The East Carolinian, March 26, 1981






�he
(Earulmtan
h
Serving (he Eastaroiina campus community since 1925
ol. 55 No. ?0
10 Panes
I hursday, March 26. !s�Ki
(.reenvillc. N(�rtharoiina
( irculation 10,(MM
Little Files Charges Against Sherrod
( harlie Sherrod
b pah con ins
SGA President Charlie Sherrod
has been charged with tour viola-
tions of the bast Carolina Code of
Conduct,The East Carolinian has
learned.
Ihe charges were filed Wednes
da) b SGA Treasurer Kirk I ittle.
He has alleged that Sherrod had a
pun in switching a picture in Little's
campaign advertisement that ap-
peared in the March 3 edition ot The
East Carolinian.
Ihe advertisement was supposed
to contain a picture ot Little in a
coat and tie. it was altered to con-
tain a picture of Little in an Air
Force ROTC uniform.
A source close to Little said,
"Sherrod approached one. it not
two, staff members and asked I
they change the picture
Thus, the source I ittle
decided to file the charge against
Sherrod rathei than the paper
"The newspapei did everyth
within its powei to rectify the situa-
tion 1 ittle said ' 11 ve om-
plami with them
Though Sherrod ha- denied ha
ing any pan in the matter, he has
admitted to being I
newspapei's office . ht ihe
isue was being prepared
"1 ynnaide; and I were a!
office, we had letters to the editoi
turn in. 1 was also complaining
all the candidates' Mid plat
tornis were noi in the papei
According to Paul ' inck
East Carolinian's directoi ol idvei
tdvertisement was correct
when the last member ol his siatt
left th iffice between 10 and 11
p.m that mgh
"( huck I ostei was responsible
sure that the ads were
and the) were when he
left I inc ke said.
1 ittle fell tdvertisement,
as it appealed, ma) have hurl his
campaign
"It was a definite detriment o my
campaign b) picturing me in a
military uniform fie said. "1 feel
like ,i was done with the intentioi ol
hurting no. re-election campaign
He added that the use ol the pic-
. :ated a problem foi him with
commanding officers. "It im-
plied that the Al-ROK was suppor-
ting me, and that's illegal
Sherrod has been officially charg-
ed with violating sections F, G, Q
and U of the Code ol Conduct,
Ihe first charge deals with van-
dalizing, maliciously destroying,
damaging or misusing property.
1 he next charge concerns stealing
or receiving stolen property.
The third charge is forging, alter
ing or misusing as documents or
other such materials.
The final charge deals with the
violation ol city ordinances, state
law or federal law by students.
"M) ad was vandalized Little
said. "This is my legal recourse
Sherrod has indicated that he will
file counter charges against Little,
He said he will charge I ittle with
section A of theode ol Conduct,
which deals with slander, lying and
libel.
"Kirk Little, the politician, is up
to his old tricks again Sherrod
said.
"Most people, when they look at
the charges against me will consider
the source. He tried the same thing
last year Sherrod concluded.
In last sear's campaign Little
c u sed his o p o n e n t, Danny
O'Connor, of rearing down hi
paign posters
I ittle has asked tor a preliminary
hearing Thursday, at which time the
charges will be formallv presented
Set SHrRROI). Pat 3
ECU To Sponsor Activities
Bv 1)1 N WDrRsON
-ne-
I
ean
C (illl-
tion
on-
Week
March
ise the
idents,
iblic in
( (
v
Handicap-
reek in
North
Is that
he added. The program here at ECU
is scheduled to last four full days
and includes a wide variety of
acitiv ities.
It I . over the past few years, has
spent approximately S3 million
removing barriers that cause dif-
ficulties tor the handicapped.
William Haney and Cindy Mlylin-
sk v , graduate students in
Rehabilitation Counseling and
chairpersons lor the Minority Arts
( ommittee, explained that the Han-
dicap Awareness Week activities
will display everything that ECU has
done to accomodate its disabled
students.
Throughout the week, simulation
workshops will be held to provide
able-bodied people with a first hand
iook a! what it is like to be disabled.
Wheelchairs will be provided f
participants to experiment with.
There will also be simulations to
experience blindness and other han-
dicaps.
Rowe aKo indicated that 60 to "0
percent ol the individual
in the organiza nd supervision
ly and the Circle K
a national division of
!so, organizations in
i as the Employment
Ol the week
die
ported by
service sorori
organization,
the Kiwanis.
the area sucl
Security Commission Handicapped
Services and Pitt County Services
foi the Blind are also supporting
this program.
Ihe activities tor the week will
begin on Sunday at 7:00 p.m. with a
jazz concert by kav Codrington, a
well-known recording performei
Many ol the speakers at the various
workshops held throughout the
week are nationally k
m the field I i i en ices
rehabilit ition.
EC!
state with programs lor the deaf,
and is recognized throughout the
nation as having an excelleni overall
awareness for tl e needs ol the
physically disabled.
Ill if
11
jVTJ j
I
pyj

0
Photo By JON
I be new Prograai Board of the Student I nion met Wednesday to discuss plans for the upcoming year. Pielured
(trim. nuht to left) in the top row are harles Mine, Major Attractions (ommittee chairman: Keith McCorkale,
Special Concerts; Steve Bachner. Films (ommittee; (re�onyers. Student Inion artist; Joe I ewis. Minority Arts
and Sam Boyd, Travel (ommittee. In the seeond row areathy Edwards. Special Events: andammie Harris
( offeehouse. Seated are Anyelia Brinn, Entertainer (ommittee. Ron Maxwell. Student Union president: and
Teresa Guion, Artists Series. Art Exhibition Chairman Reid Jenkins is not pictured.
Gay Students Win Case Against Georgetown
v A S H 1 N (i 7 O N . I) . C . K ii?hf s I a w ret used in Tecran'7f f wn cav sturlpnl he intprnrAtAH Ki; mom n,i,ir ivf� aF firnVn� . i u. .1. . ��
( I) '
. - � aps at
a par-
universi-
inds and campus
(. atholic Church
osexuality.
. Washington, D.C .
in � iled that d 's
e Cav People ol
d the Cav Rights
: e t o w n
i aw
Rights I aw
The ease will now go to a higher
court, and probably he heard in
September. That decision will help
set a national precedent that could
influence gay groups at other
church-related schools
The ruling will come too late to
help the National Women's Studies
Association, which was prevented
from holding a conference at the
University of San Francisco, a
I atholic school, for similar reasons
' SI administrators, who earlier
refused to recognize two gay student
groups, announced the women's
studies group includes people who
admit ti b . lesbia ' tier
refusing the use ol US1 facilities,
Vice President foi Student Deve!
ment Ann Dolan wrote that the
presence ol lesbians contradicts the
Catholic doctrine that homosexuali-
ty is sinful.
Similarly, Georgetown Dean
William Schuerman argued in court
that "official subsidy and support
of a gay student organization would
Students Face Cuts;
Awards To Be Late
IIJ
v
be interpreted by many as endorse-
ment of the position taken bv the
ga movement on a lull range of
issut Georgetown, he added,
would not fund any student group
se "philosophies collide with
the c lunch's teachings
Ihe university claimed it had a
right to reject the gay students
because it is a private, religious
school.
In response. Ronald Bogard, the
student groups' lawyer, asked.
"How can they be religious for pur-
I
s
j
poses of defending a civil rights suit
but secular for receiving federal
money?"
Superior Court Judge Bleonard
Braman agreed. calling
Georgetown's rejection an un-
mistakable violation of cav law. In
September, a higher court will treat
the issue o Georgetown's denial ol
space to groups with non-doctrinal
philosophies.
East week's case, says Clint
Hockenberry, president of the gay
law students' group, was "the
leanest confrontation yet betw
religious schools and gay groups
Hockenberry also asserts e iu
ministration is inconsistent m ap
portioning some $200,000 to about
90 different s'udent groups.
"The Womens Rights Collective
disseminates information about
abortion and contraceptives and
puts ads about it in the paper he
notes. "The Jewish group here ob-
viously doesn't recognize Jesus a-
Christ. If you accept Georgetow
logic, that would be inconsistent
with Catholic teachings

Bv Pl I Ullll K
Mhlri
!) � or of Fii
Boudreaux, the I as'
�id administra
: ble problems
anciai
tid for
I9S
11 Dui its bv the
Reagan administi federally
funded appropriations foi financial
aid have been reduced bv $660
million. aff( the HI OG,
i)M . SEOG, and Work Study
pr igrams.
2) 1 )ue n i ihe Basic c Irani I oun-
dation's decision to stop the prin-
ting ol studeni eligibility reports un-
til June, qualified students will
receive financial aid no earlier than
the first ol August.
J) f he total number ol E.( l .
students qualifying foi financial aid
will be considerably highei than last
yeat 's numbet
In the upcoming school year
tederal funds foi the 1 .C.I finan-
cial aid program will be cut
significantly. Funding tor BEOG
will be sliced from S2. million to S2
million, a reduction ol approx-
imately $700,000, according to
Boudreaux.
Io compensate for the lack ol
funds, the Financial Aid administra-
tion proposes to reduce individual
basic grants bv sums ranging from
$200 to $500 tor the following
sch � �l yeai.
With an average reduction ol
about $200 foi each student.
Boudreaux figures to compensate
foi the deficiency in funds without
ling away eligible applicants
empty-handed.
Boudreaux savs the allotment for
the M)S1 has been chopped from
$725,000to$663,000, a reduction of
approximately $60,000, with in-
terest rates remaining at four per
cen t,
Appropriations tor the SEOG
(Student I qual Opportunity Grant)
have been slashed from $269,000 to
$164,000, a reduction ol approx-
imately $105,000, according to
Boudreaux.
I unding foi the Work Siudv pro-
gram received the smallest cut with a
decrease ol about $14,000. The pro-
gram will operate on a $592,000
budget foi the forthcoming school
vear. About 619 students were
employed this semester, before a
lack ol hinds caused the program to
be terminated.
'Next year 6(H) jobs will be
available Boudreaux said, "but
students will be allowed to earn no
more than $500 a semester, and
some students will be provided jobs
tor only one semesir
Ihe Sell Help and emergency
loan programs will not be affected
See All), Page 3
NTS SU'PPL
Liquor 'Flim-Flam'
Plagues Greenville
JHHnmHHBHL
Pnotc B JON JORDAN
Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity, in conjunction with the American lung
Association, sponsored a rock-a-thon Wednesday on the roof of the
Students Supply Store. More than $200 was raised, and proceed will go
to the lung association. Sets of six "rockers" took turns rocking during
the 12-hour event.
By JIMMY DuPRCE
Munuinic r dllor
Caveat emptorl
This old addage has been passed
from generation to generation, but
it seems a few students at Last
Carolina University have recently
been exposed to a new understan-
ding oi the term.
With current liquor prices ranging
from $75 to $95 per case, it is not
surprising that enterprising students
would jump at the chance to obtain
a case of their favorite ehxer at $50.
Unfortunately, the person selling
liquor at this price is somewhat
more enterprising than his ECU
customers.
According to one student's ac-
count, a black male around 20 years
old ottered to sell his roommates li-
quor at $50 a case, with the promise
that it they purchased three cases
they would receive half a case free.
from there this story of fortune
turns sour.
"Two ot my roommates drove
the guy to a house on Drum Street
across the river the student
reports. "You have to give him the
money before he can get the liqour
from inside the house. He said. '1
have to go around back to pick u up
and I'll be right back They said he
walked around to the bask ol the
house but never returned
"The whole deal is illegal from
the start, so he knows no one will go
to the police the student con-
tinued. "1 jus; want to let other
students know about him so
don't fall into the same trap we
did
Accotding to the source, several
other ECl students have alreadv
fallen victim to the flim-flam artist.
"I understand some guvs at a
couple of the traternaty houses have
gone through the same thing he
said. "There's nothing that can be
done to this guy by the police, but
I'd like to see him again sometime. 1
think 1 could even the score
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds9
Features5
Letters4
Sports8

f





I
1 HI 1 S i koi INIAN
MARCH 26, 1981
Announcements
coordinate h
Regents Ete
grams in Nu
Sit)
eveloi
NURSING
ai tvaluation in Nurs
�ij an t s �
� - i scheduled foi Ma
.
to Dr Mohd ad
- ' man Ot th� v '
�iopment C ttee ot the
� 'q
to nave
featured Dr i. i B
New vj; K
. � �� Pro
.ng at the state
Na orli MFhd
� ' in her
I wasunab
iram will
� �
COOP
� � �� I
, itlVI
� �� . made w

stude " � '�
�'
�. � i daily si
� �. . .
SLAP
The EC U sign language . luD will
ha � .1 neetinfl On Sunday March
jv at 6 00 Mendenhall room 121
That is the SGA meeting room We
will be making some very impor
tant arrangements lor the perfor
mance on March 31 It is im
perative that all members attend
We will not have a cover dish sup
pet All persons working in or on
the performance are required to
attend Prior to the pertormance
we will need people to sell tickets
and put up posters II you Have
time or motivation please contact
Dana Brown at 7S2 �348 or the ol
PAGEANT
Appi v atlonj � �� . rjnteslants tc
v s Black and Gold Pageant are
. .i i . '� �
AMBASSADORS
re m � � imbassadors

