The East Carolinian, April 2, 1981






�he �aat Carolinian
H
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No.
o. si
10 Pages
Thursday, April 2, 1981
(Greenville. Northarolina
( in illation 10,000
Braxton, Little Win;
Second Run-Off Looms
By PAUL COLLINS
Wednesday's SGA run-off elec-
tion has yielded a clear winner in the
vice-presidential contest and the
possibility of yet another run-off in
the treasurer's race.
Marvin Braxton will be installed
as the new SGA vice president after
defeating Peggy Davison. Braxton
finished with 600 votes to Davison's
417.
Incumbent Kirk little defeated
challenger Angela Pepe bv seven
votes in the treasurer's race, 515
votes to 508.
The close nature of the result has
raised the possibility of another run-
oft.
SGA election rules provide for a
run-off if a candidate's winning
margin is less than two percent. It is
not specified, however, if this rule
applies in a run-off itself.
"It doesn't make a lot of sense to
have an additional run-off said Al
Patrick, SGA election committee
chairman. "That's the way we (the
committee) look at it.
'The rules are not clear,
though he continued. "It doesn't
exclude her right to a run-off
Patrick said there was no prece-
dent for an additional run-off.
"Elections have been won by less
than this he said.
However, SGA President Charlie
Sherrod felt that Pepe was entitled
to another run-off. "If you add up
the results of the two races Angela
still came out ahead he said.
Pepe has 48 hours to appeal the
result. If she does, the SGA Review
Board will decide whether or not
another run-off is permissible.
When asked if she will seek
another run-off, Pepe said: "I'm
not sure. The campaigns have taken
too much time. I have school to
think about. It's a possibility,
though
"I really don't know what to
say Little responded when asked
how he felt about the prospect of a
second run-off. "I really don't
know.
"Angela ran a good campaign
he added. "She definitely had some
good ideas
"It was very tight Pepe com-
mented. "I feel like both Kirk and I
ran good races
Both candidates spent more than
S300 in the two races combined.
See RUN-OFF, Page 2
Photo B JON JORDAN
Students Cast their ballots at Mendenhall during Wednesday's run-off election. Marvin Braxton and Kirk Little
were the winners.
Selective Service Seeking Records
(GPS) � The days of private stu-
dent records may be numbered, i
cording to a variety of privacy law
experts
A number of the experts say that
the immense political pressure now
building to gel around laws protec-
ting the privacy of student rec
may succeed despite the opposition
of administrators who keep the
records, and students themselves.
Mosl of the pressure comes from
the Selective Service System, which
has expressed interest in getting lists
ot men who have (and have not)
complied with military registration
laws.
The SSS. swears government
lawyer Henry Williams, has no in-
tentions of requesting information
from schools to help locate draft
registration dodgers. But the SSS
lias long made it known it might ask
schools to cooperate with it later on.
I he SSS' ambiguity has pushed
many administrators to research the
legality oi such a request, if it's ever
made.
Most contend student records are
protected by the Buckley Amend-
ment to the Privacy Act of 1974.
"The Privacv Act doesn't apply
to colleges Williams flatly asserts.
"And if a college ret used us infor-
mation, it couldn't stand on the
Buckley Amendment
"Unfortunately, the Buckley
Amendment wouldn't be very
helpful in this situation agree
privacy expert Trudy Haydn,
formerly of the American Civil
I iberties Union (ACLU). "If the
Selective Service were to be refused
by colleges, all Congress needs to do
is pass a congressional statute over-
riding Buckley, and the information
will have to be given out
The amendment makes directory
information on a student � name,
address, birth date and place, phone
number, and major field of study �
public knowledge. The law,
however, gives a student the chance
to object to having his or her
records made public. Upon objec-
tion, the school is prohibited from
distributing the information.
State laws protecting student
records are already under frontal
assault in California and Maryland.
The California General Assembly
is now considering a bill mandating
school's permission to make student
records available to military
recruiters.
Marie Gerich, aide to state Sen.
John Schmitz, who wrote the bill,
says the measure was designed to
alleviate problems recruiters have in
getting information to students
about military careers.
"This could set a dangerous
precedent of cooperation warns
Beth Meador, an AC I L) lobbyist in
Sacramento. She forsees "a
cooperation among government
agencies to exchange informal ion
about individuals
Across the country, a Maryland
couple has gotten a bill introduced
Suspect Wanted To Impress Actress
Reagan Improves, Walks Hospital Halls
WASHINGTON (L PI) President
Reagan got out of his hospital bed
for a walk today and aides said he
might return to the White House by-
next week. Police probed evidence
the young drifter charged with
shooting him was seeking the love of
a teen-age movie star.
White House Chief of Staff
James Baker described Reagan as
"cheerful said he was up and
about in his hospital room and still
wants to go to Mexico in late April
to meet with President Lopez Por-
tillo.
A mid-morning medical bulletin
issue by Reagan's personal physi-
cian at the White House said the
president "continues to improve as
well as can be expected Dr. Daniel
Ruge added that his diet has been
changed from liquid to solid food.
Presidential press secretary James
Brady, critically wounded when he
was shot in the head in the
assassination attempt, was reported
by the White House to be making
"astounding" progress and was
even said to have played "catch"
with his wife Sarah from his
hospital bed.
Brady also was able to speak for
the first time, but there was still no
indication whether he suffered any
mental impairment from the bullet
removed from his brain after a five-
hour operation.
Mental tests were planned today
for John W. Hinckley Jr 25, the
man police tackled after he allegedly
tired six shots at Reagan, also
wounding Brady, a Secret Service
officer and a Washington policeman
outside a downtown hotel Monday.
Hinckley's father, a wealthy Col-
orado oilman hired Washington's
best known criminal law firm,
Williams and Connolly, to defend
the suspect. Law enforcement of-
ficials, meanwhile, said there was
evidence Hinckley wanted to im-
press Jody Foster who played the
role of a pre-teen prostitute in the
movie "Taxi Driver
"I will prove my love for you
through a historic act the
Washington Post said Hinckley
wrote the actress in a letter
recovered from the hotel room he
was staying in the capital.
As the president's condition im-
proved steadily, presidential
counselor Edwin Meese reported it
"was business as usual" at the
White House and at the hospital
w here some of the Oval Office func-
tions were transferred so Reagan
could resume his functions as chief
executive.
Vice President George Bush took
over the president's schedule at the
White House, but the president
would be making the major decisons
from his hospital bed, aides said.
"He's got a few more papers that
he does have to sign and we will give
him a national security briefing dur-
ing the course of the day Baker
said on CBS.
The While House has not released
any pictures ot Reagan in the
hospital, but Baker said Reagan
"will shortly be able to com-
municate through the medium of
television
"We would sure be hopeful that
sometime next week he could be
back in the White House Baker
said.
Reagan and his wife Nancy stayed
up until 11 p.m. EST Tuesday to
watch part of the Academy Awards
show, which included a message the
president taped two weeks ago,
aides reported.
"The president is in good condi-
tion but is experiencing some pain
and fatigue in response to his in-
jury Ruge said in the medical
bulletin. "The president slept well
during the night and is up and walk-
ing this morning
Baker added that Reagan
"experienced some discomfort over-
night" due to soreness from the
operation.
Baker said the president was
"extremely pleased this morning"
to hear about the Senate's vote
Tuesday.
in their state legislature that would
allow parents to see their children's
confidential records as well as direc-
tory information.
Currently, Maryland law and the
Bucklev Amendment bar disclosure
ol student transcripts to anyone but
school authorities, but Beverly and
Jerome Kamchi contend the laws
violate their rights as parents of a
dependent child.
"Without access to my son's
1 do not have the option of
counseling him and encouraging
him Jerome Kamchi says. His
son, Mark, has refused to tell his
parents his grades since he entered
the University of Maryland two
years ago.
The ACLU's John Roemer
doesn't see the Kamchi case as verv
important, however. He observes
the state already allows scholarship
sponsors to see grades.
"I would suspect they could re-
quire release of transcripts to
parents under that same idea
Roemer says. "But I wouldn't call
this an invasion of (students') rights
offhand
Neither Roemer or John Shad-
dock of the ACLU's national office
know of other legal challenges to
privacy laws, but they say that the
looming presence of the Selective
Service has spread the issue around
the country.
Student governments in Illinois
and Nevada, for example, have
passed resolutions asking ad-
ministrators not to allow the Selec-
tive Service access to student
records. Administrators at places as
diverse at Stanford and the College
of Wooster in Ohio have already an-
nounced they would not cooperate
with the SSS unless directed by law.
Over 300 students at the Universi-
ty of California-Santa Barbara
recently marched to their ad-
ministration building, demanding
security of directory information.
At California-Riverside, a student
government official met with cam-
pus officials asking for similar
assurances of privacy.
Nevertheless, privacy expert
Haydn warns students have "little
redress" if personal information
were released, even over their objec-
tions.
The Buckley Amendment, she ex-
plains, applies only to schools
receiving federal funds, and
threatens a school with a cutoff of
funds if it violates the privacy law.
Petitioners Set For
Mendenhall Boycott
A boycott of Mendenhall Student
Center to protest the recent alledged
political manipulation of the East
Carolina University Media Board
has been called for by a group w hich
last semester organized a petition to
show support for former WZMB
general manager and advisor John
Jeter.
According to Van Brown, peti-
tion organizer, administration of-
ficials are manipulating the actions
of Media Board members, thus tak-
ing away student control. Brown
and other petition organizers are
saying Media Board Chairman
David Creech is working hand-in-
hand with Dean Rudolph Alexander
and Vice-Chancellor Elmer Mever
Photo By JON JORDAN
These motorists evidently had their eye on something other than the road as they passed by ECU's west campus.
Blood mobile Set
For Spring Visit
The annual Red Cross Spring
Blood Drive will be held April 7
and 8, according representatives
of the sponsoring Inter-
Fraternity Council of East
Carolina University. The Blood-
mobile will be located at Wright
Auditorium from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. both Tuesday and Wednes-
day. The fratefnity with the
largest percentage of their
membership donating blood will
receive a plaque for their efforts.
All East Carolina University
students are urged to participate
in what is considered "giving the
gift of life
American
Red Cross
to dominate the board as well as all
of the student media.
"That is completely, totally ab-
surd says Creech. "Of course I
work closely with them, as do all
campus leaders, but there is no truth
to those charges.
"We have worked very hard to
maximize the freedom of the cam-
pus media; we have bent over
backwards to guarantee this
freedom
WZMB petition organizers say
the boycott will take place on the
grounds of Mendenhall Student
Center Monday April 6 at noon.
Brown and other petition supporters
say they hope the boycott will make
everyone aware of the fact that the
Media Board, its chairman and ad-
ministration officials are overstepp-
ing their constitutional power in
keeping the student media from
operating at "free will thus not
allowing the students to be totally
informed.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials 4
Classifiedsjo
Features5
Letters 4
Sports g
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FACULTY STAFF
DISCOUNT DAYS
COFFEEHOUSE
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2 30 p m in Ro' '�
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Hinckley Sought Foster's Approval
ECU LAW
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WASHINGTON isolated undei 24-houi make sure that i.othing It
a Pi) lohn Mm guard. happens to him said Woe,
ckley I. the 25-year- rodav, he was to ap U.S. Marshal Larry tuples
old lonei accused ot pear before I .S. Bullock.
shooting Presideni Magistrate Lawrence Hie letter found by met'
Reagan, left a letter in Margolis foi a investigators in Hin-
his hotel room address preliminary hearing. ckley's om at
ed to actress Jodie 1 he psychiatrist's Washington's Park
lostc-t that said. "1 report was scaled and Central Hotel began,
would abandon this will be turned ovei to "Deal lodie: rhere is a
idea ol getting Reagan the court to help deter- definite possibiht that
in a second if 1 could mine whether Hin- 1 will be killed n
only ami your heart, ckley, the son ol a tempttogetReagan.lt
wealthy D nvei is tor this reason that i
The text ot the letter, oilman, is competent to am writing you now
obtained from uniden ,tand trial and assist his I he neat, handwnt-
tified "sources was lawyersinhisdefen.se. ten letter reviewed Hin
n; today's Hinckley is charged ckley's attempt
o 1 he with attempting to reach the
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Run-Off Results
Still Murky
( iintinued I rom Paat
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editions
Washington Post, and assassinate Reagan and thi ens
: es the theory assaulting a Secret Ser- poems, lettei
Hinckley acted in a vice agent. It eon me-
bizarre hid foi the at- victed, lie could be ly, 1
icnti the teen age sentenced to life ��' ��
prisonment. lin8 Reagan u
Authorities

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where he lias been kept "We are going to wassn
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sale in each Kroger Sa. - as speo't
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iTTvou yout choice o� a comparable '� -
a.moso. ara.ncheck hich will � � " � ����
used
the same saving
n�m at the advertised pnee with
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
Items and Prices
Effective Thurs April 2
thru Sat April 4 1981
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Photo By JON JORDAN
As the temperatures soared into the 80's Tuesday, these ECU students worked on their tans.
