The East Carolinian, March 31, 1981






uUte iEaat Carolinian

k
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 N
oO
10 Pages
Tuesday, March 31, 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Reagan Wounded In Washington
B DEAN REYNOLDS
WASH INC, ION (UPI) A young
gunman ambushed President
Reagan at close range Monday and
fired half-dozen shots, one of them
piercing the president's lung inches
from his heart. Doctors removed the
bullet m a two-hour operation and
said Reagan would recover.
The would-be assassin, identified
as John Warnock Hinckley Jr 25.
ol Evergreen, Colo was tackled
and pinned to the pavement, whisk-
ed away, in a squad car and charged
with attempted murder. Officials
said that last fall during the
presidential campaign Hinckley had
been arrested for carrying three
guns.
The shots outside a Washington
hotel, crackling through a dismal
rainfall like balloons bursting at a
child's birthday party, gravely
wounded presidential press
secretary James Brady and left a
Secret Service agent and a police of-
ficer in serious condition.
The shooting stunned the world
and a nation whose citizens seem
unable to shake the stigma of seem-
ingly mindless murder of public-
figures.
Sen. Edward ML Kennedy, who
buried two assassinated brothers in-
cluding the last president shot,
deplored the incident: "Violence
and hatred are alien to everything
this country is about. With our
prayers must go our resolution to
rid our society of violence and its
cause
But Reagan himself look the
event in stride, joking with
bystanders as he walked into the
hospital under his own power. At
8:50 p.m. he handed doctors in the
recovery room a hand written note
paraphrasing W.C. Fields: "All in
all, I'd rather be in Philadelphia
Doctors at George Washington
University Hospital said the
70-year-old Reagan is an excellent
physical specimen with the body of
a young man and his survival never
was in doubt.
The prognosis for complete
recovery is "excellent and Reagan
should be able to resume presiden-
tial duties Tuesday morning from
his hospital bed.
And Vice President George Bush,
ordered back to Washington from
Texas, said "I can reassure this na-
tion and a watching world that this
nation is functioning fully and nor-
mally
The stunning murder attempt oc-
curred outside the sprawling
Washington Hilton Hotel, one mile
from the White House, where
Reagan had just delivered a speech
to a union convention.
Waving and smiling, Reagan
neared the bulletproof presidential
limousine when the gunfire crackl-
Atlanta Toll Reaches 21
Another Body Discovered
ed. The grin on Reagan's face turn-
ed to froen horror as a Secret Ser-
vice agent shoved him into the car.
Pandemonium erupted.
Bystanders screamed in horror.
Guns were drawn in an instant. Hin-
ckley was buried immediately under
a mass of agents.
And the bloody bodies ol Brady,
Secret Service agent Timoth) Mc-
Carthy and District ol Columbia
police officer Thomas Delahantv
were sprawled on the rainswept
pavement.
An attorney for his family said
Hinckley had a history of
psychiatric care. Federal law en-
forcement officials said he was ar-
rested in Nashville for earning
firearms near the time both then-
President Carter and Reagan were
to make campaign appearances in
Tennessee.
William Bnsscy, captain of the
Nashville, Tenn Airport secuntv
VI L ANT A (UPI) A young man
irving out a new outboard motor
found the bodv of a black youth
iting in the Chattahoochee River
Monda) and police said it was the
21st victim of Atlanta's child killers.
Fulton County Police Chief Clin-
ton c hafin said identification of the
y, "that of a young black
male was unlikely before Tues-
da).
Bui wl t vas asked if it was
the late- i string of murders of
black children that began 20 months
e said "1 don think there's
question about that
The bodv was pulled out of the
rivei in a rural, sparsely-populated
area of southwest Fulton County,
about three miles from the spot
where the body ol I ubie Geter, 14,
was found Feb. 5. Chafin said a
young resident of the area was on
the river trying out a new boat
motor when he saw the bodv
floating on top of some debris.
Fhe corpse, clad only in
underwear, "seems to be in
reasonably good shape Chafin
said, but authorities said its features
were unrecognizable due to decom-
position and Chafin said "1 would
not think the body will be identified
until tomorrow. It will take other
means than personal identifica-
tion
He said it was impossible to deter-
mine immediately how long it had
been immersed, but he said
"everybody agrees it's been in the
river for several days
Assistant Medical Examiner Dr.
John Feegel said "1 think it's been
in the river for a long time
Only a one-lane, dirt road led to
the spot where the body was found
and authorities finally had to resort
to four-wheel-drive vehicles to get
the body out and deliver it to the
Fulton County morgue.
Of the 22 children on the list be-
ing handled bv the task force, 20
have been found dead and two are
listed as missing. One of them. Dar-
ron Glass, vanished in September
and authorities said it was highlv
unlikely that his bodv would be in-
tact by now.
The other missing child on the list
is Joseph Bell, 15, who disappeared
March 2. Timothy Hill, 13, has been
missing since March 13, but police
have remained convinced that he is a
runaway and have not turned his
case over to the task force, although
the Missing Persons bureau has
assigned several officers to his case.
W.R. Beddenfield, a farmer who
lives near the spot where the body
was found Monday, said the corpse
was clothed only in jockey shorts
and appeared to be 5-feet-5 to
5-feet-6 tall, and weigh about 120
pounds.
Bell was 5-54 and weighed 110.
Monday's discovery was the first
since March 6, when the bodv of
Curtis Walker. 13. was found in the
South River in Dekalb County, on
the opposite side of the
metropolitan area. Walker, who
vanished Feb. 1. had been suf-
focated.
Walker, loo. was dad only, in his
undershorls. Most of the children's
bodies have been fully clothed when
found.
W alker's was the third body to be
found in a river.
Aid Application Processing Halted
WASHING ION. D.C. (CPS) �
In an attempt to make families con-
tribute more to their offsprings' col-
lege education, the Reagan ad-
ministration has imposed an un-
precedented temporary freeze on
processing federal financial aid ap-
plications.
I ast week Secretary of Education
lerrel Bell announced the govern-
ment wanted to change certain
eligibility requirements for Fell
Grants (formerly Basic Educational
Opportunity Grants), and would
not process any more applications
tor the grants until Congress voted
on the change in requirements.
Congress has until April 28 to
react to the proposed rules changes,
though Rep. Peter Peyser (D-NY) of
the House Postsecondary Education
Subcommittee hopes to debate the
proposals sooner than that to
minimize the freeze's impact.
If the requirements are changed
as Bell requested, "maybe 100,000
students" would be knocked out of
the Pell Grant program, estimates
Skee Smith of the U.S. Department
of Education's Student Special Ser-
vices office.
In the meantime, the freeze effec-
tively stops the awarding of all
.federal financial aid for the moment
because Pell Grants are used to
determine students' eligibility for
other forms of financial aid, says
Dallas Martin of the National
Association of Student Financial
Aid Administrators.
Martin calls the freeze a
"travesty. They're going through a
process both questionable and il-
legal
The freeze is a new procedure,
concedes a House education com-
mittee staffer. "Normally when
final regulations are printed (as Pell
Grant regulations were printed in
January), they are not withdrawn
for reconsideration
"1 am sure (the freeze) will be an
inconvenience for many financial
aid officers Smith understates.
The House of Representatives is
expected to conduct hearings into
the legality of the administration's
maneuver.
The administration's aim is to
change the way families figure their
police, said Hincklev had been ar-
rested Oct. y for trying to board an
airliner with three handguns and 50
rounds ol ammunition in a suitcase.
I here was no immediate indica-
tion how a person once so detained
bv authorities could have placed
himself, without detection and car-
rying a .22 caliber handgun, 10 teet
from Reagan
Brady's prognosis was grim. Doc-
tors said the bullet had entered his
skull over his right eye and passed
through his brain, and Dr. Dennis
OT.earv said even if the 40-year-old
press secretary lives, permanent
brain damage is likely.
I he Academv Awards Oscar
presentation scheduled for Monday
night was postponed until Tuesday
night because of the shooting, ABC
television announced.
Photo By CHAP GURLEY
What A (heap Trick!
After purchasing their tickets for Saturday night's Cheap Trick-UK) concert, these girls stopped by the "big
bed" display at Mendenhall Student Center for a little cheesecake photography session.
eligibility for Pell Grants, and to
make families contribute more
toward their kids' education.
A December, 1977 study by the
College Entrance Examination
Board found that the wealthier the
family, the less willing it is to pav
more than is needed for its offspring
to qualify for student aid.
"We don't think we ought to be
subsidizing the very wealthy in this
country Bell explained on the
"Good Morning, America" televi-
sion show.
At present, a family's eligibility
for aid is calculated by subtracting
certain living expenses from total
family income. Regulations sav
families can increase their living ex-
penses estimates by 12 and one-half
percent to cover inflation.
The administration, however.
wants to scrap the 12 and one-half
percent increase, thus saving SI83
million in the next fiscal year.
By figuring eligibility the ad-
ministration's way, more families
would show higher net incomes, and
thus become ineligible for Pell
Grant s.
Secretary Bell also wants to set
upper limits on how much a student
can deduct from his or her income
estimate. New regulations would set
maximum amounts on how much a
student could spend � at least for
purposes of determining eligibility
for Pell Grants � for housing,
books and related school expenses.
Talk about changing the rules of
getting Pell Grants, Martin says, is
affecting other federal financial aid
programs. Administration promises
to reform the Guaranteed Student
loan program are "frightening"
some banks, which are waiting to
make student loans until the issues
are settled.
Photo Bv JON JORDAN
The SGA Legislature observed a moment of silence Monday for Presi-
dent Reagan and those injured in the assassination attempt.
Reappearance Slated
For Ebony Herald
By OTIS ROBINSON
Staff Wnicr
After a one-year absence, the
Ebony Herald is scheduled to begin
publication in the fall.
Lamont Byrd was named editor
of the minority newspaper by the
East Carolina Media Board. He will
have the responsibility of re-
establishing the publication.
"The purpose of the paper is to
inform people living at the Interna-
tional House and any ethnic group
thai is a minority Byrd said. "We
want to cover activities about
minorities on campus which are not
reported in the East Carolinian
Byrd has been working with the
ECU Media Board to finalize a
budget for the newspaper. The
budget is expected to be completed
in April.
"We want to sec how much
money is needed and how many
people we can employ Byrd said.
"We're planning on getting the staff
together next week
Byrd has named Edward Nesbitt
to aid him in selecting students for
the newspaper's staff.
David Creech, chairman of the
Media Board, said, "We are work-
ing with him (Byrd) on putting
together the figures for the paper.
The figures have to be kicked
around in the Media Board before
we can propose a budget.
"The advantage of the Ebony
Herald is that it will be another
medium. We need a publication for
the minority students on campus. I
think the paper will be able to cover
events that the East Carolinian for
some reason or another has been
unable to cover
Gracie Wells, president of
SOULS added, "I think it can only
be an asset to the students. There
were a few problems with the other
paper, but I'm sure that this one will
be a better paper
Students wishing to apply for
positions as writers for the paper
can pick up applications at the
Media Board office.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds11
Features6
Letters4
Sports9
Remember To Vote Wednesday





IHl I SI . AKOI IN! W
NlARt H 31, ISS 1
Announcements
COFFEEHOUSE
1 '�� Coffeehouse Committee will
- Thursday. April 2 1981 at
2 30 p m in Room 238 of
I �hail Student Center All
members arc urged to attend
GAME ROOM
, Room
� basement
� � I
Win l hurs l 11
S v IY1 and Su" 8
� Hirnea
� �� udent

