The East Carolinian, March 24, 1981






She
(Carolinian
Vol. 55 N
o
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 192
10 Pages
Tuesday, March 24, 1�81
Greenville, North C arolina
Circulation 10,000
Lester Nail Officially
Wins SGA Election
By PAUL COLLINS
I he SGA Review Board decided
Monday to turn down Russell Over-
man's request foi a run-oft in the
presidential race, making 1 ester
Nail the official winner.
'The Review Board decided thai
the election committee earned out
the election in the man net described
in the rules said Attorney General
Clint Barnes
Ihe seven-member board decided
that although some rules were
technically violated, there was no)
sufficient reason, to overturn the
result.
Barnes indicated that the nature
of the charges would have ioccd
the board to overturn the entire elec-
tion rather than any single race.
In a related development, both
candidates tor treasurer. Kirk 1 ittle
and ngela Pepe, dropped their
charges concerning the election.
Overman, who lost to Nail by
slightly more than four percent o
the vote, cited si violations o elec-
tions rules.
mong other things. Overman
charged that several polls opened
late, that several dorms had to share
a single poll and that the poll at
fvler Dorm ran out of ballots.
According to Barnes, Nothing
was really the fault of the elections
committee1
Overman indicated that he ac-
cepted the decision and would not
appeal it. "Ihe Review Board's
decision was that the elections were
run fairly and thai there were no ir-
regularities. 1 am satisfied with then
decision. I will support 1 ester in his
endeavors next year
Barnes felt that overturning the
election would have set a dangerous
precedent. 1 don'i think the reasons
were sufficient.
See SGA, Page 3
"IN IDPOAN
The SGA I egislature voted Monday to appropriate $3,500 to the ECU Playhouse and S2.000 to a program en-
titled la Kor Juniors President Charlie Sherrod has indicated his opposition to both the bills.
Deposit
B PAU1 WHITE
staff ntrr
A select group ol East Carolina
geologv and oceanography students,
led by Or. Stanley Riggs. have
discovered large phosphate deposits
off the North Carolina coast.
The group has also achieved the
first successful off-shore drilling foi
phosphate in the state.
The largest phosphate deposits
were discovered in Onslow Bay ap-
proximated 40 to 60 miles o' C ape
Fear, but findings indicate the
possibility oi large deposits exten-
ding down the continental shell
�:n North Carolina to Florida.
Riggs and his team cruised twice
last year and plan to shove off again
this May. The cruises are sponsored
bv a grant from the National
Science Foundation tor a two-fold
purpose: to study how phosphate
deposits are formed and to test Dr.
Riggs's model for phosphate-
genesis.
The model is furnished with the
conditions necessary for the forma-
tion of phosphate, and il has proven
to be a tremendous asset in locating
deposits.
I hough there are many theories,
there is mi decisive evidence determ-
i: g how phosphate deposits are
formed, I'hete has been no easv wav
to locate deposits either. Phosphate
is a major ingredient in fertilizer,
and without it nothing can live or
iirow, according to Rigjjs
I he model is significant in thai il
may help to detect phosphate in
countries where it is soieiv needed.
Off-shore phosphate mining is cui
rentlv illegal in the United States.
Riggs savs. "It's a model to help
people find phosphate resources and
to help people help to feed
themselves
Riggs has done much to help
undei developed countries tap this
essential resource. He has worked
with the I nited Nations for govern
ments in frica, South merica,
(. entral America, and more recently
in Australia, Angola, and Mexico.
Previously, he worked tor Interna-
tional Minerals and Chemicals,
which is ihe largest phosphate
company in the world
Along with Dr. Orrin Pilkey oi
Duke, he discovered phosphate in
surface sands off the Carolina coast
in the mid '60's. I hey attempted
drillings bui were unsuccessful.
Riggs and his 'earn firsl set out
last May aboard Duke's 112 feel
�� R . (Research Vessel)
I astward rhc) made the second
voyage on the 170 fee! "R.V. ln-
deavor which was c mtracted
ugh ihe Universit ol Rhode
Jaycees Indicted For Role In 'Jamscam'
ASHFBORO (I PI) I. Harold
Herring, Maurice Wilson and
Johnny Lee Fletcher were indicted
Monday in connection with a SB1
investigation oi the "Jamscam"
scandal, the alleged misuse oi chan-
tv funds raised through jelly sales
for paving office expenses and na-
tional dues for non-existan;
members.
Arrest warrants were drawn Mon-
day for Fletcher and Herring.
New Pact
To A vert
Long Strike
WASHINGTON (L'Pl) The
United Mine Workers union and
soft coal industry reached a ten-
tative contract settlement today lo
avert a lengthy strike, but miners
still plan a walkout for three to five
days until the pact is ratified.
Miners in the coal fields adopted
a "wait and see" attitude about
terms of the accord, but most said
they were pleased a tentative settle-
ment had been reached.
Agreement on the three-year eon-
tract came at about 7a.m. EST after
five hours of early-morning
bargaining.
The current contract expires at
12:01 a.m. EST Friday and UMW
President Sam Church, Jr. said his
160,000 miners will adhere to the
"no contract, no work" tradition
until rank-and-file ratification. That
process is expected to take nine
days.
Bargaining occurred in the same
hotel suite where talks broke off last
week, dashing hopes of settling
without a strike for the first time
since 1964.
"We worked all night and we
worked very hard Church told
reporters in announcing the
breakthrough with B.R. "Bobby"
Brown, chief industry negotiator, at
his side.
He predicted ratification of the
settlement.
The union scheduled a meeting ol
its bargaining council for 10 a.m.
Tuesday to consider it. The bargain-
ing council must approve the terms
before they are submitted to the
rank and file.
W ilson already is tree on bond stem-
ming from the earlier charges
Wilson is charged in all eight in
diet ments of conspiring to misapply
and actuallv misapplying the
dollars, while four oi the indict-
ments name Herring and the re-
maining foui list Fletcher,
With Monday's indictments,
authorities now claim various
Jaycees officers misapplied a total
of $239,500.
Ihe new indictments come in ad
dition to the nine from Oct. 20 that
Wilson already faces. Besides
Wilson. Herring and Fletcher, the
state also has accused formei U.S.
Jaycees President Robert "Archie"
Riiston of Cray, Cia and former
Charlotte Javcees President Thomas
nilu-nv Alsopin the scandal.
Monday's four indictments
against Wilson state that he con-
spired with Herring between
September 1978 and April 1979 to
misapply $69,158. -n estimated
$42,379 of thai amount was taken
from the chant fund to pav
operating expenses, while the resl
was senl to national headquarters to
pay fees and dues for bogus Jaycees
chapters, the indictments said.
The foui indictments against
Wilson and Fletcher claim that, bet-
ween December 1977 and Mav 1978,
they diverted Sll,4"0 from the
Javcees operating fund to pay fin
us chapters and misused $5,100
from the charity to pay Jaycees
operating expenses.
1 lalf the indictments cited dates in
1977-78. when Fletcher was presi-
dent oi the North Carolina Jaycees
and Wilson was executive vice presi-
dent.
I he other alleged crimes occurred
m 1978-79, while Wilson was ex-
ecutive vice president of the state
Jaycees and Herring was president
and a director of the North Carolina
Jaycees Foundation Inc. Wilson
follow ' - -idem.
Herring was a strong candidate
foi national Jaycees president when
the scandal broke. He then
withdrew from the race for national
president.
According to the new indict-
ments, Wilson testified before the
Randolph grand jury Monday .
In indictments Oct. 20, Wilson
was accused on nine counts of
embezzling and misapplying
s,f6,44 while state laycees presi
dent. Other indictments returned
March 2 charged that Rustin and
Wilson used $25,500 in Jaycees
funds during an lN-dav span in 197S
to pay entertainment, travel and
lodging expenses oi about 60 people
on a trip from Charlotte to las
egas.
Island. They cruised five to sixiv
five miles off-shore in Onslow Bay,
between Morehead City and Wilm-
ington, in depths of 55-120 feet.
To test for phosphate samples,
the team uses a vibracoring ap-
paratus that protrudes 30 feel .
the ocean's floor. They also use a
seismic svstem, consisting of a
uniboom (a device that sends out
varying sound beams through layers
of sedimentary rock), a hydrophone
(an underwater microphone that
receives sound waves), and a seismic
recorder which records information
on a graph.
Riggs says ol the excursion. "It is
a neat opportunity tor EC I
students to have played a major role
in the research. They have received
invaluable job experience and are an
integral part of the success
The project has helped ECU gain
more federal research grants. A con-
sortium between the UNC school
system and Duke University is
presentlv creating an oceanographic
program, of which E.C U, will be a
majoi participant. A research vessel
with modern scientific equipment is
now being ucted.
Doug Ellington, an ECl
graduate studenl ol the Department
ol Geology participated on the first
two trips at sea He reflects on his
experiences:
"It's not easy. 1 here's a loi of
work to be done night and da. You
encounter bad weather and bad seas
with waves up to 10 feet out there.
You feel pretty good when you see
port coming up on the last day. But
on the whole it was fun and provid-
ed much useful experience
Other ECU students who have
participated on excursions are Pat
Mallete, Don Lewis. David Reict,
Doug Roberts. Bonnie Crowson.
Ernie Hoiworth, and Kelly Scar-
borough. A future cruise is set for
Mav oi this vear on the "R.V. Col-
umbus lslen which belongs to the
University o' Miami.
Legal Action Halted
By Angry Students
Photo Bv JON JORDAN
Student Union Coffeehouse Chairperson Cammie Harris is shown aboveaccepting c-ert.f.cates of menI for
her committee at this year's Installation Banquet held Friday night .n Mendenhall Student ���'���
Committee" honors went to the Films Committee; Major Attractions Chairperson Charles Sune won the
Best Chairperson Award, while former Student Union President Karen MeLawhorn took the annual t.ary
Ma sie Award. New president Ronald Maxwell and Student Center Direetor Rudolph Alexander look on.
B PAH COFFINS
Sf�� l-diii'r
A group of work studv students
attempting to take legal action
against the university has ended its
efforts.
"You can chalk it up to good old
ECU student apathy said Nancy
League, a senior who was coor-
dinating the group's efforts.
On March 1 the work study pro-
gram was terminated for the re-
mainder of the school veai at EC I
because funds for the program had
been exhausted.
League said the group met March
18 to decide on a course of action
but that only 10 students showed
up.
"We felt we needed the support
of at least 50 studeivs to continue
our efforts she added.
The group had planned to ask
work study students to contribute $5
toward retaining a lawyer, but only
$50 of the necessarv S2(X was rais-
ed.
"We're not considering anything
further at this time League said.
"We had to have that student sup-
port .
"We felt it was a clear breach of
contract League also commented
that she thought the administration
may have been counting on student
apathv.
If the group had raised the
necessary funds, it planned to retain
the services of Howard, Vincent and
Duffus, a Greenville law firm.
According to one of the firm's at-
tornies, Richard Poole, the students
could have pursued the case either
through a class-action suit or by way
of an injunction preventing the
university from stopping the pro-
gram.
"U looked like a classic case for a
class-action suit Poole said. "We
had an identifiable eroup against
which action was taken
Poole said that at least 25 people
would have been needed to initiate
such a case and that 100 would have
been a more ideal number.
"But we never entered the case
he continued. "We were not retain-
ed by anyone
He added. "In a cursory glance
over the contract it seemed that
somed contract rights may have
been breached
Work study students are given a
letter of introduction to their pro-
spective employei ; in addition to
their financial aid packages. Accor-
ding to financial Aid Director
Robert Boudreaux this does not
constitute a contract.
"We enter into a good faith
agreement with students he said.
Boudreaux said oi the group and
its intended law suit. "I'm dissa-
pomted that they felt they had to
take that route instead of talking to
me
He continued bv saying that his
office had placed 260 of 651 work
stud) students m new jobs through
the Self Help program. He said that
loans were available to other work
studv students.
Financial aid packages for the up-
coming year can be arranged so that
students will not be penalized at all
bv accepting such loans, Boudreaux
said.
He added that between 20 and 25
students were seeking loans each
dav.
The
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds8
Features5
Letters4
Sports7
'
. -
� � .� -
�� - -