���nt Centc At
versity day and
.
' AOrk on
�he general

CHI OMEGA
COMMITTEES
GAME ROOM
The College Hill Game Room
located in the Aycock basement
leatures electronic games, pm
ball pool pmg pong and tooseball
Hours are Mon Thurs 12 11
p m Friday 12 5pm and Sun 8
U p m All proceeds are returned
to the students through the Student
Residence Association please
support the game room
BKa
Beta Kappa Alpha the Banking
8. Finance Fraternity will hold its
March meeting Thursday the 26th
at 4 00 m room 221 ol Mendenhall
ihc guest speaker will be Kim
Bass a loan ollicer with First
on All interested persons are
invited
WZMB
The Media Board is presently
.i i eptino. app'x ations lor General
Manager ol WZMB For lurther in
formation please can 757 6s0i
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold a
short business meeting tonight
I Thursday March 26) at 8 00 p m
in room 221 Mendenhall Plans lor
the Washington D C trip will be
finalized Law Day ano other final
club proiects will be discussed
This is an important meeting and
all members are urged to attend
it attendance is not possible and
you are nterested in the
Washington trip please call Lynn
Calder 1756 923' by Apm I
RUNNING
The ECU intramural Depart
ment will sponsor two Cross
Campus Fun Runs on Wednesday,
April 8 at the ECU track There
will be a 2 5 mile race begmninu at
5 00 p m and a 5 mile race star
ting at 5 30 p m Entry blanks are
available at the intramural Office
and are open to all ECU students
fa ulty staff and alumr
ANNOUNCER

Bl
and Sp- I
. , ah meet on
25 a t 6 30 p m
-hall Stu
� s are urg
ed fc
PROGRAM BOARD
The Student union Program will
meet on Wednesday March 25 at
4 00 p m in Room 248 of
Mendenhall Student Center
Please plan to attend
TWIG
Did you know that the more you
understand the Bible, the better
you will feel inside? Do you know
that il you understand the Bible
believe it. and act accordingly
you will have a meaningful and en
loyable hie? II Tim 4 8, II Peter
1 2 4) Thats our goal, to learn
what the Bible says and apply it in
our lives Then we can teach
others so they can enioy the good
life (II T,m 2 2. Col I 27. 28i
Check out our fellowships Tues
day March 24 and Thursday.
March 26 at 12 00 noon Thursday.
March 26 at 7 30 p m room no
212 Mendermall Student Center
STUDENT UNION
Applications are now being
taken for the positions of Day Stu
dent Representative to serve on
the Student Union Board of D � I
tors Interested individuals are re
quested to submit their applica
lions by April 6 Applications can
be obtained from the information
desk at Mendenhall Student
Center or the Student Union office
Any questions should be directed
to the Student union office.
757 6611 ext 210
SUNDAY
This Sunday is Collegiate Sun
day at the Memorial Baptist
Church. 1510 Greenville Blvd Col
lege students will be in charge of
both Sunday School (9 45 am)
ano worship services ill 00 a m i
Don't miss this opportunity for a
different type of celebration1 The
Blue Angel" (our vans will be
making its Sunday morning
rounds on campus tor those who
need a ride
SPRING FLING
Phi Kappa Tau is sponsoring an
all expense paid weekend for two
at the Whaler Inn Atlantic Beach
The winner may choose any
weekend between Apr-1 10th and
June 4th
Donations are il 00
may be obtained from,
Tau
The drawing will be held Friday
April 3 at the Phi Tau house during
our "Spring Fling party.
3 00 6 30 p m The drawing will be
at 6 00 Everyone is invited to at
tend
CONSUMER ED
Ways to slash grocery bills with
manufacturers' coupons and re
fund offers will be taught at a
special consumer education
seminar at East Carolina Univer
sity m early April
"Coupons and Refunds How to
Save Money on Groceries will be
offered twice. Tuesday. April 7. 7 9
p m . and Wednesday April 8 10
a m noon
Instructor is Cheryl Pevehouse
editor of two consumer interest
newspapers whose success with
coupons and relunds has beer) the
subject ol numerous television and
newspaper features
The class is designed tor
homemakers. single people
students and all bargain hunter'
interested m cutting costs of foodf
and household products, says Ms
Pevehouse
Further information is available
from the Office of Non Credit Pro
grams Division of Continuing
Education. East Carolina Univer
Sity, Greenville. N C . telephone
757 6143
WORSHIP
An Episcopal service ot Holy
Communion will be celebrated
Tuesdsay evening March 24 ir I
chapel ot the Methodist Student
Center (5th Street across from
Garrett Dorm The servni
be at 5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplain the Rev B Hadden,
I elebrating
INTERNSHIPS
The Coop Office has intorma
ton concerning summer interi
ships for both graduate and
undergraduate students who have
backgrounds in compu I
Students should review internship
descriptions posted outside 313
Rawi it interested and should
tact the Co op Office for additional
-ntormation
BAWLING
a No Tap bo Tournament,
sponsored by Meflent II S'udent
Center, will be t Marcl 23
through April 13 foall ECU
students A nine pm hit jnt
strike In this mixed aout!s �
singles competition v
The tournament began Monoa.
March 23 with three w�-e�s ot
qualifying for the mixed dou'
roll off to be held Apr ill 3 Wirmi
in the Singles event will be deter
mined over the entire three a
period
Eight trophies will be awai
to the top tmishers m the singles
�ed � ibles e
Detailed information and r
are available at it. b ���
Center
FOOSEBALL
Mendenhall Studen' I . Il -
par
ticipriv n the I
ment to be held ot
Apr.i 8 at 6 00 p -
competition m bi
elimination will It
to the first and � �
teams
Ail participants n isl �
by Monday April 6 a'
B'lliards Center T ' �
S2 oc p lean lo I �
tournament
CITY COUNCIL
A spe Bl cal
Greenville Cdy Council I �
called tor Thursda, Mat M �'
8 00 a m in the Cor n
First Floor of "
:� � � (he pur) i
questmg the I �
� ew Ot Chai
que- ling
il act 1 e City ot
,i eenville to lea l " � � "
Greenville Chambi
mer
on the corner ol G" � �
��, . � . �
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday Plu8 tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
1 hursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Tickets
an, P h
POLO
B Ralph Lauren
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
v jm
HHOOH D6UGHT
Ralph Lauren tailors dusks.
Meticulousls detailed shirts in the finest,
all cotton fabriceach with the distinc-
tive Polo signature. from our collection,
choose the oxford cloth button-down in
soft summer colors priced at S21.IM). For
casual occasions, select the cotton isle
Polo knit in an arras of light and bright
colors.
$21.50 to $23.(X)
Featuring
i
10C Beverages while it last
Friday, March 27
4:00-7:00p.m.
Admission 25
Canned beverages
only 60C
AT
THE ATTIC
Sponsored by Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
a
i
t
veto
T


A 6
Lean Trim & Delicious No gristle No surprises
No Sir1 It's America s Roast Beet Yes Sir'
J
roast beef at
America's roast baaf
Ytaair!
Two more reasons
why you A I
love Arry's
tuesdau
march 31
3-00
I
I
WITH THIS COUPON
WITH THIS COUPO
2 SUPERS!2 KINGS
N rf WITH TH
i & 2R
hendrix theater
mendenhall student center
ecu. campus
fantasy is a group of hearing and
hearim impaired students who, interpret
popular music in sian language
IS COUPON
I
ROAST
BEEF
$2.09
�at all participating Arby's Limit! at a" Participating Arby's. L
I one coupon per customer perone coupon per customer
-visit. Not valid with any other of � visit- Not va,ld witn anV otner of-ivisit
Ifer fr MM,MMffifc
imitlat all participating Arby's. Li
perone coupon per customer
Not valid with any other

students svso, public $200
tickets aval lab If at mendenhaW
and at brewster building a n 4
Greenville Square Shopping Center
ACROSS F-O A K-MART
sponsored by the ecu. 5?pr ancuacte club
niiiiti
si
ha
C7
Iht
r
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t
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Aid Cuts Coming
Continued I-rom Page 1 s,udents and everyone's provide I'oi student feels ihe funds would
needs can be taken care financial aid needs be more farily
idget cuts, of he added where othei programs distributed on a need
are programs One such optton is do noi basis. I he federal
solely by the GS1 (Guaranteed Presently, an stu governmeni is paying
Studeni loan) which deni can appl foi a i he nine percent interest
�vi can provide a studeni CiM without assessing rate on formerh ob
nen tinancial with up to $25,000 pei his 01 hei needs in a lained CiSL's, bui n
letters in yeat Boudreaux feels Confidential State will not pa interest on
month that the (M should ment, but Boudreaux future loam
HasK
Conference To Be Held
s � IUK Mis
basic grants
out of
I he 1 went) tn si n
nual Family 1 ife . on
ference will be held at
I as: (. at ohna I m et si
dlerian child Care "Developing Intimacy
Centers in Columbia in Male-Female Rela
and Harbison, South tionships 2:(H) p.m
Carolina; W'avne M Ms. Kathleen
i on pril 1 and 2 I lie Motile, a
ychologist Walton and Dr. Francis
specializi ng in Walton
psychotherapy for "Maintaining Intimacy
adults and adolescents, in Relationships"
Fhursday, April 2
Ml daytime meetings 1(I,H) a m Dr. Wayne
ologists will be held in room 129 M. Sotile "Impact of
akers at the Speight Building. Ihe 'alt Sexuality on In
rhursday night meeting terpersonal Relat
will be in the School ol ships 2:00 p.m Di
rt Auditorium. Wayne M. Sotile
rhe schedule foi the 'Treating Problem
two days is as follows: Relationships 8:00
Wednesday, April 1: P-m Dr. Waynt M
0:00a.m Dr. Francis Soi!l "Intimacy .
Walton and Ms. Interpersonal Relati
theme ol this year's
conference is Intimacy:
Developing and Main
taining Close Personal
ships
II � are
s Walton,
iculty
Xdlei In