STRING BASS
. perform in
- �S1 at
i , I
. i � � it .iss si
CONSUMER ED
Ways to slash grocery bills KrtWl
manufacturers' coupons and re
fund offers will be taught at a
special consumer education
seminar at East Carolina Univer
sity in early April
Coupons and Refunds How to
Save Money on Groceries will oe
offered twice, Tuesday. April 7. 7 9
p m and Wednesday. April 8, 10
a m noon
instructor is Cheryl Pevehouse
editor of two consumer interest
newspapers whose success with
coupons and refunds has been the
Subject of numerous television and
newspaper features
The class is designed for
natters single people,
students and an bargain hunters
interested n cutting costs of fooof
and household products, says Ms
Pevehouse
Furlher information is available
from the Office of Non Credit Pro
grams. Division o Continuing
Education East Carolina Univer
�. Green le N C , telephone
757 6143
FOOSEBALL
Mendenhall Student Center in
vites all ECU students to par
ticipate in the Fooseball Tourna
ment to be held on Wednesday
April 8 at 6 00 p m This team
competition will be double
elimination with trophies awarded
to the first and second place
teams
All participants must register
by Monday April 6 at 'he MSC
Billiards Center The entry fee is
S2 00 per team to be paid at the
tournament
STUDENT UNION
Applications are now being
taken for the positions of Day Stu
unit Representative to serve on
the Sludent union Board of Direi
tors interesteu individuals sip re
quested to submit their applica
tions Dy April 6 Applications can
be obtained from the information
desk at Mendenhall Student
Center or the Student Union office
Any questions should be directed
to the Student union office
757 6611. exl 210
-
A II l'i
. nord.
v
and
I . la
PIANORECITAL
� hop m will
lha
l of
. . �
BOWLING
� �
� nfl tor
�� 'o be
n the
. letei
�eriod
entered tor
ophies a it be awarded
ers m the 5
YARD SALE
� '
RUNNING
The ECU intramural Deparl
ment will sponsor two Cross
Campus Fun Runs on Wednesday
April 8 at the ECU track There
a II be a 2 5 mile race beginning at
5 00 p m an � . race star
t.ng at 5 30 i n I lr� blanks are
, , � �, �� viiurai Office
pen 1 all ECU students,
tacul'v s'J"
FACULTYSTAFF
All ECU faculty and staff
Mendenhall Student Center
take advantage of your
un1 day a! 'he Bowling
in Mendenhall Every
Wednesday from 5 00 p m unM
8 00 p m faculty and staff MSC
members may bowl two I 2' games
. t a 3rd game FREE Don t
Wednesday is savings
It the Bowling Center
PPHA
The Preprofessional Health
� .(, will meet Thursday April
2 a' 6 00 in 'he Ledon,a S Wright
Afro �'� I ��' � Cultural Cl '�
ns for nex' u S
IVCF
I nter Varsity Christian
fellowship will meet Thursday
n,qht a' 7 30 in the Methodis' Stu
This week we wll be
a special concert by Jerr,
. . a Contemporary
� . $1 i v ,i" E . � rone is
TWIG
Did you know 'ha' 'he more you
understand the Bible, the bettei
you will feel inside7 Do you know
tha' it you understand the Bible
believe it. and act accord
you will have a meaningful and en
lOyable life' (! Tim 4 8 n Peter
. 4 Thats our goal, to learn
what'he Bible says and app . I
our uves Then we can teach
others so thev la enioy the good
lite (II Tim 2 2. Col 1 27 28)
Check out our fellowships Tues
uav Ma'h 24 and Thursday
March 26 at 12 00 noon Thursday
March 26 a' 7 30 p m room no
212. Mendenhall S'uden' Center
COOP
The following co op oppor
tumties are now available
1 The Galleon Esplanade Nags
Head, NC A representative
from the Galleon Esplanade will
be on campus March 25, 1981 inter
viewing students for summer
work Pick up application and sign
up tor interview in the Co op Of
fice, 313 Rawl
2 NIH Normal Volunteer Pro
gram, Bethesda MD A
representative from the National
Institutes ol Health will be on cam
pus March 26. 1981 interviewing
�s tor the Normal Volunteer
program for summer, 81 or Fall
81 Help physicians in their
studies 0' how the normal bod.
tunc'ions During your free lime
work alonq side scientists m the
laboratories Yoo'H receive trei
room board laundry service
recreation 'ranspor'ation to and
from NIH. plus a daily stipend
3 Navy Civilian Personnel Com
mand A representative of NC PC
� on campus March 31 and
April I interviewing students tor
'he Navy Co op program Majors
m business, computer science,
psychology soooloqy. and INDT
arc needed Sign up for interviews
today in 313 Rawl1
PAGEANT
Applications tor contestants tor
Miss Black and Gold Pageant are
. , : . no. a epted it interested
,�� . . , � "iber of Alpha Phi
. fraternity or i alll '52 9875
AMBASSADORS
There will be an ambassadors
meeting April 5. 1981 at 7 00 in
nhall Studenl Center We
�suss university day ana
home tours It is important tha'
�� � students w sh.no to work on
ictivities attend the general
� � . etina Apr.i 5. 1981 meel "u
PHI ETA SIGMA
nil ates are
me 'o 'he multi
purpose room of Mendenhall Stu
. . by 7 15 p m on
� . ' ' � ' �'
i "
SOULS
CORSO
AED
De for
. i the iV "
The Kast Carolinian
S Tl ���
wiir IttJ
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ng 'he summer
The Eas' Carolinian s 'he of
ficiai newspaper of Eas'
Carolina University owned.
operated, ana published for and
. �� � student; Eas' Carolina
Subscription Rates
Business S3' �� ��
:L .� h
Second class pos'agi- pa
Greenville N C
The Eas' Carolinian offices
are loca'ed in 'he Old South
Buildmo on �� i apuS of ECU.
. ille n c
Telephone 7S7 6366 6367 630'
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now
compete for several
hundered Air Force scholar-
ships are to be awarded to
students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen
or at the beginning of their
sophomore year. The
scholarship provides for tui-
tion, books, lab fees and
equipment, plus a S400 mon-
thly allowance. Investigate
this financial alternative to
the high cost of medical
education.
Contact:
TSgt. Bob Payne
U.S.A.F. Health Profes
sions Recruiting
Suite Gl-1. 1100 Navaho
Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
(919) 755 4134
AIR FORCE
&�
204 E. 5th ST.
Across from Newby's
Sub Shop
INFLATION
FIGHTER
SPECIAL
BRING THIS AO AND
receive$1.00OFF:
LIST W AD
FABULOUS KNOBS 4 99 3.99
X-TEENS 499 3.99
SECRET SERVICE 4 99 3.95
ARROGANCE'S RUMORS LP 3 99 2.99
THIS WEEK'S SALE
ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT RELEASES
OPEN TIL 9:30 P.M. NIGHTLY
Carolina Protective
Services, Inc.
Kent A Bouncer
For Your Party or
Function
Office 758 0675
Call Anytime
Don Jefferson (Bail Bonasmen)
8.98 FOR 5.99
RK SPEI DW V.ON
RIM) STEWART
I'M rRAVl Rs
V II I II MISON
f Rl( C I M'loN
7.98 F0R 4.99
NAZARI IH
I l is c OSTI LLO
DAVID AI I NOl
15.98 FOR 10.99
BRlI
SPR1NGST1 IN
ALL PARAPHANALIA ON
SALE
MOST IS 50 OFF
APPLE RECORDS
T-SHIRTS
$99
Ri'K. 4.50 with coupon
�M mm. ��� m- MM MHB M ��� "� J
WE Bl Y USED ALBUMS
Available
All Day
Every Day
Open
1 I a m 9p m
Sun thru Thurs
Mom 10 p m
Fri &Sot
Wwhstcrn Stccr0
Family
STEAKH0USS
3005 E
1 Oth Street
Greenville, N C
(Beh.nd Hait.ngj Ford)
Toke Out Service
Available
7588550
Monday
Beef Tips
$2.49
DELIC IOUS 30 ITEM SALAD BAR
Tuesday
8 oz. Chop Sirloin
$1.89
Wednesday
Beef Tips
$2.49
Thursday
8 oz. Chop Sirloin
$1.89
Friday
Family Night
Petite Sirloin Filet
Salad and Drink
$4.75
Saturday
8 oz. Rib Eye
$4.69
t
I
SPRING FLING
Phi Kappa Tau is sponsoring an
all expense paid weeKend tor two
at the Whaler inn Atlantic Beach
The winner may choose any
weeKend between April 10th and
June 4th
Donations are SI 00 Ticket:
may be obtained from any Phi
Tau
The drawing will be held Friday,
April 3 at the Ph. Tau house during
our "Spring Fling" party,
3 00 6 30 p m The drawing will be
at 6 00 Everyone rwited to at
tend
WZMB
The Media Board is presently
accepting applications for General
Manager of WZMB For furthei In
formation please call 7i7 6501
MARSHALLS
All persons interested in tiling
for ECU Marshalls may do so by
going by SGA Ottice Room ?J8
Mendenhall Student Center not
later "an April 3
AKA
The Ivies of t- � ' I � I I
chpater of Alpha Ka
sorority will)
eo tood drive on Thurs
�� . oorms The proi i
donated to an area Ian
needy Your support w
appreciated
INTERNSHIPS
The Coop Ott'ie has ini
tion concerning summer intern
ships tor both graduate and
undergraduate students who have
� .ounds m computer science
Students should review internship
descriptions posted ou'Side 313
Rawl it interested and should con
tac� the Co op Office tor aco.tionai
information
CHEMISTRY

� old a
31 in Flanagan 20V at 7 p m The
wilt be discuss
ed All members and ottH
leresti � jrged to at
DELTA ZETA
There is a meeting ot ail Delta
Zeta B'9 Brothers on April 1 8 30
p m . at the house Bring your ,pr
,ng at' . nj '� ' it you haven '
direadr
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chap'�� M I PI N�
t.onai Honor Fraternity will meet
at 6 00 p m Wednesday m 132
Aust:n All brothers should attend
because elections will be held
Group pictures also will be taKen
FILMS
The Student union Films Com
mittee will meet on Tuesday
31 1981 at 6 30 i
Room 22 of Mendenhall
All members are urged to
� "�
CHEERLEADING
varsity cheerleader ri .
be held Tuesoa. I ��) a" 8 00 in
ii interesK
sons a 'end
ATTRACTIONS
The Man�
31 l�81 at 4 00 p m m Rl
if MH Kit SI
mem
UNION
The Univei
Comrr ��
March 31. at 4 OOP n
of MenoenhaH SI 'er An
members .�
Ax
Sun Tannery
15 sessions $30,00
Free Introductory
Sun Session
To ECU Students
756-2820
United Figure Salon
Red Oak Plaza
1 j mile W. of
Carolina E Mail
on 26J By Pass
OLD FASHIONED
HAMBURGERS
.35C OFF
Anv
Sandwich
wCheap Trick
2 Locations
In Greenville
264 By Pass 10(h St.
Concert Ticket Stub
VOTE
MARVIN BRAXTON
tor
SGA VICE-PRESIDENT
April 1,1981
&ft
APRIL 4.1981
MINGES COLISEUM
$6.50 STUDENTS
(in advance)
8.50 PUBLIC
WITH SPECIAL
GUEST; UFO
WHEN WAS THE
LAST TIME YOU
A
(i
Mi
H
O
( I
Fun
Yes
As
-
-
U
loc I
I
f
"I i
ih� 1�
nuc I
1961
inf
"Bi
inquirj
there
radioJ
he adj