1 HI EAS1 I KOI INIAN 1 FU"H 24, 1WI
Announcements
LECTURE
Jane Maier a well known
storyteller the teal
spedKi'i rt' MM '
1980 81 Librrtr , S4 en � � . I
I Ms WaU' Will di!
. ��� g li in,
qucs ,incl demonslt1
storytelling abilities T'u p i �
will beg n .1' 6 30 p m on
Weonesdasy March 25 in room
ot Joyner Libra I �
foiiowtM t s so ial '� ' � V
tontluitecl story hot
the p .hi it's in Green Bat
Wisconsin prior to moving to
North Carolina She has pri
programs on storytelling loi "
Ch'io Developn ent and I im ,
Relations Department ana M
Libra' v S ience Deparl
E ast Carolina Un,i. � �
lo at
lend this proa' in �
� . � on � � � � �
nal Be obi
�� � � Dei
ol Library
SOCI ANTH
� " C lot) ana Her t
im about
Buddhism on Wednesday v h �
� a ! held at i 30
' � �
� � � I . �
ents w t� � ' ied I cm
rial � Anna at
M3o. 1 at
don t miss out1
ECGC
ACADEMICS
is sui viving b axtemii all� ai
, ng old v '� i
� � i in'j. students? rhi

two mi
VSanaut
entitH
(1 How tO
PSI CHI
pen to a
SALES
Gav Com
iu ' Mai ' . J .)t 5 00
r he E CG it 953 E
at the botton



AMA
R
I iptei �
MADRID
00m - '
thousand Pesel is ea
mat � � � �
Canaclisr soph
semes an gi aO �'� '
the Facoitao de I ' -
ot the Univers
the Acack
�' Student �
shouldoni.i. � �' �
�� iltao I
Students
should �� I addi
10 enveU �;
before AA.i.
sh;p Committ.
Abroad P. O. Box 9. Ni
NY 125,61
SOCIAL WORKER
v
WORKSHOP
� � N
sessii I' i lirsl sessioi i
�� '�� Marcl
3 oo 4 oo p m in Root -
Wrirjht Annex 1 n
wm be conducted wednesi � �
Marcri 25 trom 3 00 4 00 p r-
30S Wr iqrt Am . .
Both sessions are availabk I
� . � M ti barge mti � - ti
. � . �� � ersity
Courrg . enti r57 6661 ' i
lor mat
WZMB
in, Media Board s pri
� . � . Ti itionsl
v . � .� � , ; v :� Forturthet
plea ill 757 6501
CONSUMER ED
Ways to slash grocery I
'ttrr s I Ot la �' '
.ii consu nei � �
ist i �� na Univei
' . ' � . April
:
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p n � ly. Api
loon
. �
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it
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lacl
-
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ii
Education I
Si ty
CHEERLEADING
. .�
.
I 8:01 i ��
1981 �
lerest � � ' ould
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� it 5 00 I
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MED SCHOOL
�. � I gaining a

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by thi
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UNION

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CHEMISTRY
hoi- �
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BKA
Beta Kappa �
&, finai ������
neet . ' � �
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'
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'
IS Ot I
Division ol
TWIG
'�
l
enhall SI
FINANCING SCHOOLS
, ague ot Women voters wn ��
a Forum on Education Finam
tor the Future on Tuesda. Mar
24 r - it tl
.
Cna

i
ATTIC ATTIC
Youth's No. 6
Rock Nightclub
TUESDAY
JESSE BOLT
(MAKE UP DATE)
WEDNESDAY
LUKY OWENS
& REVOLVER
THURSDAY
CHRYSALIS RECORDING ARTISTS
THE STATES
COMING - FRI.&SAT
CHOICE
SUNDAY
STEVE BASSETT'S
VA. BREEZE
(M.D.A. BENEFIT)
RI6GAN
SHOE
REPAIR
uoftulo i Greenville
Across From
Bount Harvey
Parking In
Front a. Bach
Of Shr.o
PHONF
758 0?04
III Vv 4!h S-
r N C
Tie H(g)Sfew
0�� 14 MOW�t
harQfl t'oirjiiBs Beef Wine
n Master Charge Visa o
Oedit atds
� � �
t IN
I � M
Mr ����. II II
llitkl�rw�. ��.
I
1 ti
I M
f -t ���
&
� �v �� Lt-TW v
ABOMTIONI tTO
'ttiiwiiK or
PHtONANCY
t76 00"aMliKto�lv�"
rrtOn�r.y Mf Wr t0r
PJH tattroi. �fXJ pfOtlfT prtfnar ir counthrg For rvrft�r �1for�r�IIO till �? 0SIJ '
BB� -I fi1 toll lr�t nvmr�r
��.MlLaj?�l ISMI NtwHn � g AM s P M wMkdayt
MtnlHl Ortunlli'loo I
tl' WniMtrfM tt
Art and Camera
526 S. Cotanche St.
X�i�- Town
N.CS No.1 BEACH CLUB
Downtown Greenville
Presents �
Lucky Ladies' Night
Every Tues. & Thurs.
Ladies7 Lockout:
8-10p.m.
with all the usual Chapter
X specials for Ladies.
Doors Open � 10 p.m.
for General Public
�?a?.
�$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$�

KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
$3.23
$4.81
f
12
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
No Forp-g,
Film
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
$5.53
&
No Fceigr
F,im
24
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
at.
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$7.97
FILM DEVELOPING
$1.92
T:Ti
RTION
Tlie Fleming Center has been here for you slnoe 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of an ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hours
Vary aauly pregnancy teata
9vaiiing birth oontroi hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
Oall 781-6630 to Faiaigh anytabna.
m:i
FLEMING CENTER
20 EXPOSURE
KODACMROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
36 fXPOSURE
KODACMROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
$3.15
LOW. LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
$2.11
KODACMROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
SUPER t AND iTANUAA MOVIES
LIMITED OFFER
Of FSK IXPIRf S .
-TTSxTTYTfJ
I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available fw bale at
I below the advertised price in each A&P Store, except as specifically noie
in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT, MARCH 28 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL
DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Highway 264 By Pass Greenville Squar
Shopping Center Greenville, N.C.
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BONE-IN
(Steak it, I48)
Chuck Roast
lb
EXTRA LEAN SPECIAL TRIM COUNTRY FARM PORK
Pork Chops
(
Assorted Pkg
8 lbs. oi more
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTFRN GRAIN f F D Bf F f
BONE IN
New York Strips
Whole
or
Half
lb.
A&P QUA! ITY HF AVY Wl
Ground Chuck
( 3rnbore0' 179
lb
US DA INSPECTED
Young Turkeys
5-9 lb
V avg
lb
79
c
HOLLY FARMS
Franks or Bologna
89c
Pepsi-Cola
Mountain Dew
$129
8� 16 Oz
Bottle
Carton
Plus
Bottle
Deposit
2 Lowfat
Milk
OR ANN f'AGF
1
83
ASUPt HR HI ! N!) RICH IN iN Mil
Eight O'clock
89
Bean
Coffee
1-lb
(3 lb. bag 5.59) bag
ANN PAGE
Potato Chips
Regular 8 oz
or twin
Rippled pack
79
c
ANN PAGE
Dessert
Topping
Save 38' on 2
Handi Whip
2. f�
tmm ctns i
FROZEN
Jeno's Pizza
� Hamburger (12 oz.)
�Pepperoni(11.75oz.)
�Sausage(12 oz.)
�Combination (12.5 oz )
1
09
ANN PAGE
Vegetable Soup
410.75 oz yy
cans M&W
BUTTERMILK
Pillsbury Biscuits
C
Save
on 4
4702 mMm�
cans
ANN PAGE
Facial Tissue
� White
Yellow
Z: 99
c
SAVE 10'
Charmin Tissue
White
Yellow
Blue
Hr Pckg ww
70 COUPON
A1
Kraft
Mayonnaise
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT MARCH 28 AT A8. P IN GR E E N VI LL E NC
quari
jar
99
ci
I
674 I
U.S. 1 ALL PURPOSE EASTERN
LfARfV
usset Potatoes
IM&lilll
SUNKIST GROWN SWEET JUICY
Navel Oranges
f !Large88Size 15�
VSunkist size l0
RED � RIPE � READY TO EAT
Strawberries
quart
box
1
49
J
t