Switch To Oil May Be Mistake
GAINESVI1 1 E,
Ha. (UPI) I tie Carter
Administration may
have underestimated
natural gas reserves and
mistakenly ordered the
nation's power plants
to convert from oil to
coal, a University of
Florida energy expert
said I uesday.
"The federal goverrt-
meni came out hard-
nosed b saying coal or
else, and then someone
reported lots of sup-
plies of gas Dr. Alex
Green, a physicist and
graduate research pro-
fessor, said. "There
could be 10 times the
natural gas in the coun-
try, than the amount
thai underlies their
policy to switch to
coal
Green was ret erring
to the 197 8
Administration-backed
energy legislation
ordering power plants
to draw up plans to
switch from oil to coal.
The government ex-
perts at that time
pessimistically
estimated the country's
known natural gas
reserves at about 10
years supply.
But Cireen said recent
discoveries o! major
reserves of gas in the
V est and in Oklahoma
and Louisiana, enough
to last up to 100 years
at the current national
rale of consumption.
have drastically chang-
ed the energy picture.
Cireen. co-editor with
Ray Jones of "Coal
Burning Issues a
book thai recommends
conversion to coal as a
way of "buying time"
until other energy
s mi rc e s can b e
developed, also cited
the deep gas theory of
some Russian and
American scientists.
That theory holds
that there ma be in-
calulabk amounts ot
natural gas deep in the
earth, enough to pro-
vide the entire world
with energy for a
millenia if it can be tap-
ped.
"But even without
deep gas. there are
enough new reports of
gas to call for a re-
evaluation of the
government s pohev,
he said.
Referring to his
book. Cireen said. "1
am concerned thai we
might have narrowed
down our options in
our book. Our new idea
is to consider a broader
range of energy options
because even if the gas
will last only until the
year 2,000, we can
come up with options
that allow us to go in
main directions
Cireen said he is not
advocating a total re-
jection ot dirty-burning
coal, but does support
the development of
technology that would
enable powet plants to
mix gas and coal into
blends that burn like
oil.
He said billions of
dollars could be saved
it existing oil-burning
plants could be con-
verted to burn the gas
coal blend.
"Gas-coal produces
a more benign flame
than coal he said.
Hinckley 'Stoned'
Senator Says
Insurance Rates
May Change,
Legislators Say
RALEIGH (UPI)
four senators have pro-
posed a bill that would
require insurance com-
panies to change the
system they use to set
insurance rates for
drivers.
The measure in-
troduced Tuesday in
the Senate would
abolish the industry's
special point system. It
was sponsored bv Sen.
Joe Raynor,
DCumberland; Sen.
Carolyn Mat his,
D-Mecklenburg, chair-
man of the Senate In-
surance Committee;
Sen. Robert Swain,
D Buncombe; and Sen.
va ilham Redman,
Rlredell.
Insurance companies
would be required to
adopt the traffic viola-
tion points system used
bv the state Depart-
ment of Motor Vehicles
as the basis for deter-
mining insurance rates.
The DMV assigns
points for moving
violations and drivers
with an excessive
number within a
specified time period
risk having 1 h e i r
licenses suspended.
Insurance companies
use a separate point
system for violations
that are used to deter-
mine surcharges to
basic auto insurance
rales.
The bill also says in-
surance points may not
be assessed unless a
driver has been found
guilty of a moving
violation or is found
liable for damages to
another person.
The Legislature was
hit with a flood of bHJs
luesdav as lawmakers
met a deadline for sub-
mitting local legislation
for their home districts.
One bill introduced
called for an additional
one-cent sales tax in
Rutherford County for
school construction
and renovation.
KM TICH (I PI)
1 w o R epubl ican
legislators sav they
have collected about
100 signatures on a
resolution condemning
an assassination at-
tempt on President
Reagan.
In a related develop-
ment, a state senator
said luesdav the inci-
dent was a reason the
Legislature should not
consider loosening the
stale's marijuana laws.
Sen. Ollie Hams.
D-C leveland. told the
Senate luesdav that
Reagan's alleged
assailant was apparent-
ly a drug user.
"In all probability
the man started with
marijuana, got on
heavy drugs and is now
a mental case Hairis
said, and voiced his op-
position to a pending
oiII that would reduce
marijuana penalties tor
possession of up to
four ounces.
But Harris later ad-
mit led to reporters he
has no proof the man
arrested bv police is a
drug user and was bas-
ing his opinion on news
pictures he had seen.
The bill Harris
cha llenged would
create a new misde-
meanor penalty tor
possession ot between
one and tour ounces of
mat 11 uana. Current
state law now carries
only a S50 fine for
possession of an ounce
or less, but possession
ol over an ounce is a
felony with a maximum
penalty of five years in
prison and a $5,000
fine.
1 egislation was in-
troduced last month to
create a maximum
misdemeanor penalty
of iwo years in prison
and a S2,000 fine for
people caught with
amounts between one
and tour ounces.
Eastern Carolina
School of Bartending
A DIVISION OF BAR SFRVICES IMC
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Bartending offers Career Opportunies, Great Pay, Flexible
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With Liquor by the Drink
Qualified Mixologists are in GREAT DEMAND!
Let us prepare you with The Ability and Diploma from
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Upon Graduation you can take advantage of our Complete Job
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Accepting Applications For Enrollment
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QHfe lEaat (Earnlfman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
CHRIS I l( 1IOK. Gnm Itaw
Jimmy DuPREl. - e�m
Paui i ic ki . . Paul Collins, New,��
Davi Severin, ensM Charles Chandler v���
Anita Lancaster, ,�� l)in Norris. ���
ii im
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Meetings
Legislators Disrupt Proceedings
The Speaker's gavel had a work-
out at the Student Government
Association meeting Tuesday,
March 31. In fact, more was heard
from it than from many o' the
representatives present at the
meeting.
Private conversations were con-
tinually in progress around the
meeting room, in and out of context
with the topic o' discussion during
the meeting. Individuals were in and
out of their seats, walking around to
confer with their fellow legislators.
rhese actions were called down
regular!) by the Speaker, but con-
tinued throughout the proceedings.
Debate over the bills presented at
the meeting varied from short and
uncomplicated to lengthy and
volatile. With little discussion or
questioning, a proposal was in-
troduced and approved to ap-
propriate over S500 for a sports club
on campus to purchase equipment.
Later in the meeting, a long and in-
volved debate broke out over the
opening of two new po'ls to- yester-
day's election, and the possible clos-
ing o' two that seemingly were not
in well-traveled locations.
It seems questionable that an
organization representing the
students would spend more time
arguing over polls for a run-off elec-
tion than questioning the effective
use of over $500 of the students'
money.
This is not to say that there are no
interested students involved in the
SGA. Many of the representatives
are hard-working, enthusiastic in-
dividuals who want to see legislation
passed that will be of benefit to the
students they represent. However, it
is extremely unprofessional
behavior when their dull roar of en-
thusiasm makes it impossible to
hear the comments of the person
recognized by the Speaker to ad-
dress the assembly.
The loquaciousness of those
representatives was contrasted,
however, by the seemingly
uninterested attitude of some of the
others. Many of the student
representatives did not participate
in any of the discussions at all.
The Student Government
Association can only be as effective
as the students who support it. As
demonstrated by the small percen-
tage o' students who participated in
the last election, there is a definite
epidemic of apathy throughout this
campus. Some of this apathy has
spread into the SGA as well.
As students at East Carolina, we
arc the foundation of the university.
If we are not actively involved in
our own student government and its
activities, we can never hope to at-
tain our potential excellence as a
university.
Election Results
Remain Uncertain
One more try for old times' sake?
Well, maybe not.
We've just completed 'Round 2'
of the continuing saga of the Stu-
dent Government Association elec-
tions. Marvin Braxton came
through with a convincing win
(600-417) over Peggy Davison for
vice-president, but incumbant
Treasurer Kirk Little managed only
a seven vote win over contender
Angela Pepe.
Lame-duck President Charlie
Sherrod hopes for another run-off,
but the students of ECU may be
spared this anguish by Pepe who
feels the campaign has been a drain
of her resources.
There is no doubt that Pepe could
handle the duties of the office, and
we applaud the dignified manner in
which she ran her campaign.
Media "Mislead9 American People
WASHINGTON � Some of the na-
tion's most powerful news media � in-
cluding all three of the major television
networks � are engaged in what amounts
to an effort to mislead the American peo-
ple concerning President Reagan's efforts
to reduce the federal government's deficit
spending.
There are two possible explanations:
Either this is being done deliberately � or
it is an act of ignorance on the part of the
media. One thing is for sure: Their reports
are not based on an actual examination of
the Reagan budgetary proposals.
Meanwhile, seldom a night goes by
without one or more "protest movements"
being given nationwide television publici-
ty. And I have not seen one instance in
which President Reagan's side of the con-
troversy has been given anything like ob-
jective coverage.
FOOD STAMPS � A great deal of
caustic criticism has been directed at me, as
well. Following public hearings on the
food stamp program � hearings providing
an equal balance of contrasting views �
the major media, in large measure, virtual-
ly ignored testimony by several local and
state administrators of the food stamp pro-
gram � testimony which made clear that
countless millions of dollars are wasted
each year due to fraud, waste and ineffi-
ciency.
These hearings were conducted by the
Senate Agriculture Committee, of which I
am chairman. I presided over the hearings
for nearly five straight hours one day,
carefully listening to testimony by
Jesse
Helms
witnesses who came to Washington from
various parts of the country.
They spelled out the ways in which the
taxpayers are being ripped off. their
testimony confirmed precisely what we had
been hearing from local and state ad-
minstrators of the food stamp program
over a long period o time.
EDITORIALS � Then came the usual
spate of editorials. The morning paper in
my hometown implied that 1 didn't really
have much, if any, evidence of fraud and
waste in the food stamp program. It I had
such evidence, the paper sarcastically sug-
gested, why did 1 not make it public?
I was astonished. For five straight
hours, two days earlier, I had done precise-
ly that � using food stamp administrators
who are perfectly willing to testify under
oath.
The staff of the Agriculture Committee
called the Washington correspondent tor
The News and Observer, and left word that
the detailed information his editor had
demanded that morning was available :
inspection. As 1 write this column, the
paper has not published the evidence
WHAT? � What arc we supp
do? How cari such journalism be offset?
Perhaps the minds ol sonic editors are
made v.p. and they don't wai be
bothered b the facts.
Just the same, unless the I
program is tightened up considerably,
will cost the American taxpi $1!
billion this year, and far more tl
years to come.
1 he program has become so
costly that it is absoluteK imperative to
reduce its costs bv elimii ition
o benefits. bv taking
remove those persons wl
above the poverty level, ai d .
foregoing a portion ot a
increases in the future.
WORKFARI final n
think it fair to require able-bodied
to do a little work in exchange tor iheii
food stamps
sear oi so ago, some ol us in c ongress
included a requirement thai a few random
tests be conducted to determine what
would happen if such a "workfare" re-
quirement were made a part ol the law.
A few areas were chosen in different
states for this test. Guess what it showed
When able-bodied people were told that
the) would have to work tor their food
stamps, they decided they didn't want
them. The test results show thai HS percent
of the able-bodied food stamp applicants
didn't report for work.
Campus Forum
East Carolina Pair Still Shows Support For Jeter
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is
an account oj a conversation between
supporters oj the HZ MB petition which
was circulated on campus during Fall
Semester, 1980. This account was sub-
mitted to The East Carolinian by Van
Brown and Tom Zielinski and is
reprinted as submitted.
Question: (Zielinski) It's seven mon-
ths since the petition to reinstate John
Jeter and save WZMB radio. What has
or is happening concerning the station?
Answer: (Brown) First, I would like to
apologize to all those 2,500 who
faithfully signed the petition for not
coming forward before now, but unfor-
tunately I was taken seriously ill during
the petition and have spent the last mon-
ths recovering.
Q: Just what did you learn from peti-
tioning the Media Board?
A: Well, it only reinforced everything
John Jeter originally complained to me
about in the summer of 1980. The Media
Board minutes show that Ms. Kill-
ingsworth was originally accepted as a
figurehead with Jeter remaining to do
the technical work. She asked that he be
removed from the staff when he ordered
a piece of equipment while she was away
on vacation. This equipment design was
later accepted, I'll come to this later.