tERLEADING
1 FACTIONS
UNION
)FF
ich
Trick
vet Stub

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WSEUM
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I HI lAST CAROLINIAN MARC H 31, 1981
Pfioto By JON JORDAN
ECU students watch the latest developments in the Reagan assassination attempt on a television set in
Mendenhall Student (enter.
Harvard Historian To Speak
On Economics At ECU
ECU News Bureau
A prize-winning Har-
vard historian will be a
featured speaker at a
business and
economics related
Humanities Conference
April 9, sponsored by
the N.C Department
of Cultural Resources
and East Carolina
University.
Dr. Albro Martin.
editor of the Business
History Review
published at Harvard.
Further
Tests
Asked
WASHINGTON
(I PI) Rep. Charles O.
Whitley, D-N.C, has
aked tor further
radioactivity tests at a
farm near Faro, N.C,
where an Air force
bomber with two
nuclear bombs aboard
crashed more than 20
years ago.
Whitley said he was
sure the area was sate.
but wanted to reassure
residents.
"I've got faith in the
Air force lie said. "1
don't think the Air
force would have left a
hazardous situation
A B-52 carrying two
24-megaton atomic
bombs from Seymour
Johnson Air Force
Base in Goldsboro
crashed on Jan. 24.
1961 on the farm of
Buck and Ellen Tyndall
near faro. One bomb
was apparently
recovered, but the se-
cond split apart and
parts ol it were never
recovered.
Whitley said last
week he accepted the
Air force's contention
ihat the unrecovered
piece of the bomb poses
no threat to residents.
Many details of the
crash are still classified,
and the Defense
Department has refus-
ed to say how large a
fragment of the second
was not recovered.
The crash site was
monitored extensively
for several months
alter the test, but the
testing was discon-
tinued years ago.
I he 1961 crash resur-
faced in the news last
year with reports that
one of the two bombs
on the plane nearly
detonated, but Whitley
said his request is
focused only on the
possibility of lingering
radioactivity.
"1 raise no question
whatsoever in terms of
ihe likelihood of a
nuclear explosion in
1961 Whitley said.
"That is really whipp-
ing a dead horse.
"Bui it is a legitimate
inquiry lo ask what
assurances we have thai
ihere is no residue of
radioactive material
he added.
will speak on "The
Role and Responsibility
of Business in Creating
Public Expectations
and Modifying
Values
Martin also teaches
business history in the
Harvard Graduate
School of Business Ad-
ministration.
His PhD dissertation
at Columbia University
entitled, "Enterprise
Denied: Origins of the
Decline of American
Railroads. 1897-1917
won the first Allan
N e v i n s prize in
Economic History. A
Martin article. "The
Troubled Subject of
Railroad Regulation in
the Gilded Age won
the Binkley-Stephenson
Prize of the Organiza-
tion oi American
Historians tor the best
article published in
94 in the Journal of
American History.
In 1976 Oxford
University Press
published his "James
J. Hill and the Opening
of the Northwest a
definitive biography of
one of the major
business leaders of the
nineteenth and early
twentieth century. He is
now at work on a book
on the social and
cultural impact of the
railroad and telegraph.
The Humanities
Conference scheduled
at ECU's Willis
Building is open to
business and profes-
sional men and women,
civic leaders and others
concerned with
economic and cultural
development of eastern
North Carolina.
"American business
is confronted with a
new challenge the
sponsors said. "A new
understanding of civic
responsibility, and the
impact of technological
and commercial
development on com-
munity values, is essen-
tial
The theme of the
conference will be
"Private Institutions
and Public Good: An
Exploration of How
the Humanities and
Sound Business Prac-
tices Can Complement
and Inform One
Another
East Carolina
University Chancellor
Thomas B. Brewer,
himself a business
historian, will be
moderator.
Dr. William Blood-
worth, professor of
English at ECU, will
discuss "A Critical
View of Business and
Culture in America
Dr. Henry C. Ferrell
Jr professor of
history at ECU , will
speak on "The Impact
of Industrial and Com-
mercial Development
and the Resulting Im-
plications for Tradi-
tional Community
Values in Eastern
North Carolina
Issue To Be Decided
(C PS) � The fate of all
federal college programs for
helping handicapped students
will be in the balance when the
U.S. Supreme Court decides
the case of deal student Walter
Camenisch, who wants the
University of Texas to pay
SI,245 a year for his sign
language interpreter.
The court two weeks ago
gave the U.S. Department of
Justice permission to defend
Camenisch.
Texas claims that schools
are not required to spend
money to accomodate han-
dicapped students. That view,
if validated in court, would
change the standard inter-
pretation of the 1973
Rehabilitation Act, the high
court said.
Under Section 504 of that
act, federally-funded schools
can't discriminate against
otherwise qualified handicap-
ped persons.
CAROLINA EAST MALL
THE PLACE TO BE
WHERE SPRING
IS IN BLOOM.
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if
ee What's New A for Spring!
Two Fashion 4 Shows-
Friday. April 3rd.7pm
Saturday, April 4th. 2pm.
and Carolina East Centre
264 By-pass on Hwy 11. Greenville, N.C.
(wreck Week 1981
The 4th Annual
Phi Kappa Tau
m
- �PRING
0S

te
LING
At the Phi Kappa Tau House
409 Elizabeth St.
3-6:30 p.m.
April 3rd
r
Sponsored By Our Friends At:
Marathon
Stereo Village
Apple Records
The Pipeline Restaurant
Hallow Distributing Co. inc.
The Happy Store
General Heating Inc.
Malpass Muffler Shop
Southern Pride Car Wash
Chapter X
Sports World
Arbor Room at Ramada Inn
Overton's Supermarket
Papa Katz
Alligood Motors
Shirley's Cut & Style Shop
Elbo Room
King's Sandwich
Jolly Roger
California Concepts of Greenville
Pizza Inn
Bissette's of Greenville
University Book Exchange
The Pirate Pit Stop
Domino's Pizza
The Tree House Restaurant
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Greenville
Everyone Is Invited To Attend
WHY SHOULD
KIRK LITTLE
BE RE-ELECTED?
Perhaps
It's because LITTLE favored the VISUAL ARTS FORUM EILL
which Charlie Sherrod vetoed.
Or Perhaps
It's because LITTLE favors the MARCHING PIRATES, SCHOOL
OF MUSIC, and ECU PLAYHOUSE.
Or Perhaps.
It's because LITTLE wants to right the many wrongs that
have been done ECU students over the past years.
Or Perhaps
It's because certain people are afraid of having facts
revealed to the public.
Or Perhaps
It's because LITTLE has instituted sound business policies
and procedures to orevent mismanagement of YOUR student fees.
Or Perhaps
It's because LITTLE has begun revamping the SGA Loan md
to enable more students to receive more money.
YOU DECIDE
RE-ELECT
KIRK LITTLE
SGA TREASURER





�tje last Ear0lmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Paul Lincke.
Dave Si u kin. � m.
I 1 N STER,
C'HKls I I. 1UK. Gmrr tfemvo
Jln DuPRI 1 � tA�wcM��Mr
PAUI CO! 1 INS, r�WJ.W
CHAR1 1 S CHANDI IK Sports Edtloi
DA ID NORKIS. tart! Erfiw
March
lsl
Opinion
Pane 4
Media Freedom
�Ct Board Oversteps Bounds
SGA President Charlie Sherrod
announced last night that he is ap-
pointing Robert M. Swaim to take
over his seat on the media board for
she remainder of his term as presi-
dent.
An amendment o the Media
Board Constitution was passed last
year thai allows members of the
board to appoint people to serve in
their place if they so desire. Sher-
rod's appointment of Ssaim was
made under the provisions of that
amendment.
Swaim, a veteran newspaper
employee who was a driving force
behind the creation o' the Media
Board said that he was "humbled
and honored" by the appointment.
Swaim resigned from his position
as assistant to the general manager
of The East Carolinian Monday
afternoon to later accept the ap-
pointment.
1 aM week, the board heard com-
ments, remarks, and gri. an
concerning personnel mattersat The
lasi Carolinian. Instead ot setting
forth its findings in the form of sug-
gestions to the general manager
Chris Lichok or actually bringing
formal charges against the staff
member(s) involved, the Media
Board decided to use pressure to
force Lichok to resolve the matter
to its satisifaction. This area is
clearly out o' the realm of control
of the board although they deemed
themselves a judicial body and
found the accused guilty,denying
him any due process of law.
Actions taken thus far by the
board set a grim precedent. At no
time in the stormy history of the
Media Board has that organization
so blatantly exceeded their constitu-
tional authority.
If any outside board or authority
is permitted to have such great con-
trol over personnel matters at The
East Carolinian, this newspaper
may lose its freedom and become
merely a rubber-stamp newsletter,
answering to the whims of the con-
trolling board.
"STICKS AND STONES MAY BREAK MY BONE 5 ,
BUT NAM�5 MLl NEVER HURT Mg
Pentagon Prepares US Hospitals
Secret Service's Actions
Prevent National Tragedy
As the United States and indeed
the entire world recovers from the
shock of an assasination attempt on
the President, it becomes appearant
that terrorism has replaced
diplomacy as the most affective
means of gaming recognition and
acceptance.
The bullets which would have
ended the life of Ronald Wilson
Reagan on Monday March 30, 1981
marked the first assasination at-
tempt against the chief executive
since a pair during the Gerald Ford
term of office.
The Secret Service should be ap-
plauded for their prompt action to
prevent further injury to the Presi-
dent. Many people watching the
videotape of the incident are shock-
ed by their sense of duty to prevent
injury to the commander-in-chief.
This group is trained to surrender
their lives rather than permit harm
to come to the President. Their ac-
tions Monday may very well have
saved George Bush from the
ominous task of leading a nation in
mourning. For this accomplish-
ment, the people oi the United
States will be eternally in debt.
B DAVID ARMSTRONG
When clouds of war till the sky, they
sometimes gather thunderously, other-
times in porteniious silence. Thus, while
Ronald Reagan and Alexander Haig issue
their clamorous pronouncements on world
affairs, the Pentagon is working quietly
behind the scenes, preparing Stateside
hospitals to receive large numbers o
wounded GIs in a lightening-swift foreign
war of the near future.
1 In discreet effort is pan ot a Pentagon
program called the Civilian-Military Con-
tingency Hospital Ssiem (CMCHS).
Designed to handle expected overflow war-
time casualties by setting aside unoccupied
beds in advance - or by emptying beds ot
unfortunate civilians, pronto, once war
breaks out � CMCHS is eventually ex-
pected to enlist 1,000 major hospitals in 13
cities, including Washington. D.C
Baltimore, St. Louis, Denver, Seattle, San
Francisco and San Diego.
In a 43-page booklet distributed to
hospital administrators in early March, en-
titled "CHMCHS: In Combat. In the
Community, Saving lives Together the
Pentagon introduces CMCHS and pro-
vides its rationale. "It is no secret that the
Soviet Union's awesome military power
poses a threat to the United States the
booklet begins. Adding that. "We assum-
ed there would not be an attack on the
U.S. homeland the unnamed authors go
on to state that, "a future large scale war
oerseas will probably begin and end very
rapidly and produce casualties at a higher
rate than any other war in history due to
the spread ot sophisticated modern
weapons.
The devastation of the next war thus
established, the Pentagon booklet goes on
to ask hospitals to join CMCHS
"independently of emergency wai legisla-
tion" (i.e a draft of doctors and military
appropriation of hospitals). As advantages
ot the program, the authors promise in-
teresting wartime medical problems ("the
types and severity of injuries and il-
lnesseswill present a challenge to your
hospital staff) and improed community
relations ("the public has always been sup-
portive ot a strong national defense)
I he Pentagon wants 50,000 beds,
minimum, tor CMCHS. Just how his ex
tensive program will be financed goes
unexplained in the booklet. Ihe military is
more forthcoming about public relations
aspects ot ihe program, providing ad-
ministrators with a sample letter with
which to com nice employees ot the merits
ot the plan, and a sample press release tor
officials who decide to reveal their
hospital's participation to the media.
Although CMCHS has been lightly-
covered in the mass media (the small An-
lioch, Calif. Daily Ledger revealed the pro-
gram's existence in its March 13 issue),
CMCHS is sparking considerable heat in
medical circles. Its defenders see the pro
gram as patriotic and humanitarian, while
critics are worried about ethical questions
posed by participation in CMCHS.
"This is in-keeping with the president's
desire that the nation have a maximum
defense capability said Edward Leibson,
an Oakland health official. "We ought no;
to dramatize it beyond that Other
medical professionals are less sanguine
about the program. Dr. Walter Carr, a
California public health official, said that
"There has been a concern by some physi-
cians (about) getting ready for war and all
that means. There's a dichotomy on
preparations for war and preparations tor
peace Carr also wondered aloud what
moving out civilian patients on the 24 to 48
hour notice the Pentagon would require in
nine of war would do to those patients.
According to the Daily ledger, the
CMCHS plan originated last summer in
the office ot John M. Maxley HI. the
Assistant Secretary ot Defense tor Health
Xttairs. Since then. Pentagon lobbying for
the program has gone quietly and per-
sistently forward, with hospital ad-
ministrators around the country invited to
view slide shows on the Soviet military and
attend Department ot Defense briefings on
CMCHS.
In addition to worrying manv medical
people, the CMCHS plan has boggled
minds m official Washington. David
Passage, a State Department spokesper-
son, called the program "almost incredi-
ble" in a brief interview with the Oakland
Tribune, averring that "The State Depart-
ment has nothing to do with this Could
it be that the left hand o government
doesn't know what the right hand is doing
� again?
Other questions remain, t-or example,
who is going to pay for what promise-
be an expensive program involving 1.000
major hospitals, their administrators, and
mihtarv coordinators for each hospital?
Can we believe the disclaimers certain to
come from the Pentagon that this sudden
need for empty hospital beds has nothing
to io with U.S. plans for intervention in
Central America or the Persian Gulf? The
prognosis � for getting straight answers.
and for peace in our time � doesn't look
good.
Campus Forum
1
Run-off Candidates Present Platforms To Students
EDITOR'S NOTE: The first four en-
tries in today's "Campus forum" are
the platforms oj the candidates involved
in the SGA run-off elections which will
be held tomorrow. Kirk I it lie and
Angela Pepe arc competing for the of-
fice of treasurer, while Marvin Braxton
and Peggy Davison are up for vice-
president. These platforms were submit-
ted to The East Carolinian by the in-
dividual candidates and we are proud to
provide this space for their publication.
H e hope that alt ECl students will take
the tune to vole April I.