�n ilinn a
li
�n Walli'ii
siun-
S her rod
Faces
C h urges
ntinued 1 rnm Pane 1
Crawford Service Held
I m
for 1 � K
( at
depai
follow ng
Mi . ra
'U'i
divid
vere I eld Sunday ol security "As the students ki
rd of ihe he always had time to stop and
jrsity police His death was a great shock to
i died Friday (.aider A&dc that Mr.
had pi.umed to retire
2. was buried at year but had been una U
tl Pat� ol a mix up in record -
' ireem die and state
el S. Navy, in- Surviving are his wife, ! lellen
V tr II. v iallow ay Crawl
ECl Mrs. Graham ! I I oria
Ellenrawford
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�lje lEaat (Earaltmatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C HR1S LlCHOK, Cram Mb�w�
JlMM DuPRI I . t
I'M I I INC kl . Dm wo) Mm PAUI CO! I INS, Vr�a�fc�
Davi Sim kin. bmMowttf Charles Chandler v ��'
Am i 1 c am i k. �� m David Norris. ���. &,
March 26, 1481
Opinion
Page ��
The Handicapped
ECU Sets Week Of Observance
The United Nations has declared
1981 to be the International Year of
Disabled Persons. In conjunction
with this East Carolina University
had declared March 29 through
April 2, 1981 Handicap Awareness
Week.
The program is designed to in-
clude activities that will help
everyone participating to gain in-
sight into the world of the physically
impaired. Workshops will be set-up
in various locations around the
campus with special emphasis on
students, professors and employers
and their specific needs in dealing
with the handicapped. All of the
events are open to the public, and
are free of charge, with only one ex-
ception.
At 7:30 p.m on Tuesday,
March, our own ECU sign language
musical interpretation group.
"Fantasy will put on a perfor-
mance in Hendrix Theatre. Admis-
sion is SI.50 for students and S2.00
for the general public. Tickets are
availat le at the cam us nt
Ticket Office.
There will also be simulation
workshops that will allow par-
ticipants to experience a world of
blindness, for example, or find out
what it is like to get around in a
wheelchair. This is an excellent op-
portunity to broaden the understan-
ding of people to the problems of
the disabled.
For example, how would you
function if you had no use of your
amis or legs? How would you per-
form such normal tasks as dressing
yourself, brushing your teeth, tying
your shoes, eating, etc.? On the
CBS news magazine, "60 Minutes
Sunday, March 22, one man dealt
with these problems through the use
of a specially trained monkey who
could even properly brush the man's
hair for him. Admittedly, this is not
the answer to all quadraplegic's pro-
blems, but it shows that there are
alternatives to institutionalizing
severely handicapped persons.
Did you know that you should
not pet a seeing-eye dog, even if it is
sitting beside its owner, looking up
at you and wagging its tail? How
would you handle a class in which
the professor drew many graphs and
illustrations on the blackboard it"
you were blind? The workshops
during the coming week are design-
ed to enlighten partipants on the
many alternatives that are provided
by the university to handle such
frustrating situations.
Handicapped men and women
are not different from able-bodied
people except that by some conse-
quence they have a physical impair-
ment. Sometimes, this disability can
cause unimpaired individuals to be
uncomfortable in dealing with the
handicapped. Handicap Awareness
Week is designed to alleviate some
of this unsureness, and help
students, faculty, and employers to
relate in a positive and relaxed man-
ner with disabled persons. Let's
support Handicap Awareness Week
by getting involved in some of the
workshops and gain some insight in-
to the world of the handicapped.
Campaign Posters
Clutter Hallways
Okay guvs, enough is enough.
is are I nal w i two
ot the Student Government
Association elections, with Lester
Nail soon to be inaugurated as
president and Denise Phthisic as
secretarv.
The only offices still undecided
are vice-president where Marvin
Braxton and Peggy Davison enter a
runoff April 1 and treasurer with
Angela Pepe and incumbant Kirk
Little running neck-in-neck. This
editorial does not apply to these
candidates still running for office,
only those who participated in other
races.
With this in mind, the question
remains: why are campaign posters
still displayed throughout many
campus buildings? It can't be that
students enjoy reading them so
much, so what is the explanation?
While the situation may seem
ridiculous at this juncture, we
would not want ever) poster to en-
dure the fate of a particular
"Charles Sune For Sophomore
Class President" poster (vintage
19) which still exists in the foyer
of the Publications Building.
We are not implying that these
candidates should sprint through
buildings grabbing their posters and
rush to have them cremated, just
that two weeks is plenty of time to
rid our halls of this literature.
NOBODY
6GA
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IT BETTE
FOR
PRE SIDE NT
�'��jfl �' '�"��'��'��'��V�f �'� '� '� '� vlv IVil L. 1 f I
SUPPORT
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v.Vr: i in�
tfr NAIL, �r
V0 BPttKPWA AftOUtfO AMO Nor HWC ToTWY
t0 HW.MSfciF
r Campus Forum
ECU Hunger Walk Supported
1 desire to know the rhetoric lhat will
persuade the most to participate in the
"Walk for Humanity yet there is an
absurdity to rhetoric in speaking of star-
vation; 1 know only to beg and plead for
participation in the walk.
The starving do not care to work for
equal rights for minorities, or discuss
ethics or logic with the philosopher, or
demand-theory with the business
analyst, or laws of thermodynamics with
the physical scientist. What is so
grievously true is that they cannot care
about these things; a person can have no
freedoms, liberties or privileges when
they know not whether they shall die for
want of food. Seneca is correct: "A
hungry person listens not to reason, nor
cares for justice, nor is bent by any
prayers
Yet so serious we seem, and so actual-
ly absurd we are, in complaining about
S.G.A. elections, or lack of a fall break,
or allocations to the E.C.G.C; so
serious we are in fighting over a loss of
work-study funds and in complaining
about foreign language requirements.
Actually we are paltry, trite, crass peo-
ple if we are capable of assigning any im-
portance to our actions and at the same
time perhaps denying a few moments
freedom or life to another by not giving
even so little of our time to help. Think
of how much time we've spent on our
social institutions, and how little time
we've spent to help a starving person.
Surely anyone with conscience will
desire to help on April 11th. If you can-
not help by actually walking, at least
sponsor someone else and participate
through your giving.
If you do not wish to help at all, then
one can only wonder if you really care,
and I find such egoism revolting.
STEVEN M. FISHER
Senior, English
Break Recommended
Statements made in the "Fall Break"
editorial in the March 19, 1981 issue ol
The East Carolinian were incorrect I he
Calendar Committee recommended a
1983-84 calendar starting the las! week
of August and incorporating a "Fall
Break The Committee also recom-
mended that a "I all Break" be placed in
the 1981-82 calendar. These recommen-
dations were rejected. The possibility ol
classes starting later or classes lasting a
longer period of time as reported in the
editorial were not proposals of the
Calendar Committee.
FRANK W. SAl NDI Ks
Calendar Committee Member
Abortion Stand Challenged
I am writing in response to Jesse
Helms' column of March 24, 1981 on
abortion. Helms makes several remarks
which 1 strongly oppose. Helms in-
dicates that he does not believe thai the
taxpayers should be forced to finance
the killing of an "unwanted babv Isn't
that what the baby would be:
"Unwanted"?
Isn't it better lhat the child never be
born rather than being born and going
through life knowing that he or she
wasn't wanted? Helms advocates that
women or rape victims have no other
choice but to have the child. In fact
Helms is implying that no (me has the
right to do with their body as they
please.
1 feel that a person's body, is his and
his alone, and that government should
not regulate a person's sex life. In my
opinion government regulates our lives
enough. These women who seek abor-
tion did not plan to get pregnant. There
is no one-hundred per cent reliable
means ol birth control; except to obstain
trom sex. And who should say that one
must obstain trom sex: the government?
Helms is biased because he only
presents one side of the story. To be
realistic one should look at both sides ol
the issue. In our society it is said that we
are free. However, if one does not have
ihe means to carry out that freedom
what good is freedom.
GREG PARKER
Sophomore, Psychology
Forum Rules
1 he Last Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
Eor purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the author!s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters arc subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted.
Economic Message Haunts US
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
Ronald Reagan's economic message �
delivered on the night of a full moon bet-
ween two Friday the 13ths � was the most
ominous omen the powerless in our society
have seen in many years. When Reagan
formally submitted his budget to Con-
gress, the bad news was confirmed:
military spending will soar, while the
"safety net" of social services for the
disadvantaged will be shredded.
At first glance, the president's proposed
budget cuts seem consistent with the
laissez-faire philosophy Reagan has ar-
ticulated for years. By slashing govern-
ment spending and federal regulations
governing commerce, his argument goes,
Reagan will be getting "Big Government
off the backs of the people restoring our
liberties and entrusting the helm of the ship
of state to the most productive members of
society.
A closer inspection of Reagan's policies
reveals a less comforting vision. The
Ronald Reagan who is, in theory, a cham-
pion of free enterprise is, in practice, a
guardian of frozen privilege. Like the
liberals whom they have swept from the
temple, Reagan and his apostles are
perfectly willing to use the power of cen-
tralized government to implement their
political agenda.
Thus, the administration can entertain a
proposal made last November by its transi-
tion team to shut off federal funding to
municipalities with rent control laws. Such
a proposal, if it is adopted, would invoke
the power of Washington to crush the local
and state autonomy Reagan claims to
cherish. That would be inconsistent with
American
Journal
Reagan's rhetoric, but perfectly intune
with the reality of his presidency. Reagan
doesn't care about cutting back govern-
ment, per se; he cares about protecting the
sanctity of private capital, especially for
those who already have a lot of it. If drop-
ping government regulations can best pro-
mote capital, fine. If extending govern-
ment powers does it best, Reagan will ex
tend them.
Ralph Nader, in an interview with
Baltimore's City Paper, described the
president and his aides this way: "ihe
Reaganites are not really conservatives.
They can be classified more as cor-
poratists. They are not going to reduce the
tax expenditures which involve tens of
billions of dollars of indirect subsidies to
business Moreover, Nader continued,
"Reagandoes not believe in anti-trust
laws, which are designed to preserve a
competitive economy and, therefore, a free
enterprise system
Reagan's fiscal policies, if fully im-
plemented, are as likely to be enmeshed in
failure as his philosophy is in contradic-
tions. Indeed, Reagan's economic package
is almost guaranteed to accelerate the in-