I Ml I AS I XkOl INIAN
MAK H 24, 1981
I
8
8
3
n
16
iC
1
0
I
I
674
9
Lobbyist Seeks Perfection
W V S H I N (i T O N
tl Hi In ihe spring ot
Paula I
spoi led
thai bore ih
"pet leei
special lobbying el Parkinson is a troubled
furls person and I resent and
' I here lias been a loi regrei thai I his woman
:klaee ol talk said a eon is using m name in an
egend gressional aide, effort lo gain publicity
"I-vcryouc is waiting toi a possible book
"I'm noi perl'eet anxiously Spokesmen foi
yet blond, Ihe gossip and Playboy and Penthouse
beautiful woman told tremors began this magazines say Mis.
i month when n was Parkinson offered hct
disclosed Mis. Parkin stories of Washington
son, 3(), shared a vaca intrigue, bin ihe rc-
lion house in Honda jected them.
lasi yeat with eight n insidci says
men, including Reps Playbo) questioned het
Ihomas Fvans, R-Del credibility and was
Rep. Ihomas mined ofj b uilk thai
K Isback, K 111 and she secretly videotaped
DanQuayle, R-Ind some encounters.
Railsback ana Mrs. Parkinson, who
Qnayle, now a senator, separated from her hus
iC vie n ied a n band in January, has
t l with het. been unavailable foi
"I dceph regrei ha comment, i-riends said
an association she has been staying
will her I sans said with hei parents in
a statement, "Ii is Dallas, but has made
n me thai Mis. frequeni nips back to
1 soon hop. I i
having s i I i c o n e i m
plants
ce ihen, a more
robusi Paula married
yis Hank Parkin
son,
r e g i
foi a Playboy
W as
won
W ashingion.
Hank Parkiitson, V).
married Paula Clifton
on March ll, I9R0. Ii
was his seeoud mar
i iage and hei i hird. I he
daughtct ol an An
I iu ee officer, she
earlict mat i ied het high
school sweetheart and
latCl a Kansas doeioi
Parkinson, who had
been a lobbyist foi
mote I ban M) years, got
out ol the business
because ol publicity
about his estranged
wi fe.
' � I don' i know
w hei hei ihe stories l e
heard about hei are
iiue, bin the mountain
ol nimois was loo
much foi me to take
said Parkinson. "I had
no idea. I guess Ihe hus-
band is always ihe lasi
Id find out
Parkinson said she
assisted him as a l�b
bus; by "primarily be
iiif ,i hostess ai ihe
nearly weekly parties
ue held
Onapitol Hill, the
Justice Department has
begun examining
w hei hei voles have
been swapped foi se
ual oi othet favors.
I he aci ion was pi o
mpted by hei week in
I lot ida w ii h I ai is and
i lie two olhei eon
pressmen. All voied
against legislation she
?pposed .i bill designed
�' increase govern
i
meut's role in insuring
lai mei 's ei ops.
b passed on a vote ol
235 150 and ihe three
congressmen said Iheii
voles were noi promp
led In Mis. Pai kinson.
Blacks Protest Vigilante Arrests
11 w i
weapon.
mi 50 residents of
I et iw � �od 1 lomcs
� project went io
a

Mi
h
disappearances i ha i
began 19 months ago.
I don'I think
they ie going io do
�lice headquarters anything but cause pro-
phi io protest blems in ihe communi-
ty said I orctia I lai
us, a moi her at
lech wood Homes.
" 1 he 're jusi draw ine
chai ed "1 ree
.i� �" and siowded
he lobb ol the
rested by police seconds at ihis point. While
afici walking nui ol a ihey are here arresting
community center to us, ihe child killei is
begin iheii patrols I h roaming the city
day. Ihey were charged "We told ihem whai
with carrying a firearm would happen before
ai a public gathering ihey started said
Deputy Police C hie
h
tijin
bin dispersed attention.

-
1
be le
rhret
I � It
Jerome Gibbs ' sere u
appeal i court ' � la

1

rned io the
,r :he urging ol
some members ol the
up.
Marion Green, one
he organizers ol the
rol, said Sunday the
nip, w Inch carries
baseball bats, had
� �wn from 25 to 44
�pie since il began
1 iday " e'le gaming
support she added
Bui some residents ol
I c w i od 1 lomes com-
plained ihe tenants
tocialion, which is
" 1 hey don't need
I hose bats said
anothei mother, Cyn-
thia I lowell. " 1 hey 're
iu si gonna gel
somebody hurt.
1 hey 're gonna gel a
child killed
Jenga, an organizer,
and I ereuson were ai -
and latei ieleased.
Ciibbs was arresied 1 Idrin Bell, adding thai
Saturday, moments lenga and Kadalie di
afiei beginning Ins noi live in rechwood
patrol. He was weaimg Homes. "We can't
a pistol strapped in a allow thai type til ihing
holster. to happen in the com
"We'll i irry one gun mutiny.
a day Jenga said. "It "I think ihe police
ihey arrest people every are perfectly capable ol
day, then we'll all go io patrolling the
jail Ihe police have neighborhood and gi
pui themselves on the ing it ihe kind of securi
side ol the child killei t it needs
Paving Execs Convicted
RALEIGH (I PI)
sponsoring ihe patrol, six paving-company
Joes noi represent the executives will go to
feelings of mosi federal prison for their
residents at the conn roles in rigging bids on
plex rhey wtid they state highway projects.
d publun v sur- federal Judge
patrols Franklin T. Dupree Jr
di aw
rhe executives plead- that each company
ed guilty March 9 sub would receive its share
mining rigged bids u oi state highway eon-
win highway contracts tracts and caused the
costs of those contracts
to be artificially in-
from the state.
The bid-rigging oc-
cured when paving
company officials met
Hated.
le killer to sentenced the men the day before bids
' Monday alter review- were to be let on paving
No child from ,ng plea-bargaining ar- projects and decided
iwood Homes has rangements between which company would
.olved in thestr- them and U.S. attorney make the lowest bid.
slayings and .lames Blackburn. Ihe scheme insured
SGA Election Results Upheld
Continued From Page 1 treasurer's race had charges, I'm glad
been dropped alter he they've been cleared
rial and Dean Jim Mallory up Pepe said. "I'm
Rip & Sew
Alterations
2d it. l experience
Reasonable Rates
M4 Dickinson Avi-
757 1136
-
Ol
Bat ties
Leg ,
changetions
rule
Ba; mtid the
es in the
needs to had a discussion with looking forward to a
both candidates. clean race
"I talked to them Little indicated that
tid both (Pepe and Little), he too was glad to see
�A and they both decided the charges dropped.
to drop their charges As things stand now.
Both candidates a run-off election will
declined to reveal their be held on April 1 for
charges publicly. the offices of treasurer
"In reference to the and vice president.

A�W�Y MAW STOttC
AjctMCkt � ��. �omr

0 t r' Ore ri.gm Snorkel
J J�ki' tCO1s ��
� Vor Cnmtw? �oot� i�l�s
l��S f ��jiS're�l

Avoiloble
Ml Doy
Every Doy
Open
1 1 o m 9pm
Son thru Thurs
Itom 10pm
Fn &Sot
BENNIES
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Alltnmtnt
All Typ� of
Auto Repair
Foreign 1 Oomwtic
Reasonable Rafts
StOOE. lOfhftrttt
Phont 7 SI 4124
r
i
COUPON
�Tk� Hum �Sim
OeiM IHOu�l
Wholesale & Retail
Ice Sales i
SPECIAL reg OQC I
MB BAG 89'
with this coupon
Eiplret April 1. 1981
K.g i le. 0�H��'�
! 3$ S �&
10tr i E �mi St
COUPON
I
I
I

