quotations
namnm���������������������������������������������
This
Weekend
at the
Coffeehouse
April 10-11 9-llp.m.
Rm. i5Mendenhall
Admission 50
44
doc

Needs writers for news,
sports and features to work
on the
summer
editions.
Good pay, good work.
Only hard working,ambitious people
need apply. Neat appearance
required.
vsfwi Be a part of something
NEED
YOU!
great:gii)C aat Carolinian
V
Apply in person at the
East Carolinian Office on the
2nd floor of the Publications
Center across the sidewalk from the
Library. Apply Monday�Friday
Noon�5p.m.
kXXXXXXXXXK
nHiimiii1"111
�����������������miiiiiiiiiimii
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Stye iEaat darolimatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris I ic iiok �
Jisin Dui'Ki i . m
I l l l lNl M , ; i r. !
DU Si 1 RUM, s v
i 1 1 W SI! K. pi u,
PAUI CO! I INS, s, ���
CHAR1 I S CHANDI IR sports lauo,
1) 111 NOKKIS. f-nuurn 1,1,1
pul s. ISK1
Opinion
Paac 4
Harassment
ECU Assaults Often Go Unreported
Do we have a problem with sexual
harassments and assaults on female
students at last Carolina? Joseph
Calder, the campus Director of
-Security, reports that he feels
"we've just got a normal year in
regards to reports of assaults of this
kind.
"State has a problem, Duke has a
problem, Chapel Hill to a degree
lias a problem, but yve don't have
that problem he indicates.
Sergeant Lynne Singleton, yvho is
in charge of the rape prevention and
awareness programs for campus
women, also feels that ECU has
been very fortunate to have so few
incidents of sexual assault.
However, both Calder and
Singleton feel that many cases of
harassment probably go unreported
because women are reluctant to tell
the security department about the
attacks.
Interestingly, most of the women
reporting such incidents are ac-
quainted with their attackers. Fur-
r, man oi Lne on .re from
girls who have been harassed by
men they have dated.
The number of security guards
seems to be adequate to cover the
campus area in relation to the size
of the population. Working within
"budgetary limits Mr. Calder and
Sergeant Singleton expressed no
concern that there is any lack of ef-
fective security.
Mr. Calder did say he would, of
course, "like to have twice as many
people but explained that we do
have an "adequate" amount of sup-
port in our security department.
Compared to other schools in the
state and the size of their security
departments in relation to campus
population, Mr. Calder feels yve are
"getting a fair shake
There have been rumours on cam-
pus that rapes have occurred, but
have gone unreported by Campus
Security to the student body.
Sergeant Singleton explained that if
there have been attacks of this kind,
recently, they were never reported
to her office. "If a rape were to
happen on campus, 1 believe the stu-
dent population should be told
about it she stated.
If any kind of sexual harassment
should take place, it would be ad-
visable for the victim to report it im-
mediately to the Campus Security
Department, not only for her own
help and protection, but for the
safety of all women on campus.
Although there is no apparent
problem with an extreme number of
incidents of sexual assault on cam-
pus, any kind of sexual harassment
should be reported to campus
security immediately. This action is
not only for the benefit of the vic-
tim, but also for the protection of
the entire female population of
ECU.
Sergeant Singleton of the Campus
Security Department indicated that
there are female officers to handle
such reports, and also rape preven-
tion educational programs provided
on a regular basis around campus.
Student Union
Supports Activity
rbere seems to be some disagree-
ing Dctween peoples of varying
musical taste as to the quality of
Saturday's 'Cheap 0
But there is one thing that must not
go without recognition, and that's
the many hours of preparation that
go into not only concerts but all
ECU Student Union projects.
Once again the Major Attractions
Committee, chaired by veteran
Charles Sune, provided a top-notch
group for students and the public.
The event was another sell-out, pro-
ving eastern North Carolina does
appreciate talented musicians.
"Barefoot On The Mall" is
presented today by the Student
Union, and if the weather remains
as pleasant as it has been the past
few davs, it too will be a success.
The 1980-81 SU president, Karen
McLawhorn, and new president
Ronald Maxwell are a portion of a
network of talented and dedicated
students who strive to eliminate one
of the major problems faced by the
campus society: apathy.
Often these students are guilty of
letting homework and reading
assignments fall behind because of
their participation in 'orgademics
But few, if any, would trade their
experiences and friendships for
higher grades if given the chance.
Am.
It all depends on uuWeae you dpau The Line beTween sexu
HftassmenT arcl qood clean ronofheetv
Americans Moving Back To Cities?
By DAVID E. GILLESPIE
A recent published report on an urban
affairs conference began (his way: "OK,
so everybody knows people are moving
back to the cities
Wrong. Some few metropolitan cities
are exceptions, but census data shows that
large U.S. cities collective!) are losing
three persons for every new one they gain.
Most of the nation's population growth is
occurring in the suburbs, small towns and
rural areas.
Raleigh and Wake County are fairly
typical of what happened in the nation bet-
ween 1970 and 1980. Raleigh's population
increased 21.9 percent versus 31.4 percent
for Wake. This dizzy growth occurred in
the Raleigh suburbs of Cary, 182.9 per-
cent, and Garner, 94.1 percent.
But Charlotte is doing much better than
most cities in the nation and even in the
rapidly growing South. The Queen City's
population grew 30.2 percent in the last
decade. An aggressive annexation policy
and extensive downtown renewal and
housing redevelopment were responsible
for the gain. The city's population growth
rate exceeded that of Mecklenburg County
by 16 percent.
It's easy to see the magnet effects for
population in Charlotte's redevelopment
of the old Fourth Ward area near
downtown, the restoration of homes in the
Dilworth section by young families and the
extensive building of townhouses and con-
dominiums within the city limits.
An observer could get much the same
impression in Raleigh from restorations in
Oakwood, Boylan Heights and the Five
Points area, plus the "fill-in" houses on
urban lots formerly passed over. But
Raleigh has not experienced enough move-
ment back Into the city to balance or
reverse the trend to suburban-rural growth
in Wake County.
In fact, John 1). Kasarda, chairman ol
the Department of Sociology at the
University ol North Carolina in Chapel
Hill, minimizes the effect ol the
"gentrification" o cities that some ur-
banologists have cited optimistically.
"1 couldn't find a shred of evidence
he said recently, "that the documented
How ot middle-class and upper-income
population to the core residential areas oi
the city was even beginning to compensate
for the continuing outward movement
from the city to the suburbs
Kasarda is a little too evangelistic about
"a whole new form of spatial organiza-