big job with lots of responsibilities.
I hat is the only way to describe the job
ol SGA Treasurer. 1 know, I've been
holding that job for the past year. Some
people might try to pull ihe wool over
your eves bv telling you that anybody
can hold the job o' SGA Treasurer even
if they have no qualifications or ex-
perience. Don't be fooled. They have
probably never even seen a meeting ol
the SGA legislature. I have. They
haven't staved up late at night trying to
find solutions to getting the most money
appropriated to the most groups. 1 have.
They haven't had to implement, from
scratch, effective policies where none
have existed before. 1 have. Over this
past year I have demonstrated that 1
have the commitment and the resolve to
sec thai the SO A is in the best financial
situation possible. This past year. I have
utilized all that 1 have been taught in the
School of Business to implement effec-
tive procedures and guidelines for the
best administration ot your money. By
these actions, I have proven myself as an
effective administrator.
Students involved with the performing
and visual arts might wonder what my
attitude is toward their respective field
ol studv. Quite simply, the Arts could
not have a better friend in the SGA. Cast
fall, when many members of the SGA
were busy doing everything they could to
keep the Visual Arts Forum from receiv-
ing an appropriation, 1 was the lone ex-
ecutive officer who spoke in behalf of
the VAF urging the legislature to grant
them an appropriate sum of money. You
don't need lo guess where I stand, 1 am
staunchly behind the performing and
visual arts.
By holding office this past year, 1 have
acquired the experience and proven the
leadership necessary to fulfill the office
o SGA Treasurer. ! would appreciate
your vote of confidence in me in my bid
tor re-election on March 4th.
KIRK LITTLE
I have been a student at ECU for over
three years and I want to become involv-
ed in Student Government. As
Treasurer, I feel I would enter a position
which I have the competence, capability,
and knowledge to excel.
1 am a junior Finance major with an
Accounting background. As current
1 reasurer of Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorori-
ty, I have to deal with ledgers, receipts,
and disbursements in supervising the
financial transactions of the organiza-
lion. Through other official sorority
positions such as director of in-
tramurals, parlimentarian, social chair-
man, and Executive Board and Rho
lambda member, I feel 1 have proven a
leadership ability.
In not having been involved with Slu
dent Government in the past, 1 am not as
politically inclined as some other can-
didates. However, 1 feel the Treasurer
should concentrate on running the
business end of SGA and restrict most
political opinions to Executive Council
meetings.
1 am sincere in wanting to work hard
and do a good job for East Carolina
students and would appreciate support
on March 4th.
ANGELA PEPE
My name is Peggy Davison and I'm a
candidate for SGA Vice-President. I'm a
junior majoring in foreign language.
I have been involved in the legislature
since I've been at E.C.U. I was elected
vice-president of the sophomore class,
and then due to the resignation of the
president, I took over. This past fall 1
was elected Speaker of the Legislature.
The vice-president's powers are not
specified in the constitution; they are
delegated by the president. My basic
goal if elected is to make the students
aware of what is going on at E.C.U. The
students need to know what is going on
here and why things are happening. 1
don't feel like there is enough com-
munication between the administration
and the students, and communication is
necessary if this University is to grow,
not only in number but also in stature.
PEGGY DAVISON
I've noticed during the time period 1
have attended E.C.U. there seems to be
a lack of communication between the
administration and the students.
Everybody is aware of the recent con-
troversy over the firing of work-study
students and I think it is a shame that
students weren't notified ahead of time,
even in the private sector they give you
more than 5 days prior notice if they are
going to terminate your employment.
The relationship between the city
council and students seems to be strain-
ed as shown by the treatment of the Kap-
pa Deltas and the negative press students
received during the liquor by the drink
referendum, according to the press we're
a campus at 13,000 alcoholics. 1 think
it's time for the S.G.A. to exert it in-
fluence in such matters, and 1 feel that if
I am elected I can provide competent
leadership within the power alloted to
me to give students a much needed voice
as to their special needs. 1 would ap-
preciate your vote on March fourth and
1 hope you join me in my desire to make
E.C.U. as great as it should be.
MARVIN BRAX I ON
Little Supported
l would like to take this opportunity
to remind everyone who is involved with
the Arts (whether art, music, or drama)
that there is a candidate running for re-
election that has been a constant and
consistent supporter of the arts ever
since he was in the legislature. SGA
Treasurer Kirk Little has helped and
supported us in the past, now it is up to
us to help and support him on Election
Day.
DASHAK.EF1RD
Senior Class Vice-Pres.
Davison Backed
As the present SGA Secretary and
with three years experience in Student
Government. 1 know SGA politics.
There have been many times when I have
lived and breathed nothing but Student
Government. 1 know what it takes to
win and more importantly, I know what
it takes to make a leader.
Peggy Davison is a winning leader.
When she is elected to the office of SGA
Nice President this week. Peggy will
represent the students in an enthusiastic
manner that will keep the students ot
Fast Carolina proud.
Peggy Davison is experienced. Twice,
she has been elected to represent day
students as a Day Student Represen-
tative in the Legislature. She has served
on the Rules and Judiciary Committee.
Yet, most importantly Peggy Davison
has been elected from the members of
the legislature this year to represent
them as their leader! Peggy has run the
legislature this year efficiently and effec-
tively as Speaker of the I egislature.
In this week's race for the oifwc o
SGA Vice President, there is NO alter-
native. Peggy Davison is the choice for
SGA Vice President.
MARIANNE EDWARDS
Junior, Business
1 have only known Peggy Davison for
one year but within that year I have got-
ten to know her very well. 1 personally
feel that her three years in the Student
Government Association has provided
her with the necessary knowledge of the
duties of the SGA Vice-President. Her
own enthusiasm and rapport in the com-
munity gives her the best chance to serve
the students of East Carolina University.
I urge you, the students, to vote for
Peggy Davison for SGA Vice-President.
DOUGLAS R. HAMILTON
Freshman, Business
Sp
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75"
HAMIl rON
Business
Spring Starts Campaigns
! HI I MKOI IM-W VAKi H M, I9KI
(() I 1NSV 11 1 I ,
111. (I PI) It's spring
and Pakin Williams is
plotting ei another
political campaign.
1 he Illinois lawyer is
nearl) a perennial can
didate. lour times he
lias sought the gover-
norship and the Senate,
usuall) as a Democrat
but once as a member
o! George Wallace's
defunct American Par-
ty, and Foui times he
has lost.
Bui that has not af-
fected his humor. One
year he ran for office
on the back of a motor-
cycle. Another tune he
dragged a plastic foam
cross around the slate
to dramatize his op-
position to abortion.
During a guber-
natorial campaign,
Williams called a news
conference, served te-
quila sunrises to the
assembled reporters
and solemnly promised
it elected to move the
state Capitol to the
Ritz-Carlton Hotel in
Chicago. The press
room, he said with a
iwmkle in his eye,
would be in the hotel's
(losh bar.
But that's all past,
W illiams is going tor
greater goals: 1 he 1984
Democratic nomina-
tion for president. And
he sas he's going to
win.
"It (Sen Edward)
Kenned) is m only op-
ponent (in the New
Hampshire primary),
I'll have an advantage
because the editor
there, (William) 1 oeb,
hates Kennedy
Williams said gleefully.
T h e o n 1 y w a
Carter could get back
in the White House is
b btcaking and enter-
ing. Mondale' George
McGovern is an exam-
ple ot what you can do
tunning from a small
state
Williams, t h e
younger brother of
playwright rennessee
W illiams, plans to cam-
paign on what he calls
the "no sweat" plat-
torm.
1 he 62-year-old
lawyer speaks Chinese
and said Americans can
learn much from studv-
ing Oriental customs.
"One of the reasons
Chinese don't have
problems Americans
have, such as ulcers and
high blood pressure, is
that they have mei yo
guan chi Williams
said. "It means 'no
sweat' in our transla-
tion
Williams said disar-
mament would be the
"hallmark" ot his ad-
ministration.
"In other words,
we're going to make
love, not war he said.
"The Russians are in a
position where they
can't afford both bread
and bullets. As presi-
dent, I would go to
Russia and put the
cards on the table: 'I'll
make a deal with you.
We'll throw our arms
in the river, or lake, if
you do the same
thine
Despite his tormer
affiliation with the con
servative American
Party, Williams said
the current political
climate requires that he
be more liberal.
"I'll be an aging
flower child in this
campaign he said.
"I'll be a lot more
liberal. It's not going to
be a dull campaign it
I'm in it
Program Helps Junkies'
CHICAGO (UPI) � At the age
of 11. Monica Pencz and David
Kahn were addicts. They spent most
of their waking hours satisfying a
habit in front of a glowing box.
Television had taken control ot
their lives so that the youngsters
could not stop themselves from
automatically switching on the set.
But with the help ot a new
psychology program at DePaul
University, Monica, David and
doens of other children � all of
them television junkies � have been
able to get rid of the habit that once
ruled their world.
"I couldn't get away from it
recalled Monica, who once watched
at least five hours of TV daily. "My
homework wasn't getting done. I
just torgot about all my friends
Said David, a 10-hour-a-dav ad-
dict, "Once I got hooked on it. I
couldn't get oft. I just watched any
show
David and Monica now watch an
average of no more than three hours
oi TV daily. Some days they don't
watch any. By the end of the DePaul
program, the children should be
watching no more than two hours of
TV on weekdavs, and three hours
on weekends.
North Carolinians
Accept Increase
RALEIGH (UPI)
N o r 1 h Caroli ni a n s
responding to a poll
would accept a small
increase in the gasoline
rax or other taxes if
persuaded it w a s
necessarv to maintain
the state's highways,
Ciov. James B. Hunt Jr
saj s.
Hunt sard Sundav he
commissioned a poll
earlier this month to
gauge the public's
views on declining
highway revenues, and
denied reports the
survey found over-
whelming opposition to
rax hikes.
1 he poll showed op-
position to a "steep"
increase in gasoline
taxes, but acceptance
o a small increase it
necessary. Hunt said in
a prepared statement.
He did not sav how
much of an increase
would be acceptable.
The Greensboro Dai-
lv News said Sunday
the poll conducted
earlier this month
showed residents want
highways maintained,
but do not want to pay
higher gasoline taxes.
The new paper said
sources revealed the
poll results.
"The poll shows that
people are opposed to a
sleep increase in
gasoline taxes, but they
are willing to pay some
additional taxes it they
are convinced it is
necessarv Hunt said.
PRESENTING
THE GREENVILLE JAYCEES
SPRING BEACH MUSIC
uR.no FESTIVAL
THE FABULOUS
a
EMBERS
1)
THE ORIGIN A L
DRIFTERS
1)
SUNDAY
APRIL 12 1-5 P.M.
AT THE
NEW CAROLINA WAREHOUSE
ON CHARLES ST. NEXT TO
MINGESCOLISEUM
$6 ADVANCE TICKETS $8 GATE ADMISSION
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFF ICE
TICKETS SPONSORED BY MCDONALD'S
BEVERAGES AVAILABLE ON PREMISES
NO CANS OR GLASS ALLOWED
GATESOPEN
AT 11:00 A.M.
RAIN OR SHINE!
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for sale at or
below the advertised price in each A&P Store, except as specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT APRIL 4 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE. N C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL
DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Greenville Square Shopping Center
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EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM COUNTRY FARM PORK
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99