Q: There was talk that the Media
Board or the chairman forced Jeters
resignation. What were the cicumstances
under which Jeter resigned?
A: John had been carrying the burden
for some years. On the Friday before
Labor Day 1980 Chairman (David)
Creech told him he was not going to be
able to finish the station and not to
bother to sign up for school. At that
point he -racked. This hurt John so bad
after all the time he had put into it that
we were unable to persuade him not to
resign.
Q: What was the problem with the
original equipment order?
A: Well in case you didn't know the
original design was to be "state of the
art" but because of budget problems the
only way Jeter could do it was if he did
all the hook up work himself supervised
by the contractor. Mel (the contractor)
balked on the contract because John
resigned. He had already given us a
sizeable price cut and if he had to pay to
install the equipment himself he would
have taken a big loss. Mel gave us a final
delivery date anyway of the first week of
December. Manager Killingsworth gave
him an ultimatum that they had to have
it by Nov. 15. She cancelled the order
because she said it was taking too long.
By the way, what month is it now?
Q: What is the status of the broadcast
equipment now?
A: Since then, a state engineer who
has helped with other university stations
has redesigned our equipment order. It's
no longer what you call state of the art.
Chairman Creech allowed the original
equipment order to be changed because
he thought the state of the art transmit-
ter design was illegal. The truth of the
matter is that Mr. Jeter intended to use a
more powerful high quality transmitter
which is a type accepted by the F.C.C. to
provide a clearer signal with less failure.
This is perfectly legal as long as the ef-
fective radiating power output does not
exceed what is authorized by the F.C.C.
Because Chairman Creech has no
knowledge of broadcast electronics he
was unable to conceive of the engineer-
ing design or the reasons behind it. The
new equipment design approved by the
WZMB Faculty Advisory Board is se-
cond rate at best. That's the good news!
The bad news is that (the present
manager that everyone wanted to give a
chance) has not even ordered any new
equipment. They have sent out for state
bids. That took six months last time,
and by the way the student body has lost
another three or four thousand dollars
due to inflation, taking into considera-
tion the cancelling of the first order and
paying a station staff that has only taken
us backwards in time.
Q: Why is it taking so long to ac-
complish such a small feat?
Q: 1 thought you'd never ask. During
the debate over whether or not to accept
the microwave unit which will save the
students' money in the long run, Dean
of Student Affairs Rudy Alexander buf-
falowed the student members of the
board by accusing John Jeter of
violating state law by ordering the equip-
ment without a requisition or going
through normal channels. Chairman
Creech asserted the same thing. This is
how they got the rest of the board to
support Killingsworth. This was a total
lie. The administration refused us access
to the paperwork which would move
otherwise, violation of the Federal Truth
and Information Act. As if that isn't
bad enough, try reading Media Board
minutes concerning Jeters resignation.
There aren't any nor are there any
minutes concerning the petition.
Discussion: Further, in order to keep
us from going to the Board of Trustees
with the complaint they refused to take
up the petition because they had more
important work on their calendar. What
they considered more important than
WZMB's $43,000 budget was trying to
make all media have a 2.5 average to
work, and changing their own constitu-
tion to add a new seat for next year. In
this way the board stalled until after the
Board of Trustees had already met for
the semester.
Q: Why would the board purposefully
do this.
A: At first I thought the board was
responsible, but it really wasn't; at least
o
some of its student members weren't.
The problem is that Dean Alexander and
Dean Meyer run the entire Board with
the help of student collaborator David
Creech. Meyer said at the first o' the
year he didn't want his children to listen
to rock music. Alexander, meanwhile,
has done everything possible to help this
project fall on its face. This includes in-
timidating the newspaper to print its
December editorial refuting that
anything was wrong at WZMB. In-
timidating the newspaper is nothing
short of blackmail. Censorship is illegal.
Furthermore, the News and Observer
first reported problems with the ECU
administration over WZMB in a
December 1979 article.
Q: Where does WZMB go from here.
A: A new student needs to be found
who understands radio station opera-
tions. There are quite a few who arc
qualified. What disturbs me is that
although Killingsworth's term officially
ends April 14, Chairman Creech says
that he will be keeping Ms. Kill-
ingsworth in the office until June. What
is to be gained from keeping her on since
the board now admits it wants someone
with electronic broadcasting credentials.
Therefore, there really can be no solu-
tion to the problem until the administra-
tion quits manipulating the Media
Board. There will never be a constitu-
tionally democratic Media Board as long
as Dean Alexander transgresses his ad-
visory position. His advisory member-
ship on the board is in no way in the stu-
dent interest but merely an implement of
political bargaining. With the aid of
Dean Meyer, Chairman Creech plavs
petty politics as petty people who have
nothing better to do. Furthermore, Mr
Alexander's conduct of slandering a
former student I find nothing less than a
disgrace for a state official.
Therefore along with the rest of the
W.MB petitioning committee. 1 per
sonally urge each ol you, as the ripped
ofl student body, to boycott the
Mendenhall Student Center until you
can decide what you want to do with
your money instead of being told what
you can spend it on.
Humanity Walk
I think that the Walk for Humanity,
to be held on pnl 11th, is a SI PER ac-
tivity to become involved in! The funds
that are to be raised will be given to the
hungry and the walking is very healthy . 1
hope that all ECU students will become
involved in this bemticial protect. Come
on, put a little heart in your soul!
1 l RA WHITE
ECU Student
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj new. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
' or purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by (he
same author are limited to one each 30
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Student
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fcAST ki s
Featu
Xl'KIl
Student Copes With Rare Handicap
UOR S OTl I:
ui a student at I j
� who has a seven hat
wishes in prest
Ms kl HAKIM klMBLKI N
oneni
tificial kidney allow cxscss amounts
ol such minerals as potassium,
sodium, nitrogen, and phosphates
diffuse through them until
.is (a balance ol the chemicals
w n hm and w ithoui) occui s.
rhis complicated process means
that two days, Don must go to
the dialysis center in Doctor's Circle
and spend about lour hours on a
dialysis machine. Don has been on
ichine foi Nun and
yeai s. I he mosi nine he can -p.
the machine is two da s;
- to make an extended
P, must plan it a month in
I; L'hose .i destination
as .1 dialylsis centei near In.
and make reservations to use the
clv machines there ! an ca
ke material, lion
su rounded
�mains a He is also on � ieted diet and
�sar body must limit his fluid intake Because
� the ai a it th machine places
US i 1
kidne)d sfunc-
docshave one
odv, iI does not
and tle is
1 "t him, and the amount ol time it
nsumes, Don is forced to lake less
urs in school, thus extending Ins
iduation dale, Anothei ,op
proaching problem is that the
(ireenv ille dialy sis centei, w hich has
been operating on three shifts
seven to twelve, twelve to five, five
� imateh is being
'ui the ihird shift foi
lomic reasons, rhis cut
. �
Don and
url
:
' as li i
win i m
on
A ho
to
( l'l)
ted to
v is a
g into
dial sal
artificial kidney, "he poisons drain-
ed hack into the bat- are emptied
out, and another two liters of
dealsate are poured back. I his pro-
cess is also lengthy, taking tour to
six hours, and is also very, restric-
tive.
I he best alternative foi a dialysis
patient is a kidney transplant. A
transplant would tree the patient
from almost all rest net ions except
diet. I he operation itseit is not
dangerous; the only danger lies m
the possibility oi the body rejecting
the transplant. I he first source con-
ed tor transplation is relatives;
howevei it the patient has no
relatives who are willing or able to
ate a kidney, the patient is
carefully typed and coded, and the
information is fed into a computer.
It a kidney is donated, its type is
also fed into the computer. The
compute! then matches the organ to
a patieni with a similar typing.
Depending upon the rareness ol the
patients type and the abundance ol
donated organs, the match up could
take from six months to ten years
The more organs there are to choose
from, the greater the chance ol a
candidate finding one quickly
The purpose ol the organ donor
program is to increase the amount
ol organs that can be used tor
transplantation.
Hie kidney is not the onlj i i gai
needed for transplantation; medical
advances in recent years have made
possible the transplantation ot ovei
2 different tissues and organs, in-
cluding the heart, lungs, liver, bone
marrow, and skin. As with kidney
transplants, the success rate is high,
and. m some cases, can save a lit
I he I inform Anatomical (iifi
Act has made it possible tor anyone
in the U.S. over the age ot 18
donate organs a' death by com
pleting the I Iniform Donor (. ard.
I heaid enable- one lo donate all
organs, specific organs, or his entire
body tor medical purposes. The
condition ol the donor's bodv or
aiis is irrelevant; the suitability
of ilie donated organs can be made
by the transplant team a' the nine ot
dona! ion.
(ireenville 1 ion'slub, the
1 l Pre kdlub, and the
I piscopal Fellowship are sponsor-
ing an Organ Donoi Dine on April
8, 1981 I he locations ot the Doi
tables will be Mendenhall Student
Center, the Allied Health Building.
Wrighi Auditorium. Evans Street
Ma Pin Plaza, and thearolina
� as! Mall, "he limes ot the Drive
will he from 10 to 12 and from 2 to
4. So please, join Operation Sur-
vival and help lo lengthen.
strengthen, or save a lite
Bad Habits
Supressed, But Never Eliminated
ItO rj, CHAP GURLEV
Cheap Trick Tickets Selling Well
In kits turheap 1 rick's 8:00 p.m. Saturday concert in Mingesoliseum have been selling well. I ess than 2.(KM)
tickets now remain. I heentral ticket Office will be open until 6 p.m. Friday and from noon until 4 p.m. Saturday
lo met the last-minute rush. Am tickets left at the door wil In S8.50.
B DAVID NOKKIS
Bad htabits are those little flaws
can never be fully exorcised
m people, no matter how hard
we oi society may try.
ceaseless wai against whai
are deemed 'bad habits' begins in
oui early childhoods. Parents
tenth supress such activities as
nting with toothpaste on the
bathroom mirror or shaking up
Cokes and spraying the ceiling with
them, calling them bad habits.
Indeed, some things like nailing
back door shut never even get to
Ms. since children seldom
, than once after their
parents tuid out about it.
v hewing gum was regarded as a
horrendous!) bad tiabn in elemen-
tary school it was much worse
than talking in class (hut not quite
as bad as blowing up school
buildings.)
Despite the disadvantages of
�ving gum, such as having to
e T will not chew gum in class'
. dreds ol times or getting sticky
gum all over everything or getting
sore jaws from too much chewing, it
was still a popular vice among ki
back in my time. (Prool ol this ex-
ists in the millions ol pieces ol gum
stuck under desks and tables
every school in the country.)
I eachers were not immune
having bad habits. One ol their
worst habits was that ol assigning
sentences as punishment for almost
any offense. I had one teacher who
was making me write sentences
every time I turned around. (Did
you ever have to write 'i will
turn around' fifty time- �
Bad posture is anothei vice that
main ol us indulged in 1 never
believed that the human bodv was
meant to sit up straight with both
feet flat on the floor, when
slouching was so comfortable.
(Until you develop permanent cur-
vature ol the spine, you never
believe things like that.)
Another bad habit that can really
rack you up is not eating properly.
It's an understandable vice, since
everything that tastes good rums
your stomach, teeth, liver or
something and the stufl that's g
tor you tastes like axle grease
robacco is the cause ol some ol
the yuckiesi habits in existence, il
don't smoke, as you can tell.) Y.
tually, smoking is (kav in anything
a closed environment, but chew-
ing tobacco is pretty revolting, even
in a well-ventilated area I here a
to be fair, a couple of good thi
about chewing tobacco chewers
: accidentally burn anyone w
il plug, and peopie dor
ii leftover tobacco under desk
tOps
( racking knuckles is one bad
habit 1 never succomb to, since I
't get my knuckles to crack. 1
:ss that good, since it 1 evei
-tart wearing rings. won't have to
worry about having fat fingers.
Bad table manners are an unsight-
ly habit, but they are a lot more tun
than eating politely. Utensils are
really a nuisance most of the time,
unless you're eating spaghetti or
See BAD, page 7. col. I
For Black History Month
Essay Wins SOULS Contest
I! This essax,
. i .
Bv s I N lAJOM-s
itelv
side. 1 w . d
1 all o
'evolve . and
i
lid awaken. 1 il .
veeks, I dei
. d 1 told h
tm I asl '
pen it 1 eve: hit the
i n g a t 11
I
mehow oi
-� As 1 fell, niv bodv
i
�in. I

: hap-
itom. Met
became
� -
� i

n
- I
heine
i and I
them a.