tion" in the United States to suit me. He
appears to have tew qualms about the con-
tinuing sprawl ol the population, business
and industry. But Kasarda does have some
facts to back up his assertion that the
"people revival" ol U.S. cities is exag-
gerated.
The 1980 census figures show the
greatest growth in nonmetropohtan coun-
ties, in what Kasarda calls "the mailbox
economy" with its scattered industry and
regional shopping malls. Also, people
locating anew in the core residential areas
of the city tend to be the young and the
childless. Once married and with children
of their own, most depart for the suburbs
and the crabgrass, especially if inner-city
schools have gone bad with pinching and
an increase o' crime.
By Kasarda's estimate, between 1970
and 1978, the major cities in Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Areas lost $64.8
billion in disposable income by the out-
migration of middle-class and professional
families. Raleigh should be paying atten-
tion to all this. These policy implications
seem clear:
� The city must resist the deterioration
ol the quality o public schools inside the
Beltline if it is to retain a school-age
population.
� I lie city must pursue an aggressive an
nexation policy to maintain uniform
good metropolitan services and keep the
urban tax base sound.
I he city must put more of its thought
and energy into central city renewal and
housing redevelopment.
� The city must have strong law en-
forcement to assure personal security and
offset the perception that the central city is
not safe.
� The city must be vigilant to see that
the growing demand for urban-level ser-
vices in the county� garbage disposal, tax-
financed water systems, intensive law en-
forcement and the like� does not hit the
double-taxed Raleigh resident so hard that
he flees the city in self-defense.
A small-town newspaper in Iowa once
said editorially that "by the year 1970 we
can have a population of 10.000 if
everybody in town will do something
Raleigh should approach the future in the
same spirit.
(GUlespie is an editorial writer on the
stajt oj The News and Observer.
Hinckley, Moore Motives Similar
'I0ONT GET NO RESPECT
3
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
The near-fatal shooting of Ronald
Reagan has given new life to both the con-
spiracy theorists and psychologists who in-
sist that only deranged loners attack
American presidents. Reports on John W.
Hinckley Jr Reagan's accused assailant,
have done little to clarify matters. On the
one hand, we are told that Hinckley is an
ex-Nazi, expelled from the white-supremist
hate group for being too violent(l), on the
other, that he shot Reagan to impress ac-
tress Jody Foster. Were Hinckley's
motives then personal? Political? Both?
What's going on, anyway?
In the days since the shooting, I've
found my mind drifting back to the 1975
attack on then-President Gerald Ford in
San Francisco by Sara Jane Moore, both
because the jumble of personal-and-
political was similar, and because I knew
Moore slightly. I met "Sally" Moore
several months before she took aim at
Ford (and missed), when she walked into
the office of the weekly Berkeley Barb,
which I then edited, and claimed she had
been an FBI informer, spying on radical
leftist groups.
I was flabbergasted. It isn't every day
that an undercover informer walks into a
newspaper office and confesses. 1 assigned
a reporter to interview Moore and check
out her story. We printed it in the June 20,
1975 issue. In September, Moore, took her
shot at Ford. The FBI then admitted that
Moore had been a paid informer earlier
that same year, but pooh-poohed her work
as unimportant. Fearing, as she later told
the Barb, that her trial would be "a cir-
cus Moore pleaded guilty and was quiet-
ly sentenced to life in prison. Her connec-
tion to the FBI, which 1 found fascinating
and still largely unexplored, was quickly
forgotten.
Was Sara Jane Moore crazy? 1 don't
American
Journal
think so. She appeared confused, yes,
uncertain whose side she was on, since� as
she claimed� she had been converted to
radical politics while she spied on leftist
groups. But out of control? No. When I
spoke to her, in person and on the
telephone, Sally Moore seemed like an in-
telligent, middle class American. She had a
nine year old son whom she loved. She did
not foam at the mouth. I never heard her
threaten the president. I told this to the
many reporters who descended on the Barb
office after the shooting, and repeated it to
the FBI agents who interviewed me about
their former employee with a remarkable
lack of curiosity. The interview lasted five
minutes.
I did not condone what Moore did, but 1
pitied her. The radical groups she seemed
to be trying to impress with her militance
(were they her Jody Fosters?) quickly
disowned her. She lost her child and her
freedom. And she told the Barb that she
was afraid. "I know that someday people
are going to stop writing stories about me.
No one will remember I'm here I'm go-
ing to be alone
When I resigned from the Barb in 1975,
Moore sent me a letter, complementing me
on the paper. That was (the last 1 heard
from her, but not the last 1 heard of her.
Two years ago, she was back in the news
after briefly escaping from prison. A
month ago, she wrote another letter, this
one to the Columbia Journalism Review,
humorously raking the media for inac-
curacies in "SJM stories Then came the
shooting of Ronald Reagan, and the
memories came flooding back� and, with
them, questions about the latest Sara Jane
Moore.
I would like to see a thorough investiga-
tion, this time, of the possible political
motives of the accused assassin. I find it in-
teresting, though certainly circumstantial,
that john Hinckley's brother was planning
to dine with Vice President George Bush's
son the night of the attempted assassina-
tion. Conspiracy theorist Sherman
Skolnick believes that "proves" that
former CIA director Bush was hoping to
bump off Reagan so he could seize power.
I don't buy that one, but there are many
unanswered questions surrounding the
shooting and, thus, plenty of fertile areas
for investigation. For example, Hinckley's
possible past (and present?) ties to the
American Nazis should be checked very
carefully. Could his motive have been
political? Or is this report merely a grands-
tand play by the Nazis? As it stands, the
Nazis have come off looking like Boy
Scouts for claiming that they expelled Hin-
ckley because "he wanted to destroy our
enemies"� blacks, Jews and communists.
Isn't that what the Nazis want to do?
Didn't their German cousins do that not
long ago?
Unlike Sara Jane Moore, John W. Hin-
ckley Jr. hasn't had his day in court, nor,
at this writing, has he made a public state-
ment. It may be, as the psychologists
assure us, that Hinckley is crazy and he
acted alone. But recent evidence suggests
that the line between the personal and the
political is easily blurred, especially in
unstable (not necessarily insane) persons.
This time, I want to know for sure.
A
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for the
year andl
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cheerleac







