The East Carolinian, March 19, 1981






She Safit (Earnltmatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Ihursday. March 19, 1981
(.reenville. North Carolina
Circulation HUMMl
NewMediaHeadsNamed;
WZMB Post Still Vacant
Bv KR1 WEND!
Sllfl ril.i
New heads for the various cam-
media were named by the E I
Media Board in a closed session just
hciore spring break, with the excep-
tion ol radio station WZMB.
ken will serve as the
S2 Buccaneer, while
will have Angelia Brinn
d was named editor
i Herald. Byrd will
bility ol re-
it ion after a
the position of head of the Photo
1 ah. Gurle) took over that post
after the former head photographer
Pete Podezwa resigned during the
fall semester of 1980.
Paul Collins was named general
manager of The lasi Carolinian
after serving only tour monthes as
news editor. Chris I ichok assumed
that post m December to fulfill the
unexpired term of Richard Green.
1 hough there were several ap-
plicants tor the WZMB post, no one
was named to the position and the
Media Board has chosen begin ac-
cepting tun her applications for the
job. Application forms are available
ai the Media Board oft ice in the Old
South building.
'�We're starting the whole process
over again tor WZMB said Media
Board Chairman David Creech.
The station was expected to begin
broadcasting during the 1980-81
term, but delays in the delivery of
equipment have prohibited current
general manager Glenda K ill -
ingsworth from fulfilling that
desire.
It is believed that no one was con-
sidered qualified to take over the
technical work involved in getting
the 1 M station on the air.
"We feel that the complexity ol
running a radio station and the laws
involved must be taken into con-
sideration Creech continued.
"We feel obligated to search for the
most qualified person available.
"In addition to having a good
knowledge oi radio stations and
FCC regulations, the general
manager must have at least a 2.5
grade average
Creech, however, was pleased
with the other selections.
"We arc very pleased with the
people we have at this time. We are
looking forward to working with
them next year
The new media heads will take of-
fice at noon on April 15, in accor-
dance with the Media Board C con-
stitution.
Aim Pickett, shown here distributing yearbooks, has been named as the
editor of the Buc for the upcoming school ear.
ippointed to ai mc wcuw owu� ���� �� "� v
Pitt Psychiatric Patients Enjoy New
��. -�,�i;�� etitiitp dt Mental Health, the em- on some patients.
Bv GEORGt 1111. HlDRKk
in K
icipal
. unit don't sta
street clothes.
re dances and
i
a loom to watch
television. The)
repare their snacks in the
� walk down the hall
ig room. On
ns the) go bowl-
veekends the may go
eii families or
obvious dif-
etween patients on the
psychiatric unit and those on other
I atients at
( unt Memorial Hospital en-
me � e else that makes them
facility that opened
December.
I he 18-bed addition to the
psychiatric unit represents an expan-
sion oi psychiatric services at Pitt
Memorial to meet the increasing
regional need for inpatient beds.
When the new beds opened, the old
14-bed unit closed for renovation.
which should be completed in
March. When the enure project is
finished, the unit will have 36 beds
and modern support facilities, in-
cluding a multipurpose room for
group therapy, rooms for occupa-
tion and recreation therapy, a
classroom, a new dining area and
ofti.es for physicians dd staff. It
will be the largest inpatient
psychiatric unit in a community
hospital Ui eastern North I arolina.
Whs is there an increased demand
for inpatient psychiatric beds?
Several reasons, according to Dr.
W.R. Walker, assistant professor of
psychiatry at the Past Carolina
University School ol Medicine.
"The public is beginning to unders-
tand mental illness better, and so are
psychiatrists. Recent research,
which has identified biochemical
components in some mental il-
lnesses, has also given us more ef-
fective approaches to diagnosis and
treatment he said.
"Mental illness has lost some ol
the stigma that once prevented pa-
tients from entering a voluntary unit
such as the one at Pitt Memorial.
Not so many years ago, patients had
a choice between admitting
themselves to a state hospital or
entering a private hospital, if they
could afi it Toda many pa-
tients find psychiatic care in a com-
munity hospital more attractive per-
sonallv and financially
According to the National In-
stitute oi Mental Health, the em
phasis for treating mental illness
shifted between 1955 and 1975 from
the larger state mental hospitals to
community programs, particularly
mental health centers and inpatient
psychiatric services in general
hospitals like the one at Pitt
Memorial. This shift in the selection
of a facility was responsible for a
reduction in the average length o'
stay, which decreased from 38 days
to 16 das.