I b '�� e
am now li
In thi
response was thai I w.
ihlv
all
v sleep.
Barefoot On The Mall
Celebration To Include
Music, Art And Fun
Jen
citi
arolina I niversity Stu-
l to their third
t On I he Mall ex
festival was
c success i � .a: and
be an even more ex-
Mlt
8
this veat. All Student
ittees combine their el
ie spectaculai produc-
on the Mall. Apr.
2:(H Noon until 10:00
p.m
Baretoo! ()n Die Mall originated
in the spring ot 1979. It was the idea
of Mendenhall Student Center's in-
tern from Rose High School, I aura
1 auffei Her proposal was for a
festival that was the epitome ot spt
ing fever, that would include enter-
tainment of all kinds, food, games,
and crafts.
Student Union, Mendenhall Stu-
dent (enter, other organizations on
campus, local vendors, and craft-
speople combined their talents on
April 3, lM). to provide a mixture
of talent and entertainment that at-
tracted 3,500 people, shirts,
balloons, and banners helped en
the carefree atmosphere so impoi
it to the festival. Michael Marlin,
a comedian - Higgler - musician.
emceed the davs" activities Kate
Bent ley and laskie Wildau, other-
wise known as Mainly Mime, per
burned smart and sassv routines
twice on the mainstage and
throughout the dav as they mingled
in the audience.
I ocal performers New Vintage, a
young bluegrass band, and the
Oreen Crass (loggers ottered the
festival-goers a taste ot traditional
music and dance, fantasy, a group
of ECU students, faculty, and staff,
used sign language to relav musical
messages to the deat. The ECU Jazz
I nsemble and karate Club also of
tered demonstrations oi fun, excite-
ment and skill.
s ven
m a
lop we have
W reai hed a poim
in e feel sate and
free s a resuh. wc � aken oui
11 si fell asleep, li
is Sunda m i iga n and it we
continue t ide with
deaih. Wake up Black America!
I. struggles have been much loo
long and n painful to end m
a rapid, devast ill. Out
forefatl slaveiv. postslavery,
and the civi battles have
cried, a � j died I
we mil ' and remain on top
ot the mountain. ill all ol that be
made unimportani because ol our
neglect and disconcernment?
W't musi awaken and realize that
the struggle and climb is not over.
We are slowl) slipping down and
unless we unite as a group we will
tall and the pain of a lifetime will be
out s ai, nc.
Noi doubi many blacks ate sued
ot this storv and they do not dp-
preciate the pa it w e have all been
spoiled by being fortunate enough
to be bom dining a lifetime where
racial prejudice and violence is not
as apparent as m the past. 1 oi this
reason, the past must be
remembered and its relationship to
the present must be accepted.
rhrough past works, toil, and
education, the advancements and
achievements ot blacks are prac
tically endless. ins m itsell is a
blessing, an upward step, vet s,�
many blacks, because ot ignorance
ot selfish reasons, have turned all
the achievements to a curse, fhev
have been blessed, they have made it
to the "top ot the ladder and the)
have forgotten as best they could
where they came from and what so
many others have done foi 'hem.
I oi some reason they actually
believe they made it on their own.
I heir attitudes have become threats
to the future and destroy our
previously established groundwork.
1 he knowledge ot the past instilled
in black minds should be used in
collective work and unity, not for
personal gams alone. e must be as
one, not as individuals who strive
alone for self. Wake up Black
America! It is not done this way. No
one can survive alone, nor was
an)one meant to do so.
We have not made it vet. and no
matter how wonderful things look,
the struggle must continue. We must
be made to realize that no matter
what advancements we make, no
matter how high we climb as in-
dividuals, be it up a mountain or the
socioeconomic ladder, we will still
be black. We will still need each
othei lo survive, and most lmpor-
tant, we are si ill (or must be) a
cohesive group. No height in the
wot Id will change skin color.
All oi this is not to say that
achievements are meaningless but
let us not forget our sense oi being.
1 et us not forget how we got where
we are. It was not bv our own works
alone, it was not through the finan-
cial assistance of our parents nor
was u ilie twenty-five dollars a
month allowance. Instead, it was
the struggles that began long ago
dining the davs oi slavery, up to the
activities of the civil rights battles
that paved the wav for us all. It was
See LSS.AY, page 6. col. 1
The Billy Taylor Trio will perform in Wright Auditorium Sunday April 5 at
8:15 p.m. Tickets are $4 for adults and SI for students.
Billy Taylor Trio
To Give Concert
The Billy Taylor Trio, widelv ac-
claimed jazz group, will perform in
ECU's Wright Auditorium Sunday,
April 5 at 8:15 p.m.
Also appearing on the Taylor pro-
gram will be the LCI Jazz I nsem
ble. The event, parr oi the 1(1
School of Music's Spring festival of
Misic, is co-sponsored by the 1I
foundation, the Student Union
Special Attractions Committee and
the Greenville-Pitt County Aits
Council. Taylor is a native oi
Greenville.
rickets are available from the
campus Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center at $4.00
tor adults and SI.00 for students.
Profits will be used bv the ECU
Foundation for student scholar-
ships.
Considered b many to be one of
ia's great artists. Billy Taylor is a
pianist, composer, recording artist,
at ranger and conductor, with a doc-
torate in music education from the
See TAYLOR, page 6, col. 1





Hi t s i KOI ll
M'Kll 2. 1981
Senior Shows
Announced
Paintings h Mar)
Alison S m i ih of
c amden, S.C senior
student in the last
Carolina University
School of Art. are on
displa) through April 4
in the I eo Jenkins me
Arts C enter here.
The show, entitled
"Conquistadora in-
cludes oil, acrylic and
mixed-media paintings
� encompassing a
variet) of styles and
methods, such as
figurative, design-
oriented, and pattern-
embedded.
Miss Smith, a can
didate tor the Bacheloi
of line Arts degree in
painting with a minor
concentration i n
ceramics, will be guest
of honor at an April 4
reception, 7-9 p.m. in
the Jenkins Center
foyer.
She is a past pi
dent of the 1 c I Visual
Arts Forum, a student
representative to the
School Ol Art faculty
executive board and a
member of the Painting
and Drawing Associa-
tion.
� r t works b y
Patricia Anne Plaster
of i nst on-Salem,
senior student in the
1 C I School ot Art,
will be display April
5-12 in the lower cases
in Mendenhall Student
Center.
! he woi ks include
mixed media painting,
(Mints, weavings and
batiks.
Mis Master is a can-
didate for a B.S. degree
in art education, with a
minor in design.
Her future plans in-
clude student teaching
in Greenville in the fall.
She hopes later to open
a crafts store.
She is the daughter
ol Mt and Mtv Don
I Powell of Winston-
Salem.
Huntingdon's Disease
Seminar Sponsored
Photo by CHAP GURLEV
Dinner Theatre Production
Performances of the Mendenhall Student C enter Dinner Theatre Production of "And Miss Reardon
Drinks A Little" continue through April 4. Tickets are on sale at the C entral Ticket Office. For infor-
mation, call 757-6611. et. 266.
GR1 ENV1LL1 Marjorie
c,inline, wife ol the late Woody
Guthrie, merica's celebrated
folksinger, will addre ttewide
symposium on Huntington's
Disease. April II. in Durham
Mrs Guthrie is the foundei and
President I meritus ol theomn
tee to Combat Huntington's
Disease. Hei husband died in 1967,
aftei 13 years ol gradually losing his
ability to walk, talk and read,
because ol the disease.
T symposium is scheduled a)
the Searle t entei � ke l niversi-
t. It is sponsored by the N.C. Ep
silon C haptet ol Alpha Epsilon
Delta, a pre-medical honor society,
at East Carolina I nivei sity in con-
junction with the C C HI) and is
funded by the Belk-Tylei Founda-
tion. 1 he public is united.
Huntington's l)s :netic
disorder, afl d more
than 15,00 ns in the I S
in most instances does not appeal
until the � ' her
mid-thirties, i n ol the
hi am begins to d md con-
ol ol the body's phys
movements decreases A! present.
no known treatment can halt the
progress ol the disease and there is
no one proven medication that can
relieve its symptoms.
( hildren whose parents had the
disease run a 50 50 chance
developing it themselves. In the
i S in estimated 20-50,000 persons
are considered potential victims.
One ol the problems with the
disease, according I 'I ar Jet
Webb ol Rocky Mount. a pre
medical student at II . is the
stigma that surrounds it. Patients
are often misdiag nosed
schizophrenic and families tend to
deny the existence ol the disorder
because of shame, tear, or guilt.
ebb said.
In Woody (nit line's case, he
been misdiagnosed, conside
alcoholic, and shunted in and out ol
mental hospitals tor years before
diagnosis ot Huntington's Disease
was finally made.
I he objectives of the symposium,
says Webb, is to "provide accurate
and current information al
Huntington's Disease to attc
families
Mike Tyzack
To Lecture
ABOttftdN
Essay Wins SOULS Contest
Continued from page 5
the pam, toil,
and hardship ol peo
we never even met that
put us w here we are to-
day.
Again, we are
tunate to be born in a
time period when most
of the suffering has
already occurred But
the work is not finish-
ed. We must wake up.
go forth together, and
continue the fight for
freedom, rights, and
equalities that havt
been fought tor so I
and must be preset
in the present
i ii
O sC
Black
ins who have
. ei r. about any
those who
rune already climbed
too high, tor those who
do not even want to
listen, and most of all,
those who have
forgotten all together
w hat being black is all
about, 1 have nothing
to otter except maybe
and regret. These
the people that have
already been blinded
and deceived b the
disguise ol a freedom
yet to come. These peo-
ple are blinded to pre
indices that still exist
and most importantly.
the
not anticipate
the fall that will occu
quickly and with a
great deal of pain.
In order to prevent
all ol tins we must all
unite and we must
become one. PI EAS1
W K1 UP!
W ake up 1)1 ack
America! Realize you
are black. We are all
black and unless we act
with unity, we will all
be destroyed in our
sleep. It will not matter
then w heIhe r t he
tms wei t h
in bl
a ill be
the same foi ail a
: i m e
tms.
T'm Hc4, Siu
,
11
i -
- - ; �
I �
a -� w - ; :
i :
H �. 1 !
Unidff v . 1 .
. i � N � . ;
, r s � i � . �
.� i
.
Iii conjunction with
Ihe Eastern Carolina
Arts Festival, the ECU
School ol Art is presen-
ting a 111 s t Mike
1 ask. who will give
three lectures in the
lenkins Fine Arts
( enter uditorium.
Born in the United
Kingdom. 1 yzack has
won main prestigious
awards. His works are
included in the late
Gallery and the Vic-
toria and Albert
Museum in 1 ondon,
among other places. He
has a one-man exhibi-
tion planned for the
Spoleto Festival in
Charleston. S.C. in
May and June ot this
year, plus others com-
ing after that.
I ack's fust lec-
ture, concerning Ins
work, will be held
Monday, April 6 at
8:00 p.m.
1 lie second lecture,
on Color. Matisse arid
e ttermath will be
lmen on Tuesday.
April 7, at 10 a.m.
Ihe third lecture, on
Monet at Giverny, will
be given on Wednes
day. April s at 10 a.m
The Fleming Center has been here for you Blnoe 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion boon
Fr�e pregnancy XmmU
Very �arty prCnanoy U�u
Wexdnl birth control boxxzn
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us
Can 761-6SS0 In PjQd anytime
FLEMING
Technical
Electronics
And
Maintenance,
Inc.
756-1387
u1i, ideo,
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( ommunication:
Maintenance
(Preventive t�
Overhaul)
serlies oirecled b) l1
( lass K licensed techni-
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Available
90 I)a Warrarm
Period
OLD FASHIONED
HAMBURGERS
.35C OFF
Am
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264 BvPass 10th SI
COncerf Ticket Stub
j
Taylor Gives Concert
i
; s
� v
( ontinued from page 5
University t
Massachuse
Taylor began
ing music ai the age ol
seven in Washington,
D.C. After graduation
from Virginia Mate
C ollege, he went to
New York and became
part ot the "he-bop"
revolution ot the 194()
and 50's. performing
with Charlie Parker.
Dizz) Gillespie, Billie
Holliday and others.
His trio includes
basset Victor Gaskin
and percussionist Keith
C'opeland, veteran per-
formers who have ap-
peared with recording
and concert artists

B
KL
Mitchell's
Hairstyling Salon
STUDENT
SPEC1A L
From Apr. 2nd-9th
Haircut $5.00
Open Mon. Sat.