mi i i k 11 i i
Features
Spring Fever Makes
Schoolwork Difficult
ipc
9
Pi Mu Alpha Jazz Festival
Il v .eta Psihapter ol Pi Mu Mpha Sinfonia I raternity is sponsoring tin third annual Pi Mu Mpha
la festival. s pan ol (he 1 asternarolina ris Kestival, the event will bring high school and college
la bands togethei For clinics and concerts, rhe festical will be held on pnl 10 and II at the .J. Fletcher
Mushenter On Friday, the K( I Jazz'Bones and theeciljohnson Jazz Quintet will perform beginning
al 7:31) p.m the II la I nsemhle will perform on Saturday at 7:30 p.m.
H DAVID NORRIS
I i-aliirr I li("f
"April is the cruellest month
begins I .S. Eliot's poem " I he
aste 1 and 1 aken oul ol con
text, iIns line could be used to prove
the contention thai Eliot wanted to
slop Jomi! schoolwork and gel oul
into the beautiful spring weathei
like the it-si ol us.
I he firsl few weeks ol beautiful
sunn) weathei have the effect ol
ruining student's efficiency by
anywhere from 1') to C'S percent,
depending on the individual's
strength and discipline (and how
much he wants to graduate). I have
leat ned a few things thai can help
prevent some ol this springtime
slacktitude (Is "slacktitude" a
word? Well, ii is now.)
One thing to remember is not to
work in fronl ot an open window.
No term papei or notebook can
compete with the warm, gentle
breezes and !lower-carpeted land-
scapes that untold outdoors. 1 his
typewrite! I'm using laces an ugly
semi-yellow wall, and even that
makes me want to go outside and
goot off.
It you have work to .o, avoid
running into friends who
I asl week, on the way I
building to trv to starl a da
work, I ran into a couple ot friends
on then way to the rivei to
tishing. Foui hours later, it wa
vleat that my afteinoon ol , real
art was not to he.
It is, ot couise, poMe to hi.
one's time properly so that one n
finish then wot k and 1111 he abh
enjoy playing outdoors. I don'i
know vetv many people � illy
can manage that, though.
I he best way oi no! letting
ingtime lute you into not finish
vour wotk is to get all ' I me
during the damp, v ui'
the semester. (I usually
during those vuchy mi
have to do everything durit
nice, pretty spring d,i s.)
Springtime is absolute!
with things to sidetrack cue's time
and attention. 1 here is a musii
ait show every time vou turn
aroui
illet but
sied pai
W h i
around, keep a wai �
frisbees. I lie spun.
Ho �
B
i
sufficiei
wati uie tor Fer.
in fact, yi
I
the "injury index wl
� �

nd, it's t
More Trivia To
Baffle Movie Fans
Bv l II) NOKRI
and
Wll.1.1 AM VFI.VFRION

I
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s lb-
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Photo bi G4�r PSTTI �' �
I

New Cheerleaders Chosen
l'n lured above, Kmi Blevins is one of eighl II cheerleaders chosen
Inr the HI-K2 school lear. kmi served a cheerleading mascot lasi
ear and has had eight viars ol formal trininy in gymnastics and
three years iii dance. She recentlj attend I i prestigious summer
cheerleading camp at I i harlotte
Mendenhall Offers
Tournaments, Bingo
C ity I imits' A t 'Barefoot'
I lu Chicago based comedy-improvisation group Chicago City I imits
will perform today from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at this year's Mudent
I nion sponsored spring festival. Barefoot on the Mall.
I his w eek is
qualify for the mixed-doubk
ofl in Mendenhall S
No-lap Bowling rournameni Six
(6) mixed-double- teams will qua.
tor the roll-ofl to be held M
iving the I
period which began M
Singles winners a ill
bv the two highest thi
bowled over I
period b
women'
A nine-pin hit l
this compel
entered I imes bow led ai
before pril I V. K I
aie eligible to paJ ticipaU - d
enter scores as main tunes as they
would like.
I ighl (Si trophies will be awai
to the top finishers in I
R
I he las; Bingo Ice
ol Spring Seme
la � pv 14 al " �
V1 M
F
d play b

-
� ��
week
able tennis al M
B 13 ofl each Friday
3:00 p.m. until 5:30 p.m.
billiards and table tennis are 1 3 I
h Wednesd ; �
til 5:30 p.m. D � t!
'Modern Romance'
New Film Might Make Albert Brooks A Star
� l I y V (I PI) me
. mote
n � . insisl
movies to
iplin,
-
medy,
o interpret
nes, imes and other com-
is one ol the mosi
com m