The average stay in the Greenville
unit is 18 days, a short-term visit
that Walker sas is good for the pa-
tient mentally and economically.
After the patients are discharged,
they receive outpatient therapy in
mental health centers or with private
psvchiairists.
"The problem with long-term
care is the institutional effect it has
Coast Shows Striking Change
Census Shows N.C. Population Growth
on some patients Walker said.
"They start to regard the hospital as
their home, and they adapt to that
setting rather than maintain bonds
with their families, friends and com-
munities
The unit at Pitt Memorial offers
treatment for the full range of
psychiatric illnesses, including
schizophrenia, depression,
psychiatric complications ol alcohol
and drug abuse, and geriatric
disorders. Severe depression and
manic depression are the most fre-
quently treated illnesses.
Physicians do not know what
causes manv forms ol mental il-
lness. It may be triggered by an
emotional :onflicl in a re: on's M
or it may be the result ol chemical
changes in the brain. Generally all
forms of the disease are characteriz-
ed by the patient's inability to cope
with reality, and treatment usually
involves psychotherapy in conjunc-
tion with drug therapy. A
psychiatric evaluation determines
the patient's need for inpatient care.
Although the majority o patients
in the unit are from Pitt County,
Walker said more referrals are com-
ing in from psychiatrists, other
physicians and mental health centers
throughout the region. When the
original 14-bed unit was open, pa-
tients frequently had to be placed on
a waiting list for admission. "We
simply were not able to deliver the
services the patients needed he
said.
"The old unit was too crowded
tor patient and staff and lacked
privacy. The new unit will help us
lake referrals promptly, and we
hope that a wait will no longer be
necessary. We want to make treat-
ment for mental illness as available
and convenient as treatment for
other diseases
Since the train, goal ol the unil
to prepare patients to return to their
homes and work, the staff is par-
ticularly concerned with helping pd-
tients keep their ties with the outside
world. Patients receive as much
freedom as possible to make their
own decisions and express their likes
and dislikes. Recreation therapy
may, while it is providing entertain-
ment, show a patient how to use
See MEDICAL, Page 3
(I PI) Population in
� mountains grew
. area ol the
h 1970s, but it was
tsl that showed
. inc change from the
tde.
ipulation grew
decade, accor-
igures from the
S
l. the
c ensuj
I he I
iedmont
s in the
Committee
Recommends
Rape Payments
i 1GH (I PI) rhe House
M , i! Committee has recom-
n seeking the pav-
S500 to rape victims
foi medical care and recovery
Ipy .
dei the bill, the state would
women up to S500 tor the
medical treatment they receive alter
the rape and the therapy they receive
jp them recover from the
ma. The state later would get
nursed it a man is convicted for
had a 15.6 percent gam and
the coast 13.2 percent.
atewide, North Carolina's
population grew 15 percent in the
decade to .S"4,429.
In the 1IK, bv comparison, the
Piedmont had a population gain o
17 percent, the Mountains 11.4 per-
cent and the coast 4.5 percent.
Although the 1970s figures,
released Tuesday b the VC. Office
o State Budget and Management,
showed the mountains with the
atest region-wide growth,
county-by-county figures showed
the most remarkable growth on the
coast.
I'hree coastal counties- Dare,
C urrittick and Brunswick had
population growths of 77 percent,
s9 percent and 46 percent, respec-
tive. A decade earlier, the greatest
countvwide growth was in the
state's more populous counties,
Cumberland, Wake and Orange in
the Piedmont.
While the birth rate was the most
significant factor in population
growth in the 1960s, the state-issued
studv said people migrating to
North Carolina from other slates
were the kev element in the 1970s.
Growth in the birth rate actually
declined 6 percentage points from
1970 to 1980. By contrast, the
number of new residents moving in-
to the state grew 7.18 percent in the
1970s; in the 1960s, the state lost
1.54 percent to migration.
rhe change in migration patterns
were again most striking along the
coast. the studv said. The region
had 10 percent more people leave
than arrive in the 1960s, but the
number of new residents in the
1970s was 3 percent grater than the
number leaving, a shift o 13 per-
cent .