II EAST -KI IM-n
MARCH 31. m
L�flli0j06 fifrXJT C0LL�tt Ttif HfaP lAMf
5S OAviO h)oti$
IV
�mln I heatre on
; entral fickel Of-
y
ent
A
m.
he
in-
ra!
flftS
'Hip � usband.
je's real name?
� Hawkeye, what
from?
1 ed to Henrv Blake
�red home?
psychiatrist who
is the MASH unit
? pane 8. col. 1
IT TH�T ?hfiT
FipiY might!
YOU FKIDA1 AJIGHT.
! OOrOr (L�rt�tbEfl- MUCH
AfccXTT THtT PNTTI, so Vn
CTieap Trick Hit
ime
Continued from page 6
rock & roll; raw. loud
guitar (one offset by
witt songs and ar-
rangements. Critics lik-
ed Cheap 1 nek's in-
telligent rock & roll,
but the album never
found its audience. Too
smart for Kiss fans, too
loud tor AOk. Cheap
Trick sold about
150,000 copies.
Barel) six months
later. Cheap 1 rick tried
again, this lime with
1 pic staff producer
I om erman. In Col-
or had a cleaner, pop-
oriented sound; W er-
man turned down the
guitar and brought the
melod up front.
Around this time,
reviewers began mak
ing Be a t le s - C h e a p
Trick comparisons. In
Color sold slightly bel-
ter than the first I P.
but not enough to make
a difference. Mean-
while. Cheap 1 rick was
performing, according
to Ken daman. an
average ol 250 one-
nighters a year, open-
ing for Kiss, the Kinks,
Santana and Boston.
Maybe American
didn't lump on Cheap
Trick's bandwagon,
but 6,000 miles away,
Cheap Trick mama was
in full force. "Clock
Strikes Ten from In
Color, reached Number
One on the Japanese
Greek
Week
Planned
charts, followed b "1
Want You to Want
Me The press, more
influential in Japan
than in the U.S. made
Cheap Trick its darl-
ings. Two months after
the release of In Color,
the major Japanese
music magazines began
clamoring for inter-
views.
Ihe break-through,
when it came, surprised
everyone. Cheap Trick
had recorded two per-
formances from the
tour in Osaka and
lokyo and released a
record called Cheap
I rick I ive at Budokan
for the Japanese
market. It was a rough.
hastily prepared recor-
ding ("Some o the
songs Zander
remembers, "were
single takes), but it
contained the best
songs from the three
studio albums. Import
copies sold so briskly in
the I .S. that Epic rush-
ed it out and later
released a live version
oi "I Want You to
Want Me Budokan is
now just shy of the
platinum mark, "1
Want You" is rising on
the charts, and Cheap
Trick's completed
studio UP, Dream
Police, is being held
back until Budokan's
popularity fades.
Thanks to Budokan,
Cheap Trick is now a
major U.S. concert at-
traction; their spring-
summer tour of large
halls and stadiums is
their first full tour as a
headline act.
It's ironic thai Cheap
Trick should get their
first big hit by fluke;
from the beginning,
very little in their career
has been left to chance.
They've toured in-
cessantly, created four
quirky, distinct per-
son as and have
marketed themselves
with savvy. The Cheap
Trick logo, a bleeding
typeface designed by
Peterson with the help
of artist friend
Christopher Crowe,
adorns everything from
album covers to
underwear crotches. A
Chicago-based writer
remembers seeing logo
stickers in every
tollbooth on the
Chicago-to-Rock ford
portion of Interstate 95
as early as 1975.
"Everywhere, people
were saying, 'Who are
these guvs?'
"Isn't it much more
interesting this way?"
Rick asked me last
year, after I'd inter-
viewed him for a half-
hour and gotten a half-
hour of quick quips,
fantastic fibs and not-
so-serious stores.
1 had to agree. As
every performer
knows, the best way to
keep them entertained
is to keep them guess-
ing. Cheap Trick does
the Kiss routine one
better: they don't need
the makeup. Music,
marketing, a carefully
crafted image � it all
adds up to one smart,
irresistible rock & roll
package.
But who are these
buvs?
ECU Playhouse
To Present 'Caesar'
A number of events
are scheduled this week
as part ol Creek Week,
lie Interfratermty
t ouncil Banquet is
scheduled for 00 p.m.
Tuesday, March 31.
The Sigma Tau Cam-
ma Tug-O-War is plan-
ned for 2-8 p.m.
Wednesday, April 1.
This event is spon-
sored b Miller Brew-
ing Company.
The Kappa Sigma
"Tunk Naussau" par-
ty begins at the Kappa
Sigma House at 3:30
p.m. on April 2.
Among the events is a
chugging competition
tor" sororities and
fraternities.
The Phi Kappa Tau
��Spring Fling 'HI" will
be held at the Phi Kap-
pa Tau house on Fri-
day, April 3. from
3:00-6:30 p.m. It's an
all-campus event with
kegs o beer and music.
The annual Moser's
farm event will top oil
the week on April 4.
Open to all fraternity
and sorority members,
Moser's I arm keg par-
ty is sponsored by the
FC and Pan-Hellenic
Council.
Continued from page 6
play that shows what happens when
personal judgment tries to move ex-
clusively on a political plane, where
issues are simplified and distorted.
"Julius Caesar" clearly points
out how men come to deliver
themselves to illusion and how they
construct for themselves a world in
which they inevitably come to
disaster
Even though the ECU production
will be a unique presentation of the
drama, it will retain the original
language and make no specific
political references.
Playhouse General Manager Scott
Parker commented that the
"excitement" the production has
generated around eastern North
Carolina "has been wonderful
"We will have nearly 2,000 high
school students bused in from as far
away as Raleigh and Elizabeth Ci-
ty he said.
Tickets are available for all even-
ing performances and will go on sale
Monday, March 30, at the ECU
Central Ticket Office, telephone
757-6390.
r
BENNIES
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Atfrtmtwt
All Ty�M o
Awl RMir
Ffttm A Pfnwtk
ftMMMW ���
JWI IWItrn'
Phont 7M-43M
ATTIC ATiTIC
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightclub
WED. - NO
VACANCY
THURS. -
CONTROL GROUP
(All College Hill
Residents - FREE
Admission)
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday P,us tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
VOTE
MARVIN BRAXTON
SG A V1CE-PRES1DEN T
April 1,1981
VOTE FOR EXPERIENCE
RE-ELECT
KIRK LITTLE
SGA TREASURER
STUDENTS
FIRST
tr





8
l HI I SI C ROl INI N
M-XKl'H H, 11
Honors Its Heritage
coupon
Continued from page 6
tieers who have completed master
degree programs in a variety oi cur
riculums, as well as professional
military courses, including academic
instructor training designed to
prepare them for the college en-
vironment.
Selection of instructors is based
not only on academic status, but
also takes into the consideration the
diversity of previous assignments.
For example, Majoi Billy D.
Tudor, an Assistant Professor, has
accumulated more than 5,000 hours
of thing in various aircraft, some Ol
which circled the globe and visited
more than 30 countries. He has sen
ed at Headquarters Air Force Man-
power and Personnel Center where
he vsas responsible tor the assign-
ment of 17,000 officers. Major
rudor also has 238 combat hours in
Vietnam as an u Commando.
Lieutenant Colonel James (
lhomas. Chairman of the
-erospace Studies Department, has
fourteen vears experience on the
faculty at the Air Force Academy
where he was a tenured professor.
Other staff members have similar-
ly varied backgrounds in missiles
and security police.
I he Air Force provides more than
6 000 scholarships to college
students in the ROTC program,
c adets can compete for tour
three and two-year scholarships,
with the majority going to those
students majoring in math, physics,
computer science, or business ad-
ministration with a concentration in
qualitative methods. Cadets on
scholarship and all POC cadets
receive $100 per month tax tree.
Dunne the last decade some im-
portant people-related
developments have occurred in the
AFROTC program at ECU. For ex-
ample, enrollment of minority
cadets has increased to 37 percent.
and since 1969 when the Air Force
opened ROTC to women, the
number of females enrolled and
commissioned through the
AFROTC program has steadily in-
creased.
What does all this mean? It means
that AFROTC is an integral part of
campus and community life, and the
curriculum is closely related to the
needs of today's society. And from
the looks of things in LCU's
Detachment 600, AFROTC is facing
up to the challenges of the 80's.
OF1M 1� HOUtl
Wholesale & Retail
Ice Sales
SPECIAL REG OQ
i-LB BAG W 3
with this coupon
EKpif�iApr�M.1981
ATTIC
$fe
JB33HJ
Student Publishes Review
TV Trivia Quiz
For 'MASH' Fans
A book review by
Chad Buffkin of
Whiteville, an East
Carolina University
student, appears in a
recent issue of
"Challenge a journal
published by the U.S.
Department of Hous-
ing and Urban
Development.
Buffkin's review
discusses Bruce C.
Vadeck's "Unloving
Care: The Nursing
Home Tragedy The
published version of
Buffin's review evolved
from a class assignment
in an ECU English class
in advanced writing for
business and industry
taught by Dr. Bertie
Fearing.
At the time his
review went to press,
Buffkin was working as
a H.U.D. writer intern,
under sponsorship of
the ECU Office of
Cooperative Educa-
tion.
Now enrolled on
campus as a full-time
student, Buffkin is a
candidate for the
bachelor's degree in
English with a concen-
tration in technical
writing.
TUES w - r
MARCH 31 �,� V
the . n pCV
IF YOU
COME BEFORE 10:30 AND WEAR
3 OR MORE BUTTONS - ADMIS-
SION $1.00 - PRIZES FOR MOST
ORIGINAL BUTTONS