directed
mong the cur-
the whip hand
nies are Mel
vildei and Martv
w ;degrees ol

Mben Bi
Modern � . about a ei w ho dumps his a ' de
B r o i -n ol the late com-
Haitein who played
time stai ol
1 nMlto starring in
Romance Brooks w rote
ig and edited
think a per-
former docs all these things to; an
ego trip said Brooks. "Bui that's
not the case with me. I had to get in-
volved with everything out of
essity. When vou have a budget
N4 million these days, you 1 veto
do most ol the work yourself.
"Also, if vou want to get a style
of comedy going, something that is
all vour own. then vou have to do it
yoursell.
"In comedy it's the director who
sets the tone. I'll give you an exam-
ple. It Jerry I ewis is directing
himsell and is supposed to spill
some cot tee. he's going to do it dif-
ferently than 1 do it to get a laugh.
"Jerry's liable to spill a cup. three
cups oi a whole cot tec pot all over
himself. I might dribble only half a
leaspoonfu! to set tin tone.
"Mote comedians than dramatic
stars direct themselves because it's
easiei to rum something funny than
something dramatic. It'samattei of
style and energy. Vou really can't
compare screen drama and comedy .
"If a comedic scene doesn't
work, if it tails to amuse or get a
laugh, it's a disaster. It a dramatic
scene doesn't work, well, it isn't a
total loss
Brooks brims with sel f -
confidence. He's a stocky, former
Beverly Hills High School football
lineman with broad shoulders, tight
curly hail and a curiously bald
pearance to Ins mobile face.
He doesn't look like a comedian.
and, as is the case with most of his
breed, he's no! particularly at
when he's not woi k
It was suggest
an abundance
man to write, direct.
his own mov ie tor a ma
Columbia.
Brooks thought a moment and
said. "Well, yes, confidence bul I'm
not infallible. lv judgment is all I
have.
"This is tin 16th yeai as a come-
dian going back to the days when 1
was an opening act tor rock stars. I
did stand-up comedy on the old
Steve Allen Show, with Dean Mai
tin, 1-d Sullivan. Merv (.iriffin a
the Gold Diggers show .
" 1 hat reallv builds up v
tidence. I know w hai nal me
laugh and 1 have to trust it will n.
other people laugh.
"Alter all. this is a subjective att
form. God knows that what makes
one person laugh doesn't make
another person laugh. I've been
fighting to develop a style that will
make a lot ot people laugh.
"It's becoming harder and harder
to encourage experimentation in
movies. lodav they're looking tot a
picture to make SUM) million which
discourages anything thai seems ex-
perimental.
" nd I think a certain aim uni
nentation can b Foi
n 'Modern R
Brool
� a mov ie dii 11
. :� Pei feel v .
Also in this film I've;
and,nd relation a
young man and a young woma:
1980s. And it doesn't hav
happy ending, or a sad ending ll
has a funny ending.
"I don't play a man who sa
animals or adopts kids He's nol
hero and he's nol an ai
" 1 he i haracter I pla

ikes, IK
I
Because most of the sa
sau
w -t idy Mien play s, Brooks was
asked it he pa d his
characterization aftei Woody's
"No he said, "there's a big
ference. Woody's charactei
obsessed with convincing womei
to bed with him. Mine are preot
cupied with what happens the day
aftei
At the moment, Brooks himsell is
how "Modern
Rom v il! do :
Lfluj.oG .eour Courts Tnr ttieo lAMv
fs 0)vjip Ao���s
J0HVN) GOT SOVir A�KJ
CASSETTE S
CL ft0�20Wj �V A0
PWEy rfi� loo sa'O
TTfOSeT SPANISH TP�

V 1 VI





Happenings
Thursday �
� 12.1H) p.m. S:45 p.m. Barefoot on the Mall
Plaza � Salurda) Best in Beach 1uk
� "The Postman h.is Rings rwice" (R) Sunday Kappa Alpha ' Nickel Nitc'
� 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Friends ol the I ibrar Shows al 2:30, 4:45, 7 00, & 9:15 p.m.
Book Sale, Joyner Library � "Final Conflict" (K) Shows al 3:15, 5:15,
� 3:00 p.m. Competition, Joynei 1 ibrarj 7:15, & 9:15 p.m.
� 5:00 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Badminton � "Dogs of War" (R) Shows at 3, 5, 7, & 9:00
(Singles & Doubles) p.m.
� ECU Playhouse Production, Hendrix rheatre
� 7:30 p.m. Men's Baseball: N.C. Wesleyan; Mghtlije
Rock) Mount, N.C.
Attit
Friday 10 � Piursda) ROBBIN lHOMl'SON HANI)
� 6:00p.m. Sigma Iheia Van. Beta Nu t haptei � BRU I Ol SON BAND
Spring Banquet, T.B.A. Friday ARROdANCl
� ECl Playhouse Production, Hendrix Theatre Saturday RROGANCE
� April 10-11 Women's Softball: N.C State In � Sunda N.C. CHAMPIONSHIP
vitational, Raleigh, N.C. FOOSBA1 L TOl RNAMI Nl
� Iuesda 3rd NNll SPRING INC,
Saturday II WING DING 1 1 ING 1H1NG SUPER LRU
� ECl Playhouse Production, Hendrix Theatre � Wednesday SUPER GR11
� 7:30 p.m. Men's Baseball: I NC-Wilmington;
Wilmington, N.C. aroIinaOpn House
� rhursda Bil 1 IV1R1Y BAND
Sunday 12 Friday Bil 1 1 M-Rl Y BAND
� ECU Jazz Festival, Hendrix rheatre � Saturday Bil 1 1 Yl Rl V BAND
� 1:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: UNC-Wilmington; � Monday GREENVIL LI ARTS FESTIVAI
Wilmington, N.C. Wednesday SNUF1
� S: 15 p.m. ECl Wind Ensemble Concert,
Wright And. ChapterX
� Palm Sunday rhursday Pi Kappa Bin "1 ucky 1 adies Nile"
7-10 p.m.
Monday 13 Friday Alpha Delia Pi "End ol Week Party"
� 5:00 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Putt-Putt 4-7:30 p.m.
� Hicsday Pi Kappa I'hi "I iuk I adic Nile"
I adies 1 ockoul 8 10 p m.
� Wednesday Sigma Nu "50,50 Beach Nitc"
1 hi i Room
� rhursday rhc Originalollcgc Nile
� I riday I nd ol the Week Party
� Saturday Dance Musk i Ii Best
� Sunday I adies Nile
� ruesday Delia Sigma Phi Mistci 1 eggs Con
lesi
� Wednesday I lump Nile'
CARICATURES �.(
Emergency
Meeting
Scheduled
I In 11 will be .in
emci i'i � 11 v i ii H r.iiu.i
lion iihiiinr lui lilt
St u iel i�I i illii'i.tit
11 111 11.111 Is I 111 III'
day, piil 14 I lit
nu t i in ill be helil in
u nu 101
� ffp � �- f
�� f
' � V ' ft
PLAN AHLAI)
( press Gardens annonour t
Apartments Apartments
l loth stnrt Greenvilh Blvd
AActke arrangements NOW for
next year's apartments. Im
mediate one bedroom vacant ies
al Cypress Gardens 60 new two
bedroom townhouses available
September 81 at Cannon Court
Call Rem o 1 ast, ln for Details
758 6061
r7o?�
'BAREFOOT ON THE MALLEI
Colt (Individual)
� 8:15 p.m. Women's Glee Club Concert, J
Fletcher Rec. Hall
� pnl 1.1-16 Intramural Badminton (Singles &
Doubles), Mem Gym
Tuesday 14
� 3:00 p.m. Women's Softball: INC Chape!
Hill; Chapel Hill, N.C.
� :iX p.m. Phi Upsilon Omicron Meeting,
Home Ec. Social Rm.
� 7:00 p.m. MSC Bingo Ice 'ream Party, Stu-
dent Cir Multi-Purpose Room
� 8:00 p.m. ECU Symphony Orchestra Concert,
Wright And.
� Apn! 14-15 Intramural Putt-Putt Golf
(Individual), Greenville Putt-Putt Course
Wednesday IS
� 1 ast Da to Remove Incomplete Given Dui
ing lull Semester 1980
� 7:00 p.m. Psi Chi Meeting. Speight 129
� 8:15 p.m. ECU Symphonic Band Concert.
W right And.
� 8:00 p.m. Movie: The Emigrants Hendrix
Theatre
Movies
Buccaneer
� less" (PG) Shows at 1:00, 4.3d. & 8:00p '��
� Ordinary People" (R� Shows at 2:00, 4:30,
7:00, & 9:20 p.m.
� "Hardly Working" (PG) Shows at 1, 3, 5, .
& 9:00 p.m.
COPIES
Tkf Hapfc SUM
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Copies4-25c
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(Preventive to
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Service directed h a 11
lav l(( licensed lecfcni-
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( onvenietet) located
1: Block Off Campus
Piek-l p and DeHven
Available
) I)a Warrants
Period
f



