In the mountain, the numbc ol
people leaving the area came close
to negating the number of new ar-
rivals in the 1960s. By 1980. those
arriving outnumbered those leaving
by 11 percent.
Reagan Plan Called
Disaster Blueprint
reim
i i c ui v .
rhe House Appropriations Com-
mittee now receives the proposal tor
consideration. Hep. �e'h
Spaulding, D-Durham, the hi 1 s
sponsor. declined comment I uesday
he measure's chances in the
committee.
(an lames B. Hunt Jr. as well as
rney General Rufus Edm.sten
support'Spauldmg's bill, Edm.sten
recentIv took the unusual step ol at-
tending a committee meeting to pro-
mote the measure.
I d.msten and other proponents
lunc wanted to expand the victim
compensation idea to help murder
and other violent crime vict.ms as
well, hut Spaulding said he wanted
entrate on rape victims first,
members ol boards of education m
c.tv and county school systems with
populations under 7,500 from state - . t k n the new ots on Ninth Street. Parking is open to all
conflicts of interest laws when the Tne administration is urging students and faculty to park in me ne
board members are doing business venices displaying an ECU sticker.
with the local school systems.
Parking Available
Photo Bv JON JORDAN
W A SHIN G T O N
(SPS)�President Reagan's educa-
tion proposal is a "blueprint foi
disaster" according to educators
who are gearing up to fight the plan.
This month Reagan proposed giv-
ing federal money for 57 education
programs directly to the states. This
package also includes a "massive
and unprecedented" 25 percent
reduction in funding to those pro-
grams, according to Office ol
Management and Budget Director
David Stockman.
Washington lobbyists have pledg
ed all-out opposition to the plan
which American Federation o
Teachers President Albert Shanker
called "reverse Robin-Hooding
Said Shanker, "most of the pro-
grams he is cutting are specifically
helping the poor
"We see a declaration of war
against public education said
Thomas Shannon, National School
Boards Association executive direc-
tor. Shannon said that the budget
cuts, combined with the administra-
tion's support of tuition tax credits
for private schools shows Reagan
has turned his back on public educa-
tion.
As part of his effort to "return
control of education to the states"
Reagan proposes combining federal
programs into two big grants and
then letting the states and local
school districts decide how to spend
that money.
Reagan contends that local agen-
cies would reduce paperwork and
have much greater flexibility to
spend federal money according to
local needs.
Other experts, however, say that
his approach will allow states to ig-
nore the needs of certain students.
"Budgetary cuts of 25 percent are
awesome in themselves, but the
stripping away of all targeting, pro-
cedural safeguards, parent involve-
ment and civil rights provisions
completely nullifies lb vears of
federal legislation said Children's
Defense bund President Marian
Wright Edelman.
She explained that school districts
could choose not to serve handicap-
ped children under the Reagan pro-
posal. Title 1 grants for disadvan-
taged students, basic skills and han-
dicapped education would be ad-
ministered by local schools rather
than the federal government. The
state agencies would be responsible
for career education, consumer
education, law-related education,
women's educational equity, pro-
grams for gifted and talented
students and school libraries
The second part of the Reagan
program would cut 25 percent of the
education budget. Reagan's propos-
ed 1982 budget would cut SI.46
billion from the current spending
levels, bringing total education fun-
ding down to $4.5 billion.
National Education Association
Executive Director Terry Herndon
is concerned that states will not be
able to raise taxes to make up for
the lost federal aid. "Reagan won't
be able to cut the number of
children who attend schools he
See Bl'iXiET, Page 3
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials
Classifieds1"
Features5
Letters4
Sports8
- �






hi I s i. Ki l li W
l Ki
IV. WM
Announcements
SRA
A '
V
PPHA
Cultural
COMICS
FINANCING SCHOOL S
AKA
COOP
� a ng co op oppor
ire i an� a a I
1 The Galleon i Nags
S A ' �' �'
an i - v �- ' '� '
. , -hi student I '
� k Pic k up appi �' � �
I . i nt - v a n the C( oj CH
� � 113 iIA I
�. H Normal Vol '
� i
� entativi � '� �' lnai
������' ���
pus March ;6 198! interviewing
stud '� �! voiui �� � '
i rest � ' i- �� ' '�
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ART
ii, � rtool ' �� �' itterin
sevi � � ' I 'o
until" � irt student I
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irshii (he a
I. ret
� . ifti the t ' I Apt
. a ' � ' ' ' '����'
� � �

.�.��'�� " � �
PSI CHI
Applu ations are now available
National Honor � ' � �
sycl . � n the ps, '
���� is open to all ps�cr,
, - .� � n rn � � �'�: �' '

� �� east fivi

WATER SPORTS
i! . ti i i" i jiai ah
� iba diving a
thi: � at I as'

NAUI or PAD!