flationarv spiral we've been whirling in for
more than a decade. The reason? Chiefly,
his proposed massive increase in the
military budget � a form of spending
fraught with cost overruns and delays, one
which, moreover, produces relatively few-
civilian jobs and virtually no consumer
goods. Runaway inflation � well over 10
percent a year now, compared to 1.2 per-
cent in 1962 � began with the huge
mihtarv expenditures of the Vietnam war;
Reagan's policies will strengthen inflation,
not combat it.
The Reagan rhetoric does not draw at-
tention to the fact that military spending is
government spending. The president
prefers to pin that label on "frills" such as
food stamps, social security and
unemployment compensation. In fact, the
billions for boondoggles such as the
neutron bomb, the Cruise missile and the
1 missile � a project that would rip up
several Western states to put constantly
circulating missiles on railway tracks �
comprise the most common kind of
government spending. For Reagan, who
has also proposed fatal cuts for Amtrak.
it's only "government spending" if human
beings, rather than weapons, ride the rails
at Uncle Sam's expense.
Seen in the light of day, Reagan's "new
beginning" for Amrica is a transparent
fraud. Promising to curtail govrenment
powers, Reagan has merely rearranged
them. Pledging to cut government spen-
ding, he has taken funds from the needy
and given them to an already overstuffed
Pentagon � thus increasing the chance
that the brass hats will sally forth on
another ill-fated foreign adventure. That's
the bottom line in Reagan's bad news
budget.
t
1
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- m i r a ,
lit tiunian
the rails
new
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arranged
I spen-
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ith on
rhafs
lad news
l Ml I s c K� II 1
Features
M K n 26 ivsI Paj
Cheap Trick
They 'Want You
To Want' Them
(heap I rick lead imitarist Rick Neilsen will be wielding his ae at 1(1 on pril 4.
With just ten days remaining before the devastation
of Minges Coliseum by superstar-statue rockers Ch
Trick and special guest UFO, less than 2000 studi
tickets are still available. Central Ticket Office (MS I
operating hours will be extended until 6 p.m. beginni
Monday in order to accomodate the usual las! min
rush.
"The Major Attractions Committee is very excited
about this concert and has been having as much fun pi
moling it as 1 can ever recall said Charles Sune,
Chairperson of the Committee. "We're very pleased
with ihe support that we have been receiving thus fai '
The April 4 appearance of the two groups has
distinction of being the only North Carolina date
scheduled during the current tour.
Since exploding onto the modern music scene in 1977,
i � gained mass appeal with theii live album
� V Budokan" which featured ihe hii singles l Warn
I Warn Me "Surrender and "Ain'i rhai
singles by the group include the
mbei one songs "Dream Police "Voices
"I vt � � If ou 1 el It" (from ihe sound
ihe motion picture "Roadie"), "Slop
Gamt " and iheii mosi recent nil "Baby Loves lo
America with their latesi I (' "All Shook
: been performing to capacity crowds
Music Hall in New York, and ihe Boston
Ga reviews throughout ihe lour,
ricl concert are only $6.50 (in advai
; I S8.50 for the public. n remaining
b8.50 ai the doi,
Handicap Awareness
Week Begins Sunday
Smokev Returns To ECU
Hurt Reynolds, Sally Field, Jerry Reed and Jackie Gleason return to the
screen in 'Smokey and ihe Bandit II' the Student Union Free Hick for this
weekend, show times are 7 and u p.m. on Friday and 5, 7 and 9 p.m. on
Saturda. dmission is free with student II) and activity cards.
number ol public activities are
planned foi the observance of East
( arolina I niversity's annual Han-
dicap wareness Week. March
29-April 2.
Ihe events will begin with a 7
p.m Sunday, March 29, concert on
the 1(1 mall featuring Ka Codr-
ington and Group Sax. Ram sue is
Hendrix I heatre. �
Monday's program includes the
opening ol awareness booths and
simulation activities on campus and
a ' p.m. film festival in the Leo
i en kins Fine rI s Center
uditoriun
' 1 p.m I uesday, Pal Parker ol
Community Services for the Blind
jnd Sonai Glasses representative
Bob Hun! will speak in the Student
I nion. t 7:30 "Fantasy
I i I 's sign language musical inter-
pretation group, will perform in
Hendrix I heatre.
Members ol "Fantasy" are
Michael lines! and Kathleen
Beetham Westbrook of the ECU
Program foi Hearing-Impaired
Students, Greenville interpreters
reresa Dims! and Donna Rehm,
and several student sign language in-
terpreters: Keith Stephens, an An-
napolis, Md. senior; Rachel
Ramsey, a New ork C"iiy senior;
Michael Cotter and J.C . Watford,
seniors from Greenville; Ron Gill, a
junior from Zebulon; Donna
Broun, a Cary junior; Laura Styers,
a Winston-Salem junior; Sharon
A cademy A wards
Our Critic Makes Predictions
B JOHN WKHLK
�Mall W
Coming up on March 30 those on
the motion picture merry-go-round
will have a chance to grab the brass
ring he 53rd annual Academy
Awards. Once again, Oscar (so call-
ed either because he resembled
Academy secretary Margaret Her-
rick's uncle) will go to honor the
besi of lasi year in film. Below arc
the nominees for the major awards,
with this filmmaker and film
reviewer's predictions as to whom
will win.
The biggest excitement this year
should be over the Best Actress
award. I his is indicative of a new
and much-welcomed trend in film:
the resurgence of strong roles foi
women. Ellen Burstyn is reputed to
have given a dynamic performance
in "Ressurrection" but the film was
little-seen. Besides, she's won
before, for "Alice Doesn't Live
Here Anymore" in 1974. so against
Miss ECU Pageant
Held Tuesday Night
Ihe Second Annual Miss II
pageant was held Tuesday night in
Wright Auditorium.
Thirty-six contestants competed
in the pageant, which was sponsored
by Joe Hallow of Stroh's and the
Kappa Sigma Fraternity.
Ihe winner of ihe contest was
I isa Ward, who was sponsored b
the Chi Omega Sorority. She receiv-
ed a $300 scholarship, plus a trophy
and some roses.
The first runner-up was Courtney
( ox; second runner-up was Jennifer
Coates; third runner-up was Kim
Blevins and fourth runner-up was
Kim I lora. Runners-up also receiv-
ed scholarships, trophies and roses.
Ihe Mistress of Cermonies was
Diane Bowen, who was Miss North
Carolina of 1976. Judges for the
event included Joe Hallow, Jack
Minges, Mrs. Ld Emory, Brent
Heisner, Pat Bernetie and Lena
Brown.
The production was coordinated
by Mark Mueller.
The brothers of Kappa Sigma
would also like to extend their
thanks to Scott Hoover and Greg
Needham for their help in conduc-
ting the pageant.
such stiff compel ion she won't be
awarded again. Goldie Hawn is
popular with both ihe critics and ihe
public. She's so cute and engagingly
daffy she makes you want to like
her. The Academy would probably
like to give her the grand prize but
her time has not vet come. It pro-
bably will someday soon, though.
Mary Tyler Moore is another actress
who's a hit with both critics and
public alike. She of course has been
honored and successful for years,
but the Oscar is one honor that will
be denied .her this time, I believe.
Oena Rowlands gives a strong, gut-
sy performance as "Gloria the ex-
moll who engages in a one-woman
war with the Mafia. But the
cademy will contend that the film
is basically just another violent
shoot-em-up, and besides, her hus-
band, John Cassasvettes, directed it
just to give her something to do.
My money is on Sissy Spacek for
Best Actress. In "Coal Miner's
Daughter" she impersonates a well-
known celebrity from teenage to
middle-age, and is perfectly
believable the eniire time. She also
sings her own songs in the film,
which is quite rare. This actress has
given striking, intriguing perfor-
mances in a host of fine films. She
always manages to appear in ex-
cellent if 'unusual movies:
Badlands "Carrie "Welcome
to IA "Three Women
See Ol R, page 7, col. 4
1 a u 1 k n e r of ECnightdale, a
sophomore; and recent ECU
graduate Terry Brown of Ahoskie.
Tickets, available at the campus
Central Ticket Office, are SI.50 lor
students and S2 for the general
public.
At 8 p.m. a wheelchair basketball
game. Capital City Hustlers vs. the
Greenville Steelw heels, will be
played in Minges Coliseum.
On Wednesday, at 7 p.m. in the
Leo Jenkins Fine Arts Center
Auditorium, several expert speakers
will discuss rehabilitation and public
awareness. They include Chet Mot-
tershead, stale liaison for the Inter-
national Year of Disabled Persons;
and George McCoy of the N.C.
Division of Vocational Rehabilita-
tion and the N.C. Hemophiliac
Association.
Thursday's events include a 2
p.m. demonstration of the Kurzwei
Reading Machine for ihe blind in
ECU's Joyner library and a 3:30
p.m. concluding conference in room
221 in Mendenhall Student Center.
All events are open to ihe public
free of charge, except for the
"Fantasy" sign language musical
performance.
Handicap Awareness Week is
sponsored by ihe ECU Student
Union and arranged by a campus
committee chaired by two graduate
students in rehabilitation counsel-
ing, William Haney of Fayetteville
and Cindy Myslinsky of New Mar-
tinsville, West Va.
Dinner heatre Tickets Still Available
Paul Zindel's brilliant Broadway hit "And Miss Keardon Drinks A I it-
tie" is being brought i� Mendenhall student (enter as a Dinner I heatre
production under the direction of versatile Stephen B. Finan (pictured
above). Ihe play will open ihis Monday. March 30, and run through
April 4. Students can siill purchase tickets for three dessert performances
at only $3.00 ($4.50 tor faculty and staff). Tickets for dinner perfor-
mances are $7.00 lor students; $9.00 for faculty, staff and the general
public, rickets are on sale at Ihe Central Ticket Office, MSC.
Authors Louis Simpson and Louis Lieberman (pictured above) will appear together for a dramatic reading tonight
at 8:00 p.m. in the Jenkins auditorium. On the following day, March 27. at 10:30 a.m they will conduct a
workshop in room 221 Mendenhall. Simpson is the author of eight volumes of poetry, an autobiography, critical
studies and a novel. He has won many awards, including a Pulitzer Prize for poetry. Lieberman has written two
books of poetry and a collection of essays on contemporary poets, and has had poems and essavs published in
many of the nation's leading magazines.
Illumina Accepting Entries
The Student Union Art Exhibi-
tion Committee is sponsoring the Il-
lumina Competition, an art show
open to all current ECU students.
This competition is one of the
easiest ways for students interested
in a career in the arts to accustom
themselves to entering juried shows.
A two dollar entry fee allows the
student to enter up to two works for
judging. Works or slides may be
submitted between noon and 6 p.m.
on March 27 in Room 212
Mendenhall. Works must be readv
for exhibition.
Rejected works may be picked up
on March 29 from 3-7 p.m. in Room
212 Mendenhall and accepted works
may be picked up on April 11 from
noon until 4:00 p.m also in Room
212 Mendenhall.
First and second prizes will be
awarded, at the judge's discretion,
in the following categories:
ceramics, communication arts,
drawing, painting, metal design
photography. printmaking,
sculpture, textile design, weaving
and wood design. In addition, the
committee will award $400 in pur-
chase prizes.
The juror for this year's competi-
tion, Ms. Cynthia Ference, is the
director of the Greenhill Gallery in
Greensboro.
In addition to jurying the show,
Ms. Ference will be speaking in the
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
Auditorium on Friday, March 27 at
7:30 p.m. Her lecture is titled "Out
of the Ordinary: Art in North
Carolina
!