I
I
i
I
I
Technical
Electronics
And
Maintenance,
Inc.
756-1387
Audio, Video,
� 2Wa)
( ommunieations
Maintenance
(Preventive Io
Overhaul)
Services dim-led t� a 1st
( las Klicensed techni-
cian. Mudent of Applied
Passim at lasl arolina
I niversit).
( onvenietelv Located
1 j Block Off Campus
Piek-l p and Delivery
Available
90 Day Warranty
Period
The Bandit, Frog and Justice are at it again
in the all new adventures of
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
so u�visal cmr stvxjso c u. wohts matmiD

e

W
c
6
aH
a
4
ecv

j
march 3
8-00
ijendrix theater
mendenhaW student center
e.c.u. campus

MWcstcrn 5ccrr,
STSAKH0VSE
3005 E
10th Street
Greenville, N C
(Brhnd Mos'ingi ForrJ,
Tcjke Out Service
Avoiloble
7588550
fantasy is a yroup oi hearing and
hearing impaired students who interpret
popular music in sign language
DELICIOUS 30 ITEM SALAD BAR
Monday
Beef Tips
$2.49
Tuesday
8 oz. Chop Sirloin
$1.89
Thursday
8 oz. Chop Sirloin
$1.89
Friday
Family Night
Petite Sirloin Filet
Salad and Drink
$4.75
Wednesday
Beef Tips
$2.49
students $S0, public $2-00
tickets available at mendenhall
and at brewster buildinq a-iH
Saturday
8 oz. Rib Eye
$4.69
sponsored bytfa ecu. "rrQuace club

t





ffitie iEaat (Earnitnian
Serving (he East Carolina campus community since 1925
CHRIS LiCHOK,
JlMM Dul'kl I . w
Pl I 1 INC M . Ihm
DAV1 Sl I KIN. Bus ,
Am i 1 m si i k.
PAl 1 C()l I INS. Vr� J
CHARI ESCHAND1 I K sport Ld,u�
David Nokkis. ����.�
March 24. I4SI
Opinion
Page 4
Hunger Walk
ECU Support Essential To Success
In Greenville, North Carolina,
surrounded by rich farmland, the
problems of starvation seem far
away and a little unreal. However,
famine is a way of life, not only for
millions of people in this country,
but even more so for many nations
around the world.
In view of the seriousness of the
problems of hunger and its pro-
found impact on many
underdeveloped countries, Dr.
Thomas B. Brewer, Chancellor of
East Carolina University, is en-
couraging the entire campus com-
munity to participate in the tenth
annual "Walk for Humanity
which is scheduled to be held on
April 11, 1981. The program is
sponsored by the East Carolina
University Hunger Coalition, and
the campus ministry.
According to Sister Happy of the
campus ministry, "We're hoping to
have three to five hundred people
walk About three hundred in-
dividuals have already signed up to
participate in the 20 kilometer, or
121: mile program. Sister Happy
said that the participants will be
sponsored by the kilometer.
The funds raised by the walk will
be divided in half, with one part be-
ing allocated to the campus
minister's emergency fund, or Kit-
chen Fund, which goes to help Pitt
County residents who suffer from
some sort of emergency, such as a
house fire, and also supports the
underprivileged. The second por-
tion of the funds will be contributed
to an international cause, Oxfam-
America. This organization was the
first to get into Cambodia and help
its people be self-sufficient after
their devastating war. This year, the
allocation will go to the Horn of
Africa project.
In a news release for Monday,
March 16, Dr. Brewer said, "I urge
all members of East Carolina
University, and the citizens of
Greenville and Pitt County, to sup-
port the 'Walk for Humanity' as an
expression of the social con-
sciousness for which this communi-
ty is so well known Mrs. Brewer,
the Chancellor's wife, is honorary
co-chairperson for the walk, and
will be participating. Maybe even
Dr. Brewer will put on his tennis
shoes and participate in what he
calls "this outstanding
humanitarian program
Everyone interested in
ticipating in the "Walk
Humanity" can obtain all
necessary information, and
sign-up, at the ECU campus
ministry, or telephone at 752-4216.
We are fortunate to live in a
country where the problems of
hunger do not directly touch the
lives of the majority of individuals.
The "Walk for Humanity" is an
opportunity for us to help millions
of people throughout the world to
whom life is a devastating reality of
starvation and famine. Perhaps we
can help in a modest yet significant
way those in desparate staits move
towards a positive hope for a better
future. Our support can make a dif-
ference.
par-
for
the
also
Presidential Election Final
Well, congratulations are finally
in order to our new Student Govern-
ment Association President: Lester
Nail. But at the same time, con-
gratulations should also be extended
to the other presidential aspirants;
Russell Overman, Ben Singleton
and Guy Dixon.
The final decision came Monday
from the seven-member Review
Board of the SGA. The Review
Board usually hears matters of ap-
peal from the University Honor
Board, but in matters of elections
has original jurisdiction of appeals.
The Review Board had investigated
charges by Overman that certain
polls had not opened at the
designated time and that another
poll had run out of ballots before
closing.
Had the Board decided in favor
of Overman, all election results
would have been void and a new
election mandated.
In what many veteran University
administration staff members call
� �
"one of the cleanest campaigns in
the history of SGA at East
Carolina Nail nudged Overman
by only 4.2 percent of the final tally.
Certainly both of these can-
didates have shown an ability to ral-
ly support from their fellow
students here at ECU, and the SGA
would not have suffered with either
of these young men at the helm.
As it now stands, there will be a
runoff election Tuesday April 1 for
the offices of vice-president and
treasurer. Marvin Braxton and
Peggy Davison will again vie for the
vice-president slot, while Angela
Pepe and incumbant Kirk Little run
for treasurer.
Regardless of the outcome of the
April 1 elections, our SGA will have
a period of struggle as it always does
when the reigns of command are ex-
changed. We can only hope that
coming year will be one of improve-
ment and unification for this stu-
dent body.
U.S.fl.
I
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o
:
O
m
IE
,vA
Y-

v
e
s
3
3 UORLD
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Campus Forum
ECU Student Faces Harassment
I am a concerned E.C.U. student and
1 felt it an obligation to others to share a
recent experience I was involved in. This
concerns an encounter with a campus
policeman, Stan Kittrell, on the night of
February 27th, at approximate!) 11:20
p.m.
I was carrying two friends home to
Jones Dorm. Upon leaving 1 ran the slop
sign in front of Aycock Dorm and was
stopped at the bottom of College Hill
Drive, by Officer Kittrell. 1 pulled in the
day parking lot, my first mistake. This is
where I feel the injustice came into play.
1 was not upset at the fact of being pull-
ed for a stop sign violation, but 1 am
very upset for the inhumane and brutal
way I was treated.
After looking in my car, he spotted a
beer and asked me to take ihe sobriety
test, but I refused. Officer Kittrell
stated, "You're under arrest, get out o
the car
After assuming the position with my
hands on the car, he came up behind me
and stated, "I said put your hands on
the car" at which time he shoved me on
the car further. I looked at him with my
hands still in place and he said again. "I
said put your hands on the car while
he shoved me again.
1 couldn't believe it. He didn't frisk
me, but put the handcuffs on me.
Simultaneously, as he secured the hand-
cuffs Officer kittrell stated, "Now I'm
going to kick your ass
At that moment 1 turned around and
thankfully there was another campus of-
ficer approaching the scene. 1 was so
petrified that this cop was going beat me
up that 1 told the other officer the situa-
tion and asked him to ride downtown
with us.
He refused saying, "Officer Kittrell is
a good old guy, he wouldn't do anything
like that, etc Officer Kittrell said he
had arrested me for D.U.I but when 1
blew the breathalyzer 1 blew under .10. I
was then charged with careless and
wreckless after consuming.
The case appeared on March 9th and
Officer Kittrell couldn't provide suffi-
cient evidence to find me guilty of the
charge. I was found quilty of exceeding
a safe speed. This is only a two point
violation against my license, instead ol
the three point violation I was really
guilty of, running the stop sign.
Justice was finally done after a cost
of:
1. 1 awyer � $250.00, 2. Court Costs
� 52.00, 3. Bond � 30.(X). 4. Estimated
rise in insurance over three years �
150.00. Total Cost � $482.00.
I feel that I went through a whole
ordeal that was very unnecessary. It cost
me money, a degree o my dignity. and
my lime. 1 feel the campus police should
be there to protect and serve us. not to
harass us.
BARRY P. KASS
Junior, Psychology
Correspondence Requested
It is my great pleasure to write to you.
1 expect you will be pleased to accept my
appeal regarding overseas pen pals for
our students.
1 am a student of English in a noted
university in Seoul, Korea, My English
class has about 57 students o both
sexes. I am eagerly seeking foreign
students who would care to correspond
with our students. There are also main
Korean students who want to exchange
letters and friendship with American
peoples, and they frequently request me
to let them have foreign pen friends
since 1 have been to U.S.A. in the year
o 1979.
Throughout my career, I've noticed
this would help not only their English
and emotional life, but also expand their
knowledge of foreign lands. This would
also promote world-wide friendship and
mutual relationship as well as serving as
a true foundation of world peace.
1 feel it is necessary to publish this
simple wish among the students o the
world. Therefore, 1 courteously request
you to run this letter in a corner of your
valuable paper.
The only information 1 need o a stu-
dent is his or her name, address, sex.
age, hobbies and picture if possible. 1 ex-
pect to receive many letters from your
readers wishing to correspond with out
students.
1 will appreciate it very much if you let
me have the chance to do this for my
students. This would be a warm and
thoughtful favor. Awaiting good news, 1
remain.
Mr. Park Jeong 11
C.P.O. Box 3315.
Seoul 100. Korea
Forum Rules
The Last Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner library.
lor purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorts). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
da vs.
L
Women's Lib Group Pickets
By Sen. JESSE HELMS
WASHINGTON � Last week 1 men-
tioned my visit in early February with
former U.S. Ambassador Earl Smith, who
now lives in Florida. I flew to Palm Beach
and back to Washington on a day when the
Senate was not in session. Earl was our
Ambassador to Cuba at the time Fidel
Castro seized power in Havana.
The purpose of the Florida trip was to
deliver a foreign policy address before a
prestigious group headed by Ambassador
Smith. Several hundred people were pre-
sent, and it was a very interesting and plea-
sant experience for me.
I didn't realize, until the meeting was
over, that I was being picketed outside by
one of the so-called "women's liberation"
groups. There were seven or eight women
carrying placards as 1 emerged, and some
began to shout epithets.
AMUSING � Frankly, I found it amus-
ing. I was fascinated by one enormous
woman who rushed forward to declare that
I was "un-American, anti-women" and
two or three other things I can't remember.
1 smiled at her and mentioned that 1 have a
wife, two daughters and two grand-
daughters, all of whom 1 love dearly �
and that I didn't think any of them would
agree with her.
It turned out, of course, that the pickets
all strongly favor abortion on demand.
They are among those who insist that the
taxpayers should be forced to finance the
killing of what they call "unwanted
babies I told the women with the
placards that I didn't agree with them, and
moved a few steps toward the car that was
waiting to return me to the airport.
It was then that the woman who had
earlier been so loud in her criticism of me
stepped forward again. "Why she
demanded, "are you so obsessed with con-
trolling my body?"
My answer to her was: "My dear lady,
there may be someone in this broad land
who is less interested with your body than I
� but I have never met him Then I pro-
ceeded to the airport, and flew back to
Washington.
DISTORTIONS � Incidentally, some
of the pro-abortion propagandists are
engaging in outright distortions in their op-
position to legislation which I have in-
troduced relating to abortions. I don't
mind criticism � 1 am accustomed to it.
And certainly I don't object to disagree-
ment. That's a part of the democratic pro-
cess.
But some of the propaganda I've seen is
astonishing. For example, I noted a recent
column written by a young woman who
stated flatly that I would prohibit an abor-
tion even when the mother's life is at stake.
That is simply not true. I have repeatedly
stated that the doctrine of self defense
becomes applicable in such rare cases �
and that no one has ever suggested that a
mother's life should not be saved.
The same woman columnist stated as a
fact that I would forbid the saving of a
mother's life even if she had been injured
in an automobile accident and surgery was
mandatory for her survival. That, of
course, is an utter falsehood.
The propagandists are also falsely claim-
ing that my legislation would prohibit birth
control devices. My legislation has nothing
to do with any prohibition against con-
traceptives. It would simply restore the
legal situation that exis'ed before the
Supreme Court's unfortunate abortion
decision of 1973.
VIEW � My view is that innocent
human life is sacred, and that one of the
Ten Commandments clearly spells out the
awesome implications of destroying inno-
cent human life.
If we should ever reach the point that it
is acceptable national policy to kill inno-
cent unborn children, then one day we may
very well agree to the destruction of elderly
people, or sick people, simply because it
may be inconvenient to have them around.
I cannot and will not condone the
deliberate termination of innocent human
life, whether it be an unborn child or an
elderly person, or anyone in between.
If we ever reach that point, then the na-
tion's survival will be in peril. I'm not sure
we would even deserve to survive under
such circumstances.
c
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1 III 1 S K 'I IM Xs-
Features
1 K( H 24. I'VM
Comedy Double Feature Showing Wednesday
B JOHN WEYLER
Stall tut i
1 his Wednesday at Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix rheatre
the Student Union 1 ilm's Commit-
tee will present a Classic American
Double Feature, rwo o! the best
nun ic comedies evei made will be
�ah. "It Happened One Night"
'11. and "Some 1 ike it Hot"
� p m dmission is, as usual. by
1 (. I student 11) and ctivity�t
oi bv Mendenhall Student c enter
Membership Card to ilty and
s membei s oi us.
Like It Hot" is a wildly
soph ed, satiric, and
� iomp d d bv six
rinnei Billy
I rony urtis anc
as two musk
also
(lark (.able and Clandette olberi in "It Happened O.n
ill inno-
we ma)
�I elderly
arounu.
one the
il human
ild or an
.een
n the na-
sure
ve under
c .able, a! first, naturally hated the
whole thing. Columbia wanted to
make the picture solely because of
the rare presence ol a star on their
lot.aught m the middle of a game
ol studio politics was director Frank
Capra. s he himsell said in his
autobiography "The Name Above
the 1 itle the news about 'It
ipened me Night' was not that
it made the 'classic' ranks, but that
. ei got made at all. A film about
the making ol "It Happened One
Night' would have been much fun-
niei than the picture itsell
an example. Capra recalled
�Alien he went to personally per
i laudetteolberi to appear
hei 1 rench poodle bit
. he reai, She agreed to do the
nly because she knew they
re desperate foi a leading lady
I able iei usual salary.
w Mete
ayei
1934 (The only other film to collect Risk
d it maioi awards was I97f his n
Fie Ovei -he Cuckoo's created Wh, hlmwas finished she was
Happened One Night" saying.
p lireetoi
Resi Vctoi c lai k
��One
V
u I
ivorsi picture in the world
Since no one connected with the
(
tauue
See lOt Bl � � Pag � co1-
Monroe. I emmon and (urtis in "Some Like It Hot
Cooking Romantic
Dinners In The Home
H
Acclaimed Authors Slated For Campus M orkshops
� i i ;niiiiuilnr tor a dramatic i
deluding I he Dancer from the Dance. 1 yes, and I he Buzzards which was nominated tor a 1 ul.ter 1 nze.
Dinner Theatre Production Of
'Miss Reardon' Begins Monday
Dinnei
.a come
- h een a faculty foi 1 I
production, "And Mi
Drinks Litth
K e. �
I
April 4,
lie P
liant Hro
1 ml nuk
II
the first with a I
1 he prodi
30 and ru
die H