� � � � ,� � I'jenmg to
adult swimmers, is si T'dulect
for Tuesday ai rhui
I provide t
� � �
pment in be rented
luring thi
I , , .� hrectoi �� � �
TAX ASSISTANCE
begu
a i � � lav
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roon �
?rucl

CORSO
BOWLING
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. v
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HEALTH CAREERS

MUSIC
mo � ���
SOCIAL WORKER
. �� i � hool
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here v. � lepresenta
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A'
FOOSEBALL
ifford ' ' '
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GERMAN
BILLIARDS
ELECTIONS
GAME ROOM
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FOL

MADRID
DA-
ANNOUNCER
�� .
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THIS SUNDAY
COME SHOW YOUR
FLORIDA TAN AND
WIN A PRIZE! ! !
1st
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prize:
$100!
Znd prize:
1 free month at
The Body Shoppe
PLUS A SLAVE FOR A
DAY!
S�

3rd, 4th, etc.
prizes donated by
HAIR PIZZAZ
MITCHELL'S STYLING
GEORGE COIFFURE
ALL ENTRIES WILL RECEIVE A PRIZE
1st place winner will
receive a bouquet of
BALLOONS FROM THE
MUSHROOM
and
Jolly Roger
Tan Contest
Sunday, March 22nd - 9 p.m.
Contestant sign-up 752-9151, 752-4668 or 758-6401
� , � � �
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CHEERLEADING
me f ast Carolina v'a- Si' 1
i oler tryout! a be hi Id in
. rtt 8 00 p rr. on
uesdav A" ,n
�� Mould
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Wednscia, Man I IB ft �� � ��
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rout- �
SALES
How to Develop S.i �
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80 s a sen - it
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HOUSING
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WORKSHOP
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Anyone w
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TUTORS

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DELTA ZETA
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Thursday
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Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
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Telephone " 636 63�? 630�
Items and Prices
Effective Thurs , Mar 19
thru Sat . Mar 21. 1981
Copyright 1981
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I





I HI I M ko IN1AN
MR(II 14. 19X1
Budget Cuts Criticized
( ontiaucd From Page I
said "School districts
vs. ill tune the same
numbei oi kids and less
� Something will
hae to give
ocational and bil-
ingual education, child
ion and aid to
school districts on
federal lands will still
administered b the
federal government,
but are up foi he
spending cuts.
se large funding
is have some
itors on (. apitol
Hail upset "We have
n to see
Si . : a! asststai
� pi o e Knit � it
. on
n
. IOOI is :
to sati . .
npaign promise- to
imeni ofl oui
said Rep i arl
� ns, ! K c hail
1 ducation and 1 abor
Committee
One Pet kins stall
membei predicated a
"tough tight and
said Perkins will not
yield to the President
on all points. "He'll
tight out his last ounce
ol strength to stop the
budget cuts he said.
Lobbyists have
c iiai ged that t he
Reagan cuts are not
tan, because the poor
will suffei most.
1 de! man said I he
Reagan proposals are
" profound i s ine
quitable" and he is cut-
pi ogi anis that
ve the neediest while
ss e r v i n g less
necessan programs like
vocational education.
s.ud 1 delman, "He is
iking a mockers ol
the commitment to
make all groups in out
. ietv !x share
1 sacrifice.
Despite the accusa-
tions that Reagan's
plan is designed to rob
from the poor and give
to the rich. Education
Secret ar 1 errel Hell
said federal education
monej will continue to
support the nation's
disadvantaged and han-
dicapped students.
Although the plan in-
cludes no safeguards
tor ensuring a percen-
tage ot that money will
go to such students.