J
t
Buffet Specials AH You Can Eat
'IKECROS
hJ
Continued from page 6
9. What document does Klinger
really want?
10. Who runs the Korean bar that
MASH members go to?
11. Which member of the MASH
unit is of Lebanese ancestry?
12. What strange device does Col.
Flagg, the fanatical intelligence of-
fice, have implanted in his throat?
13. Name the tent inhabited by
Hawkeve and, at one time or
another. Trapper, B.J Frank and
Mai. Winchester.
14. Who in the radio operator
often spoken to b Radar?
15. What is Major Winchester's
full name?
16. Name Col. Potter's hobb.
17. Name the MASH theme song.
18. Who wrote the original
"MASH" novel?
19. What was Klingers' vote's
name?
20. What town is Frank Burns
from?
Trivia Quiz Answers
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103 n t 33d E aBJ j3JJ3-i z
EidsoH pKMSms uijv 3imv � 1
MonFri.
MonTues.
Sunday
11:30 - 2:00 Soup-Salad-Pizza
6:00 - 8:30 Soup-Salad-Pizza
12:00 - 2:00 SpagSalad Pizza
Wednesday Spaghetti Day 11:00 - 11:00
Spaghetti-Toast Coffee or Tea
All You Can Eat $2.49
Coming, Sun April 5th
In Concert
Thursday Lasagna Day 11:00-11:00
Buy One Lasagna At Regular Price Get
Second One For A Dollar
Phone 758-6266
1840 E. Greenville Blvd.
Advance Tickets 5
Tickets available at:
Western Pleasure
Apple Records
COH
Doors open: 7:15-8:00 p.m.
or advance ticket holder
00
ALWAYS FRESH
DAIRY FOOD
1
Home of Greenville's Best Meats'
Clip This Coupon
l
Lb.
Heavy Western Sirloin
or T-Bone Steaks
$1 89
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ScotTowels Paper
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48
Gt. Roll with this coupon and $7.50
food order
69 C
Limit one roll per customer.
Without Coupon W J� JTHKLtffLJ
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$179
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98
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Limit 4
ll ��
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Gwaltney
Franks
12 Oi Pkg.
Sausage
99
Cream Corn 303can
Garden Peas
Little DarlirT Cut
Green Beans
303 can
3M
Grade 'A
1 Lb Hot or
Kraft
Jumbo Eggs
78C
Dozen
Macaroni &
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Generic Frozen
Chicken or Turkey
Pot Pies
4l
8 0z.
La
H Uil I I M
It
dowi


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weekend
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is
)0
I fcAR
ADMIS
� MOST
f
'111 ! s v ROI I SI
Sports
M Ki I!
Lady Pirates Win Tourney, Now 19-2
Bv NMl ! I 1 UIMKION
M.I�III V
M you k h'em knock
dow . � been
Cullow � ckend.
� thai
ral Patton
ud, I as- arolina's 1 ady Bucs,
led b 1 I' 1 ��; ! avis, cruised to
v �� V arolina In
Bui - del siaic
?, t w ic
� ip
I'n.i Davis was
able playei in the
is sie banged oul II
hits in � and w as the
leadei in pi
"I'd o say w - J. pretty
Jam good rent; I eado
ita Dilloi w . ball really
I, and I tee! like we are gaining
n as the sea es on
In 1 i iday s fii si game, tht I ady
Pirates w hipped c atawba I" a
l'i e runs w i
(. y nthia
V H
1 ydia R
-

I
s

md bs
Coach Is
Upset With
Showing
Bv Wll I lM I I BIOS
Ute
:

said, rt ferrinj
Pii ates the
I rida P
ry

B
-
Kile, who had het second ol the
afternoon. Shirley Brown and Jo
i anda c layton each had one round
tripper.
Dillon sas Davis was a worth)
choice foi most valuable player.
"She's been really steady, she had
an excellent at m and most ol all. she
really thinks out there
In the win ovei the Seahawks,
Davis, Kile and Shepard were all
2 $, and Humphrey notched hei
seenth win ol the season.
In the third game, the Hues had to
rally with tour runs in the bottom ol
the sixth to edge N. State, 8 5
Rile hammered a double and drove
in three i uns in the hard-fought eon
test.
Shepard also was 2-3, including a
double, as pitchei Jeanette Roih up
ped her reeoid to 9-1.
In Saturday's first game, the Bui
dow ned arc h -rival Westet n
Carolina, 6-1.
1 he second game proved to be a
marathon, as the Pirates nipped
State in a 12-inning slugfest, 14
I he Buss svl"ed foui iuns in the
the sixth to tie the game
all. I he teams remained
I until the 10th when Stale picked
up tour more runs and tool 11-7
I ady Pirate ba

the inning I he Pack picked
up one more in the top ol
but once more -lie Pirates ca
bat. k to tie the
In the top hall ol the 12th,
pieked up anothet i uri � ! 12
lead I he Wn came b; and
scored two tuns in
inning to win, � 13
I his was a crucia
Dillon said V
we weren't gi �ing
showed me a lot about rls v e
had to come ba nes,
and out team j knu
undei
1 he Bucs wei lii ley
H'ow n andiingei Rothei mel. e
chipping in w ii h a 4-1
h was ; het as she
relieved M
pieked up
I he I ad � I'
W oil pack
to captun
Hues were le
( la ton, eat I
Man Powell i
t lump
S t a
.��
11
;
dv
I ady Pirate First Baseman Shirley Brown lakes ihnm
"I rom here on out, we i take
game ai a time e can de
mi ben,
�etween
in the
sea
I he I ady Bucs
tini winning
el I Gi een I
noon in Greenville D
"st G is n �� as pDv, � �
Pirates, bul
dangerous. "I
'
(
rd a let-
the ECl
B
i
��w
- .
babl
.
Comeback Pushes
Bucs Past Fairfield
leftl
bea
Mil
i d
El after 1

� �
��
ECL Piti her Bill Wilder
Hai
Lady Netters Lose To
Both Guilford, At C
.eman lo Ha
"�
o lead w tici (airfield
- k �
I . ans to si
S e win push,
lourth and 12-5 on the season I i
ime head coach Hal Baird
lei t bird
I lei dley Designated ability
I e Zap was disappointed w i
rd baseman loe I evellis areas
� RBI single. "We seen;
red on an
ei lay (. ai i away.
games this B
om ol the fifth inning to was not satisfied wit
� never play.
d. " e executed evei al
mer in the fourth b Biw as well as we could draw
w t "But he's
I
i
-
travel

I j
aw n
me in men
arked. "1
e
tve revenge in
N . . al well
; : ' � " Keit h CIar 1
: (a
11 until
ain.
I
i irl - - �
.
n!he mile relay was
d a 17
:
e i't

behind I i
� rhe Bu rai a II 19.
I
' it wat
Bucs will be
P rung in the
! lie sprint
le iela
BvM)I( I M I III s

1 asi : a's l v
team had a busy schedule lasi week.
playing two top Division II teams
and one I )iv ision 1 team.
ruesday, the Lady Netters met
Guilford ollege, last year' -
) ision 11 ruunei -up. As was �
peeled, Guilford took the match,
lefferys, the number foui
single's player, lock the only win.
The match was played indoors,
which was quite a change for ECl .
"It was dil ficull tor oui players to
adapt. " d oac h aroline
Brown " e didn't adapt as quickly
as would've liked us to
1 hui sday. the team played
theii first home meet ol the
nsi Atlantichristianollege.
ECl fell to c. 4 "We were
down 4 2 al the end ol the singles
said Brown " I his put us in a dil
i 'ii. V e should have been
easi 3 J
In order to win, the I ady Netters

second
� I

w et
�-aid �
WOI
rracey I
won
ee doul
au let!
"Is
progran assessment
s.ud Bi � V. e wei
expectations. 1 really I
w e
State due to
periences
rhe Ead
( ollege edi
match. 1 hen on Satui
Davidson (
son was last yeat 's D 11
C h a m p
ECU Assistant Football Coach lerry Lewis Drills Players During Spring Practice
Indiana Wins
Game Nearly Cancelled
PHII ,)1 1 PHI il PI) On a night
ive belonged to Indiana,
ketball was ihe least ol the nation's con
cerns.
In a game nearly postponed because ol
�n attempt on President Reagan,
V erica guard Isiah rhomas scored 23
points and Indiana, a team toughened to
rnament pressure, won the N cham
nship Monday night with a 63 50 vict
ovei Northarolina. rhomas, who scored
IS points in the second half, was named the
tournament's Most v aluable Playei
Ordinarily the premier spectacle in college
spoi is. (he title .name lost much ol its edge in
�: the shooting ol Presideni Reagan.
I he stat i ol the game was in doubt until 30
utes before tipoff. Wayne Duke, Chaii
man ol the N Basketball Committee,
then announced the game would proceed as
eduled.
"Based upon reports we have obtained in
pas! several minutes Wayne s.ud. "we
have decided to proceed as planned with the
mpionship game. 1 he two coaches ol the
competing teams were consulted separate
ly
Duke met with N Presideni Iim
Prank, N Secretary rreasurei lohn
roner, and the presidents, athletic directors
ind faculty representatives ot both schools
as well as Athletic c oas;onference (. om
missionei Mob lames.
Duke said NBC, which televised the game
io a viewing audience ol about 50 million,
did no lak : part in the final decision.
Before the start of the game, Dr. Donald
I uh ve a prayei before the sellout
crowd ai Ihe Spectrum. A moment ot
silence followed. In the consolation game.
Jcfl I amp scored 2 points and I ee Rakei
ovei 1 ouisiat S a
Did lid tin ag
ed a
the 1
1 � v i! �
site ol theii
now
title sea
comii
" 1 nev ei
V
was 11' y ii didn't - ughi we
migl
hune
themselves
and l hey a first two minu
did S
day
Die 1
for Coa i
short six tin he 1 inal i yi Smith
look
' 11 omas' sec hall pei I � �i mani e
(7-ol lit tto Heldi wa
Sum ii said "It diana' vt as vei a
live. I don' - we played as well as we
lid but I'm very
Indiana w i
In light of i v- on,
Smith said he as unsure is ol the
game.
"We did: - w we were goii play
foi su;e urn it v he said.
"It was
Rea ����
hospital and
repoi ledly I ' his den
tois which read: "All in ail, I'd rathct be in
Philadelphia






Last Pins Fall
CO-REC BOWLING
Co-Rcc Bowling drew to a finish Sunday,
March 2. tight teams participated in the
playoffs from a division total of 24. These
teams were chosen based on their respective
records during regular season play.
Results from the first round included a 4-0
sweep bv "BOPARASM" over
"ASSORTED NUTS RICHARD PAR
RISH led his team with a fine 470 series. 1 he
�'Misfits" triumphed b a 3-1 score over
�AVHd Bunch I BOBBY JONES rolled a
458 and LARUE YOUNG had a 389 series to
secure the victory.
Other first round scores included a 4-0
sweep for the "Rolling Rocks" oveT the
��Strikers" and a 3-1 victory by "BSU" over
��Bolton's Pin Busters
The semi-final round again saw the Rocks
and Misfits score wins. JUDY GODDARD
rolled a fine 451 series to lead the Rolling
Rocks She receded able support from team-
mates CHUCK Hll 1 . BUZZ CHADWICK
and SUSIE BO D. JEFF WAGSTAFF and
1 ICE H1NHS led the misfits over BSU in
the other semi-final match. WAGSTAFF
bowled a 505 series while HINFS had a 362.
In the finals it proved difficult for either
the Misfits or the Rolling Rocks to gain
much of an advantage. After the Rocks won
the first game by 65 pins, the Misfits' came
hack to win the second game by 75 pins.
1M Sports 'N' Shorts
By Dwayne Grooms
�and�
Gregg Melton
Therefore, going into the final game only 10
pins separated the two teams.
Both teams bowled superbly and only a
big 10th frame by the Misfits assured the vic-
tors bv 11 total pins. High scorers for the
Misfits' were BOBBY JONES with a 464 and
IARUE YOUNG with a 409. CHUCK
Hll I. led the Rocks with a 430.
The 1M Department would like to con-
gratulate to Misfits and all the bowlers on a
great season.
C ROSS-CAMPl S FUN RUNS
The ECU Intramural Department will
sponsor two "Cross-Campus Fun Runs" on
Wednesday, April 8, at the ECU track.
There will be a 2.5 mile race beginning at
5:00 p.m. and a 5 mile race starting at 5:30
p.m. Entry blanks are available at the In-
tramural Office and are open to all ECU
students, faculty, staff and alumni.
Lady Pirates Send Four
MAI
HEWS
CANDICE
M�fl ttnln
Competing in less
than perfect weather
conditions, ECl 's
A1AW track team senl
four people to the
finals m the Universit)
of Virginia 1 in na-
tionals l-rida.
All three freshmen
advanced to the finals
in their eents. Carolyn
Moore won her heat in
the 200. taking seventh
m the finals. Felicia
Warren took second in
the hurdles, placing her
in the finals. Anne
Hariman placed sixth
in the 400 meter
hurdles.
The relay team did
not have a good day,
missing a hand-off tor
the second time in two
weeks. Gwen Dancy
advanced to the finals
in the 100. finishing
seventh.
'T had wanted to see
more this meet said
coach 1 aurie Arrants. pionships.
"However, considering
the weather conditions. "We don't expect to
I wasn't too disap- sc�" well team-wise
pointed since we haw s"cnA a
small team said At
The 1 adv iracksters rants. "Instead. I'm
travel to Raleigh this going to b
weekend to compete in good
the NCAIAW Cham- scores.
n d i v idua
iEaat (fjaroltman
�" �
Subscription Rates
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v�
iss postage I
N
VOTE
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DAVISON
SGA
VICE-PRESIDENT
Art and Camera
526 S. Colanche St.
Dow Town
SPEClAh - �
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ECU Students
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KODACOLOR
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75 I
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TAKEOUT
SERVICE
2903 E. 10th St.�
758-2712
264 By-Pass �
756-0040
Li
20 EXPOSURE $1 92
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AND EKTACHROME
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MON.thru FRI.
PLUS
FREE TEA
with college I.D.
20 OFF ALLAAENU ITEMS;
AAON. thru FRI. from 3:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
FREE DRINK with college I.D.
RI66MI
SHOE
8EFMRI
Pa �
I
0
PHONE
758 0204
Vudi
&
Maid
.J'rtN
I � dir
i law M (
v �� I
I bim
( nnMiiif
Block
I'uk I P
�MlMav
P