biting
relat ions!
Ha-
drinking problem and the secoi I
who ad to g
turd sister
discc fun-
ny and rce m i
NEWSWEEK stated
Zindel we seem to have that variety
a playwright u write in
telligent. sensitive, entei
p!as for a wide public
I he production is beinj li
by Stephen B. 1 mnan. 1 mnan holds
a Mastei ol I ine Arts degree in
id S4.5'
)r a and Spec faculty and sta
it East Cat olina mances
has had profes- student -
and directing : staff, �
. a with 1 ee Strasberg, formances. 1 oi ad
Gene Fiankel, George Morrison, tion call 757-6611
ently associated with the
� - Circle In I he Square
il w orkshop.
the production in-
Karen Baldwin.
lulie Haskeit,
wood, 1 otte Darwin,
R ; Meyei.
first three performances,
ii 30-April 1. will be dessert
tting foi dessert perfor-
will begin at 7:15 P.M. with
time ai 8:00 P.M. rhe final
three performances, Apr11 2-4. will
be dinner shows. Seating foi the
dinner shows will begin at 6:30 P.M.
with curtain time at 8:00 P.M. I he
s ool ol Home 1 conomics will
cater all events.
arc on sale in the Centra
Bv KVlin WI U IK
-Lit! M nH I
v rnes you want to share a
quiet dinnei at home with someone
aurants, with their
noise and well-meaning but inter-
. aren't really very
when sou think about it.
you see the bill lends
i dampei on romance, too.)
. . �meone spec
ovei residence and
n him or her with yourex-
. culinary skills. But what
us sei e?
j you ever saw the movie " 1 om
lones ' bably know that
anytl uen with the fingers can
be very sexy. Keep ibis in mind
when you plan ycjui menu. I here's
something about a lot of dishes and
pieces and clutter that can
a romantic dinner for two into
dinnei at Grandma's. You
want, then, to serve something
sensuous, but simple. In
. you might want to thmk oi the
meal mi - as a big snack that could
easily be left on the 'able or
�� erated it necessary.
s an entree, vou mighl consider
something like SHRIMP
i i K K U,1 . You'll need one-
half pound ol ready-to-cook shrimp
, size, but the larger the better),
a pan. combine I. 4 teaspoon
tit, l 4 cup olive oil. two
; dry white wine, one
a oi lemon juice, one
lespoon ol parsley and basil
ed together), and a pinch ol
pei over the shrimp with this
made and refrigerate at least
two bouts. Ihen. broil the shrimp
tor approximately ten minutes, be-
ing careful not to scorch them.
Meanwhile, melt a little less than
one-halt stick ol 0
margarine and continue cooking un-
til lightly brown. Add one scant
tablespoon oi finely chopped
parsley, one teaspoon lemon juice
and one good dash of garlic salt.
Serve in a dish for dipping with
broiled shrimp.
Raw vegetables are also ap
propriate for a romantic dinner
Considei fresh mushrooms, carrots,
broccoli and cauliflower, carefully
washed and sliced or broken into
bite-sized pieces Serve on a tray
with a ready-made dip. or make the
dip yourself from one ol the main
mixes available. A good mix to try is
Hidden Valley Ranch, original recipe
salad dressing mix. Use any lef-
tovers later tor salad dressing.
Pasta can also be a very romantic
food, conjuring up images oi soft
candlelight and Chilian, but don't
thmk only of the usual meat sauce
type of spaghetti. Fettucini noodles
can serve as a bed for any number o
interesting sauces, or you can be
more economical and serve them
with regular spaghetti noodles if you
like.
Anchovy lovers might like pasta
with MARINARA SAI CE. Heat
two tablespoons olive oil and the oil
drained from the anchovies. Add
about one-half teaspoon garlic salt
and slowly add one sixteen-ounce
can pressed and drained whole
tomatoes. Stir in six finely chopped
anchovies, one-hall teaspoon
oregano, one tablesp i
parsley and bring
reduce heal and simmer I
i -
dies and top with
Parmesan or Romai
I raditionally. the
: meal is dessert, bui you
� anything heavy that's going
till your companion up and bring on
drowsiness. Fruit and cheese,
perhaps nuts as well, make an ex-
cellent light desert. Prepare a
pieces ol your I
in wedge- or bite-sized pieces)
and bite-sized pieces i eese.
Strawberries, washed ipped
and served with a dish o sugar for
dipping, ot a bunch of grapes can
make dessert fun.
v omplement your meal a ��
beverage you and your companii
will both enjoy. Wine is certainly
the traditional romantic drink, and
the delicate May wines should be
available soon. But your drinks
needn't necessarily be alcoholic.
spued hot wa can be warmly relax-
ing. Simply prepare your regular
type of hot tea and add a pinch oi
nutmeg, cinnamon allspice, or all
three.
With the right atmosphere
candlelight, soft scent spritzed on
cool light bulbs (let it dry before vou
turn them on), your favorite music
� your romantic dinner with your
special dinner partner could very
well be the start ol main delicious
things to come.
Directing from Brooklynollege in rick
ice and are priced at $3 00
Works On Paper
Exhibit Open Now
��Works on Paper a national
juried art exhibition sponsored
fast Carolina University, is being
shown in PC I s Gray Gallery
through April 12.
luroi tor the show is 1 dward
Henning, chiei curator ol modern
art at the Cleveland, Ohio. Museum
of Art. Works submitted represent
entries from numerous artists
throughout the nation, with approx
imately one third ot the entries from
southeastern artists.
The show, co-sponsored by the
ECU School of Medicine and the
ECU School ot Art, was conceived
as a means of building the perma-
nent collection ol the EC I Museum
of .n Works purchased (with
funds provided from the medical
I) will be displaved in the new
Brody medical sciences building ol
the ECU School o Medicine.
I he " Works on Paper" show is
scheduled to coincide with the first
Eastern Carolina Arts Festival
1 4 p.m. reception has been set tor
April 5.
Gray Gallery is open to the public
each wcekdav from 10 a.m. until 5
p m. and from 1-4 p.m. on Sun
days. It is located in the east end ol
the 1 eo Jenkins Fine Arts Center on
the main campus.
TV Trivia Quiz
Challenges Memory
Cheap Trick s Mel sen Beckons
Holding souvenirs of their first tour of Japan. �hieh spanned the sue-
eessful live album " t limlnkan guitarist Rick Nielsen strikes a
characteristic pose, rickets fot the April 4 Cheap I rick concert (with
special guest UFO) at Minges Coliseum are selling quickly.
B DAVID NORMS
and
WILLIAM YELVERTON
Here are twenty questions tor the
television addicts among vou. It you
eet a score of twelve or more correct
answers, it is enough to prove that
you probably spend loo much time
watching TV.
1. Give the address of the Minister's
house.
2. Name the children o Morticia
and Gomez on "The Addams fami-
ly
3. What town is "Mash's" C orporai
Klinger from?
4. What is the name o' Colonel Pot-
ter's horse on "Mash?"
5. Who played the Green Hornet's
sidekick Cato?
6. Name the German officer who
lost every battle on "The Rat
Patrol '
7. Name the boat on "Gilhgan s
Island
8. Who was the Cartwright s
Chinese cook on Bonanza?
9. Name the pig who appeared on
"Green Acres
10. How long did it take for a tape
to self-destruci on "Mission: Im-
possible?"
11. What saloon does Miss Kitty
own on "Gunsmoke?"
12. Name the bartender at the
aforementioned saloon.
13. Name the newspaper that now
employs I ou Grant.
14. Who was Underdog's girlfriend?
15. Name the fort on the series "I
Troop
16. What bank does .led Clamp
keep his millions in?
17. Here's a two part Andy Griffith
question:
a. Who was the town drunk
ot Mayberry?
b. Who was Opie's schoolteacher
and what other relationship
did she have with the Taylor
family?
18. What character did Chad
Everett play on "Medical Center?"
19. Name the Boone's two children
on the Daniel Boone TV series.
20. Name the six kids and the dog
on "The Brady Bunch
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sought wi Mrreaio
For it
Faculty Member Chosen
President Of Group
Double Feature Showing Wednesday
Continued from page 5
all
picture gave a damn about n
decided the might as well have
some fun while making it. So they
shot it fast and loose, clowning
around on the set between takes
Much of il was improvised. Ml were
stunned when the movie became a
hit.
The story concerns a run-awa
heiress (Cl audette Colbert) and a
down-on-his-luck reporter (Clark
Gable) who meet on a long bus trip.
At first the) hate cacti other, she
considering him a bum. he sensing
in hei a scoop for his paper. Both
being broke and in trouble, the)
band together to survive their hazar-
dous cross-coutnr) journey, their
relationship gradual!) turning to
love. Sprinkled through the story
are subtle social comments concern
ing the signs of the times; its theme
of the rich versus the poor reflected
the then-current Depression.
Main classic comedy bits from
the film are fondly remembered, in
eluding: the "Wall of Jericho,1 a
blanket over a line strung through
the middle of a motel room to
seperate the two would-be lovers;
the hitch-hiking scene where. Gable
being unable to thumb a ride. Col-
ben flashes a gam and immediatel)
succeeds, proving that the leg is
mightier than the thumb (the
originator of this oft-used gag); the
famous undressing scene where
Gable strips almost to his skivvies in
front of Colbert, all the while wittily
delivering a lecture on how men un-
dress (and supposed!) sending the
undershirt industry into a plunge
when audiences noted that Gable
didn't wear one).
"It Happened One Night" stands
at the forefront of its genre, that
uniquely 1930's creation called
screwball comedy. It was a turning
point in the career of frank Capra
who. up until thai time, hail been a
respected but struggling director,
not vet having found his niche in
film-making. It opened his eyes to
the type of films he wanted to make,
and at which he excelled � warm,
human comedy with a smattering ot
social comment. "It Happened One
Night" blaed a trail that led to such
Capra classics as "Mr. Deeds does
to Town "Mr. Smith does to
Washington" (both of which were
presented earlier this semester b the
Student Union Films Committee).
"It's a Wonderful life and "A
State of the Union
Scott Parker,
member ot the East
Carolina Universit)
drama and speech
faculty and genet al
manager ot the I CTJ
Playhouse, is the new
president ot the
3 , 0 0 0 - m e in b e r
Southeastern Theatre
Conference, the largest
regional theatre
organization in 'he na-
tion.
Hie SETC comprises
the southeastern states
as well as Puerto Rico
and the Virgin Islands.
Its m e m be r s h i p
represents theatre on all
levels; professional,
college and university;
community, secondar)
school and children's.
Parker is a Guilford
College alumnus, with
graduate degrees from
UNC -Chapel Hill and
t tie I niversity ot
Virginia. He joined the
1(1 faculty last year.
During a theatre
career which has in-
cluded technical and
administrative posi-
tions with theatre com-
panies m North
Carolina and Penn-
sylvania as well as a
vear as stage manager
tor Walt Disnev World
in Florida, Parker has
held various offices in
the SETC and is a past
president o( the N.C
I heat re Conference.
Parker officiall)
assumed SETC
presidency at the
organization's 32nd an
nual convention in
Orlando, 11a. earlier
this month. Among the
speakers were H
Jenkins. Britain'
formei Minister for the
Arts; Florida Secrel
of State deorge
Firestone; costume
designer
Do r 1 e ac
Rogers
G a 1 a c t i c a
lean Pi
("Bu �
Battle:
.�B
lagoon") and
designer Ion. Wall
("Pippin "C hie
� � w oma n ol
Year
Actor Jose I ei
was presented with
SI Id's highest awa
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en
I'M- EAST CAROl 1NIA