Hell said the students
will still receive ade-
quate services. "It's
just that the federal
role will be limited he
said.
1 muting the federal
role raises the question
ot whethei the Depart
ment of Education will
be needed under the
Reagan local control
plan " I his new pro-
gram will force us to
look at what the house
o education at the
tedeial level ought to
be and build a new
home for it said Bell.
He said no decision has
been reached so far,
but that the Reagan ad-
ministration will be for-
warding a proposal
soon.
Former Education
S e c r e t a i S h i lie)
Hutstedlei said, "The
impending destruction
ot the department will
be a grave disservice to
American students
1 he real issue is the
basic level of support
for public education.
" I he loss of Cabinet
status will mean less
money Hutstedlei
said. "Education will
not get its fair share in
this combat one unless
there is a secretary at
the Cabinet table with
an equal voice in the
budget decisions and
direct access io the
President
Medical Advances Come To Pitt
( (intiiuii'd from Page 1
residents, physicians lion. The project is part Eastern Carolina
activitv ol a $5.3 million con Health Systems Agenc
bine struction package that, avs those figures ma
theii special ways ol with the addition ol a K h,8her for eastern
preparing the patients 144-bed patient tower, North Carolina due to
i return to their will add 166 beds to low income, low educa-
lives Patients Pitt Memorial. tlonal level and tne
aKo are ver supportive rural setting. In projec-
each other and often rhe 1978 President's ting the needs ol the
develop strong friend- Commission on Mental 29-count) area from
"Re� ships here " Health estimated that 1980 to 1985, the agen-
15 percent of the c noted that the
State appropriations population is in need ol number ol short-term
School of mental health services beds should be increas-
'� . led the and that 25 percent suf- ed, especially in Pitt.
hers funding the fer from depression, Onslow, 1 enoir,
i,es, psy( unit's ex- anxiety, or other men- Roanoke-Chowan and
idents, pansion and renova- tal disorders. 1 he lbermarle counties.
SRA To Sponsor Battle Of Bands

B PAl I I Ol 1 INS
s, - I
i i i e S
Residence Association
announced that it
will sponsor a "Battle
of the B x-nl 2
on the Mall.
1 he contest
beg at ' i
all
d playing
con-
bands
� limit ol it) bands
has been set. and each
uili have one hour oi
:ing time. There are
no restrictions on the
type ot music that can
be plav
A prize o S5(K) will
given to the winning
band. The runner-up
band will receive $300
and the third-place
band a kee ot bee:
panel of five
judge- will be drawn
from SKA board
member
In addition, the SRA
is now accepting ap-
plications tor its Ex
ecutive Board elections.
I iling dates are March
18-26.
1 he positions
available are preside!1
vice president.
secretary. treasurei and
publicity chairman.
1 he campaign will be
from March 26 through
April 2, which is the
day of the election.
Students running
must have a minimum
grade average of 2.0, be
enrolled full time and
live in a dorm.
Western Sizzlin
Steak House
"The Family Steak House"
THURSDAY SPECIAL
12 8oz. Chopped Sirloin; Served
With Mushroom Gravy or Fried
Onions. Baked Potatoe or
French Fries and Toast.
$1.79
THURSDAY ONLY
55 Item Salad Bar and Take Out Service
264 By-Pass 756-0040
2903 E. 10th St. 758-2712
MONTUES, - AVAILABLE FOR
PRIVATE PARTIES - PAPA KATZ WILL
CATER ANY PARTY OR FUNCTION. WE
ALSO HAVE A MOBILE D.J. FOR ANY
PARTY ANYTIME.
WED, - "ORIGINAL LADIES' LOCKOUT"
- 8:30-10:00 - LADIES ONLY - GENTS
IN AFTER 10:00.
THURS. - "SUPER COLLEGE NIGHT-
SPONSORED BY THE SIG EPS - DOORS
OPEN FROM 8:30 to 1:00 - NOW WITH
THE BIGGEST SHAG CONTEST IN GREEN-
VILLE. COME OUT FOR THE DANCE OFF.
MAIN DANCE OFF ON MARCH 19th
WITH OVER $300.00 IN CASH & PRIZES.
FRI. ESCAPE THE DOWNTOWN
CROWD & INFLATION - JOIN THE
CROWD AT THE KATZ FOR AN AFTER-
NOON AND EVENING OF ENJOYMENT.