T





I HI 1 AS I CAROl IN1AN
MARCH 26, W8I
Happenings
HAPPENINGS
C ampus Events
Thursday 26
� 3:00 p.m. Men's Baseball lantield Harr-
ington leld
� 6:(K) p.m. Intramural Co-Rcc Inner lube
Water Polo Team Captains' Meeting, Memorial
Gym Pool
� 8:00 p.m. I-A Film: .haver Soule-SPAIN,
Hendnx Idealic
� March 26-27 Intramural dolt c lassie Ayden
cnlt Course
Friday 27
� 7:00 a.m5:00 p.m. Eastern Regional Science
1 aii Minges Coliseum
� 5:00 p.m Deadline Intramural lenms
Doubles
� . 7, & 9:00 p.m. Movie: Smokes and the Han
dil II Hendnx 1 heat re
� March 27-28 Women's Softball: Western
Carolina Invitational rourney, Cullowhee, N.C.
Saturday 2
� 8:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Comprehensive Exam in
Education, Speight 1 29
� 2(H) p m Sigma I beta lau. Beta Nu Chapter
Induction, I .B A.
� 3 00 p.m. Men's Baseball: William &. Mary
Harrington I icld
� 5, 7, & 9:00 p.m Movie: Smokey and the Ban-
dit II Hendnx ! heatre
Monday 30
� Marcl JO pril 4 c.Rl Ik WEI K
� 4:00 p.m. Intramural I emus Doubles
Meeting. Memorial Gym 104
� 7:15 p.m. MSC Dinner I heat re-Dessert Per-
formance, I HI shadow BOX Student Center
lid. 244
� March 30-April 9 Intramural Badminton
gles & Doubles) Entries Due. Memorial Gym
204
� March 30 pril 13 Intramural Putt-Putt Goll
(Individual) Entries Due. Memorial Gym 2(4
� March 30-April 24 Intramural Co-Rec Inner
lube Water Polo, Memorial Gym Pool
I uesday 31
� 4:30 p.m. Intramural Council Meeting,
Memorial Gym 104
� 6:00p.m. Men's Baseball: Atlantic Christian
i 2 i Harrington field
� 7:15 p.m. MSC Dinner Theatre Dessert Per
formance, Student Center And. 244 THE
Mino box
� 8:15 p.m. ECU Concert Band Concert, AI.
Fletcher Ree. Hall
� March 31-April 2 Intramural Tennis Doubles
Tournament, College Hills Courts
Wednesday 1
� 3:00 p.m. Women's Softball: N.C. State
I niversity, Home
� 5:00 p.m. Clothing & Textiles Assn. Meeting,
V an 1 andingham Room
� 7:00p.m. Student Nurses Assn Nursing 101
� 7:00 p.m. Psi Chi Meeting, Speight 129
� 7:15 p.m. MSC Dinner Theatre Dessert Per-
formance, THE SHADOW BOX Student Center
And. 244
� 10:00 p.m. April Fool's Concert, A.J. I lei
chef Rec. Hall
� 8:00 p.m. Movie: Grand Illusion Hendrix
Theatre
School of Music
� March 26 Dowell Idol, piano; Junior Recital
7:30 p.m Mark Hite, clarinet; Tercssa I assiter,
piano; Senior Recital, 9:00 p.m.
� March 27 Tanya Moor, flute; Martha Almon.
piano; Senior Recital, 7:30 p.m. Eugene Cowan,
trombone; Larry l.vles, violin; Senior Recital,
9:00 p.m.
� March 28 Junior High School Choral Festival,
All Day
� March 29 String Orchestra Concert, 3:15 p.m.
Stephen Maziarz, piano; Faculty Recital. 8:15
p.m.
� March 30 Selma Gokcen, cello; Faculty
Recital, 8:15 p.m. Hendnx Theatre
� March 31 Sigma Alpha Iota Musicale, 6:00
p.m Jazz Band Concert, 8:15 p.m. April 1
Movies
Buccaneer
� ��less1' (PG) Shows at 1:00, 4:30. !v 8:00p.m.
� "Ordinary People" (R) Shows at 2:00, 4:30,
7:00, cV. 9:20 p.m.
� "Raging Bull" (R) Shows at 2:15. 4:45, 7:15,
v. 9:30 p.m.
� Starting Friday: "Galaxina" (R) in place ol
"Raging Bull"
Plaa
� �"Tear No Evil" (R) Shows at 3, 5, 7, A: 9:00
p.m.
� "Tun House" (R) Shows at 3:20. 5:15, 7:10,
& 9:05 p.m.
� "Final c onflict" Shows at 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, &
9:15 p.m.
� Starting lnda: "Tarthlmg" (PG) v.
"Sphinx" (PC)
Music Recitals Announced
live ad v a n c e d
students in the East
Carolina University
School ol Music will
perform in campus
recitals next weekend.
All recitals are tree
and open to the public.
Performers are
seniors Tanya Lynne
M ore of Cary, a
and Martha
Brvan Almon of Wilm-
umton.
lanist
two
graduate students.
flutist Ellen Kaner of
Greenville and percus-
sionist Mark Shelton of
Bethel Springs, Tenn
and a junior, organist
Diane Lynn Bndger of
Suffolk. Va.
Miss Moore and Miss
Almon will perform a
joint recital Friday,
March 27, at 7:30 p.m.
in the A.J. Fletcher
Music Center Recital
Hall. Both are can-
didates for Bachelor of
Music degrees in music
therapy.
Miss Moore's por-
tion of the program w ill
include the J.S. Bach
Sonata in G Minor,
three Robert Schumann
Romances for Flute
Lecture Planned
I he Area Studies
Program in Medieval
and Renaissance
Studies i� presenting a
lecture b Dr. I.iam B.
de Paor, professor of
history at the Universi-
ty College Dublin,
Ireland. Dr. de Paor is
currently a visiting
Fulbright Scholar at the
University of Pitt-
sburgh.
The lecture, which
includes slides, is on
1 r i s h chalices and
liturgy in the Middle
Ages, will be held today
at 4 p.m. in Room
C-103 in the Brevster
Building.
Interested members
of the public are invited
to meet Dr. de Paor at
an informal coffee
hour on Friday, March
27 from 9:30 to 10:30
ISAAD'S SHOL
REPAIR
1 I IGranHf Aw
759-1228
a.m. in the W.B. Graj
Gallery in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center.
Dr. de Paor's visit is
sponsored by the Col-
lege of Arts and
Sciences, the Depart-
ment of History and
the School of Art.
and Piano and a Len-
nox BerkeK sonatina.
Miss Almon, a stu-
dent of Dr. Paul Tardif
of the ECU keyboard
faculty, will perform
two Antonio Soler
sonatas, the Chopin
Polonaise in C Minor,
Opus 40, No. 2 and two
selections from
Debussy's
"Fstampes "La
Soiree dans Grenade"
and "Jardins sous la
Pluie
Ellen Kaner and
Mark Shelton, both
graduate teaching
assistants in the ECU
School of Music, will
perform a joint pro-
gram Sunday, March
29, at 8:15 p.m. in the
Music Center Recital
Hall.
Miss Kaner will be
featured in the Fran
Schubert
"Arpeggione" sonata,
transcribed for flute
and piano, and the
Marcello Sonata in F.
Shelton will perform
"Variations on a
Gailliard" by Ervin
and "Tour Verses tor
Timpani" by Houliff.
Both students will
peform Ingolt Dahl's
" Duettino Concer-
tante" for flute and
multi-percussion.
Diane B r i d ge r' s
organ recital is schedul-
ed for Sunday, March
29, at 3:15 p.m. in the
F l r s t Presbyterian
Church here.
Her program in-
cludes Pinkham's Con-
certante, the Bach
Sonata VI in G, Per-
sichetti's Sonata tor
Organ and several
selections from
DuMage's "Premiere
I ivre d'Orgue
She is a candidate tor
Bachelor of Music
degrees in church music
and organ performance
and is a student of Dr.
Robert Irwin of the
ECU organ faculty.
Qudlih
r.
WINE SALE
OPEN 24 HOURS
Check Cashing Cards
For Facu'ty and Students
Sp�
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N.CSNo.l BEACH CLUB
Downtown Greenville
Presents �
Lucky Ladies' Night
Every Tues. & Thurs.
Ladies' Lockout:
8-10 p.m.
with all the usual Chapter
X specials for Ladies.
Doors Open � 10 p.rrr.
for General Public
Nightlife
Attic
Thursday THE STATES
Fridaj CHOICE � Pi Kappa Phi H.H.
30-7:00 p.m.
Saturday CHOICE
Sundav STEVE BASSE IT
Tuesday TUT PRODUCERS AND IHI
RANTS
Wednesday No VACANCY
Carolina Opry House
rhursday LARRY 1 RANK1 IN BAND
I ridaj 1 ARRY FRANKLIN BAND
Saturday 1 ARRY FRANKLIN BAND
Sunday I ARRY FRANKLIN BAND. AM
Hi SH, & FARGO
Chapter X
Thursday Pi Kappa Phi "Evening Delight"
10 p.m.
Friday Nu Pi "End of Week Party" 4-8
"i.iu
Saturday Best in Beach Music
Sunday Kappa Alplha "Nickel Nite"
Tuesday Sigma Phi Epsilon "ladies Night"
Wednesday Sigma Nu "50, 50 Night"
It you have anything you would like put in
Happenings, please send it to: Nancy Morris, The
last Carolinian, East Carolina University,
Greenville, N.C. 27834.
Senior
Show
Planned
Paintings by Mark
Ringrose of Raleigh,
senior student in the
East Carolina Universi-
ty School of Art. will
be on displav March
22-28 in the T.( I Hap
tist Studententer on
Tenth St.
The exhibition will
include eight oil, acrylic
and mixed media pain-
tings and an intaglio
print.
Ringrose is a can
didate for the HS
degree in art education,
with a minor concen-
tration in painting.
ATTIC ATTIC
IU AIM
Souths No. 6
Rock Nightclub A
L
Thurs.
THE STATES
Fri. - Sat.
CHOICE
K
Sun.
W Pi Kappa Phi
Happy Hour 4:00 7:00
Sieve Bassett's
Va. Breeze
Tues. The X-Raves
CHAPS, INC.
HWY 258 NORTH
KINSTON. N.C. 28501
Eastern Carolinas
Newest And Finest
Private Club
Fri March 27th
Spontanes
Sat March 28th
Pieces Of Eight
Sun March 29th
Country Rock
Every Tuesday With Eddie Dee
Wednesday Night's
are Ladies' Night
Members and
I heir Guests
Welcome
All ABC Permi
its
From
5:00-7:00pm
Where Bonds mane it rock oncj Roadies makes it roll"1
200 W Wair � ,� Goldsboro 734 455)
PRESENTS IN CONCERT:
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y
n
Flash 'Em A Coppertone
Tan Bikini Contest
at the
AT
THE ATTIC
March 30,1981
Live Band Doors Open at 8:30
1st Prize $150.00 2nd $75-00 3rd $50.00
Sponsored by:
Contestants � P"� T Live On
Call: II ID 7ft Screen
758-6899 T NCAA Basketball
Finals

and
University Book Exchange, Inc.
Domino's Pizza
H. L. Hodges & Bonds Sporting Goods
Rick's Guitar Shop
Tree House
Area s Finest Salad Bar
Hour I 1 AM u 1 AM M.m Sal
1 N�in u I AM Sunda
Hot Dog City Jffiv
The Mushroom
'i
HI" � -�����
Overton's Ski Shop
The World s Largest Ski Dealer
Overton's Supermarket Inc.
211 Jarvis St
The Party Headquarters
Crow's Nest wone 7$2�i
Tho Beat Plima In Town (Hoaeat)
WATS
1 8004�2 M2t
107 TRADE St
tO BOX 105
GREENVILLE, N C 27�J4
In le Heart ol Oonion oreenviwe
The Tolai Eiperierce m Sound
jXQDmam
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
107 Trad. Strwi
Grnviii N C 27834
Phon. 752293
r