Netters Defeat Amherst
Classifieds
CLASSIFIED
B I1M WILLIAMS
Mall Wrllti
1 tie ECU men's ten-
nis team took an ex-
pected eas victor over
Amherst College of
Massachusetts last Fri-
day b a 7-2 margin.
1 he Pirates" number
Zengel, got the match
started in a positive
way with a very im-
pressive 6-1. 6-4 victory.
Keith played
superbly stated head
coach rim Ricks. "He
simply beat his oppo-
nent to death
Following Zengel's
one player, Keith win, Ted Lepper, Barry
Buc Golfers
Finish 10th
In Tourney
Parker and Steve Pet-
lerson also won their
singles matches to give
the team a 4-2 lead
entering the doubles
competition.
The Bucs locked up
the victory by sweeping
all three doubles mat-
ches as Zengel-Parker,
1 epoper-Norman
Bryant and Cole King-
Jeff Farfour all beat
their opponents.
The victory upped
the Pirates' record to
7-3 as they prepare for
a match on Wednesday
in Con way, South
Carolina, against
Coastal Carolina.
FOR SALE
1 c EasJ C arolina
golf team posted a
54-hole total of 938 to
finish tenth in lasl
weekend' Camp 1 e-
jeune Invitational.
IVw er t ul W ake
1 oresi won the event
with a three-day total
of 871. 1 emple was se-
cond at 873 while
lames Madison finish-
d third with an S9
lal.
1 he Pirates were
playing without iheii
lop four golfers in
Steve I ones. Don
Gafner, Mike Helms
and Mike Move.
Don Sweeting and
Dan I aw ink were the
top 1 CU finishers,
each carding three-day
totals of 230.
Chris lucker of
I C-Charlotte gained
top individual honors
for the event with a 212
total. Wake's loin
Knox and Temple's
David O'Kcllv tied foi
second at 21 5 .
I he Pirates now gel a
well-deserved w eek
layoff alter playing in
si tournaments in Five
weeks. I he team's next
action is m the Tar Heel
Invitational, April
10 12.
Is
there
life
after,
cancer?
Some people think
that even when a cancer is
cured the patient will
never live a normal life
again
The American Cancer
ety knows better
helps people return to
their homes and their jobs
Tnere is life after cancer
Two million people are
living proof if vou or
me close to you rw
help, call us

American
Cancer
Society
FOR SALE Snare drum Pearl
top of the line Extra deep Ex
cond Call 7S7 3210.
FOR SALE J C Penny 8 track
tape player Excellent condition
VS. Call 752 4379 and asK tor
Keith
FOR SALE Wedding gown and
veil. Ivory Sue 3 pettite Call
758 4238 alter 6pm.
FOR SALE Pioneer turntable,
good condition Call Jim at
752 5325
FOR SALE Bell and Howell
8mm movie camera, protector.
screen, and lights Make
reasonable otter Call 757 3124
alter 4pm
BUYER WANTED Schwinn
Super Le Tour 2 A great touring
bike in excellent condition Deuce
and a quarter Call Sam at
752 1300.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large house. 12
rooms, 2 baths Ideal tor student
group SSOO plus utilities 752 5296
FOR RENT Spacious 12 room
house 2 blocks from campus
S500 plus deposit Call 752 5294
FEMALE WANTED To share 3
bedroom apt S82 00 plus one third
utilities. Non smoker preferred
Call Nancy at 758 8398
ROOMATES WANTED 2 male or
female roommates wanted to
share spacious 3 bedroom house
during summer and( or tall
Convenient location to Carolina
East Mall and Pitt Community
College 580 month during sum
mer, one third utilities and 560
month, one fourth utilities during
the tail Call 754 9011 after 5 pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 2 bedroom apt m
Wilson Acres. 4 blocks from cam
pus. 5145 mo plus one half
utilities Call 752 9194 alter 4 30
AVAILABLE Mid May or June l
1 bedroom apt at Village Green
Assume lease. 5195 month Call
752 8288
SUBLET Looking for mature.
quiet female to sublet to Mid May
to mid August Ideal location to
ECU Call 758 1744
APT. FOR SUBLEASE During
summer from May to September
Riverbluft Apts Call 758 6728
PERSONAL
MRS PARROTT Vogels method
may be you stepping stone to a
MODI weekend, not mine Singed
the BBS
FREE PARTY FREE STROH S
Beer All you can drink No cost
no obligation Enter the photo
specialies. Stroh s beer craiy pic
ture contest All you have to do is
be a group o� 35 or more and pose
for a craiy picture by April 11 4
winners will be picked Call Mubie
Tolson at 758 3658
LITE TUG OF WAR CONTEST
will be held Wednsoay at Sigma
Tau Gamma house at 3pm The
event is co sponsored by The
Miller Brewing Co And CO
Tankard Co inc The competion is
open to all registered students of
fraternities and sororities from
ECU Two bands will also be play
ing to provide plenty of entertain
ment Be there'
COMING THURSDAY THE
CONTINUING SAGA OF
ROBERT'
BANDS UNLIMITED BOOKING
AGENCY Is now booking bands
for the spring summer, and fall
We cater to every different
musica! need and price range We
provide bands that range from
Beach, Top 40 to easy listening
and country The quality of a band
can insure the success of your par
ty Let the Pros at BANDS
UNLIMITED get the right band
for your next party Call 757 3210
BIKINI CONTEST Contestants
call 758 4899 ask tor Robert
LURCH So glad you finally got
the nerve What did you do? Visit
the wuard? COUSIN IT
ATTENTION SPORT F ers
FLASH Cobbikaze crashes at
10:30 Jaws lecture on 340 slam
dunk Mike the EnCoomser hits
paydirt at J and P Browner says
Just a little spoon ll do ya Mr
and Mrs Fiog croak in the night
Is Beury s drought over? Con
tmued Thursday
PHI KAPPA TAU SPRING FL
ING, FRIDAY APRIL 3RD
Everyone is invited! Be sure and
buy your raffle tickets tor the free
Beach Weekend
ATENTION BEACH BUMS
Atlantic Beach is now officially
fair game fro a mass invasion
Stuff a crowd into a Chevy Impala
and what do you get? One hell of a
good time! Thanks gang
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nightly 5:tX)-y.U0pm
Tues. Fish Fry- All I he r-ish You Can bat With A Mug
Ot Your r-avorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shnmp With French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Our hamous Hushpuppie$$3.99
Thur. Family Wight A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp, Kried Fish, Oysters and Deviled Crab$499
Tue,Wed,Thur(Oyster Bar Only) 1 Doz Halfsheil
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Of Your Favorite Beverage
$2.99
�l
Ph. 7 56-20II
SAAD'SSHOE
REPAIR
! i i C.rrtndr ve
758-1228
Qudin Keiiau
"
Electrolysis
REMOVALOF
UNWANTED
HAIR
SUNTANS �
PERMS
$20.00
A&B
HAIR CARE
756-0588
XI2 G B '� � o
ALLIGATORS
FOR SALE
LOCATED AT
GREENVILLE C.C
OPEN EVERY DAY
8:00 A.M. TILL
DARK
i
.�fCiKUfcLH.
St5t�
The Flaming Center has been here for you slnoe 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all ages at a reasonable oost
Saturday abortion hours
need us.
i�iy pfgnanny t�U
�wain birth control bxrori
The Fleming Center we're here when you
rt�n yai-SSSO in Fjdeigb anytime.
t. - -
� -
i.
� . - H � - .
-
- riufltn
-ij��i�c� mart -1
��.� � � ��
-ig-�r-oo� s�.�
g i S. -
N �
i'lOS
h
UmWY OW
ICf I
Neap Caaa Iwm
of Bw Km
�no�s' i -�'� � '� M
R�?g & ice Deliver
i& 131:
THE
IrU'iM
H M 0
M .c B�g
ARE YOU SICK
AND TIRED OF
WASHING CLOTHES?
I
Green�iile-Chdpel Hill
752-8772
WINE SALE
TRY OUR WASH, DRY FOLD SERVICE
WE FURNISH DETERGENT, BLEACH,
FABRIC SOFTENER & HANGERS
RIGGAN
SHOE
III W 4th S'
GreerwilK N C
REPAIR
Downtown Greenville
Across From
Bount Harvey
Parking In
Fron'& Back
Or Shoo
PHONE
758 0204
I
I
I
I
I
I
jKOREMAT
WASH HOUSE
i
i
INTRODUCTORY
OFFER
50 O OFF reg
PRICE
� E. 14th
� E. 10th
� Dickinson Ave.
Offer Expires April 8 �
Valid wCoupon Only
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
R
Technical
Electronics
And
Maintenance,
Inc.
756-1387
Audio,Video.
&2Ua
('ommunicalions
Mainlenance
(Preventive lo
Overhaul)
serurv dim U-d l � Is1
lass Klicensed leihni-
lian. Niudcni of Applied
Prnsics al fr a� arolina
( omenieleh located
� 2 Block Offampus
Pick-l pand Deliver
Available
90 l)a Warrant
Period
JUax- Vue.
OPTICIANS
&
option
r�'i
10 Discount to Students & Focualty
OVER 1,000 FRAMES TO CHOOSE FROM
Single Vision-White Glass Lenses$19.50
Bifocal Lenses � White Glass$30.50
Single Vision Photo Gray Lenses$2fc50
Single Vision Photo Gray Extra$32.50
Bifocal Lenses Photo Gray$38.50
Soft Contact Lenses $79.95
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
OMCNVIllI M C
MYMCIMI OU0�ANOll
tun dim a
IMW ITMiT
Oron�WM (lor Only
TM1M
ornci ovf
�on TN� TBWtt ��i
� �� �� �
wttmtcf
J