DOORS OPEN AT 3:00 & NEVER STOP.
TOP 40 COUNTDOWN FREE ADMISSION
TILL 7:00.
SAT. - "LADIES' LOCKOUT II" - LADIES
ONLY FROM 8:00 to 9:30 - GENTS IN AT
9:30.
SUN.RECORD BAR SPONSORS "NEW
WAVE NIGHT" AT THE KATZ WFOUR
PRELIMINARY DANCE OFFS EACH SUN-
DAY - $50.00 TO THE BEST DANCERS
AND $25.00 TO THE BEST DRESSED.
MAIN DANCE OFF ON APRIL 5th FOR
OVER $500.00 IN CASH & PRIZES.
COMING � MARCH 27 & 28 - LIVE
"SURVIVORS" FROM NAGS HEAD -
BEST IN ROCK-N-ROLL.
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FRYE" WITH HIS LARGEST AP-
PEARANCE IN GREENVILLE.
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and proper identification will be required of all members and
quests
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All applications and dues must be returned to this address P O
Bo� 1943. Greenville. NC 77834 NC State Law requires a thirty
day membership waitinq period from date of application for
clubs with brown baqqmq permits
�MEMBERSHIP
Name.
There s More
Elbow Room in
Our Attic!
Address
Telephone No.
Birrhdate
Occupation
Hobbies
Music preference:
DATE
SIGNATURE
When was the
last time you
had a
$8.50(public)
$6.50(ECU students)
Coming to Minges Coliseum SatApril 4, 8 PM
with special guest UFO
Tickets now on sale
a
t
i
���





Site iEaat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris Lichok, nManager
JIMMY DuPREE, 1jntiKtns t dltui
Pai t I.iv ki . v.w� 44 Paul Collins, ,&&
Davi Si vi kis w, MtMc Charles Chandler �&�
AMI 1 l Sl I K. Production Itaqn DAVID NORRIS, heatum. hduor
! c?
March 1. 1 ss I
Opinion
Page 4
Fall Break
Faculty Senate Turns Down Appeal
The proposed 1981-82 fall break
was defeated at the Faculty Senate
Committee Meeting on Tuesday,
March 17. However, the senate
members did a great deal of
brainstorming to determine what
changes could be made in future
school calendars that would make
the schedule more attractive to the
students.
Dr. Thomas Johnson, chairper-
son of the Faculty Senate, explained
that it would be difficult to change
the calendar for next year because
the catalogue copy containing the
1981-82 schedule has already been
put into print.
"1 would say there really isn't op-
position to a fall break he said,
but the calendar committee is con-
sidering every alternative before
they make any changes in the
schedule.
At the meeting on Tuesday, the
1983-84 calendar v - rented,
and the committee was asked to
possibly reconsider the starting
date, with instructions to include a
fall break, although not necessarily
at the time proposed. The calendar
committee has certainly come up
with some interesting ideas.
One possibility is that classes
could be scheduled to begin later in
the Fall. The reasoning behind this
suggestion is, first of all, that it
would be an energy conservation
measure. The last week in August
and the first few weeks in
September are extremely hot, and it
takes a considerable amount of
energy for air conditioning during
this time.
If school was delayed a couple of
weeks, it may save energy, and give
the students a break from the
unbearable heat.
Another suggestion along the
lines of energy conservation is to
have a winter break during the two
coldest weeks in the year. This sug-
gestion does not especially seem
practical since the coldest month of
the year in Greenville is usually
February.
The second consideration for
starting the fall session later is to
allow students who work summer
jobs to have an extra week or two to
earn money for the school year,
which might be helpful.
Instead of extending the spring
semester into June to accomodate
the delayed return to classes in the
fall, the calendar committee sug-
gested the possibility of classes
lasting a longer period of time. This
would mean that even though the
fall semester would begin a couple
of weks later, the school year would
still end at the same time.
According to Dr. Johnson, all of
these possibilities would call for ma-
jor changes in the calendar, and are
only preliminary suggestions. He
said that at the next senate meeting
the Calendar Committee may have
some more concrete suggestions to
present. Finally, the decision is not
solely dependant on the Faculty
Senate nor the Calendar Commit-
tee; the Administration has the final
authority.