�X-
Eastern Carolina
Arts Festival
April 1-16, 1981
85 Events Including
Dance Theatre Photography
Music Art Exhibits Art Show & Sale
iliens ��t Pittounlj are eneouraged i� participate. Mam events
are free �l charge.
I-or schedule information, call 757-1 ')4.
e !�
SAAD'S SHOt;
RhPAlK
1 1 3 (jrandf vt
758-1228
Quahiv Repair
4BV- NtV STOBF
� ����$ tVtk. H.qV S�r'� '
J Pf�(0'( Pj'fcJI-
S��,r Cnmt)4l acio PA-

PIRATES SPECIAL
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a Bottle of Wine
$14.96
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Corner of 5th St. &
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FREE DELIVERY!
VISA MASTER CHARGE
ATTIC ATTIC
South's No. 6
Rock Nightclub
Thurs.
v
Rohhin Thompson Band
Slin S15M V . Championship
tootshall I ournament
Registration - 1:00
Prizes and I rophies
OPTICIANS
aptK3�r�
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10 Discount to Students & Facualty
OVER 1,000 FRAMES TO CHOOSE FROM
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CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
V'4
QfttltoVUAf C
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� �. m m
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Steak House"
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item
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SERVICE
2903 E. 10th St.�
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26fl By-Pass
756-0040
20
PRESENTING
THE GREENVILLE JAYCEES
SPRING BEACH MUSIC
F
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MON.thru FRI.
PLUS
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with college I.D.
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FREE DRINK with college I.D.
THE FABULOUS
"EMBERS" N
-$ THE ORIGINAL
r"DRIFTERS"
SUNDAY
APRIL 12 1-5 P.M.
ATTHE
NEW CAROLINA WAREHOUSE
ON CHARLESST. NEXT TO
MINGESCOLISEUM
$6 ADVANCE TICKETS $8 GATE ADMISSION
TICKETSAVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFF ICE
TICKETS SPONSORED BY MCDONALD'S
BEVERAGES A VAIL ABLE ON PREMISES
NO CANS OR GLASS ALLOWED
GATESOPEN
AT 11:00 A.M.
RAIN OR SHINE!
Il (In
one ot his
S
B U
I
ot a heavywej
M

The
nl the I
W a
! asi
the ' '
the
1 he H
the s�
singled '

m






V l
Snorts
Top-Heavy Heels
Defeat Bucs, 4-3
9 �S
5IC
I
RS

)USE
Home Sweet Home
e score
ihe i 4-3 loss in
North arolina fuesdas iHfn.
Lady Pirates
Sweep Camels
wiiiiwhin

.