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH26. 1981
� ���
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LtAtuMG A&our Coctccr Tnr fWp �VJ�v
UP flMP A 50TTLT Of
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AnO SAI0 SH� H)p7He ft-U
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)fO0 COkjlPnt COr OUrZfc
sy PIvjip AJois
Our Critic Predicts
Academy Winners
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Of Your Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shnmp With French
hries, Cole SlaW and Our Famous Hushpuppies$3.99
Thur. Family Wight A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
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Ph. 756-2011
Maya Angelou Performing Monday
Performer-author Maya tngelou will appear on the stage of Kasi
( arolina I Diversity's .J. Fletcher Recital Hall on March 3(1 at 8
p.m. rhe event. An Kvening wilh Maya Aagelou is being spon-
sored bj the II Honors Committee and is open to the public. Ms.
ngelou uill be available to the audience for a ajuestioB-aad-aaswer
session aftei the perfoi nance, she is the author ��� five bestsellers in-
5 Know n (he Caged Bird Sings
clud
Continued from page 5
"Heartbeat If anyone is deserving
of an Oscar, Sissie Spacek is.
All the Best Actor nominees are
excellent actors. Peter O'Toole
won't win because too few people
saw his film, "The Stunt Man
Besides, audiences are mad at him
for daring to appear in Penthouse
magazine's multi-million dollar por-
no Hick, "Caligula Jack I.emmon
repeats his much-lauded stage per-
formance as a dying publicist in the
film version of "Tribute He's
good, the film's bad. He's grabbed
the gold twice before, anyway. Best
Actor for "Save the Tiger" (1973)
and Best Supporting for "Mister
Roberts" (1955). John Hurl as
"The Elephant Man" is definately a
long shot. No actor has won for
such a bizarre role since Frederic
March for "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
Hyde" in 1931. He could, however,
be given a humanitarian award for
playing such a difficult role with
heavy make-up for long hours under
hot studio lights. Such a perfor-
mance must have certainly made
John hurt. Robert Duvall is effec-
tive as a tough Marine who treats his
family like a platoon in "The Great
Santini He's given a long series of
varied and impressive performances
in many good pictures.
Robert De Niro is one oi the most
amazing actors around today. He
goes to extremes, almost to
masochistic length, to portray his
roles. For his nominated perfor-
mance as the vile and violent boxer
Jake 1 a Motta in "Raging Bull lie
learned to box and he gained seven-
ty pounds to play the pugilist in his
declining years, be Niro often plays
potentially explosive people locked
Film
'Spain'
Planned
1 ler on
nalh
tin " I
is ui
VI ndenhail
I I will
Student Union Notices
Mime Myron Carter will be appearing this Frida, March 27, at the
( offeehouse located downstairs in Mendenhall Student (enter.
( arter has studied under Keith Berger and has attended workshops
directed h the Pocket Mime Theatre of Boston. I he show is spon-
sored h the student Fnion Coffeehouse Committee.
I he weekend film "Smoke) and the Bandit II" will be shown at 7
and 9 p.m. onl this Friday. Saturday night shows are. as usual, 5,
1. and 9.
special Film "Grand Illusion" will not be shown on April 1, but
has been rescheduled for an April 22 showing at 7 p.m.
Special Film "It Happened One Night canceled last night (March
25�, will be shown on April 15 at 7 p.m. All films sponsored b the
student I nion Films Committee are shown in the Hendrix Theatre.
c entral 1 id el fftce at
Mendenhall Studeni
� ' i l l
E.C.U. is will be
b II) and .nii
c ards, and b I Iniversi-
alidated card foi
and staff.
BENNIES
CiTCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Alignment
All Types of
Auto Repair
Forolgw a Oom�tic
ioisonablo R�ta
WOO t. lOthStrool
Phono 7J� 4�4
Electrolysis
REMOVAL OF
UNWANTED
HAIR
SUNTANS
PERMS
$20.00
A&B
HAIR CARE
756-0588
212 Greenville Blvd
behind a facade of solid steel, as
best shown by his "Taxi Driver
Martin Scorsese should win Best
Director. His unique view of
modern despair, urban anxiety, and
big city blight, expressed in such
films as "Mean Streets "Taxi
Driver and "Raging Bull" can
certainly relate to today's audiences.
Coincidentally, all three films men-
tioned above starred Robert De
Niro. Their long experience of
working together has produced a
memorable motion picture in
"Raging Bull It is amazing
Scorsese has never even been
nominated before.
198()'s possibilities for Best Pic-
ture are indeed an unusual lot. They
range from three biographies: � a
neurotic boxer. "Raging Bull a
country-western superstar,
"C'oalminer's Daughter and a
bizarrely deformed man, "The
Elephant Man" � to a lavish but
realistic period picture based on a
classic of English literature,
"Tess to only one film about that
which, its name states, "Ordinary
People The Oscarrders love
ail-American family d. i, itness
last year's big winner "Kramer s.
Kramer For this reason, I believe
they'll bypass "Raging Bull" for
"(rdinary People
The Academy Awards are
ridiculous, there's no doubt about
it. How can one say. for instance,
that John Hurt plays a freak better
than Robert Duvall plays a Marine?
And the Academy obviously plays
favorites and loves sentimentality.
Yet still the Oscars fascinate us �
most hkely because they are the last
vestige of the glamor and glory thai
was old-time Hollywood.
SUPER SUNDAY
March 29th .
Three Bands
The Larry Franklin Band
Ambush - Fargo
Doors Open 5:00
Show Starts 7:00
Adm. $4.00
An Evening With
Mike Cross
One Show Only
Doors Open 7:15-8:00p.m.
For Adv. Ticket Holders
Advance Tickets - $5.00
Available At: Western Pleasure
Apple Records
Further Info: row
Call 758-38"
Win instant
cash and prizes
Play Pepsi Pay-off.
Take it off.
;sai
WIN $500
� jd. go ahead "� � � . � �ofPSiSP-
I a chance to .�� ' ��
Get in the act.
Just peel back and
enjoy the show.
. Dike Don stop now.
�me
' ii �
Bottleo b Pepv Colo Bottling Co e(G�Mnnltatn(
18WD.ck.nson Avenue Oeenv.ile NorthCo'olmo
Umlii Ajj tent iom PepsiCo Inc . Purchase N V
' ' � " � . ttlfg
tore for our Peps Pay Off caps
and ched t the display for ail
Play Peps: Pay-Off Ana
� � i rmer!
Winning crown may be
found on 10 and '6
ounce returnable bottles
o� Pepsi Cola. Diet Pepsi
and Mountain Dew
Winning crowns must
contain the franchise
identification on the
skirt of the crown Void
where prohibited No
purchase necesscy
The game terminates
June 30 1981 or when
the supply of starred
ops has been exhusted
IPEP8I1
t
r
� �� a
.����'��- f m, ;
m





1 HI I AM I AROl INIAN
MARCH 26, 1981
Sports
Page H
Mi
vc"�
JV
Spring Has Sprung
The East Carolina football
team began its annual spring
practices last week. Pictured
at top left is secondary coach
Garry Fast assisting two atten-
tive team members. At bot-
tom left, coach Bob Sanders
(background right) and defen-
sive tackle George Crump
(background left) look on as
two Pirates prepare to collide.
In the above photo coach Jim
Holland goes out o his way to
show a player proper techni-
que. (Photos by Jon Jordon)
Bucs Take Two;
Patterson Superb
.
Lefthander Bob Patterson pitch-
ed a one-hit shutout Tuesday as East
Carolina swept a doubleheader
from Princeton, 10 4 and 1-0.
The Pirates got complete games
out of both Patterson (1-0) and Rick
Ramey (4-0) in improving their
record to 10-4.
A sixth-inning rally broke up a
pitcher's dual between ECU's Pat-
terson and Priceton's Steve Kordish
in the second game.
Buc second baseman Mike Sorrell
was first to reach base in the sixth,
via a single. A I odd Evans single
moved Sorrell to second. Mike
Sage's single, which struck the se-
cond base bag, scored Sorrell on
what was to turn out to be the key
hit of the contest,
Patterson, a junior, struck out ten
and walked none, giving up only a
single to Paul Hauser in the first.
Hausei was the second batter Pat-
terson faced in the game.
1 he Pirates did not commit an er-
ror tor the entire contest. Patterson
was one hit Mauser's � away
from a perfect game.
"Overall, we probably played our
best ganie in the second contest
said 1I coach Hal Baird follow-
ing the sweep. "They threw a fine
pitcher against us. H course, Bobby
had probably his best game ever
In the opener the Bucs found an
unexpected power supply in short-
stop Kelly Robinette, centerfielder
Robert Wells and freshman left-
fielder Todd Evans. Each clubbed
their first collegiate homers in the
game.
A Sage sacrifice to center, a John
Hallow single and a Todd Hendley
double sent runs across the plate in
the first to stake ECU to an early 3-0
lead.
In the fourth, Wells and Evans
stroked a pair of three-run homers.
Robinette closed out the Pirate scor-
ing with a solo homer to left in the
sixth.
The Tigers, 1-2, scored al! four of
their runs in the fifth. Paul
Steinhause and Scott Minnich sand-
wich RBI singles around Mark
Eockemeyer's two-run single.
Ramey, a senior righthander,
gave up four of his seven singles
allowed in the fifth en route to com-
pleting his second game of the
season.
Second-year Buc coach Baud was
most pleased following what might
have been his team's most im-
pressive day of the season.
"We were real fortunate to get
both of them he said. "They're a
real quality team. Their pitching
staff led the nation in earned run
average last year
Baird was also happy with the
power display in the opener. "We
were really thrilled that we were able
to get the ball out of the park a few
times
Patterson
Though the weather was ideal -
there was no wmd to �peai
Baird said the trio ol homers might
be attributed to a ball cl
"We're wondering it il the
new balls he noted "We brought
out a couple oi new halls today,
which are a little small try
out
The Bucs are bac � day
against airfield, a lea down-
ed them less than a week ago by a
single run. Gametime al Harring
Field is 3 p.m.
The team takes to the road I
first time this season Friday, travel-
ing north to take on William
Mary. The club is back home Satur-
day for another encounter with
Fair field. Gametime
chup is 1 p.m.
Tournament Winding Down To Finals
NCAA Fever
I he current NCAA basketball
tournament has caused quite a sin
around the nation. I he 1981 version
of the event certainly has turned the
country on more than any in recent
sears.
I psets of the nation's top three
ranked teams in their first outings ol
the tourney beg e craze.
I his area of the country is
especially intrigued by the event,
what with Atlantic Coast (
ference members North Carolina
and Virginia now in the elite Final
Four.
Adding to the local approval oi
the tourney is the fact that many ol
the big-name schools involved �
i.e. Oregan State, I1 A, DePaul
and Kentucky �- took early losses.
There is no love lost between the
ACT and outside teams. The ACC's
success and the others' lack oi it has
locals raving.
Picking a favorite from among
the Final Four ol UNC, Virginia,
LSL' and Indiana is very difficult.
This Final four may be the most
balanced and best in many a year.
I sually there is a Cinderella squad
Charles
Chandler

that is a part oi the elite group each
sear Not this time; each team is a
recognized "power" and each has a
imate shot at wearing the crown
following the March 30th title game.
Team Analysis
INDIANA � The Hoosiers won
their last five Big Ten games to
claim the championship of that con-
ference, edging out Iowa in the final
days oi the regular season.
All-America point guard Isaiah
Thomas ranks as the premier point
guard in the nation. Only a
sophomore. Thomas is touted by
pro scouts as being ready for the
NBA right now. He makes the
Hoosiers go.
The big tandem inside of Landon
lurner and Rav Tolbert has been
awesome for Bobby Knight's club
over the last month. Thomas' un-
canny ability to get them the ball in
all sorts of situations makes Indiana
seem even more powerful.
In order to get by ESL' in the first
semi-final game Saturday. Indiana
must control the tempo. Though
they are a good transition team, the
Hoosiers don't want to go all out
with the Tigers. Turner and Tolbert
must be effective inside, also.
against LSU's awesome front.
LSL' � The Tigers are something
special. A senior-oriented team,
LSU is both fast and strong. They
have cruised through! NCAA play
thus far. A real test lies ahead in In-
diana, though.
Keys for the Tigers? There are
many. Things begin with the inside
play of all-star Rudy Macklin & Co.
The LSU front ranks with the best.
Point guard Ethan Martin is the
perfect guy to get the big fellows the
ball. He does an excellent job oi
leading the Tiger fast break as well.
Reserve Willie Sims is probably
the best sixth man in the country.
He is most likely the third most
valuable Tiger behind Martin and
Macklin.
In order to get by Indiana the
Tigers need to get their transition
game clicking. Hoosiei coach Bob-
by Knight will probably pull some
stunts to prevent this from happen-
ing. He know- only too well how
awesome I SI can be when the
came becomes a run-and-gun affair.
VIRGINIA Ihe Cavaliers have
bounced back well from their drub-
bing in the t C tournament at the
hands ol Maryland. In their last
ng against Brigham Young.
Ralph Sampson was only awesome.
The (. avs are pitted against bitter
rival UNC in the semi-finals and
face the unenviable task ol trying to
down the Heels tor a third time this
season. Both earlier wins have been
comebacks after the far Heels lost
big leads
There are doubts that the
Cavaliers can make such a com-
eback again. Therefore, they need
to gel a quicker start this time.
For Virginia to do so the team
must take what is given them. Most
likely, guards Othel Wilson and Jeff
Jones will have outside shots
available. 1 hey will need to take
them when they become available.
Jefl 1 amp can be counted upon
to play his usual great game.
Virginia can be sure oi this and
Carolina may as well accept it.
Trying to force the ball to Samp-
son would probably be a big
mistake. The big guy will have some
openings. But trying to get the ball
to him too often would only be play-
ing into the hands oi the Carolina
defense.
Defensively, Sampson must be
ready. He can not allow UNC
front line to clear him out of re-
bounding situations. Sampson is the
key. more on the rebounding and
defensive areas than on the offen-
sive, though. If he is ready from the
opening tap Carolina could be in for
a long dav.
NORTH CAROLINA - Ah,
revenge. This has to be on the Heels'
minds after dropping two heart-
breakers to Virginia this year.
To avoid a 3-0 Virginia sweep of
the years' games the Heels need to
be ready for a fired-up Virginia
team. It is not likely that Carolina
will get the sort of early leads that
they managed in the two regular
season contests.
What the Heels must do is avoid
turnovers that allowed the Cavaliers
to fight back in the last contest. Cav
guards Othel Wilson and Bobby
Stokes literally "stole" that game
from Carolina's grasp.
The Heels showed during the
regular season games that they can
keep Samp � con-
trol as is possible. W hat
do is maintain posses the ball
in crucial situatioi
The game will be close and doing
the above in crucial si �� is
most important for th ; leels. It
Stokes and Wilson a d to
have their way agaii
game. Virginia is the winner.
An advantage foi the Heels is
their great inside play In
nearly everv game in tl
ment opposing frontline in
foul trouble. If this happ
Sampson, the Cavs an ble.
Count on a great one. B ams
are reads. This one shoul( lown
to the wire
Expect Anything
It is nearly impossible to pick win-
ners in the two semi-final contests.
Picking names out ol a hal is just as
safe as going with oddsmakers'
favorites. Both games are just
even.
Anything can happen in either
contest. So expect the most bizarre.
With the tour great teams that re-
main anything can happ
Lady Pirates
Sweep By Heels
"
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Second game home runs by Kathy
Riley and Cynthia Shepard powered
last Carolina's lady Pirates past
UNC-CH 6-1, thus giving the Bucs a
sweep in the afternoon
doubleheader at the ECU soft ball
field.
The Lady Bucs shut out the Tar
Heels 3-0 in the first game as they
pushed over two runs in the fourth
and added one more in the sixth.
"1 was glad to see us play well
against a team of that caliber said
head Coach Alita Dillon. "The state
champion will be chosen on the
basis of league play, so these games
were very important
In the first game, Shepard, Riley
and freshman Jo 1 anda Clayton
each had two hits in the win, as the
Pirates out hit UNC eight to four.
Freshman ace Jeanette Roth hurl-
ed the Pirate win and upped her
record to 8-1. UNC's Susan Spears
took the loss and saw her record
drop to 6-2.
In the nightcap. East Carolina
pushed over a run in the second and
added two more in the fourth before
Carolina got its only run of the day
in the fifth.
Shepard slammed her fifth homer
of the year to lead the Lady Buc's
attack. Shenard's shot tied the
school record that Riley set last
season. Riley also homered in the
game, her second of the year.
Clayton and UNC's Spears ripped
triples, and Pirate second baseman
Ginger Rothermel slammed a dou-
ble.
Sophomore Angie Humphrey
picked up her fifth win of the season
while Spears was handed her second
straight defeat.
The sweep gave the Lady Bucs
their 13th victory this season against
two defeats. UNC's record fell to
li-5 with the losses.
"Our defense was really good
Dillon noted. "The errors we made
(three on the afternoon) came at a
time when they really didn't hurt
us
The Pirate coach was pleased with
the performance of Clayton, whom
she said is "looking very good" and
Rilev, who is "hitting the ball real
well
She is also impressed with the pit-
ching of Roth and Humphrey.
"We're real pleased with that
aspect. That is one of the key points
on our team. If our young people
can do the job, then we shouldn't
lose to anybody in North Carolina.
"We're just getting better and
better, and our depth is also improv-
ing
This weekend the Pirates travel to
Itttffr Art
-
Publication Names
Both Riley, Wright
Honorable Mention
-
"BsgSiH
��
ECU Catcher Fran Hooks Smacks One
Cullowee for the Western Carolina there Dillon remarked.
Invitational that includes Catawba, Dillon said that teams will be
Mars Hill, UNC-Wilmington, divided into two groups, and the top
UNC-Charlotte. two teams will play each other in a
"There are some top state Divi- double-elimination tournament
sion II teams that are going to be Sunday.
Two East Carolina basket-
ball players have been award-
ed honors by Basketball
Meekly, one of the leading
cage publications in the na-
tion.
Kathy Riley, a senior
member of the sensational
Lady Pirate basketball squad,
received honorable mention
on the publication's women's
All-America team.
Riley led the Lady Bucs in
scoring this past season,
averaging over 19 points per
contest, and was a unanimous
all-state selection. She finished
second in state player-of-the-
year voting behind N.C.
State's Trudi Lacey.
Receiving honorable men-
tion for Basketball Weekly's
freshman All-America team
was ECU's Barry Wright.
The Portsmouth, Va. native
was the team's second leading
scorer as a frosh, averaging
10.3 points per game.
Perhaps the highlight of
Wright's season was his
fallaway jumper at the buzzer
that beat UNC-Charlotte. His
biggest point output came in
the team's next-to-last game
against Richmond when he
tallied 25 in a 67-65 Pirate win.
Kath Rik-N
Barry Wright
ci
We ca'