In the meantime, it sounds like
there are some interesting
possibilities for the calendars in the
years to come.
Does CBS Miss
Cronkite Savvy?
It's been almost two weeks since
veteran CBS Nightly News anchor-
man Walter Cronkite delivered his
final telecast from that chair, but
the program has not suffered the
way many skeptics expected.
Under new anchor Dan Rather,
the news has still been clearly and
concisely presented. Their "60
Minutes" news magazine will still
enjoy his services for a while, as
replacement Ed Bradley waits his
turn on that highly touted show.
Undoubtedly there are those who
never seem to comprehend the
necessity of change, such as those
who narrowmindedly condemn
Rather without giving him a chance
to adjust to the new role of full-time
anchor.
Let it be remembered that
Cronkite was not the first to sit in
that chair, and we have no reason to
belive that Dan Rather will be the
last.
HMGOD�. THIS HA!) TO 6ETKE IdOftft OF
CfUNZED UJNVTCSmOfS THE FACULTY 5eNAT�!
Comics Record War Triumphs
By DAVID ARMSTRONG
When I was growing up in ihe fifties, I
devoured comic books, all kinds of comic
books, as many as six a day. For a subur-
ban kid in the demerol calm of the
Eisenhower era, comics were a revelation.
They provided adventure, fantasy,
escape� and instruction in prevailing
social values, didactic morality tales that
went down easier with a dollop of enter-
tainment.
Popular comic books of the fifties
routinely celebrated America's triumphs in
war. Paper-and-ink Gls defeated the Get
mans, the Japanese, the North Koreans
and Red Chinese in tour-color splendor
that established beyond a doubt tor
crewcut readers that the United States was
right� even blessed� in its battles with
foreign infidels. By the mid-sixties, the
Viet Cong replaced earlier foes as the chief
villains in war comics. Yellow-skinned
fanatics in black pajamas- their
machineguns spitting "BUDDA! BCD-
DA� the VC attacked American
homeboys on the frontiers of democracy.
I seldom read comic books nowdays, but
curiosity recently prompted me to take a
look at the current crop. A reading o DC
Comics' Gl Combat and other popular
books turned up some interesting
changes� and an underlying continuity�
in war comics.
Even a casual reading o war comics
shows that "the Vietnam syndrome" has
invaded their pages. Reflecting American
reluctance to engage in foreign adventures
during the Carter years, our present-day
adversaries are seldom depicted directly.
Instead, wartime tales are set in fantastic
parallel worlds, in ancient times and,
especially, in World War II. The enemy of
choice is Nazi Germany, evoking a time
when America was unquestionably
justified in waging war, and providing an
enemy that everyone can hate, without
troubling questions ol conscience in-
truding on the action.
Thus, when the editors of Gl Combat
decided to tackle the story o the American
hostages in Iran in their April 1CS1 issue,
they did so by nol depicting the situation
directly, but by having the Sazis seize
American hostages. I hat established, the
editors advanced the plot in ways both
similar and strikingly dissimilar to the way
the hostage crisis actually unfolded.
Instead of sending a single rescue team,
as did real-life Pentagon planners, the
comic book commanders dispatch two
units. When the first strike force is
discovered and destroyed by Luftwaffe
planes, the story shows Hitler himsell
gloating over the tragedy. News reports
blare that "Surprise mission to rescue
hostages fails "American rescue attempt
a disaster "Nazies display American
dead
However, "unknown to the enemy jeer-
ing at America's humiliation the nar-
rative reads, a second mission is "landing
at a remote site in the Austrian Alps I his
effort is a complete success, springing all
the American hostages. In the old days,
American Gls would have been shown
blasting their way into Tehran and treeing
the hostages on the verv first try. oday's
comics are more subtle. Gl Combat incor-
porates the suggestion o declining
American power as a dramatic device,
while still giving the story a happy en-
ding and setting the rescue in a war that
readers emotionally support.
I he same issue includes a curious tale
a World War II tank commander who flies
the Southern stars and bars and follows
advice from the ghosl ol a Confedei
general, hi a storv called "Blood and
Hi'tior German field Marshal! Rommel
spares the lite ol the American in battle
and is later spared by him. Worrying
whether he did the right thing bv letting the
Nazi go, the commander is assured bv the
ghostiv general that "War isn't only kill-
ing- it's repaying an ad ol honor rhis
storv. with its morality tale told by a
defender ol a slave-holding oligarchy,
could have been lifted verbatim from a
magnolia-scented tract of a century ago.