Pitt Plaza
756 2950 or 756 4042
r�
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WASH HOUSE
(Across from Krispy Kreme)
and
KORE-O-MAT
(Across from University Car Wash)
Use one Washer - Get One
FREE
Limit one Free Wash Per Visit
Otter Expires April B. 1981-Valid w Coupon Onlv
"1
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7V-�7
VJ
WINE SALE
,J
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force schol. r-
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The
scholarship provides for tui-
tion, books, lab fees and
equipment, plus a $400 mon
thly allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
the high cost of medical
education.
Contact:
TSgt. Bob Payne
U.S.A.F. Health Profes
sions Recruiting
Suite GM, 1100 Navaho
Dr
Raleigh, N.C. 27609
(919)755 4134
FORCE
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A Difference
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We are the nation's I
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We will visit youi campus on APRIL 13, 1981
( )(mX'Uk.
The
Institute
for
Paralegal
Training
Hi

i4
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Approved by The Amencan Biir As
Programs Earn Full Credit Toward M A in Legal Studies
through Antioch School ot Law
EYE CARE
CENTER
OF GREENVILLE
P.A.
Budget Eyewear 39.95 complete
Frames, lenses and tint in
plastic bifocals only 59.95
Contact Lenses 14" complete
Include, exam, lining, heal disinfection and all
follow tor I month.
SPRING SPfeCIAL
Ray-Ban Sunglasses
20 Off
10 u n LCL student & stalt discount
on all materials excluding
specials and contacts.
Tipton Annex
22b Greenville Blvd.
736-9404
Dr. Pete Holl.s
Coupon
$12.00 Volue
Coupon
Better Health Brings Better Grades
Special Membership Offer
Present This Coupon With $1.00 Cash
WHOLESALE BUYINGCLUB
Natural Food Supplements and Nutrition
Counseling
CLINICAL NUTRITION CENTER
608 Arlington Blvd. Phone: 756-7075
Hours 2:00 5:00pm Monday thru Friday
ECU STUDENTS
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nifhtt) 3:00:0prn
Tues. Fish Fry- All The Hsh You Can bet With A Mug
Ot Your ravorite Beverage$3.9V
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shnmp With French
hries, Cole Slafc and Our r-amous Hushpuppte�$3.99
Thur. Family Night A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp, hned rish. 0sten and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tuei,Wed,Thur(Oytter Bar Only) I Doz. HaUshrll
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Ot Your havorite Beverag'
$2.99
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4b
T





isease
red
, sent,
.ill ihe
ind the
diso
r.oe 1974
R care
cost
ieed us
OFF
llll
Trick
kel Stub �
E
T
ne
�1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
Coupon
irades
ter
Cash
B
utrition
id y
I HI S K()1 INIAN
Af'kli 2. IS�KI
ers
'i'h A Mug
IWith French
3.99
iabash
1.99
Halfsheil
e Beverag'
2.99
-2Ull
'M STILL M0���D AdOVT
AW MSptfM TOOTH
THIS 607 I Know) Hlp h
)O$$0rA ivcrrh COT 0UT,
fiMO H� jusr &LEO
All o�&THr FLhcf
Si PftJio AW is
THANKS
Happenings
Varsity
Cheerleaders
Chosen
The new ECU Varsi
ty Cheerleading Squad
was chosen after the
tryouts held Tuesda)
night in Memorial
Gym.
A panel of ten judges
vorked on the selec-
tions.
Chosen tor the squad
were Kim Blevins, Jen-
nifer Cooper, Susan
Dunn, Joanne Paul,
Donna Pritchard, Page
Stout and Rhonda
Swaim.
ATTIC ATTIC
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightclub
THURS. -
Control Group
(Same as Tues.)
FRISAT.
Rolz Royce
(Former lead singer of
Jesse Bolt)
- Fri. H.H. 4:00-7:00
SUN
The
Fabulous Knobs
HAPPENINGS
( ampus Events
Thursday 2
� 3:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: 'C State, Raleigh
NC
5:00 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Tennis Mixed
Doubles
� 7:00 p.m. Gamma Beta Phi, Biology 103
� 6:30 p.m. MSC Dinner Theatre' Student
Center Aud. 244
� 8:00 p.m. Artists Series: Charles Rosen, Hen-
drix Theatre
� April 2-11 School of Art Sponsored Art Week
Friday 3
� 3:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: UNCC Charlotte
NC
� 6:30 p.m. MSC Dinner Theatre. Student
C enter Aud. 244
� April 3-4 Women's Softball: Elager Invita-
tional. Jacksonville, 1 la.
Salurda 4
� 6:30 p.m. MSC Dinner Theatre, Student
C enter Aud. 244
Sunda) 5
� April 5-11 Ail Day-Fine Arts Festival AJ
Fletcher Rec. Hall
Monday 6
� 6:00 p.m. Intramural Tennis Mixed Doubles
Participants' Meeting, Mem. Gym 104
� 7:00 p.m. c Vocational Assn Student Set
24s
� 7:00 p.m. Men's Baseball: North Carolina
Harrington Field
� ECU Playhouse Production, Hendrix Theatre
Singles & Doubles) Entries Due. Memorial Gym
204
� April 6-10 National 1 ibrary Week
� April 6-17 Intramural Horseshoes (Singles &
Doubles) Entries due. Mem. Gym 204
Tuesday 7
� ECU Palyhouse Production. Hendrix Theatre
� 8:00 p.m. Minority Arts Film Series: A Raisin
In The Sun, Ledonia S. Wright Afro-American
Cultural Center
� April 7-8 8:30 a.m6 p.m. Red Cross Blood-
mobile, TBA
� April 7-9 Intramural Tennis Mixed Doubles,
College Hill Courts
� March 31-April 2 Intramural Tennis Doubles
Tournament, College Hills Courts
Wednesday 8
� 10 a.m3 p.m. Friends of the Library Book
Sale, Joyner Library
� 3:00 p.m. Women's Softball: Campbell Col-
lege, Home
� 5:00 p.m. Intramural Cross Campus Run,
Bunting Track
� ECU Playhouse Production Matinee, Hendrix
Theatre
� 8:00 p.m. T-A Film: John Roberts: PUERTO
RICO Hendrix Theatre
SC Dinner Theatre Dessert Performance, THE
SHADOW BOX Student Center Aud. 244
School of Music
� April 5 Billy Taylor Trio w ECU Jazz
Ensemble, 8:15 p.m. Wright Auditorium
Hendrix Theatre
April 6 John Reardon, Metropolitan Opera
baritone, 8:15 p.m.
� April 8 Martha Aarons, flute, NC Symphony
first chair, 8:15 p.m.
School of Art
March 22-April 12
� East Carolina University National Competi-
tion: Works on paper � a juried competition
jointly sponsored by the School of Medicine and
School of Art as part of the Eastern Carolina Arts
Festival, April 5-11
Movies
Buccaneer
� "Tess" (PG) Shows at 1:00. 4:30, & 8:00 p.m.
� "Ordinary People" (R) Shows at 2:00, 4:30,
7:00, & 9:20 p.m.
� "Galazina" (R) Shows at 1:10, 3:10, 5:10,
7:10, & 9:10 p.m.
� Starting Fridav: "Hardly Working" (PG)
Plaza
� "Fear No Evil" (R) Shows at 3, 5, 7, & 9:00
p.m.
� "The Earthing" (PG) Shows at 3:10, 5:10,
7:10, & 9:10 p.m.
� "Final Conflict" Shows at 3:15. 5:15, 7:15. &
9:15 p.m.
� Starting Friday: "Sphinx"(PG) & "The
Postman Always Rings Twice" (R)
Nightlife
Attic
� Thursday CONTROL GROUP
� Friday ROLZ ROYCE w HILLEL HH
4:00-7:00 p.m.
� Saturday ROLZ ROYCE
� Sunday THE FABULOUS KNOBS
� Tuesday TOMMY G & CO.
� Wednesday THE PEDESTRIANS
Carolina Oprv House
� Thursday FARGO
� Friday RONNIE MCDOW El 1 & FARGO
� Saturday LARGO
� Sunday MIKE CROSS
Chapter X
� Thursday Pi Kappa Phi "Evening Delight"
7-10 p.m.
� Friday A Nu Pi "End of Week Party" 4-8
p.m.
� Saturday Best in Beach Music
� Sunday Kappa Alplha "Nickel Nile"
� Tuesday Sigma Phi Epsilon "Ladies Night"
� Wednesday Sigma Nu "50, 50 Night"
If you have anything you would like put in
Happenings, please send it to: Nancy Morris, The
East Carolinian, East Carolina University,
Greenville N.C. 27834.
SUN. APRILS
Doors open " 15 to 8 00 pm for Advance Tickets
For More Information CalT58 393
Greenville, JVC
Ticket Locations: Apple Records Western Pleasure COH
(.rneral admission available al the
door starling at 8:00 p.m.
Bad Habits Still Persist
Continued from page 5
soup or something else
that requires special
tools to consume.
lots of rules of table
etiquette are silly,
anyway. When I wqasa
kid, 1 had to eat peas
and corn with a fork,
because it was 'polite
Today, I eat them with
a spoon, because peas
and corn always fall off
of the fork.
Putting elbows on
the table doesn't really
hurt anything (as long
as they're clean), but it
has been branded as a
bad habit. Actually.
I've found that putting
your elbows on the
table during the meal
reduces the chances of
falling onto your plate
by 50� o.
Procrastination is a
bad habit that most
people have, to some
degree. (Isn't it nice
that so many people
can have things in com-
mon?) Since I started
this article six weeks
ago, it makes me
somewhat of an expert
on the subject.
There's something
profoundly human in
the way we have of put-
ting off unpleasant or
merely dull tasks, even
though we know the
logical thing to do is to
go ahead and get it over
with. Look at it this
way, though � if
nobody ever put things
off, everything would
have been finished by
now, and we wouldn't
have anything to do.
The total number
and variety of bad
habits available to peo-
ple staggers the im-
agination. Playing
music too loud, curs-
ing, saying "ain't
telling people the en-
dings oi movies they
haven't seen yet and
thousands of other
things add up to make
the world of bad habits
a rich and diverse one.
We really wouldn't
be human without at
least one or two bad
habits. So, if you find
yourself turning into a
fish or something, you
can save yourself simp-
ly by sticking chewing
gum under a desktop.
OK TfU YOUK g�0Orsf 7
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Free Introductory
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756-2820
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Carolina E Mall
on 264 ByPass
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Fri April 3rd
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UU EAST K()1 INIAN
Sports
IRII 2. IVKI
Page 8
Hallow-Led Bucs
Win 2 Fr
A three-hit pitching performance
by Bob Patterson and some heavy
hitting by outfielder John Hallow
helped ECU defeat Atlantic Chris-
tian 12-1 Tuesday and earn a sweep
of the day's doubleheader.
The Bucs won the first game 5-2
as Bill Wilder hurled a seven-hitter,
earning a complete game and im-
proving his record to 3-2.
The somewhat quiet ECU bats of
the first game turned into bombs in
the nightcap. Hallow was the big
gun, going five-for-five with three
singles, a triple and a home run. He
also was credited with five RBI's
and three runs scored.
Patterson improved his record to
2-0 and the team's to 14-5, striking
out nine while allowing only one run
on three hits.
The Pirates scored their 12 runs
on 13 hits.
The Bucs got things going in the
opening inning. Hallow singled and
scored the game's first run on a
single by catcher Fran Fitzgerald.
ECU added four runs in the third.
Again Hallow was the main cog in
the attack, his two-run triple the in-
ning's highlight.
The Pirates came right back with
three more runs in the fourth and
two in both the sixth and seventh in-
nings.
Hallow's two-run homer ac-
counted for the sixth-inning scoring.
ACC scored their lone run in the
sixth in taking their 14th loss of the
season against seven wins.
In the day's first game, the
Pirates opened up their scoring in
the third inning. Buc second
baseman Mike Sorrell tripled and
later scored on a fielder's choice hit
by none other than Hallow.
In the fourth, the Bucs added two
more runs. Todd Hendley doubled
and scored on a Charlie Smith
single. Centcrfielder Robert Wells
also crossed the plate in the inning.
ACC scored for the first time in
the bottom of the fourth. Mike Har-
dison doubled and scored on a two-
bagger by second baseman Chuck
Downs.
r.vv
The Christians marked again in
the fifth, Tim Hardison's solo
homer narrowing the ECU lead to
3-2.
The Bucs closed the door on any
ACC hopes, though, in the seventh
with two runs. Both Mike Sage and
Hendley walked and later scored on
Charlie Smith's triple.