Bea
and
can
I
Award
HOC
MAR

NO-
ch. �
BASS
PL I
tirr-i
�MM
I
:
imj
pri
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SU '��
dec
ird F�


1






Is
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 26, 1981
Nieman Battles Out Of
Brother's Long Shadow
B BOB BENSON
Spe.ml 1 � I h Mlarolinmn
Ivor wonder il Billy Carter, before all the
political controversy arose, was always introduc-
ed as Jimmy Carter's brother, or if professional
pitcher hm Pern was always introduced as the
greal Gaylord Perry's brother The same situa-
tion once plagued one of East Carolina Universi-
ty's top swimmers, Doug Nieman.
In 1978 Done Nieman enrolled at East Carolina
I niversit) to pursue a degree in business educa-
tion and to compete among some top Division 1
swimming talent.
lwo years before Doug came to ECU, Doug's
older brother, led Nieman, was setting ar�,itv
swimming records at ECU. By the end of Ted
Nieman's freshman year he had set three varsity
records (2(H), 5(H). 1650 yard freestyle) and
qualified for the National Collegiate Athletic
Association's national championships in the
200-yard freestyle.
Mow does someone, especially a brother,
follow an aci like that? One would figure Doug
Nieman to be cast away in the wake of his
brothei.
'At firsl it sas always 'He everybody this is
led's brother but il really didn't bother me that
much because of all the people I met through
I cd said Nieman.
Outside ot the pool led might not have
bothered Doug's performance, but in the pool
led did create problems for younger brother
Done.
"Up until this year mv times were not thai
at admitted Nieman. "But now thai led is
gone, m times seem to be dropping
Doug now teels he can settle down and work
tor some good times. " 1 here is always that com-
petition between brothers admitted Nieman.
"Bui led has always been a more 'go out and get
em' type guy
According lo East C arolina head swim coach
Kav Scharf, "Doug is really bearing down and
setting some goals tor himself.
"Doug has made vasi improvements over the
years which proved his goal settings
Doug's biggest goal this year is to make the
N( national cutoff times. In order to make
these nines. Doug must shave a full nine seconds
ofi his 4(K)-yard individual medley time.
"I have confidence in myself and 1 think since
the team has been resting fot a week I'll have a
good chance to make the NCAA cutoff times
Nine seconds is not a lot ot time to drop, accor-
ding lo Nieman. especially in the longer swimm-
.v ents.
"A loi ot people don't understand about swim-
ming times he explained. "For a guv to drop a
second ot even a tenth ot a second in a sprinting
even! is nearly impossible, but to drop a second or
even a tenth ot a second in a sprinting event is
nearly impossible, but to drop nine seconds in the
400-yard individual medley is not that difficult
Now that Doug Nieman is starting to shine as a
collegiate swimmer, he looks back at the hard
work he has put into swimming. "1 have to give a
lot of the credit to both my high school coach and
my parents. They are the ones that really pushed
me when I needed it
IM Dept.
Rankings
The ECU Intramural Department would
like to take this opportunity to publish an
update of the current intramural point stan-
dings. The various leaders and their totals
are as follows:
MKVSRKSIDrNC KHALI
Aycock 947, Scott 1,143, Jones M7.5, Belk
579.8, Slav I instead 307.9.
FRATERNITY
Kappa Alpha 992, Tau Kappa Epsilon 32.9,
Pi Kappa Phi 797.2, Kappa Sigma 72S.1,
I ambda Chi Alpha 684.4, Phi Kappa Tau
667, Sigma Nu 570.5, Sigma Phi Epsilon
435.9. Sigma Tau Gamma 405.8, Alpha
Sigma Phi 293, Delta Sigma Phi 230.7, Kap-
pa Alpha Psi 275, Alpha Phi Alpha 118,
Beta Theta Pi 98, Omega Psi Phi 115.
CLUB IND(MEN)
Renegades 515, ROTC 467,5, Scuzzmen 370,
Six Killers 160. Barroom Sprinters 80, Tri-
Humps 74.3.
WOMEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS
White 915, Cotlen 98, Greene 495. Ivler
616, Fleming 446, Clement 151. Fletcher 83,
Jarvis 30. Garret I 203. Slav Umstead 120.
SORORITY
Tri Sigma 1.151.5, Alpha Xi Delia 861.8,
Alpha Delta Pi 352.5, Delta Zdta 287.6,
Alpha Phi 192.8, Chi Omega 110.2. Alpha
Omicron Pi 168.5. Kappa Delta 22.
CLUB IND(WOMEN)
Oootv Colters 90, Worm Burners 237,
ROTC 10. Bloxton House 10, IBAC 549.
Cubnets 82, Dribblers 160, Past fense 135.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
BANDS UNLIMITED BOOKING
AGENCY Is now booking bands
tor the spring summer and fall
We cater to every different
musical need and price range We
P'Q.ide bands that range from
Beach. Top 40. to easy listening
and country The duality of a band
can insure the success of your par
Let tht- Pros at BANDS
UNLIMITED ge' the right band
tor vour next party Call 757 3210
Award winner Love. YOUR
ROOMIE
MARSHA You re the song that
the trees smg when the wind
blows JEFF
SAMMY Happy 1st year anmver
sa'v' I love you' MELODY
MR C Hope I didn t come on too
strong on Tuesday but I'd like to
spend some time with you Maybe
after Spring Break'
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient,
cht-ap rates Call Amy 758 6994
BASS PLAYER. GUITAR
PLAYER WANTED For Part
time mone making Top 40 beach
band vocal ability required Call
757 3210 or 752 9288
WANTED TO BUY SPEAKERS.
Small pair of used Bose or Infinity
speakers Will pay resonable
price Call 757 3210
TYPING DONE Term papers
thesis, resumes, etc Call Jane
Pollock at 752 9719
SUMMER WORK Must be in
dependent and willing to work
hard For interview call 758 4513
SUMMER IS NEAR' Need to earn
some ii$ this summer? Average
student earned $3200 last summer
Must be able to travel to
southwest or west and must be
hard worker Interviews will be
held Wednsday and Thursday in
202 D Brewster at 1 00. 4 00, and
7 00 Please be on time!
mattlinE if you have had any
interactions with this company
call 752 8421 We need your infor
mation
WANTED Female contestants
for bikini contest For more mfor
mation contact Robert at 758 6899
or Donald at 752 1073 Contest is
March 30th
CONGRATULATIONS NAN!
Outstanding Senior OT Class of
1981 CELIA. CINDY, LAURA
KAREN ANITA
NEED ENTERTAINMENT? Con
tact Eastern Music Services and
Productions Agency Large vane
ty ot bands availiable Call (919)
758 5475
SECOND CHANCE We sell used
items for you Turn that couch,
chair, lamp, fan blender, toaster,
table, washer, bicycle or any used
item of value into CASH in your
pocket without all the headaches
of selling it yoursell We do that
for you Just bring your items to
the old A&P Building on 10th St
and we II do the rest It costs you
nothing till it is sold Free pick up
Call 757 1322
WHAT DOES A 52 AN HOUR
MAGICIAN DO' Perform
CHEAP TRICKS GPJ
HERE ISTOALLOFUSSFers:
Spring is here and it is time tor a
little springtime walk Jaws are
you married' I hope not Friday
is your lecture day Head for the
mountains! S F ers UNITE
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Snare drum. Pearl,
top of the line Extra deep E�
cond Call 757 3210
FOR SALE J C Penny 8 track
tape player Excellent condition
i75. Call 752 4379 and ask for
Keith
FOR SALE Wedding gown and
veil. Ivory Size 3 pettite Call
758 4238 after 6pm
FOR SALE Bike. Peugot, ex
cellent condition New tires,
tubes, brake pads 5180 Call
757 3154 or 758 7499, ask for Steve
FOR SALE Stereo Becker
speakeis new with 32 waft
Superscope power amp J200 Call
758 1773.
FOR SALE 1974 Dodge Colt
wagon. 4 cylinder. 4 speed, air con
dition 25 30 mpg 51.050 Call
754 3312
FOR SALE Pioneer turntable,
good condition Call Jim at
752 5325
MUST SELL THIS WEEK: 1973 12
by 55 ft. mobile home. Fully fur-
nished, 2 bedroom with double
beds, fully carpeted, storage
building, underpinned, big air con
dition. porch Set up in nice park.
Excellent condition Book value
S4500. sale for $4000 Call 756 9034
anytime
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large house, 12
rooms, 2 baths Ideal for student
group $500 plus utilities 752 5296
FOR RENT Spacious 12 room
house 2 blocks from campus
5500 plus deposit. Call 752 5294
FOR RENT Starting April 1st a
one bedroom, unfurnished apt I
block from campus on Meade St
$145 mo plus deposit. Call
758 1321
FEMALE WANTED To share 3
bedroom apt $82 00 plus one third
utilities. Non smoker preferred
Call Nancy at 7588398
ROOMATES WANTED 2 male or
female roommates wanted to
share spacious 3 bedroom house
during summer andi or fall.
Convenient location to Carolina
East Mall and Pitt Community
College $80 month during sum
mer. one third utilities and $40
month, one fourth utilities during
the fall Call 754 9011 after 5 pm
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 2 bedroom apt. in
Wilson Acres. 4 blocks from cam
pus. $145 mo. plus one half
utilities Call 752 9194 after 4.30
WANTED Female roommate for
Sixth St duplex. 3 blocks from
campus. Call 758 4599 after 5 pm.
ROOMS FOR RENT: $70 per
month includes kitchen privileges
Call 754 8457 after 4 30 pm
RIVER BLUFF APARTMENTS
has temporarily reduced its rent
Call now for details 758 4015.
i�AftOHTIONl UP TO
IMWIIKvf
PRUONANCY
� ' 76 00 "�� kcktr�tvf-
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B1 "MlBcrfpjtjClOll ' Iroo tivnttr iwnitwtl botwoon �
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PIRATES SPECIAL
Bouquet of Flowers and
a Bottle of Wine
$14.96
Call Flowers 'n' Frames
752-5330
Corner of 5th St. &
Hospital Emergency Entrance
FREE DELIVERY!
VISA MASTER CHARGE
PRE-MED?
Current undergraduate pre-
medical students may now com-
pete for several hundred Air
Force scholarships. These
scholarships are to be awarded
to students accepted into
medical schools as freshmen or
at the beginning of their
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$400 monthly allowance. In-
vestigate this financial alter-
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medical education.
Contact:
AIR FORCE
According to Nieman, his times were not that
fast when he was coming up the ranks. "I can
remember when my brother and some of the ECU
swim team members came to Clearwater, Florida
(Nieman's hometown) to workout one summer
he said. "I didn't do too badly, but those guys
were really fast
While Doug was still in the high school ranks,
he swam for the Amature Athletic Union-
affiliated Blue Dolphins out of Clearwater.
"My times were not that great when I swam
ith the Dolphins he claimed. "My times
stayed the same for about four years
Nieman did, in fact, capture a few titles while
with the Dolphins, but nothing too spectacular.
According to Scharf, Doug is East Carolina's
best all-around swimmer.
"I wish all the kids were like him explained
Scharf. "He makes coaching enjoyable. I know
Doug will get even better next year. It's just in his
blood to be a great swimmer
:�
� i
ii tt
ALLIGATORS
FOR SALE
i
i
LOWEST PRICES
IN AREA ON IZOD PRODUCTS"
FOR MEN, WOMEN & CHILDREN'
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LOCATED AT
GREENVILLE CC,
OPEN EVERY DAY
8:00 A.M. TILL
DARK
756-0504
by
:Trt
The Fleming Center has been here for you slnoe J974
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of aD ages at a reasonable oost
Saturday abortion boor
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Very early pragnaaoy
Bv�aing birth oostrol boors
The Fleming Center we're here when
men you;
anytbne.
( )ptonx'trtt
EYE CARE
CENTER
OF GREENVILLE
P.A.
Budget Eyewear 39.95 complete
Frames, lenses and tint in
plastic bifocals only 59.95
Contact Lenses 149 complete
Includes exam, fitting, heal disinfection and all
lollow tor I month.
SPRING SPECIAL
Ray-Ban Sunglasses
20 Off
10 u � bCU student & stall discount
on all materials excluding
specials and contacts.
Tipton Annex
228 Greenville Blvd.
7 56-9404
Dr. Pete Hollis
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
1st Annual "GREEK WEEK"
PIG PICKIN
Sunday, March 29
12 Noon to 6 PM
Tickets $3-00, includes
1 BBQ Dinner and A Pepsi
Sponsored
Home Builders Supplv
Lily Richardson. Galler Of Homes
Head Hunter
California Concepts
Three Steers
Apple Records
Floyd G. Robinson Jewelers
Pipeline
Bookbarn
Coin & Ring Man
Chapter X
Curry Copy
Kings Department Store
Burger King
Pinewood Craft & Furniture
Heilig Meyers
Nationwide Insurance
A (leaner World
Pirates Chest
Pizza Inn
Hollowells Drug
Kings & Queens
Wicks Lumber
Stereo Village
Ricks Guitar Shop
Zales
Singer Bob Thompson)
Wash House
Richard K. Worsley. CPA
Hair Pazazz
Hrtly. Ann. ljndtt Katrin shirlr l.arr
Szechuan Gardens
I 100 lul 10th SI
�kd��. I I.Jo �.U3
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SIZZLIN
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"The Family
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55
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2903 E. 10th St. �
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264 By-Pass �
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20
OFF
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3:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. ONLY
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20 O OFF ALLAAENU ITEMS;
AAON.thru FRI. from 3:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.
t