orts
MARCH 24, IWI
Huge 7
&
V
Double
Trouble
photo, ECU shortstop
Robinette takes pitch
second baseman Mike
as Clemson runner
Gallagher (9) races
is second. Gallagher
little late, though, as
eammate Steve Van
I first, as the Tiger duo
rt of a double play in
4-1 win Thursday.
bv Jon .lordon)
Pirates 1
emson, Then Go 2-1
Following a big win over power-
ful Clemson on rhursday, the Easi
Carolina baseball team look a
doubleheader from Vale on Satur-
da before biting the dust Sunday.
! he Pirates saw their record fall
to 8-4 Sunday following a 7-6 loss to
Fair field. 1 lie loss was literally a
"big blow" to the team following
three consecutive wins.
With ECU ahead 5-3 in the
seventh inning ol Sunday's at tan.
Ian field catchei Pete Ciardello hit a
grand slam home run to put his
team ahead to Stay.
I he Bucs came back with a run in
tiie eighth but could not recover
from the "big blow
The Pirates began a three game
winning stre;
avenging an e
power Clemsoi
1 he 1 igers ha
on Wednesday.
ching turned tl
Thursday. though
The senior hurl illy
five hits and one ri iking
out six in leading the buvS to a 4-1
win.
ECU scored two runs in the first,
which proved to be all the club need-
ed.
Shortstop Kelly Robinette led off
the first with a double to left center-
Held. I eft fielder Todd Evans
followed with a double to the
right field corner oi Harrington
Robinette.
ted hitter Mike S. ge later
to right which, coupled with
ror bv Tiger outfielder Glenn
Gallagher, allowed Evans to score.
The Bucs scored single runs in the
third and the sixth innings to go up
4-0.
The sixth inning run came via a
solo homer by Pirate right fielder
John Hallow.
The Tigers scored their onl run
in the eighth.
The win moved Ramey's record
to 3-0 while Bob Patterson was
credited with a save.
The Bucs came right back on
Saturday to sweep a doubleheader
from Yale b scores of 4-3 and 3-2.
In the first game, the Pirates
scored two runs in both the second
and fifth innings and held on as
Yale tallied three runs in the sixth.
Bill Wilder was the winning pit-
cher for ECU, improving his record
to 2-2 on a six-hit, ten-strikeout per-
formance.
The Pirates rallied for three runs
in the bottom of the seventh and
final inning after being down 2-0 to
complete the sweep by winning the
second game, 3-2.
Releiver Kirk Parsons got the win
for the Bucs after stepping in for
starter Bob Patterson to starl the
Yale halt of the sixth inning.
ECl coach Hal Baud said he was
both disappointed and pleased with
his team's weekend play, and also
their current 8-4 standing.
"Yes, I'm pleased he -aid.
"But our record is not as good as we
would like it to be. On the other
hand, we could be 6-5 right now.
We had to a make strong comeback
to win earlier this year against Con-
necticut! and had to do the same
Sunday in a game against Vale.
"The thing that pleases me
about the team Baud continued,
"is the character the guys have
shown. We just need to elevate the
level of our play
One oi the mam question areas
tor the team has been centerfield.
Charlie Waynick, Mark Shank and
Robert Wells have all seen some
starting duty there
"It's reall) been strange Band
said, "t mil this weekend we'd b
playingharlie there and thou
lie was the besl hitter at tl
e came back with Rob ri W eii
this weekend, thou
ball extremely well tor us (2
two gai
Baird
mterfield �
being settled. citing ii ;onsi
defensive performances
main area oi h con
rhe team'
Hai
Position Changes Made
Fundamental' Drills Underway
Bv CHARLES CHAND1 I R
Sports I .tih.r
Fundamentals and position
changes highlighted the firs! two
days of East Carolina's spring foot-
ball drills last week. More of the
same can be expected before the
April 25 Purple-Gold game.
"We're working ver hard on
fundamental Pirate head coach.
Id Emory said Monday. "We're a
verv young team and it's erv im-
portant 'hat we become sounder
fundamental!)
The second-year coach pointed to
the fact that the club had few ex-
perienced members.
�'We're coming off lots oi red-
shirting and injury hardships he
noted. "It'll be tough but 1 think
we'll be ready when we need to be
Emory said he and his staff had
taken measures to prevent another
year of injuries as was experienced
this past season, when over 50
players took to the sidelines for one
reason or another.
�'We're going to work the guys
hard during the first 12 practices
he said. "But, at the same time,
we'll definitely be trying to avoid
the injuries we had by not scimmag-
ing as much as we have in the past
Thus far, only one Pirate has sus-
tained an mjurv, that being guard
Maurv Banks. He should return
soon from a pulled muscle.
Most prevelant among five
players who are not participating in
the spring drills is last season's
number one quarterback, C'arlton
Nelson. The Portsmouth native is
home recovering from neck surgery
and will hopefully return in the fall.
Among the position changes that
have occurred involves two
members of the 1980 starting offen-
sive line.
Fee Griffin, a starting guard I;
season, has been switched to nose
guard. 1 he other move switches
Mark Ervin from offensive tackle to
defensive tackle.
��We feel that both fee and Mark
have defensive personalities
Emory said. "We also think that
they can easilv move back to offense
it necessarv
I morv said the moves were made
possible bv the number ot 1980 of-
fensive line redshirts that are now
eligible. He cited Tom Cams.
Johnny Robertson, Norman Quick
and Jeff Autrv as former redshirts
with "enormous potential
Another addition to the offensive
hue is formei nose guard Terry
1 ong. The 6-0, 230-pounder is the
strongest member oi the team.
"We feel that Terry's switch to
offense oft sets lee's move to
defense Emory said. "We hope
will
D a V
thai hot h moi t
div idends
I he all-important quarterback
position is up in the an, as was the
ease during last spring's drills.
Nelson's status will not be known
until tall practice begins. Greg
Stewart, a sophomore who started
in Nelson's stead atter the latter
went down with the injury last year,
is the current front-runner.
Challenging Stewart is freshman
I airy Brobst, Chuck Bishop and
Chuck Barnette. Bishop carted
several games in the secondary last
year but has been moved to the of-
fensive backfield. Also receiving a
shot at the QB job is John lelton,
who Lame to the Bucs highly-touted
several seasons ago but has been
slowed by injuries.
1 he team will continue with drills
on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, I ridavs
and Saturdays until the Purple-Gold
game.
�n
"N
ECU sophomorehuck Bishop (8), shown here chasing N I
halfback Wayne McLean, has been moved at has' temporarily
secondary to quarterback.
Record Now 11-2
Lady Bucs
Sweep Four
By WH L1AMYELVERTON
East Carolina's well-balanced of-
fensive attack led by Mary Powell,
Shirley Brown and Mitt Davis pro-
ved too much for four teams to han-
dle m N. C State's Round Robin
softball tournament in Raleigh last
Saturday.
The lady Pirates won tour
straight in the tournament,
defeating Western Carolina 6-2, Ap-
palachian State 7-1, Campbell 11-0
and UNC-Greensboro 14-0.
The wins boosted the lady Bucs'
record to 11-2, the only losses going
to powerful Florida and Florida
State in the season openers.
Excellent defensive play and time-
ly hitting spelled success for the
Lady Bucs. The team made only
four errors all afternoon and came
through with three key homeruns.
"Our defense looked better than
it has in previous games said an
obviously pleased Coach Ahta
Dillon. "Our pitchers are also doing
a fine job. That part of our game is
becoming stable.
Freshman Jeanette Roth hurled
two wins and upped her season's
record to 74. Sophomore Angte
Humphrey picked up the other two
as she boosted net record to 4-1.
In the first game against Western,
the Lady Bucs were led by Powell,
who was 3-4 and Davis who was 2-3.
First baseman Shirlev Brown chip-
ped in a fine performance by going
3-3 and driving in two runs. Roth
picked up her first win of the day as
the Lady Pirates prevailed, 6-2.
Dillon was admittedly worried
before the game with Western
Carolina. "If we hadn't hit the ball
well, we would have been in bad
shape.
"I thought that would be the
toughest game because they always
come up with a good pitcher
In the second game against Ap-
palachian, Kathy Riley belted her
first homer of the season, a three-
run shot to head the win. Cynthia
Shepard was also impressive, as was
Davis and third baseman Maureen
Bucs, each going 2-3.
Shepard ripped a triple and a dou-
ble in the 7-1 win. Humphrey was
the winning pitcher.
The afternoon's third game was
against Campbell and shortfielder
Flea Williams provided the spark by
blasting a three-run homer. Dillon
says Williams is an important key to
the team. "If we have good offense
from her, we're okay. She's been
getting on base more, and her hit-
ting is coming along.
"She seems to spark us and has
been steady defensively
Center fielder Davis belted two
doubles in the 11-0 shutout. Dillon
said she was pleased with Davis'
defense. "She has had a few spec-
tacular catches this season.
Martin Is Still Loose
ECU coach Dave Odom is still
traveling the recruiting road.
"We have good speed in the out-
field, so we encourage our players to
go after the long drives by diving or
whatever it takes
Roth picked up her seventh win in
the game.
The last game was against UNC-
Greensboro as the Lady Bucs won
14-0, a game in which most of the
regulars gave way to the other
players so they could gain more ex-
perience. Dillon was pleased with
the victory because it would im-
prove the team's depth.
The game was highlighted by a
Leslie Bunn grand slam in the
seventh. Williams and first baseman
Tammy Parham each slammed
doubles. Parham went 4-5 and out-
fielder Lydia Rountree chipped in
with a 3-4 effort. Humphrey picked
up the win.
The Lady Bucs now look forward
to meeting the Tar Heels of North
Carolina this afternoon in Green-
ville. UNC was defeated by Western
Carolina at the Florida tourney, but
that is no concern to Dillon. "We
expect a close game Dillon said.
"They have an impressive record.
Pirate Notes:
It was noted in this column some
two weeks ago that a talented young
basketball player from Danville,
Va. had included ECU on his list oi
seven schools he is considering at-
tending.
That player, 7-foot Warren Mar-
tin, has set aside April 1 as a ten-
tative date for the announcement of
the lucky school.
Martin has progressed this year
and could become a "franchise" oi
sorts should the Pirates ink him to a
national letter.
The big guy is also considering
Richmond, James Madison,
Virginia Tech, Jacksonville,
Virginia and North Carolina.
Three of ECU's four coaches
traveled across the N.CVirginia
border yesterday (Monday) to meet
with Martin. The three � head
coach Dave Odom and assistants
George Felton and Eddie Payne �
have a keen interest in the young
man. No wonder, he could turn the
entire Pirate cage program around.
Sources close to Martin still have
no idea as to which school or
schools he may be leaning towards.
The best guess is that he has not
eliminated anyone yet.
It seemed for some time that
UNC and Virginia were the only two
that he was really concerned with.
That theory seems to have been
negated, though, because of Mar-
tin's insistence that he had no idea
where he might end up.
On the football side of the
recruiting world, it appears that
ECU put an Atlantic Coast Con-
ference member on its knees during
Charles
Chandler