Hum-
ids in �
l -
P aged
. i bell ; 0
until
then ' 'he
I Ik B �
! 0 lead on a I � intree single
lo left and .1 RBI .ingh b Shepard
Rountree was
third by I�� ;)
j he P thei run in
the n inning when Powell
singled to left and
! lie Bui ith a
base hit.
Shepard l
Ihe fifth
-
a 1 I,
l noise ihe 1 amels made
in the second game was in then hall
tth when they opened the
; w o straight hits. I he
Minquished b a text
a b the Pira
14 .
id praist I 1
: had
. I
for Roui tree, the fii si pi
� � � h md someone she ex-
es confidence in b playing
Ro esponded b p
- in tour tries in the se
pard also had 11
thitampbell
mes
vard to
Raleij tough
N- State 1 n itational 1 ourney
powerful Florida and
I only team
defeal the I ad Bucs this season.
� - -n Kentucky.
P
n II
a
iv N. keniik ky Fi
" a game that
"is very important foi
� � thai game pla s
� afternoon at 2:00 w hile the
00. I he champion-
played Saturday at 2:00
Pirate Club
Director
Steps Down
Pirai.i lirector (ius Andrews
has 1 ed thai he is resigning
ike up a football
ling careei.
yeai old 1 arboro native is
stepping down from the position he
since 1976 to take over the
coat hing duties at Wilson like
M 10I.
H( 1 raduate ol N. . State,
where he played on the Wolfpack
ball teams from 1963 65. He
played on three conference cham
pionship teams ai State and com
1963 I ibert Bowl.
earch for a successoi to -n
- currentl underwav
Kellv lakes I Siring
Pirate shortstop kelh Robinette takes a swing in luesda night's F( I -I contest. Robinette went 0-for-3 for the
evening.
Odom Inks Two JuCo A-A's
J tht nine
ol
V, . M Mack of H
( olli 1 lamburg,
Chai 1 � ns ilk 1
along with �.coring anu rer
in the duo w hich made the NJ
Ml merica third tean
made the third team last yeai ��
freshman as well as this sea i
"Both and c harles will
maturin and experience
young team dom said. ' I
weie captains ol then respective
team lasi year, which
leadership ability. W
players will make mea
ti ibutions
Green, a 6 7 200-pound powei
forward, averaged 18.y Minis and
12 rebound as c atonsville posted a
J0 6 record this yeai He was the
ins! freshman in the school's
histoi v to be named nude athh I
the yeai in 1980 wh( n he led his
learn to a 2 s� mark with 1" points
and 10 rebounds pei ganu a erages
Cireen was selected all
conference, made the Ml Ju( 0 all
slat team and was the top vote
"Al
l.i. -
111 al
24 I 8 9 rebounds as
i 1 Ibt �' wei �
, 215-pound I' I
r. makini ac-
i - am All Penn York
nce's posl
ison all-tournament team. Mack x
and is a proven lead is is a native ol Rusl . ntei I o- S
Setters Fall, Golfers
On The Road Again
Ihe Fa .1 tennis team I"he tennis team has the weekend
sul ugh its third straight ofl before lal rhe toad next
M (ailing to Mlantk ruesda to face ampbell
Meanw hile, thi Pirate goll team
ft a week's layofl b pai
k � to William and Man and iting in tht la; Heel Invational
Old Dominion h the same score. 1 e at UN(
Ihe trio ol losses dropped the I !s' golfers will be going up
Pirate marl ' on the season againsi one ol the most competitive
whik i t moved to I" 4 with the fields the will face this yeai in the
Monda victors hapel Hill event.
ECU Coach Dave Odo
111
l