10
I HI I sI K( M ll W
1 ki H 2t, 1981
Track Team On Road To Success
Wi-Uni Spurt t dttcH
die Pirates will have, Frazier, Keith Clarke
then it should be a greal and Clint Harris cap-
one lured tn si place ith a
If last weekend's per rhat i says Coach time ol 1:25.53 to edge
mance in the Bill Carson, if the team out Indiana.
Domino's Pizza sun stays healthy. 1 he Pirates also
shme Kelavs i an m w Bucs' 4 :ik) came away with a third
dication ol the type ol metei rela leant ol place finish in the 4
outdooi track season i mi Cenhus. Calrton 100 and captured fourth
in the mile relay.
1 he compel it ion
opened the outdoor
track season tor the
Piraies.
"()ui freshman per
formed well at the
meet Carson said.
"As tor the mile relay.
I think we can run a
V06 The Bucs ran
3:11.53 in Honda.
1 his season the Bucs
will run only in the
spnnts and relays. 1 he
key tor success, says
Carson is whether the
team can stay health).
"Attei that lust meet,
we're no! er
healthy C arson said.
Tim Cephus came
awaj from Florida
bothered by a trick
knee, and teammate
Aliens Fall To
Loop Leaders
Northarolina Soccer
I eague
� . i c a n
Del S' ;cei lub
Divisio
5-0
Defei
tl b c '
Bal a cornet �
b Mike I aw
: l
Wi
from a pass
��
Bet!
� a
Del ayed N (
W( in ki'
1. da and
pla the Kick S
��
:
surtinulub
Club Sport
Review
BY TIM WILLIAMS
second place finish
Sunda against Allan
lie Christian College,
South
Ca i. Coastal
Car oli i d U N C-
ilmington, who w
the event.
n the Nat oi al
Si ling
p � - ted
event, Wes nan
and huck I ell ad
lifinals foi 1 c I .
� n the meet
,u i ei med ver poor
i hard to catch.
Men's Rugb)
��
Dul
m
r esii
-earn losl
number one K i
. ,i 14 4
( harlie Watkins pulled freshman speedsiei
a hamstrina Clint Harris, whom
Tennis Team Whips
Campbell, Then Falls
B IIM WILLIAMS
Muff W nlrr
I he ECU Men I en
ins team beat C ampbell
ruesda) by a 6-3
margin, but lost
Wednesday to a tough
Guilford team. CM.
Against the Camels,
Ihe Pirates took five oi
six singles matches to
lock up the contest eat
i Ihe team of Nor-
"We will get better Carson said has hopes Miller
( arson continued, outstanding lalei can tu
"We could break all was very consistent. 1:4
tour school relay Harris.arson said. rhe Piraii
records will also run the 200 ,outh aga this
In the 100, the Pirates along with teammate w � I to compete in
will be depending on I mieph ihe Florida ke,
� I I m eric Cai n said the
( arlton Bell will head competition should be
the 40 includ
( arlii m I raziei. C lai "Hopefully
and raig Raine aid,
" these kids are v
solidai son noted
Bill Miller head tei "
Pirate hop
mile. Millet ran a 48.9 (
leg in the mile relax
I lorida Ins first time li
be ��
man Bryant and I ed
Pepper also won their
doubles match.
Singles winner were
Keith Zengel, Barry
Parker. Mark Byrd,
Steve Petterson and
I epper.
1 he netters record
presently stands at 6 2.
I here is a home march
Friday at 2 p.m. againsi
Amhersi at the courts
behind Minces.
.
runnuit! in the eveni
@g)r
LETS FOOL
INFLATION!
fi
mar.cm. Ihe B team
came away with a 7-0
ictory to even out the
won loss record tor the
day. This Saturday
there is a home match
againsi the 1 t. Bragg
Rugby C lub at 2 p.m.
on the Mlied Health
Fields.
omen's Soccer
I he V omen's Soccer
t lub had their first
match Sunday against
c amp 1 ej.mne Soc
cei Club and lost by a
-l score. I )ale W esi
tallied the only goal
1 he girls play I N
ilmington this Satur-
day in W ilmington
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If you need money for fall clothet or football tickets, now It a
good time to sell your gold and silver valuables. And here's a
good way to get EXTRA CASH:
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
$
Almost everyone has a high school or college class ring
they don t wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
fair prices and good service
l�
WI PAY CASH ON TMI SPOT
FOI JIWItfY, VALUAILESARYTKI)fi
MAIKHH0K-14K-1SK.
S COLO S
� IINCS � NICKLACIS � WATCMIS � DIAMONDS
� CUSS IINCS � WEDDMC SARDS � DIHTAl
COLD � IIACIliTS � II00CMIS � 10CKITS
� (MAIMS � UCMTEIS � CUFF LINKS � tAlllNCS
PAYING OMTHIIROT
C AiH FOR ITIMt MARRIC
STIRLING SILVER
IICAtOLISS OF CONDITION
� COFFEE SERVICES � GOBLETS
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�FORKS � NECKLACES � BRACELETS
� FRANKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE
$
& RING
OF SAlES C�v INC
401 S. EVANS ST. �" �
OPEN 9 30-5 30 MON SAI
MONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
Watkins Products
To Buy or Sell
752-1201
r�
f . i j (� . H � 8 "
( hmlji � �� ��
� i i I 11
SAAD'SSHOE
RfcPAlK
I I (jtandV w
758-1228
Quality Repair
WASH HOUSE
(Acrossfrom Krispy Kreme)
KORE-O-MAT
(Across from University Car Wash)
Use one Washer � Get One
FREE
Limit one Free Wash Per Visit
Offer Expires April 1. 1981 - Valid w Coupon Only
!
THE SECOND CHANCE
f

nrRt
� r

BARGAIN HI NTFRSUONTMIS
OUR OPENING APRn 1ST'
Intersection of 5th & 10th St.
The Old A&P Bldg
Call 757 1322 For Information
t:
-V
11
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved
items and Prices
Effective Thurs . Mar 26
thru Sat . Mar 28. 1981
AD ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertnec items
s required to be readily svsilabts tor
see m each Kroge' Sav-on e�cept as specift-
aTiy noted m this ad if we do run out of an item we wil of-
er you your choice of a comparab;e item when available reflecting
The same savings or a ramcheck which will entitle you to purchase thr adver
sed item at the advertised price within 30 days
One Stop
Shopping on
I lfl, Your Way to
the Great
W4-)
OFFICIAL
COLD TO GO
Dudley �l�MSfSH Busch
Softball iStaWR Beer
$3
99
REAL
Kraft
Mayonnaise
$39
AMERICAN OR MUSTARD
6
12-Oz.
Cans
32-Oz.
Jar
ALL-MEAT SLICED
Oscar Mayer
Bologna
HecorasJl i apes chips & Snacks
rSKSjj 2 5 roisfelE� si 01
bsv i m. -M
(joob
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NONE SOLD
TO
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OPEN 8 AM TO 10 PM
tX MNTSr.�pAMv 600 Gwwv�e Blvd. - Greenv.ttf
I AM TO 9 PM
Phona 756-7031





Title
The East Carolinian, March 26, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 26, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.121
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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