Smith finsihed the game as the
team's leading hitter, going two-for-
four with two RBI's.
Following the day's action ECU
coach Hal Baird said he was pleased
with the team's play and hoped that
it would carry over into the upcom-
ing road stand.
"We played very well in two
straight games he said. "Both
games we got good pitching and our
bats came alive in the second
game
The second-game explosion was
just what the doctor ordered, Baud
hinted.
"1 was very happy with thai
game he said. "We needed one
like thai because all of them seem to
.
have gone to the las innings lately.
So we needed a laugher and I think
maybe that is going to get us going a
little bn down the road
"Down the road" is jusl where
the Pirates arc heading. Toda
Pirates Score Another Run
l NC-Charlotte and a doubleheader
Saturday at Campbell.
"We've definitely got a tough
week coming up he said. "I cer-
tainly hope we can continue to plav
with the intensity we showed
Next comes a game Friday at tonight
(Thursday) the team takes on N.C.
State in Raleigh. The Wolfpack no
doubt has revenge in mind, the
Pirates having defeated them three
times consecutively.
Did NCAA Make Right Decision?
Much controversy has arisen in
the past two days over the decision
by the NCAA in deciding to go
ahead with Monday's national
championship basketball game bet-
ween Indiana and North Carolina in
the wake of the shooting o' Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan.
Most oi the complaints on the
decision have come from papers
from the metropolitan Northeast.
Reading those papers would lead
one to believe that the NCAA was
cruel and non-patriotic. Such is
simply not the case.
"The whole business should have
been called off claimed Mark
Purdv of the Cincinnati Enquirer.
"There are a few things more im-
Charles
Chandler

portani than a national champion-
ship basketball game, and the
United States President lying
wounded in an emergency ward
would seem to qualify as one of
them
No doubt the shooting o the
president was more newsworthy and
important than the title game, but
should the game have been cancell-
ed?
There are those that argue that
the Academy Awards cancellation
on Monday night and its reschedul-
ing for Tuesday showed have been
followed by the NCAA.
"In phony, grease-painted
Hollywood, Oscar bowed his shiny
head said Hubert Miell of the St.
Petersburg. Fla Times. "The peo-
ple who invented the motto, 'the
show must go on quickly voted to
postpone the Academy Awards
show.
"People who pray prayed he
continued. "My eyes became wet, as
much for my wounded country as
for mv wounded President It seem-
ed no lime lo dribble, to shoot, lo
dunk, to cheei
rhough the nation was definitely
stunned b) the day's assasination at-
tempt, there was no wrong done in
going on with the game. Not under
ihe circumstances.
pproximateh vine hour before
gametime the word game from
hospital Dr. Dennis O'Leary thai
the presideni was in good condition
following surgerv lo remove ihe
bullet that lodged in his left lung
and that chances for his complete
recovery were "excellent
Dr. 01 eary went on to say to a
national television audience and the
press assembled at George
Washington Hospital that he fully
expected Mr. Reagan to be able to
make any decisions required by his
job on the following day.
Had O'l eary had worse news the
NCAA would have, no doubt,
cancelled the playing of the game. A
final decision was not made until
after the consolation game, not until
the word came from O'l eary. The
correct steps were taken in making
the decision.
Under the conditions, the
cancellation of the game would have
certainly put the crowd of nearly
2U.IKK) already in Philadelphia's
Spectrum in a state of havoc. What
would they do? What about reserva-
tions?
VA hen would the game be
rescheduled? All these questions
and more would definitely take a
backseat to a critical!) ill president.
But with the chief executive in good
condition, the show had to go on.
Reagan himself commented later
in the night when asked how he felt,
"All in all. I'd rather be in
Philadelhia
Sure, the title game was played
under adverse conditions. veryone
on the courl certainly was affected
b the terrible events of the after
noon.
The NCAA and NBC-TV simply
made the best of a bad situation.
They could not be asked to do any
more than that.
Record Improves To 21-2
Lady Bucs Sweep Doubleheader
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
v.Mant Sport Kdiior
On a perfect day for softball
Tuesday, the Lady Pirates of East
Carolina hosted the Spartans of
UNC-Greensboro. When the in-
vaders had left, the Bucs stood
unscathed as they registered their
20th and 21st wins of the season
against just two losses.
With temperatures in the 80s and
a good crowd on hand, the Lady
Bucs swept a double-header from
the undermanned Spartans by
scores of 8-0 and 12-0.
Even though the Lady Bucs put
their best effort forward, they were
merciful toward their visitors. "1
don't want to say anything bad
about their program said head
Coach Alita Dillon, "but they will
probably drop to Division III after
this season, even though they are in
Division I right now
The Pirates had the opportunity
to play most of their younger
players so they could help the club
more as the season winds down.
They played nearly perfect ball,
which was nearly like the warm spr-
ing afternoon.
The Bucs jumped ahead in the
bottom of the first when a Mitzi
Davis sacrifice fly drove in a run
thanks to a couple of walks.
Another run was added in the se-
cond when Lydia Rountree reached
on an infield hit, and Fran Hooks
walked. Melody Ham reached base
on another Spartan miscue, scoring
Rountree, placing the Pirates up
2-0.
Mary Powell led off the Pirate
fourth with a single to center. Roun-
tree singled, but Powell was thrown
out advancing. Rountree took se-
cond, and scored the third run when
Hooks singled.
In the Pirate fifth, Jo Clayton
singled to center, and Mitzi Davis
reached first on an error. Kathy
Riley drove in Clayton with a single
to right, and the Pirates built their
lead to 4-0. Powell then singled to
center, driving in Riley and Davis to
put the Pirates ahead 6-0.
The Pirates loaded the bases in
the bottom of the sixth due to a
Angie Humphrey walk, a Melody
Ham single to center and a walk to
Clayton. Davis stepped up and
drove in Humphrey and Ham with a
double to right.
Humphrey was the winning pit-
cher and upped her record to 9-1.
"Overall, the first game wasn't
too good because we should have
gotton more offense Dillon
remarkedHowever, UNC-G S pit-
ching was very inconsistent
The Pirates provided plenty of of-
fensive fireworks for their coach in
the second game. They exploded for
eight runs in the first inning and
cruised to the win. The game was
stopped at the Spartan half of the
fifth because the Pirates were more
than 10 runs ahead.
Melody Ham walked to lead the
barrage, and Clayton singled.
Rountree reached first on an error,
loading the bases. Cynthia Shepard
singled to left, driving in Ham and
Clayton, as the Bucs went up 2-0.
Hooks then singled, but Shepard
was forced out at second, putting
runners on the corners. Powell
singled to center, and Rountree
scored to make the score 3-0. Leslie
Bunn reached first on an error, and
Hooks scored. Shirley Brown then
singled up the middle, scoring
Powell, and the Bucs were leading
5-0.
Bunn scored on an error, and pit-
cher Jeanette Roth singled to left,
scoring Brown. Ham walked,
loading the bases. That brought
Rountree up, and she reached first
on an error that scored Barnes, and
the Pirates were up 8-0.
In the Pirate second, Powell
walked, and Brown's single to right
put runners on first and second.
Barnes singled, driving in Powell
and Brown, and advanced to third
on the center fielder's error. Roth
doubled to score Barnes.
Bunn singled to left in the Buc
fourth and took second on a bad
throw from the outfield. Brown's
sacrifice fly scored Bunn, and the
Pirates had a 12-0 victory.
The Pirates were supposed to host
N.C. State Wednesday afternoon,
but the game was postponed to a
later date due to inclement weather.
The game has been rescheduled for
April 17th.
Martin Inks With Tar Heels
Pirates Lose Out
Lady Pirate Mitzi Davis Scores
From Staff and Wire Reports
DRY FORK, Va. � Less
than 24 hours after losing to
Indiana for the NCAA cham-
pionship, North Carolina add-
ed another recruit to its grow-
ing list of all-stars that might
lead the Tar Heels back to the
Final Four.
Warren Martin, Tunstall
High School's 7-foot center
and one of the state's most
highly recruited players, said
Tuesday he would accept
UNC's offer of a basketball
scholarship and wear Carolina
Blue for the next four years.
Martin said he chose among
Carolina, Virginia, Virginia
Tech, East Carolina, Jackson-
ville, James Madison and
Richmond. One of he reasons
he wanted to become a Tar
Heel was because of UNC
Coach Dean Smith, he said.
"I feel like he can teach me
some more stuff about basket-
ball. He can take up where
Coach (Howard) West left
off Martin said at an after-
noon news conference at
Tunstall. "I like the campus, 1
like the plavers and their stvle
of play
Martin, who has only-
played two years of organized
basketball, said he informed
Tunstall Coach Howard West
of his decision Sunday night.
The other schools in the runn-
ing were called Monday after-
noon prior to the news con-
ference, West said.
Martin joined a number of
all-stars already committed to
ihe Chapel Hill, N.C, school
� 6-5 Mike Jordan of Wilm-
ington, N.C; 6-11 John
Brownlee of Ft. Worth, Texas;
6-4 Buzz Peterson of
Asheville, N.C; and 6-1 Lyn-
wood Robinson of Dudlev,
N.C.
Jordon made Parade
Magazine's first-team All-
America list, Brownlee the
third team and Peterson the
fourth.
The high school senior, who
celebrates his 18th birthday to-
day, is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Linsey Martin of Axton,
Va who were both at the
news conterence. Martin's
father works at the Goodyear
plant in Danville.
Martin said he didn't see
competing for a starting spot
against either 6-9 freshman
Sam Perkins, the Atlantic
Coast Conference's Rookie of
the Year, and 6-8 sophomore
James Worthy, as negative.
"Wherever 1 go, there will
be competition. 1 know 1 was
going to have to earn a spot no
matter where I went he said.
College coaches and
recruiters have said Martin has
made tremendous improve-
ment during the past two
years. Thanks mostly to Mar-
tin, Tunstall finished second
to Group AA champion Mar-
tinsville in the Region III tour-
nament.
In 45 games during two
years, Martin scored 801
points, including a school-
record 546 this season, for a
23.7 points per game average.
He shot 72 percent from the
floor and blocked 111 shots
this year.
His career rebound total
was 485, including 241 this
season. He shot 69.7 percent
from the foul line.
"1 think he made a solid
decision said Tunstall
Coach West. "It's a good pro-
gram and a good coach,
definitely big-time. 1 think
Warren has made a committ-
ment to be the best player he
can be. He'll get a good educa-
tion and basketball will take
care of itself
There had been speculation
that Martin would attend
Jacksonville next season. The
word was that Jacksonville
head coach Tates Locke had
offered West a job as an assis-
tant as part of a package deal
to obtain Martin's services.
East Carolina coaches made
no secret of the fact that they
wanted Martin very badly.
"He could be the franchise
for us assistant George
Felton said before the an-
nouncement.
In additon to Perkins and
Worthy, Martin will have to
compete for playing time
against senior Chris Brust and
freshman Brownlee.
Ind
PHil.ADl 1 P
(UP1) Next v
finals ot the n
Basketball C ham
ships are
Philadelphia,
doesn't mean InJ
won't be hea I
olved in the
another nati
Ihe H
their four
crown Monday n
the
63-50
their
1976, whei
captur.
on the
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26-
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All- A m e i
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although NBA
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Indiana
N
Benn
Still
Hurtil
ATI AM
Leeman B
time has c
eae the v
feels over
Falc
Super Bowl h
allowing the
Cowboys �
touchd. A
ing mi i
plaj me.
"It still
same the f
coach
watch;i $
1980 highlights
the back 1
popular Peal
St reel b
� � N o mat t
great the I
playing (while
ing Atlanta's I
12-4 re.
division I
ship) said H
"you always wai
a little be fartrn
The Falcons,
Jan. 4 game,
10-point.
with less tha
minutes to pli
their tans had
gone int(
dance.
But Danny
lofted two tou
passes to Drew
� the first a 1
with 3:40 let!
second a 2
42 seconds lei:
was Dalla-
ta, headed for
championship
Bennett said
to put that 30i
out of his mind
keeps comingl
Just when o
you've gotten
pain of
something hi
(film) bring-
again.
"It's an upai
thing said
"1 guess it real
go away until
all some day
Benneti belu
day may net be
awav
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ilee.
fHEEASTCAROI INIAN
APRIL 2. 1981
Indiana Should Be Strong Again
COUPON
iTb Ham �
PHILADELPHIA
(UP1) � Next year's
finals of the NCAA
Basketball Champion-
ships are not in
Philadelphia, but that
doesn't mean Indiana
won't be heavily in-
volved in the chase for
another national title.