Glossy or silk finish
is available
COME TO THE STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
FOR FAST, QUALITY PHOTO FINISHING AT
EVERY DAY LOW PRICES
12 exp. color film 2.99
20 exp. color film 4-55
24 exp. color film 5-46
36 exp. color film 7 84
We offer complete film processing services:
Black & White, Color Slides, Movies, Enlargements, Reprints
Satisfaction Guaranteed
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
owned and operated by East Carolina University
Win instant
cash and prizes
Play Pepsi Pay-off.
Take it off.
. � � � . � - I � U I � l
� - �� ' � � �� i � - ivegol
�� �.�� � "
PeDS Pd- "
Just peel back and
enjoy the show.
tstopi
COl' � � � �' '
msl ���'
Bonied by Pepv (-ol� Boitl.ng Co o� Greenv.n, Inc
1809 D.ckmson Avenue. (jwvlle North Corol'no
Under Appointment from PepsiCo Inc Purchose N V
� ' '
chance to win
1
WIN $500
pi
SPIRIT
Get in the act.
Pay Off caps

Winning crown may be
found on 10 and '6
ounce returnable bottles
o Pepsi Cola, Diet Peps
and Mountain Dew
Winning crowns must
contain the franchise
identification on the
skirt of the crown Void
where prohibited No
purchase necessary
The gome terminates
June 30 1981 or when
the supply of starred
aps has been exhusted
IPEPSll





enteen returns
an investment.
� iil wlriiilwiiil
Mil"11" iM
�- .MSkJ
�?
�pi
, :





1 lit I si i KOl IN1AN
Features
Japan Tour
Students 'All Shook Up'
Over Cheap Trick Concert
Drummer Bun E. Carlos
�the look In Japan: '
haseball-bat-sied sticks-
keens the Cheap Trick pace, while impossibly pretty lead singer Rob,B ande,ms
AVhn C arh,s sPmkin, his eternal cigarette, ended 'Surrender' v. ,th -a m.ghty roll ot
-well, a night worth of critical apprehensions got pummeled.
Tickets are selling fast tor this
Saturday night's Cheap Trick-UFO
concert at Minges Coliseum. Sm
dent tickets, priced at only $6.50,
are moving especially fast.
"It is advisable tot anyone in-
terested in going to purchase their
tickets by Thursday. Response to
the pairing of these two groups tor a
'once only' North Carolina ap-
pearance has been great thus far
according to Major ttractions
Chairperson Charles Sune.
Public tickets arc still available in
Greenville at both Record Bar loca
lions. Apple Records, as well as the
Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall
Student Center.
The following is an excerpl from
the June 14, 1979 issue ot Rolling
Stone magazine (pages 48-49;
reprinted by permission). 1 he article
was written following Cheap hick's
massive tour ol Japan:
Cheap Trick wasn't making a lot
of money the tust tew years alter
they formed in 1974, but the
always carried themselves as it thej
would someday. Midwest rock scene
regulars remember seeing them ar-
rive at club dares m a white
limousine with the best-looking
women in town. This is not to sav
Cheap Trick was spoiled or lazy; in-
dolence is a hard trail to develop
when you're playing one-nights in
places like Waukesha, Wisconsin.
But from the beginning it was evi-
dent thai Cheap Trick was being
groomed tor the top.
And the had Ken Adamany
behind them. The son of Lebanese
immigrants, Adamany had aban-
doned a musical career (he played
kevboards with Steve Miller and
Bo Scaggs m a band called the
Fabulous Knight Trains) to become
a powerful booking agent in the
Northern Illinois-Southern Wiscon-
sin area. Insiders and rivals nick-
named him "the millionaire playboy
of Janesville, Wisconsin" (his
hometown). By the time Cheap
I rick and Adamany joined torces.
he controlled a hefty chunk of the
club and concert traffic in the
region; needless ro sa, Cheap Trick
had no trouble getting booked.
Adamany held out for two years
before signing Cheap Trick to label
� Epic Records in August 1976.
Soon afterward, the band cut its
first album with Jack Douglas
(Aerosmith, Star). Cheap Trick
was a tour de force of heavy-metal
see CHEAP, page 7, col. 1
AFROTC Remembers Past
Developing Heritage Wall To Honor Alumni
By BUI A D. TUDOR
Easi Carolina University's An
Force Reserve Officer Training
Corps (AFROTC) is one the oldest
and most successful programs in the
country, and officials here arc plan
ning to honor some ol the sacrifices
and achievements made bv former
.adets from Detachment 600 (as the
ECl unit is known) who have made
significant contributions to the
freedom ol our country.
�AVe are developing a "Heritage
Wall" to commemorate some ol the
sacrifices and achievements ol EC I
alumni who were commissioned
here as An force officers said
I ieutenant Colonel James C
rhomas, himself a 1954 graduate ol
ECU and currentlv the AFROTC
Commander. "People from EC I.
have given their lives in service to
their country, or made significant
accomplishments and contributions
to our freedom in other ways, and
we wan: to create more awareness ol
their efforts
1 xamples cited are Captain Glen
Dyer, an All-American Diver from
CU who was killed in Southeast
Asia (SEA) in 1964. and Major
Film 'Grand Illusion' Rescheduled
Due to drama department rehearsals of the play Julius
Caesar the special film "C.rand Illusion" will .Ol be shown
,his Wednesday right, April 1, as originally intended I he
classic French drama has been rescheduled for an April 22shim-
inK at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center Hendm Theatre.
Following "(.rand Illusion the regularly scheduled film
�Peppermint Soda" will be shown, as planned, at 9 p.m.
The American comedy "It Happened One Night cancelled last
Vednesdav. will be shown as the first half of a double teature at
7 p m. on Wednesday, April 15 in the Hendrix Theatre.
1
General Charles E. Woods, a 1950
graduate who served two SEA
tours, flew UK) missions over North
Vietnam, and is presently Com
mander o the Air force Com-
missary Service. General Woods will
speak at the commissioning
ceremony on May S and also preside
at the ceremony to official!) open
the "Heritage V all
In tracing the histor) and purpose
o FROT( . Colonel Thomas
pointed out thai the Air force was
established as a separate military
service in 1947, and one year later
Detachment 6X) was formed, mak-
ing this one of the oldest AFROTC
tinits in the country. It is one of the
4" detachments where only the Air
force program is offered, and in
1969 it was chosen as one o only
five detachments in the United
States to accept women.
Today, approximately 25�'o of the
cadets here are female, and during
the past 32 years thousands o!
students have participated in the
ROTC program at ECU, many ol
them being commissioned as Second
Lieutenants in the United States Air
Force.
This summer when 30 cadets
receive their commissions from
Detachment 600, they will join ap-
proximately 3,000 other new of-
ficers from AFROTC units across
the country, rhese officers will
become part of the 43 per cent ol ac-
tive duty officers, including 24"
generals, who are ROTC graduates.
Students at ECU who arc in
crested can choose between a two
or four-year program, freshmen
and sophomores in the four-year
program enroll m the General
Military Course (GMC) and stud)
the history oi military aviation and
the contemporary Air force, each a
one-hour course. Juniors and
seniors enroll in the Professiona
Officer Course (POO and study
principles ol management and na-
tional security in contemporary
American Society .
i ntrv into the HOC is com-
petitive, based on a national screen
ing system. Onl) aftei being ac-
cepted into the POC, oi accepting
an -ir Force paid scholarship, do
cadets become obligated to serve on
active duty upon commissioning
freshmen and sophomores in the
CMC can "look-see" to determine
if the program is suitable tor their
goals, or perhaps enhance their
possibility o a scholarship, all
without incurring any obligation or
commitment.
Classroom instruction for all
cadets is provided by active duty of-
See AFROTC, page 8, col. 1
Pianist To Appear
Pianist Charles Rosen will appear in concert in the HjfTJoT
1 hursdav April 2 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets, available m the C entralJ.cket Of-
fice in Mendenhall are S2.00 for student and $5.00 for the puhhe.
Dinner Theatre Play
Is Good Entertainment
B JOHNWEYLER
SUM Wnltr
SS��Sr��. riW�aBeP. oessin as His version - en,ph�si,e .he poHUca. ,�.ne�e I.
the drama's plot.
Playhouse Presents 'Julius Caesar'
"Julius Caesar one of
Shakespeare's most powerful and
compelling dramas, will be
presented by the East Caro hna
Playhouse April 7, 9, 10 and 11 at
8-15 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre,
Mendenhall Student Center.
The production will not be a
trad.tional interpretation ot the
celebrated classic. Director Edgar
Loessin has assembled a cast of 30
actors and as many technicians who
will present a chilling version of the
play which relies heavily on such
techniques as motion picture film
recorded music and bold lighting ef-
fects.
Efforts have been underway tor
several months to furnish Hendrix
Theatre with the necessary equip-
ment and stage scenery. Scaffolding
for the lighting instruments, lighting
control boards and sound equip-
ment have been brought in from
around the state to augment the
theatre's already extensive film
facilities.
"We want to make the play live in
the ambiance of Hendrix Theatre
said Loessin. "We hope to achieve a
sense of the political cycle that is so
evident in 'Julius Caesar This is a
play that speaks directly to some of
our recent politics in this country, a
See ECU, page 7, col. 2
Last night the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Dinner Theatre
premiered its production ol Paul
Zindel's "And Miss Rcardon
Drinks A Little" mdel is known
for his unusual works with names
such as 'The Effects of Gamma
RavS on Man-in-the-Moon
Marigolds" and "My Darling. My
Hamburger His reputation is pro-
ved bv this play, a bizarre but enter-
taining tale of three sisters, all
warped in one way or another.
The Story revolves around Anna.
a teacher who recently suffered a
nervous breakdown in school and is
the cause of much commotion.
She is paranoid, obsessed with
death and has a phobia against
meat, fur, and anything animalistic.
She lives with sister Catherine, a
wise-cracking woman who seems the
most normal of the three, but has
her own dark secrets. This terrible
trio is completed by Ceil, a cold,
guarded gargoyle.
The rest of the major cast consists
of Fleur and Bob Stein, a feather-
brained guidance teacher and her
bellicose bear o! a husband.
They stop by Catherine and An-
na's apartment, the setting of the
entire play, for an enjoyable evening
of shouting, invective and near-
insanity.
Entertainment is provided by a
blank-loaded gun that is loudly fired
at people, Bob's telling ot why he
hasn't used his own apartment's
bathroom in nine years of marriage
(because Fleur steals all the
bathroom supplies from school), a
feast of raw meat, zucchini, and
giound-up kiwi fruit and kumquats,
and general hysteria from all con-
cerned.
The pla ends on a happ note
with the reconciliation ot Anna and
Catherine. Apparently the theme ot
this production is that everyone is
insane, so don't worry if you are.
All o the cast is competent and
some are excellent, including Julie
Haskett, who had to take on an ex-
tra small pan. as well as her regular
role of Fleur, due to a cast
member's illness.
Karen Baldwin sumds out as
Catherine, flawless and funny
throughout, resembling a cross bet-
ween Jane Fonda and Anne Meara.
Dianne Picketl is excellent as Anna.
Mane Farr as Ceil and Dwight
Eastwood as Bob deliver pleasing
professional performances.
Ihc show will continue through
Saturday, April 4. Performances
through April 1 will be dessert shows
at 7:15 p.m curtain at 8:00 p.m.
The final three performances will be
full dinner shows with seating begin-
ning at 6:30 p.m curtain at 8:00
p.m.
I ickets are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office. 1-or information call
757-6611. ex 266.
TV Trivia Quiz
For 'MA SH' Fans
By DAVID NORRIS
and
WILLIAM YE1.VKRTON
"MASH" is one of the most
popular shows on television today,
as shown bv the number of reruns
available every day. Since everyone
can watch "MASH" two or three
times a day, the following twenty
questions shouldn't be too difficult.
1. What does "MASH" stand
for?
2. What was Frank Burns'
nickname?
3. Name B.T's wife?
4. Name Hotlips' ex-husband.
5. What is Hawkeye's real name?
6. Speaking of Hawkeye, what
town does he hail from?
7. What happened to Henry Blake
after he was transferred home?
8. Name the psychiatrist who
periodically visits the MASH unit
for poker games.
See TV page 8, col. 1
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 31, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 31, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.122
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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