NAHEAD
Irircifn. Cannon Court
jcnts Apartments
llrecl GroenvitU Blvcl
irrangements NOW for
ir's apartments. Im
me bedroom vacancies
is Gardens. 60 new two
townhouses available
r 81 at Cannon Court.
ho East, Inc for Details.
758 6061
Irn Carolina
Festival
1981
eluding
Photography
Art Show & Sale
led to participate Many events
Lm. call 757-1194.
't t t n p n t
dents & Facualry
CHOOSE FROM
$19.50
$30.50
$250
$32.50
$38.50
s$79.95
iPTICIANS
Mfifl
ES
SIC
G1NAL
ERS"
AA.
USE
llSSION
ET OFFICE
THE tAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Top-Heavy Heels
Defeat Bucs, 4-3
Home Sweet Home
ECU third baseman Todd Hendley scores North Carolina Tuesday night
one of his two runs in the Bucs' 4-3 loss to
Lady Pirates
Sweep Camel
By CHARLESCHANIMr K
Sports Kdlttir
The top of the North Carolina
batting order came through in both
the sixth and eighth innings Tuesday-
night as the Tar Heels defeated East
Carolina, 4-3, in a close, hard-
fought game at Harrington Field.
The Pirates scored runs in the
first and second innings while the
Heels got one in the second setting
up a 2-1 lead for ECU that lasted
until the top of the sixth.
The Heels got things going quick-
ly in the sixth when shortstop � and
lead-off batter � Chris Pittaro
doubled. All-ACC performer Scott
Bradley moved Pittaro to third with
a single.
First baseman Joe Reto, the third
batter in the Tar Heel order, then
singled to score Pittaro and move
Bradley to third. Clean-up batter
Pete Kumiega pushed Bradley
across the plate as he reached first
on a fielder's choice grounder, put-
ting the Heels' up 3-2.
The Pirates tied the game at three
in the seventh when designated hit-
ter Charlie Smith smashed an RBI
double to deep centerfield, scoring
Todd Hendley, who had earlier
walked.
The top of the Tar Heel order
came through again in the eighth,
though, to push the visitors on top
to stay.
Pittaro singled and then reached
third on a foilowup single by
Bradley. Reto hit into a fielder's
choice to score Pittaro and put
Carolina up, 4-3.
ECU pitcher Bill Wilder then
struck out Kumiega and Jeff Hub-
bard to end the inning.
The Bucs did not challenge in the
eighth but put on a strong challenge
in the bottom of the ninth.
After ECU's number four and
five hitters � Mike Sage and John
Hallow � had grounded out, Todd
Hendley drew a walk on a 3-2 pitch
from UNC hurler Mark Ochal.
Charlie Smith followed up his
earlier double with a clutch bloop
single to shallow rightfield, advanc-
ing Hendley to second.
The capacity crowd of ECU fans
then lost their for an instant when
, catcher Jay Carraway took a strong
swing on a 2-0 pitch and sent the
baseball soaring into deep left field.
The excitement was for naught,
though, as the ball failed to carry
and landed in the glove of Tar Heel
outfielder Bryan Spooner. The
Heels had their 22nd win of the
season against nine losses.
The Pirates fell to 17-7 with the
loss, their second in a week by a 4-3
score to an Atlantic Coast Con-
ference school. Last Thursday the
team dropped a heartbreaker at
N.C. State.
Following the contest ECU head
coach Hal Baird said he was pleased
with the Bucs' efforts despite the
loss.
"I'm very proud of our players
he said. "We played very intense
and pretty well at that.
"They've got a national caliber
proram and threw their number one
pitcher at us. Although I'm disap-
pointed that we lost 1 have to be
proud of the effort our players put
forth
The game had been billed as a pit-
cher's dual, both clubs going with
their ace in the battle of rivals.
In the end UNC's Ochal got the
win but ECU's Wilder was just as or
more impressive.
Ochal improved his record to 7-1
with the win, going the full nine inn-
ings and allowing seven hits, walk-
ing five and striking out two.
Wilder dropped to 5-3 despite
striking out ten and allowing but
seven hits.
Smith and Hendley were the top
hitters for the Pirates. Smith went
two-for-three with an RBI while
Hendley had two RBIs and went
one-for-two.
Scott Bradley was his all-star self
for the Tar Heels, going three-for-
four. Reto had two RBIs.
The next action for the Bucs
comes tonight (Thursday) when the
team travels to Rocky Mount to face
N.C. Wesleyan for a 7:30 en-
counter. Next comes a matchups
with UNC-Wilmington on Saturday
and Sunday.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
A MhUll Soortt tmmr
You can compare East Carolina's
Lady Bucs' double-header sweep
over the Camels of Campbell to that
of a heavyweight boxer who scores a
major decision but can never quite
deliver the knockout punch.
Neverless, the Pirates tidily put
the Camels away, 5-0 in the first
game, and 3-0 in the nightcap to
register their 24th and 25 th wins of
the season against only two defeats.
"We just didn't have much of-
fense said a relieved Coach Alita
Dillon, who admittedly was a little
nervous when the Pirates had but a
2-0 lead late in the second game. "I
knew before these games that we
were going to have to get a lot of
hits, but as the scores indicate, we
just got enough to win
Mitzi Davis got the Bucs off to a
good start in the first game by
cracking a two-run homer in the
first inning, after Mary Powell
singled up the middle. The Pirates
upped their lead to 3-0 when Cyn-
thia Shepard singled to left and
scored on a bad relay throw to first
in a double-play attempt.
The Pirates thwarted a Campbell
rally in the top of that first inning
when right fielder Shepard made an
excellent defensive play on a line
drive hit to right-center.
The Pirates didn't score again un-
til the bottom of the fifth when Flea
Williams belted a home run down
the right field line to make the score
4-0.
The Lady Bucs added another run in
the inning when Shepard banged a
base hit to right and scored when
Maureen Buck singled, making the
score 5-0.
The Pirates dodged a bullet in the
top half of the inning when Camp-
bell loaded the bases but could not
capitalize on the opportunity.
East Carolina played good
defense in the first game by commit-
ting only one error as Angie Hum-
phrey three-hit the Camels in route
to her llth victory against one loss.
The second game was a defensive
stuggle, but the Pirates managed
scores in the first, second and sixth
innings to blank Campbell 3-0
behind the three-hitting pitching of
Jeanctte Roth. She didn't allow any
Campbell runner to reach base until
the fifth inning when Campbell got
their first base hit of the
game.
The Bucs jumped out to a quick
1-0 lead on a Lydia Rountree single
to left and a RBI single by Shepard
after Rountree was sacrificed to
third by Davis and Clayton.
The Pirates added another run in
the second inning when Powell
singled to left and scored when cat-
cher Leslie Bunn drove her in with a
base hit,
Shepard led off the Buc half of
the fifth by reaching first on an in-
field hit. Ham flied out to left, b
Shepard tagged and went to second
Powell stepped up and delivered a
base hit to right, scoring Shepard,
and the Pirates had their final
margin of 34). .
The only noise the Camels made
in the second game was in their half
of the sixth when they opened the
inning with two straight hits. The
rally was extinquished by a text-
book double-play by the Pirates,
though, to end the inning.
Roth's victory gave her a 14-1
record for the season.
Even though the Pirates weren't
overpowering, Dillon had praise for
some of the players, including
Shepard, whom she said hit the ball
well, and Ham, whom she said had
a good game.
The Pirate coach also had extra
praise for Rountree, the first player
off the bench, and someone she ex-
presses confidence in by playing
whenever she is needed.
Rountree responded by pounding
out three hits in four tries in the se-
cond game. Shepard "also had three
hits as the Pirates outhit Campbell
10-3 in both games.
The Pirates now look forward to
travelling to Raleigh for the tough
N. C. State Invitational. Tourney
entries include powerful Florida and
Florida State- the only teams to
defeat the Lady Bucs this season.
Another entry, Northern Kentucky,
is a tough foe that the Pirates
defeated twice to win the Region II
championship last season.
The Pirates play N. Kentucky Fri-
day morning at 10:00, a game that
Dillon says "is very important for
us The winner of that game plays
later that afternoon at 2:00 while the
loser plays at 1:00. The champion-
ship will be played Saturday at 2:00
p.m.
Pirate Club
Director
Steps Down
Pirate Club director Gus Andrews
has announced that he is resigning
from that post to take up a football
coaching career.
The 37-year old Tarboro native is
stepping down from the position he
has held since 1976 to take over the
head coaching duties at Wilson Fike
High School.
He is a graduate of N.C. State,
where he played on the Wolfpack
football teams from 1963-65. He
played on three conference cham-
pionship teams at State and com-
peted in the 1963 Liberty Bowl.
A search for a successor to An-
drews if currently underway.
Kelly Takes A Swing
Pirate shortstop Kelly Robinette takes a swing in Tuesday night's ECU-UNC contest. Robinette went O-for-3 for the
evening.
Odom Inks Two JuCo A-A's
East Carolina basketball coach
Dave Odom announced the signings
of two Junior College Ali-
Americans � Al Mack of Hilbert
College in Hamburg, N.Y. and
Charles Green of Catonsville Com-
munity College � yesterday after-
noon.
Odom got size and experience
along with scoring and rebounding
in the duo which made the NJCCA
All-America third team. Green
made the third team last year while a
freshman as well as this season.
"Both Al and Charles will bring
maturity and experience to our
young team Odom said. "Both
were captains of their respective
teams last year, which denotes
leadership ability. We feel both
players will make measurable con-
tributions
Green, a 6-7 200-pound power
forward, averaged 18.9 points and
12 rebounds as Catonsville posted a
30-6 record this year. He was the
first freshman in the school's
History to be named male athlete of
the year in 1980 when he led his
team to a 25-9 mark with 17 points
and 10 rebounds per game averages.
Green was selected all-
conference, made the AJl-JuCo all-
star team and was the top vote-
getter for the Region XX all-star
team. The Washington, D.C. native
also ranked seventh in the nation
this year with his 66 percent field
goal accuracy mark.
"Charles Green is a multi-
talented player capable of playing
either forward position Odom
said. "He has the skills to compli-
ment our areas of weakness � pass-
ing, ball handling and rebounding
� and is a proven leader who has
the potential to be a defensive
'stopper
Mack, the top vote-getter on the
Region III all-star team, averaged
24.3 points and 8.9 rebounds as
Hilbert went 24-6 this season.
The 6-9, 215-pound center shot 56
percent from the floor, making both
the first team AH-Penn York Con-
ference and the conference's post-
season all-tournament team. Mack
is a native of Rush, N.Y.
"Al has good size and an ex-
cellent shooting touch for a big
man claimed Odom. "We expect
him to help us immeasurably on the
boards and in the area of leadership.
Al is a proven scorer
The Pirates finished 12-14 this
pasi season and appear to have ac-
quired some needed help in the
JuCo twosome. The only person
lost from the '80-81 team was 6-11
center Tom Szymanski.
Netters Fall, Golfers
On The Road Again
The East Carolina tennis team
suffered through its third straight
shutout Monday, falling to Atlantic
Christian 9-0.
The team had lost contests last
weekend to William and Mary and
Old Dominion by the same score.
The tennis team has the weekend
off before taking to the road next
Tuesday to face Campbell.
Meanwhile, the Pirate golf team
comes off a week's layoff by par-
ticipating in the Tar Heel Invattonal
on the Finlev Got! ����, .
ECU Coach Dae Odom
The trio of losses dropped the The golfers will be gom
Piraie mark to 7-? on the season against one of the me-
while ACC moved to 17-4 with the - fields the
Monday victory. Chapel HSti i
s