The Hoosiers won
their fourth NCAA
crown Monday night at
the Spectrum with a
63-50 victory over
North Carolina. It was
their first title since
1976, when they also
captured the big prize
on the same court.
"My first thought
would be, really, when
does the tournament
committee want to
come back to
Philadelphia0" asked
Indiana Coach Bobby
Knight. "It's a good
place for us to play
Monday night's con-
test nearly was
postponed because of
the assassination at-
tempt on President
Reagan, but NCAA of-
ficials, after much con-
sultation, decided to
hold the contest when
Reagan's condition im-
proved.
The 1982 Final Four
will meet at the Loui-
siana Superdome in
New Orleans, and ex-
pect Indiana to be right
in the thick of things.
The Hoosiers return
four starters from the
26-9 championship
team. That includes
All-America guard
Isiah Thomas, named
MVP oi the tourna-
ment after scoring 23
points in the finals,
although NBA scouts
would like to see the
6-foot-l sophomore
turn pro.
"Right now I'm pret-
t sure I'll be back at
Indiana University
Bennett
Still
Hurting
ATLANTA (UPI) -
Leeman Bennett says
time has done little to
ease the pain he still
feels over the Atlanta
Falcons blowing their
Super Bowl hopes by
allowing the Dallas
Cowboys to score two
touchdowns in the clos-
ing moments of their
playoff game.
"It still ends the
same the Falcons
coach said sadly after
watching his team's
1980 highlights film in
the back room of a
popular Peachtree
Street bistro.
"No matter how
great the film shows us
playing (while describ-
ing Atlanta's best-ever
12-4 record and first
division champion-
ship) said Bennett,
"you always want to go
a little be farther
The Falcons, in that
Jan. 4 game, had a
10-point, 27-17, lead
with less than four
minutes to play and
their fans had already
gone into a victory
dance.
But Danny White
lofted two touchdown
passes to Drew Pearson
� the first a 14-yarder
with 3:40 left and the
second a 23-yarder with
42 seconds left � and it
was Dallas, not Atlan-
ta, headed for the NFC
championship game.
Bennett said he tries
to put that 30-27 loss
out of his mind. "But it
keeps coming back.
Just when you think
you've gotten over the
pain of losing,
something like this
(film) brings it up
again.
"It's an up and down
thing said Bennett.
"I guess it really won't
go away until we win it
all some day
Benneti believes that
day may not be very far
away.
Thomas said Monday
night of his current
plans.
The other returning
starters are 6-6 guard
Randy Wittman, who
bombed away from the
outside against North
Carolina for 16 points,
6-10 center-forward
Landon Turner and 6-8
forward Ted Kitchel.
Another player to
figure prominently in
Indiana's plans is 6-3
reserve guard Jim
Thomas, who made the
All-Tournament team
with his hustling all-
around play.
What may send
shudders throughout
the Big Ten is Knight's
opinion that the best
days of the current
Hoosier team might be
ahead.
"We've undergone a
Sports Trivia Quiz
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a list of
trivia questions that we at The East Carolinian
felt were of interest to the student body. The
sports staff put much time and ejjort into the
compiling oj the facts that follow. Special thanks
go to ECU Sports Information Director Ken
Smith, who supplied the stafj with much oj the
information that follows. Let it be known that
anyone who can correctly answer 15 or more oj
the following questions rales as a "Pirate
genius. "
QUESTIONS
1.) Who is the ECU's all-time leading rusher in
football?
2.) Who is the all-time leading scorer in ECU
basketball history?
3.) The East Carolinian has named male and
female Athletes of the Year for the past two
years. Who were they in � a. 1979 and b.1980?
4.) Who was the Most Valuable Player in ECU's
Independence Bowl victory in 1978?
5.) How many undefeated football teams has East
Carolina had and in what years did they exist?
6.) What is the winningest sport overall in ECU
sports history?
7.) How many national championships does East
Carolina have?
8.) East Carolina has been affiliated with three
conferences. Name them.
9.) What year was East Carolina declared a Divi-
sion I school?
10.) Where on campus were the first Last
Carolina basketball games played?
11.) Against what team was Memorial gym
dedicated and who coached that team?
12.) Name the highest ranked men's basketball
team to play against the Pirates in Minges Col-
iseum and name the coach of that team.
13.) Ficklen Stadium was dedicated in 1963. What
team did the Pirates play and defeat in the
stadium's first contest that year?
14.) What former ECU football standout was
the
named the Defensive Player of the Year in
Canadian Football League this past season?
15.) Who was the last person associated with
ECU who was a member of the NCAA cham-
pionship basketball tournament selection com-
mittee?
16.) What is ECU assistant coach Eddie Payne's
most outstanding accomplishment?
17.) ECU basketball player Michael Gibson
played high school ball at Maggie Walker High in
Richmond, Va. with what former Atlantic Coast
Conference star?
18.) What member of the current ECU basketball
team was once listed among the top 50 prep pro-
spects in the nation?
19.) Who is one of ECU head baseball coach Hal
Baird's best friends?
20.) A former Olympic gold medal winner still
holds a record in an ECU athletic facility. WHo is
the athlete and in what sport did he participate?
ANSWERS
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maturation process
through the course of
the year and through
that have developed
more experience said
Knight, whose team
was 7-5 in December
before turning its
season around. "This
team has grown and
developed. But I think
they haven't finished
maturing yet. That
should come some time
next year
The only starter the
Hoosiers will lose is 6-9
center Ray Tolbert,
who is Knight's choice
for the Big Ten's Most
Valuable Player.
Tolbert scored just five
points but pulled down
a game-high 11 re-
bounds against the Tar
Heels.
Indiana's five-game
march through the
NCAA tournament was
devastating. Its
smallest margin of vic-
tory was 13 points, and
the aggregate point
spread over five con-
tests was a whopping
113 points, or nearly 23
a game.
As for North
Carolina, which finish-
ed 29-8, coach Dean
Smith says farewell to
two starters � Al
Wood, the silky 6-6
forward who scored 57
points in the two
games, and guard Mike
Pepper.
But the Atlantic
Coast Conference team
does return formidable
inside strength in 6-9
sophomore James
Worthy and 6-9
freshman Sam Perkins,
plus dependable point
guard Jimmy Black.
"I feel sorry and
disappointed for our
seniors Smith said
following the game.
"History shows that
nobody comes back to
this (the Final Four) the
next year. We'll have a
good team but we have
to deal with (Virginia
center Ralph) Sampson
in our own league
If the Tar Heels are
fortunate enough to ad-
vance some distance in
the NCAA tourna-
ment, however. Smith
figures he'll see a
familiar face.
I
I
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I
The East Carolinian
Sivwnt iht' campus i i�munil
urn r
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
Thr East Carolinian is the of
ticial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned.
operated ano published for anc
by the students of Eat,t Carolina
University
Subscription Rates
Business J35 yearly
All others $J5 yearly
Second class postage pad at
Greenville, N C
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Buildmg on the campus of ECU.
Greenville. N C
Telephone 7 57 434, 6367. 630?
BENNIE'S
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FOR SALE Wedding gown and
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FOR SALE 1974 Dodge Coll. Ex
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YARD SALE Saturday April 4th
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Cassette deck model KP 707G
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for your next party Call 757 3210
FEMALE PUPPY needs good
home 4 months old, half golden
retriever Call 756 5671.
OUR MAN ROBERT CON
TINUES TO AMAZE! Pro
mising to meet a young lady at
Moser's farmhe met her at an
after downtown party at Hunting
Beaver Apts ), Robert is now lac
ed with the task of slipping by
security since he isn't in a sorority
( or fraternity 1 Those security
guards are mean too S they tore up
a rent a Ohn for not flushing and
beat up the band for not playing
"Tie You're Mother Down").
After a six pack and 10 minutes of
shifty thought. Robert formulates
a couple of not so complex alter
natives A Putting on a
buttondown and gatonng by B
Getting in a crowd and trying to
squeeze in a health teoper
dizer ). C. Ball up and
cover himself with aluminum foil
and get carried in, disguised as a
keg D None of the above
You guessed it
E Dnnk another 6 pack put on
a wig, some kelly green pants, a
pink buttondown. duck shots, add
a beads, a name tag that says
'Butty , and head for the security
guard looking like you're ready to
release a TECHNICOLOR
YAWN!
TYPING DONE: Term papers,
thesis, resumes, etc Call Jane
Pollock at 752 971?
SPORT F.er's: E V E and Corn
bread Cars and phone poles don t
mix with D.U Is EnosandT J
What is double secret probation?
And why isn t Pharo included?
G.P J and WaveDog Why do you
record your phone calls? Heavy
breathing or what? John Mc says
grab a box of Boosh wisers and
lets HEAD for 504 Clubhouse any
Sunday! YEA!
CLAUDIA: I was first attracted
by your mind. Now 1 m attracted
by what you don't mind. Happy 21
Birthday L'ya, James.
We speak TURABIAN, Little
Brown. APA. PRC, etc. Profes
sional typing editing, pro
ofreading WRITE RIGHT
756 9946.
NEED PROFESSIONAL TYP
ING Term papers, thesis,
resumes, etc 758 4241.
GUITAR PLAYER WANTED
Money making Top 40, Beach
band. Vocal ability a must. Call
757 3210.
PHI KAPPA TAU SPRING FL
ING FRIDAY APRIL 3RD
Everyone is invited! Be sure and
buy your raffle tickets tor the tree
Beach Weekend
PARTTIME AND FULLTIME
HELP WANTED Apply in per
son Hatteras Hammocks 1104
Clark St Greenville
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large house 12
rooms. 2 baths Ideal tor student
group $500 plus utilities 752 5296
FOR RENT 2 bedroom
townhouse apts 1 and halt baths
appliances, cable TV hookups. 2
locations. River Bluff and E 11th
St. No pets. $280 and $300 units,
lease and security deposit re
quired. JL Harris and Sons Inc ,
REALTORS. 204 W 10th St
758 4711
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED To share apt inside
house on E 3rd St beginning May
1st Rent is $87 SO Call Beth at
752 4550.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 7 bedroom fully fur
mslicd trailer Central air
fireplace and 2 baths. $87 SO per
month plus half utilities Call
752 2898
1981-82
East Carolina
Pirate Calendar
will be taking applica-
tions for Male Models,
Sunday, April 5th,
from 3:00-5:00 p.m. at
the Elbo Room.
Please Bring Photograph
AFTERNOON DEUGHT
April 3 lii
ATTIC
lltMCIRl
Sponsored by : Hille
4Q0-7:00p.m.
Admission 25t
Canned beverages
only BOC
iEafit (Earollnfan
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday curing the academic
year ana cver Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
fKial newspaper of East
Carolina University, ov.
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rates
Business $35 yearly
All others $25 yearly
Second class postaqe paid at
Greenville, N C
SAAD'SSHOfc
REPAIR
I 1 3 Gtande Ave
758-1228
Quality Repair
ROOMATES WANTED 2 male or
female roommates wanted fo
share spacious 3 bedroom house
during summer and! or tall
Convenient location to Carolina
East Mall and Pitt Community
College $80 month during sum
mer, one third utilities and $60
month, one fourth utilities during
the fall Call 756 901! after 5 pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 2 bedroom apt m
Wilson Acres, 4 blocks from cam
pus $145 mo. plus one halt
utilities. Call 752 9194 after 4:30.
RIVER BLUFF APARTMENTS
has temporarily reduced its rent
Call now for details 758 4015
FOR RENT Spacious 12 room
house 2 blocks from campus
$500 plus deposit Call 752 5296
FEMALE WANTED To share 3
bedroom apt $82 00 pius one third
utilities Non smoker preferred
Ca'i Nancy at 758 8398
APT FOR LEASE 600
Georgetown. Runs from mid May
to Mid August Call 758 0323
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED FROM 2 00 3:00 M F AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
FICE
PLANTERS OIL MILL, INC.
1004 Cokey Road � Rocky Mount, N.C. 442-0193
We have recently completed the renovation and expansion
of our Solvent Plant and are now able to fulfill all your needs
for 44 Protein Soybean Meal.
Any Size Order Accepted.
Available Bagged or Bulk.
No Appointment Necessary for Loading.
Delivery Service Available. Including Auger Trucks.
We are also buying soybeans.
Call (919) 442-0193 For Price Quotations
Open your windows and let out winter. Start your spring celebration with
rock & roll from the Record Bar. Pick up Steve Bassetts Virginia Breeze, and
REO Speedwagon's Hi Infidelity, among many others.
On sale April 2-8
Steve Bassett, Virginia Breeze
REO Speed wagon, Hi Infidelity
l.rivtht'ttifl
lit mush.