-
the recent signing oi Greensboro's
all-state halfback, Jimmy Wald.
Walden, who averaged 13 yards
per carry while gaining ovei 1.4(H)
yards this past year, signed with the
Pirates, leaving main anxious
schools disappointed.
Walden narrowed his choices to
ECU, Auburn and N.C. State
before inking with Pirate coach Ed
Emory. Nearly 100 other schools
were interested.
No non-Pirate was more in-
terested, though, than N.C. State
coach Monte Kiffm
I he word around h the
"wild-and-crazy" Kiffin actually
fell to his knees while pleading
Walden not to sign with ECU,
No doubt, Kiffin felt Walden was
something special, spe h to
try to sway the youngstei
ing one of the w oil
opponents.
Bad news struck two meml
the 1 Cl - w�
Offensive
brothei
I aCock,
line !av
anu
v -
I 111 Cl s
Both have injui i : contu
to flare up and thai apparently will
nevei recover fully enough to allow
the two I
doctors.
plav again, say
( I
Golfers Finish 22nd
In Furman Invitational
The East Carolina golf team
finished 22nd in the 27-team Fur-
man Invitational this past weekend
with a dismal 54-hole total of 918.
Tennesse won the tournament
with an 865 total. Wake Forest was
runnerup at 868 while Alabama and
Clemson tied for third at 869.
Georgia Southern Ail-American
Jodie Mudd took individual honors
with a 12-under total oi 204 M
strung together six straight birdies
over the tourney's final nine holes
and finished with an eight-under par
64 for Saturday's finishing round.
Steve Jones and Don Gafner led
the 1 v I contingent, each firing
three-day totals oi 228. Don
Sweeting finish 1 at 232 while C
Beaman fired a 254 and Mike Move
a 238.
"We're coming up against the
same old problems said ECU
coach Bob Helmick. "We're not
getting it together at the same time.
In the second I we lost eight
. � I
hole).
The Pirates continue their spring
schedule in the Camp Le.lune Invia-
tional this weekend.
0 m -m �
, - ?