HI t M C k01 IM
M'klt si. 1S�M
Both Local Soccer Clubs Defeated
North (. aroltiut sinxer
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Club Sport
Review
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out first halt
made tbt score 2-1 at
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Men's Rut�h
The I c I Men's
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the ake r -orest In vita
norui! Rugbs "lourna
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and
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FOR RENT
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SOOMATf SW4NTEO 3 male or
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Convenient location to C�rohn
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v MO month dunnq sum
run one tltird utilitip and i�0
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Itn St cBfe Garden Aprs in
riudei Air condition urprl
-i- T v qarttaqe dpoa;
Or.ftwasner ect If interested
piea'e can 753 ��"��
FEMALE ROOMMATE
AANTEO : Bedroom apt M
EattBrooH S7; a montn plus one
tn.rd utilities Call 7$t 314
ROOMMATE NEEDED For
summer to share 3 Bedroom Tar
River Apt SliS month plus one
ha'i ut.l.ties Call 'St 80S!
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GUITAR PLA'EH WANTED
Mon- -rraK .nq T JP M Sacn
aand icai aBiiitv a must Call
757 tm
WANTED EXOTiC DANCER
FOR PARTY Call 752 4502 asH
tor M.kp Lawrence
LAST CHANCE D'ET EKED
ClSE ADBKSHOP An .1-
proqram 'ast.nq 1 Hs Daily diet
and e�emse class will Be enforc
ed Qualified instructor DM
'ested in New r"orii and California
S 7 Lb weiqnt loss e�pec!id eu .
overall firminq and improvement
,n m,nd and Body Only one session
m Greenville To reqisler call
758 0734
aews mm Tnr� a�tetrr 4i
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it-TKUte l�c:aJlv
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:hH" M -H� SAiT -AUCL
1lN JFE1U M � I -
The Media Board is
presently accepting
applications for
Media Board
Day Representative
Applications may be picked
up in the Media Board of-
fice in the Publications
Bldg. from 8-1 and 2-5
Monday thru Friday.
:u :nx.
-
nais:n)i H-H
!iv ItaM -Minp.
� arsif
To D

Via'
4 V V)iL
;ne
Her
�CM
ECt
The 4M naaetsa
teatn aced -h.
"fcW� mail all oi om
-arc ml our time
vsa- a ittle low said
coach Laurie Arrantv
Anne Hartman p.dv
ed fifth in the 400 meter
hurdles despite stress
fractures m both tegs.
CaroKin Moore and
Civs en Dane) placed in-
to the finals in the 100
meter dash, with
Moore receiving sixth
place. Dane) also plac-
ed into the finals in the

-
ailing l
num � UK. 6
cions in singtes, and
number 3 position in
doubles.
�'In singles, our i
winning percentage s
Karen Jeffries with a
4-2 record -aid coach
Caroline Brown. "Our
doubles team ol Jci
fries and Kellie Ada:r
have our winningest
doubles percentage
with a record oi 4-2
Bge (hi -
L-Cl
mg again Ni.
arlotte
"The
Kiute �� ii-
realK tough teams
-aid Brown
schedule from here oo
out should be an
equalizer t with
most o the matches be
nig toss-ups
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If vou nod mon.y for fall clothaa or football tlcktta, now la a
JSSm S Jour 8old and allvar va.u.blaa. And h.r. � .
good way to gat EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RINO MAN!
$
Almost mryoM his a high school or collage class ring
Irtiv don't wior mymon. Check your dresser driwers
md bring yow ciiss ring Into Coin & Ring Men. We're
your protesslowl -trying wnrtce and we guerintee you
ttir prices and good service.
IWPAfCASM�.ritt.OT
tot JlWIUIt, �AUIAltlkAitTIIMIC
HAItatW-UK-lW
$ COLD $
. met � auauos � �h.tom$ -aaMHait
� cuss taws � wnfMCtaaas � aiati
COia � BUCIUTS � MtOOHS � lOCMTi
!ojA�t-HKaTmcanuwis
aavmcoN.TNi.fOOT
cAtN poainaii MAamw
STIRLING SILVIR
MCAtfHISl Off CONOITNMI
. COrTEl SERVICES � GOBLETS
. RINGS � tROONt � TRAYS � EMVES,
. FORKS � NECKLACES � aRACELlTl
.FRANKMN AND HAMILTON HINT
MERCHANDISE
KlfllMfll l�H"�
&RINC
401 S. EVANS ST. ZnZ"�
.HM.M.INV ivous. spimh PHONE 752-3866
P vAub �nonssrOMAi ptawtNtwi pitnn
t





Title
The East Carolinian, April 9, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 09, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.125
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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