W�k RECORDS & TAPES �
Record Bar
Pitt Plaza Carolina East Mall
t
f





10
IMI l s( R1 INI w
M'KIl 2. 1481
Handball Team Back From West Pt.
North Carolina
Soccer League
The Stoh's Aliens
took at tough come-
from-behind victory
Sunday over NC"
Wesley an by a 2-1
margin. The first half
was scoreless although
the Aliens had two wide
open shots right in
front of the goal. They
also missed a penalty
kick.
In the second half,
Wesleyan vsas awarded
a penalty kick after a
trip in the Alien's
penalty area. Tons Fer-
Club Sport
Review
BY TIM WILLIAMS
rell converted the kick
to give Wesleyan a 1-0
lead with only 22
minutes left in the
match. At this point,
the Aliens buckled
down and tied the score
on a well-placed shot
from a narrow angle b
Mike Hitchcock. Then,
with only five minutes
remaining in the game
Steve Young hit an ex-
cellent pass that found
Jeff Karpovitch wide
open in front of the
goal. He fired the ball
into the back of the net
to give the Aliens the
victory.
As for the American
Defender Soccer Club,
defeat was tasted for
the first time this
season as they lost to
NC Wesleyan Thursday
in Rocky Mount, 1-0.
After having numerous
opportunities to score
throughout the game,
the Defender's defense
made a mistake that
cost them the match. A
fullback was trying to
pass the ball back to the
goalie but instead push-
ed the ball into the net
to give Wesleyan the
victory.
On Sunday, though,
the Defender's got back
in the win column with
a 3-1 win over the Kick
Soccer Club in Wilson.
All the goals were
scored in the second
half with Shawn Berry
leading the way with
two. Bill Merwin also
hit the nets while Keith
Soccer Clinic Set
Johnston and Steve
Brody each gave an
assist to Berry.
Team Handball
Club
The ECU Team
Handball Club par-
ticipated last weekend
in the Sixth Annual
West Point Team
Handball Invitational
Tournament in New
York. Even though
they played some very
high-class competition,
they made a respectable
showing. As for the
men, the event was
double-elimination
against 11 other teams
from the United States
and Canada. In their
first game they lost
11-10 to Citadeiles de
Quebec who ended up
in third place, and then
were defeated by an ex-
cellent Toronto All-
Stars team, 13-7. In a
consolation game, the
men's team, soundly
defeated the New York
City Team Handball
Club, 22-3.
As for the women,
they won the first game
they played, defeating
West Point Club 10-6.
The girls, most of
whom were playing in
their first tournament,
lost their next four
games to some extreme-
ly talented teams from
Canada.
Every one who made
the trip got equal play-
ing time, and much
valuable experience was
gained.
Hubert Yogelsmger,
former Australian pro-
fessional soccer player
and North American
Soccei I eague coach,
will direct the Puma
Soccei Clinic at ECU
April 3-5.
Emphasis will be
placed on skill develop-
ment and tactics.
Seperate session for
coaches, beginners
(boys and girls) and ad-
vanced players ull be
held. The clinic will be
conducted at the ECU
Soccer Field at Minges
Coliseum.
ogelsmger was one
of the most successful
pro coaches in the
history of the NASL.
He won four division
titles, two with the
Boston Mmutemen and
two with the San Diego
Sockers. His teams
reached the playoffs
every year and finished
in the semi-finals
Conference
Championships three
times.
A s a collegiate
coach, he brought Yale
University into national
prominence when Yale
participated for the
first time in the Elis'
soccer history in the
NCAA playoffs and
reached the New
England finals.
Vogelsinger is a
member of the promo-
tional board of Puma
USA, the American
marketing company for
the internationally
famous German sport
shoe company.
"Soccer is the com
ing sport in America
said Vogelsinger, who
repeatedly pressed for
"Americanization" of
the game while an
NASL coach. "1
believe the United
States has the greatest
soccer potential of any
nation in the world, but
we need more ex-
perienced coaches and
we need to develop pro-
per skills in the young
players just starting the
game. The Puma Soc-
cer Clinics have been
created to provide help
in both cases
At ECU , the April
3rd session will be from
7-9 p.m. This session is
only for coaches and
parents.
The April 4th session
will be from 10 in the
morning until noon.
This session is for ages
7-13. The 2-4 p.m. ses-
sion will be for the 14
and up age group.
Yanks Get Mumphrey
In TradeWith Padres
On April 5th, h in-
vitation only, there will
e another session from
to I p.m.
9MX �! - to YDiSS MNE5 r a ,
II
mm
Presents
In Concert"
EPIC Recording Artist
NANTUCKET"
with special guest
"Control Group"
From New York City
Doors Open At 7:30
Showtime At 9:00
Must Be 18 With Valid ID
I OK 1 1AH)1 R-
DAI 1 . Ha. (UPI) -
Switch-hitting out-
fielder Jerry Mum-
phrev of the San Diego
Padres was traded to
Nev� oi k Yankees
1 uesdav night tor out-
fielders Ruppert Jones
and Joe I etebvre and
pitchers I im I.ollar and
Chris Welsh.
Mumphrev, 28, stole
52 bases last year, help-
ing make the Padres the
only team in baseball
history to have three
players with 50 or more
stolen bases. He hit
.298 and knocked in 59
runs.
In the deal, the
Yankees also acquired
John P a c e 11 a, a
24-year-old right-
hander who was landed
b San Diego from the
ew York Mets in a
previous deal for left-
hander Randy Jones.
Pacella, 3-4 with a
5 14 ERA last year, was
immediately sent to the
Yankees' AAA farm
club in Columbus.
One vear ago, Jones,
2fr, was considered the
"i ankees' center fielder
of the future, but he
suffered two major in-
juries and played in on-
lv 83 games, batting
.223. rhe kev to the
deal as tar as the
Padres are concerned
could very well be
I etebvre. 25, who bats
left and has a strong
throwing arm L eteb-
vre batted .22"? for the
Yankees last year but
showed some power,
hitting eight home runs
and driving in 21 runs
in only 150 at-bats.
Both Welsh, who will
be 26 later this month,
and I ollar, 25, pitched
for Columbus, which
won the International
League championship
last season.
Lollar was 2-1 with a
2.57 ERA for Colum-
bus and went 1-0 with a
3.43 ERA in 14 ap-
pearances for New
York, saving two
games. Welch was 9-12
with a 2.73 ERA for
Columbus.
The acquisition of
Mumphrey further
complicates the
Yankees' outfield situa-
tion. The only sure
starter is free agent
Dave Winfield, who
could open in right
because of an injury to
slugger Reggie
Jackson. The Yankees
have already sent center
fielder Bobby Brown to
Columbus and veteran
center fielder Elliot
Maddox has been
working in New York's
camp on a tryout basis
New York Manager
Gene Michaels said
Mumphrey will pro-
bably be in the starting
lineup as the Yankees'
No. 2 hitter.
"1 haven't seen Jerry
Mumphrey play but the
scouts say he's a good
player said Michaels.
"Right now, I'm think-
ing of him being the
No. 2 hitter
Michaels, who
managed Columbus
last year, said he was
impressed with Pacella,
claiming, "He had the
best arm in our
league
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday PluS tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
CHICK�FILA
SANDWICH SPECIAL -
ALL YOU CAN EAT
FOR $1.09 EACH.
Here's real special treat foi you and your friends oi family. You can
gel all the delicious Chick-fil-A sandwiches � the original boneless
breast ol chicken sandwich tor onl $1.09 each with the coupon
below. I hat's a deal that's hard to beat on the sandwich that's fun to
eat.
SAVE
CHICK�FIL'ASAHDYviCH
SPECIAL COUPON$1.09each
Jii-t ! : �
;avi
'�"J�-
tlu- rtM.
Our rtm- !
(M,i, per L
SAVE


N
jm
. 11
4-30-81
( losrd �undav
� xX$�
THE TAS1 L WORTH SHOPPING FOR.
. OI CON
UffM u'xxt 'I tlu tulliming hit k I it rt-l.ur.nl
� General Nutrition Centers
America's Best Nutrition Values are at GNC-Ovef 800 Stores from Coast to Coast
� Coconut BROWN ��!iL
BRAN I Matrons! RICE : VITAMIN
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VITAMINW.
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GNC QUALITY AT LtSS THAN CHEAPEST CUT-RATE MAIL ORDER PRICES'
STORE COUPON STORS COUPON STORE COUPON
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gffilB ALFALFA Vtamin � TMBK LEcr?HiN ZINC
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EXPIRES S 5 8' 1 EXPIRES �ll 1 EXPIRES i) �1 EXPIRES � 5 �l � EXPIRES S S r ll EXPIRESl
'JP"
LOSE RAT
UM
STYLEX
� Cootma b�mioctna
�twh la approved
by U S Gov t
pani ol ��pert
to app�tft� control
SENSATIONAL I
IRON
PENNY SALE
UNDER
2170SELENIUM 2470
A & D.
MOOD � u -DOC U 100 12 P
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2090 RELAX t� 2786
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CLIP THESE COUPONS FOR OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES
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CKERS
i
.vi�OC ' I �' AQC
EIPIReTVis! EXP.RtSbi
w�ol� wheat i gijLGUR Safflower Ic�l!tiorio
FLOURi WHEAT JMayonnaiselSoypeans
69c A 49� h 89 I 39
s�tfe9c�Js49c. ius
expires? s-�i i txKiRtssiti � "i14"
Men's Rugby
The Men's Rugby
team had a split deci-
sion with the Fort
Bragg Rugby Club last
Saturday. In the "A "
game, Ft. Bragg was
the winner by a 39-14
score. Scott Taylor
scored two tries for
ECU while Lee Essner
added another.
In the "B" game,
ECU was the victor by
a convincing 27-4
margin. The men's
Rugby Club par-
ticipates this weekend
in the Wake Forest In-
vitational Rugby Tour-
mment againast 16
teams from all across
the southeastern United
States.
Women's Rugby
The Women's Rugby
Club is entered this
weekend in the 1981
Michelob Rugby
Classic at the Universi-
ty of South Carolina.
The field also includes
UNC-Charlotte and
Clem son. ECU plays
USC Saturday at 12:30
p.m.
STORE COUPON
STORE COUPON
STORE COUPON
LOWFAT
� YOGURTinC:
� 8oz llM
EXPIRES S S �1
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STORE COUPON S STORE COUPON i
Ro�flLtEs� IftSsfSrtl
k'49c
FRUIT
JUICES
SAVE 39c
10
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POTATO YOGURT
Ofl CORN
f
Ofl CORN V & f n�
CHIPS lci
SAVE !9c MWST
EXPIRES 5 S' � EXPIRES 5 St'
����������������������������������������������
� ��������������ill
STICK
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S�vf UP
TO
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BOKT'
STRESS-O-WTE
GERI-GEN
$179 J 59c
IIWRfl 1 �-�1 '�PMHI �
1Q0
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of t �AAM fommu � wnmmn
amttnt w�hih
1 ����
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BANANA
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69 s-89c
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15 4? a EXPIRE
igh Blood Pressure:
mumi sai 1 iniaki
Sxvi
expires; 541 S EXPIRES s sai
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General
Nutrition
Centers
I'Oin crxioN
MO SAL 1
Tomato
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svi QQc
tic BB � o,
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MayonnclM
six CkflC
STOMf COJIO
NO 11. r
Imwi Stick
�MACKS
�M
Sit T,Mi I ��
IIMHI I � li
49
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VEG-IT
�w QQC .
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SPRING SAVINGS
Film DEVELOPING and PRINTING
Foreign Film Not Included.
12 exp. 2.49
20 exp. 3.79
24 exp. 4.19
36 exp. 6.29
ASA 400 slightly higher
SATISFACTION
GUARANTEED!
April 6 - April 10
Student Supply
Store
Wright Bldg.
East Carolina University (g)
R-rOTOTHOJ
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If you ntad monty for fill clothot or football tlckata. now It a
good tlma to aall your gold and allvar valuablaa. And hora � a
good way to gat EXTRA CASHI
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
$
Almost everyone his i high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. Were
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
fair prices and good service.
Wl PAY CASH ONTHISPOT
FOI JfWUir, VAWAIUSAIVTMIK
MAMIftlOI-UK-IIK.
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401 S. EVANS ST. 0fsw�:��.eaj sa
iHARWONY KOIISf SOUTH) PHONE 7523866
F YOUR PROFISSOM AL PERMANENT DEALER i
t





Title
The East Carolinian, April 2, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 02, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.123
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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