8
I HI AS I (. KO! IN! N
MAKC H 24. I4NI
Pirate Relay Team Wins
kin
15
B WILLIAM
YELVERTON
UriiW sporlv I dlli"
East Carolina's out-
door track team opened
the season with a bang
lasl weekend b winn-
ing the 4 .200 metei
relay at the Domino's
Pizza Sunshine Relays
in lallahasse.
The Pirates were led
by Tim Ccphus, who
ran an opening-leg o
20.4 as the team won
with a time of 1:25.53,
just ahead of Indiana's
1:25.59.
Carl ton hraier ran a
second leg o 21.3 and
Keith Clarke turned in
a 22.6. Footballer Clint
Harris ran 21 flat.
The Hues also finish
ed third in the 4 X UK)
meter relay with a time
Of 41.06 that was
behind Florida State's
39.98. Florida A ' 1
finished second.
Women Js Track Places Two
East Carolina's
iv omen's track team
claimed two places
Saturday in the 1 ad
iatoi Relas helc
iainstile. I la.
1 i s a 111 a .
sophomore transfei
took sixth m the shot
ECU'S relax team,
consisting of Dawn
iciv
m
took sixth in the shot, consisting of Dawn
putting it 43.7 teet. Henderson. Catherine
I his throw was her per- Suggs. Ros Major, and
sonal best and a new Gwen Dancy also plac-
1 (. I varsity track ed into the finals. In the
record. preliminary race they
I he Pirates ca
fourth place in tl
relay, its first i
outdoor season,
time of 3:11.53
won with a time
followed by I
and Florida A '
of whom qualifi
the Nationals. T
tional qualifying
3:08.8.
The B u cs
without the ser
i was relatively pleased Cephus, whose
with the team's perfor- knee went out,
mances
Brreeio
. it I
Faculty
Preside
Ml
ill
Lady Netters Win
East Carolina's
women's tennis team
registered a 9-0 win
over UNC-W I riday.
Every member of the
earn won then match
with scores of 6-0, 6-1,
r 6-2.
"Wilmington's skii!
level was lower than we
iad anticipated said
ich C aroline Brown.
"Because of this. I was
. er pleased with the
ram's abilitN to con-
centrate throughout the
meet
The tennis team
takes on Guilford Col-
lege tomorrow, one of
the top Division II
teams. "After beating
I'NCW . 1 feel we are
in a good position to be
a challenge for
Guilford said Brown.
1 he I ad netters
first home meet is this
1 h u r s d a against
Atlantic Christian.
preliminary race they
recorded a time of 51.2
seconds. In the finals.
however, the bat ton
was dropped, and the
1 ady tracksters did not
finish well.
"51.2 is really nol
that good a time said
coach Laurie Arrants.
"It did get us pumped
up for the finals,
though. It's loo bad
that we droopped
"We saw some good
things this week end
said Arrants. "We were
up against some stilt
competition. All in all.
I he I ad thinclads
travel to Chariottsville
Friday to compete in
the University of
Virginia linnationals.
day
event was higl
by Clarke's 47 i
Craig Rainey's
Bill Miller turn
48.9 in what , . . . . .
making. It opened his eyes to
pe of films he wanted to make.
t which he excelled � warm,
a comedy with a smattering of
first time runni
event.
The Pirate
� ��'�����ii'
��MV HtVV STOBE
� tlilNlkl B �J Bo
�-iriJ Orck Fug' V�wrl
' Jjdi't �"f�(0�� fj'tll
? Sho Comb Boo' Plus
LjTIIillJ Mil �
ticipate in the
Relays this weel ft?�?1- l "aPPe"ed 0n�
blazed a trail that led to such
lassies as "Mr. Deeds Goes
"Mr. Smith Goes to
1 (both of which were
Scott Parker,
member ol the East
Carolina University
drama and speech
faculty and general
manager of the ICC
Playhouse, is the new
president ol the
3 , 0 0 0 - m e in b e r
Southeastern Theatre
Conference, the largest
regional t heat re-
organization in the na-
tion.
The SIT C comprises
the southeastern states
as well as Puerto Rico
and the Virgin Islands.
Its membership
represents theatre on all
levels; professional,
college and university;
community, secondary
school and children's. I
-I
'He
H6DACHfAPTRICKl.fi'
Apul Jih GO pm Miners Coi
isi um
E I iABE TH Yirth tc,
� ir you .�no me ' �
m re even Ash h�m im' .�
SC kl AMING MIMI ' (-HWIS
OkAND O To i si pirn go on
nornbrt clans mon pit livrc
� ooqi JfcWELS
UFO UFO, UFO UFOUFOUFO
UFO,UFO ARE YOU SEEING
THINGS r i �. andyOoMbih.n
.nq thi-in loo Apul 4th oprnmq (01
CHE AP TRICK at M.ngts
MATTLINE If yoo hayt had any
interactions with this company
call 7S3 8421 We need yoi
�nation
HAPPY BIRTHDAY ANNF
KRIER'11 They say the OHtet fOV
u. I Ihe belief y�W qet' We .� , til.
olOei yoo qet the niulci.i r yoo qel
THE PREPS FROM RALEIGH
ABBOTT Choppy choppy chop
py ' At least you ie qettmq b M�i
CHRIS
� I MAI E CUHPr NEEDS GOOD
MOVE S months old Can
'S6 S6' i al'ei Spm
HAS REAGANS BUDGET CUT
CAUGHT YOU SHORT' Then
q, ' a h.qh payinq sonimt i 10b with
�rt jed i ecoinmendatiO'i For
MW i all fit 44U
SUMMER WORK Must b m
di -pendent and willing to work
ha id f or inter vew call ' ib ISI1
SUMMER IS NEAR' Need toea.e
some Sit this summer' A�eiaq.
studee' i .n ned 43300 last summe-
Hi be able to tra.el to
southwest or west and must bt
t.ir cl woiki-i interviews will be
yVedndav and Thursday
D Hrewstei at 00. 4 00 and
- . � on time !
ROOMATES WANTED I mat W
roommates wanted to
share spacious i bedroom house
durmq summer andl or I tall
Convenient location to Carolina
East Man and Pitt Commo
College S8G month Ou'i'iq sum
third utilities and i0
month on fourth utilities durmo
ill Call Tt �0i i attei S pm
ROLINA
Vi HOUSE
.NTS
ISAAD'SSrlOr-
RfcPAIh
I I C.tctndf A �'
75H -1228
QualiK !t'iidir
this semester by the
Committee),
re and "A
r
'ms
71
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
�presents�
1st Annual "CREEK WEEK"
PIG PICKIN
Sunday, March 29
12 Noon to 6 PM
Tickets $3.00, includes
1 BBQ Dinner and A Pepsi
1
Sponsored
tZMz
Home Builder. SuppK
I.ily KtihardoH. (.allT Of Homes
Head Hunter
California Concepts
Three Steers
Apple Records
Floyd G. Robinson Jewelers
Pipeline
Bookbarn
(din Ac Ring Man
Chapter X
lurry( opv
Kings Department Store
Burger King
1'inewood Craft & r urnilure
Heilig Meyers
Nationwide Insurance
A Cleaner World
Pirates (. hest
Pizza Inn
HoHoweU's Drug
Kings & Queens
Wicks Cumber
Stereo Village
Ricks (iuitar Shop
Zales
Singer (Bob Thompson)
Wash House
Richard K. Worsley, CPA
Hair Pazazz
Hetty. Ann. I iiujh Katnnn. shirlry .Ijt
Szechuan (iardens
MS Baal imh st
�katjn ii:m)�jo
�W.nd� II :�l 10 30
MotCot ; )
Buffet Specials AH You Can Eat
MonFri.
MonTues.
Sunday
11:30 - 2:00 Soup-Salad-Pizza
6:00 - 8:30 Soup-Salad-Pizza
12:00 - 2:00 SpagSalad Pizza
Wednesday Spaghetti Day 11.00 - 11:00
Spaghetti-Toast Coffee or Tea
All You Can Eat $2.49
Thursday Lasagna Day 11:00-11:00
Buy One Lasagna At Regular Price Get
Second One For A Dollar
Phone 758-6266
1840 E. Creenville Blvd.
i FRANKLIN
BAND
. Thru Sat.
i 25-March 28
M, -ie Larry
Franklin
Band
Wed
Ladies' Free
Men - $2.00
Thurs Ladies' Free
Coming April 5
Mike Cross
WRIGHTS PAINT
A DECORATING
Custom Framing
Mats
Framing Cross Stitch
Do It The "Wright Way"
2806 E. 10th St.
Hrs 7:30-5:30
MonSat.
Ph. 752-3881
Coupon
$3.00 OFF
w Coupon $10.00
more on a custom
frame
The Media Board is
presently accepting
applications for
General Manager of
WZMB
Applications may be picked
up in the Media Board of-
fice in the Publications
Bldg. from 8-1 and 2-5
Monday thru Friday.
Flash 'Em A
Coppertone
Tan Bikini Contest
at the
ATTIC
March 30,1981
Breckenridge
Band
1st Prize
2nd Pri
Door Open:
8:30p.m.
3rd Prize
Downtown
Pitt PI
Indian
Moccasins
$100.00 $75700 $50.00
Sponsored by:
Alpha Sigma Phi
and
ALSO:
7 FT.
SCREEN
NCAA
BASKETBALL
U.B.E.
DOMINO'S PIZZA
TREEHOUSE
RICK'S GUITAR SHOP
HOT DOG CITY
NEWBY'S
JUDA RECORDS
PAIR ELECTRONICS
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET
CROW'S NEST
PEPSI
THE MUSHROOM
OVERTON'S SKI SHOP
THE SNOOTY FOX
MR. GATTI'S
TODD'S STEREO CENTER
- � �
- �

������





Title
The East Carolinian, March 24, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 24, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.120
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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