Other things have changed in war com-
ics, to be sure. Blacks and women are now
occasional subjects t admiring stories.
Even so. however, the presumed natural
order ot things is respected. Black soldiers
are shown as brave fighters, but rarely as
high-ranking strategists. Women are pop
traved firing machineguns with aplomb in
emergencies (and barely mussing theii
hair), but they go back to the unglamorous
business ot packing parachutes tor the men
when things return to normal.
Normal, in the pages oi wai comics, is
explicit or implicit support for the status
quo. America is always the wronged partv.
Society's pecking order is tested and con-
firmed by war. America sometimes suffers
setbacks, but our side wins in the end. War
is a justifiable- even honorable� wav ot
settling scores. Despite their more cautious
story lines and nods to racial and sexual
equality, war comics convev yesterday's
message- to today's kids.
Campus Forum
Legislator Defends Position
The Tuesday March 17, 1981 issue of
The East Carolinian contained a letter to
the editor entitled "ECGC Defended
This article was written by Mickey Skid-
more. I have been wondering who this
person is.
However, I was attacked for speaking
against an appropriation to the East
Carolina Gay Community. As an ECU
student government legislator, 1 must
abide by what I feel the ECU students
want as a majority.
1 don't believe the majority of East
Carolina University students want their
student fees to sponsor any ECGC pro-
grams. None of my friends that are
students have expressed they would want
the ECGC to spend their student fees.
I was merely trying to serve the ECU
student body as a fair and competent
legislator.
As for Mickey Skidmore, I will not
personally smear you; the need is not
prevelant. You said yourself that my
position on the ECGC appropriation
was in keeping with the democratic ma-
jority of East Carolina University. You
also said you didn't understand how we
as a modern university could be so
assinine.
Mickey Skidmore, if everyone here
seems so assinine, why the Hell don't
you go somewhere else?
1 will continue to work for legislation
that best exemplifies the majority of the
students opinions at East Carolina
Univeristy.
JESSE G. YATES, 111
SGA legislator
Walk For Hunger
As a member of the Greenville
Hunger Coalition, I would like to take
this opportunity to introduce to ECU's
students, faculty, and staff a most ex-
citing upcoming event in the city of
Greenville.
In positive response to the ongoing
crisis of world hunger, the Greenville
Hunger Coalition will be pledging its
awareness for action by conducting the
10th Annual Walk for Humanity, on
Saturday, April 11, 1981.
The Walk, itself, is sponsored by the
Greenville Hunger Coalition and Cam-
pus Ministers and is supported by Dr.
Thomas Brewer and Don McGlohon.
mayor of Greenville, who has declared
April 11, "A Day of Awareness of
World Hunger
The goal of the walk this year is
$10,000. The proceeds will be divided
with half going to the Campus
Ministers' Emergency Kitchen Fund for
use of Pitt County residents. The re-
maining half will go directly to Oxfam-
America which is sending funds to the
Horn of Africa area, especially Somalia.
There will be several levels of par-
ticipation for the walk:
1. Walk yourself and get sponsors� the
more the better.
2. Sponsor one or more walkers or give
an outright donation by sending a check
to: Walk for Humanity, co Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th St Greenville.
3. Supply sandwiches and or apples tor
the walkers at the end of the 20 km.
walk. These can be taken to the Baptist
Student Union (511 E. 10th St.)
Because ECU is such an integral pan
of the city o Greenville, the coalition is
looking forward to combining its
strengths with the students, faculty and
staff in order to reach our SIO.(XX) goal.
For more information concerning the
10th Annual W alk for Humanity, please
call the Newman Center, 752-4216.
MARY CATHERINE HANIFER
Junior, French
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
da vs.
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and
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THL I AST CAROLINIAN
Features
1Rt H IV. IVM
Page 5
'It Ain't Much Fun'
Twenty Years Of Panhandling
Cheap Trick Comes To Minges Coliseum
B PAUL COLLINS
SfHv ditoi
"Hey.
"Hey, man. Hey. Come 'ere1
Hul the white man keeps walking,
leaving the grizzled old black man
standing alone on the sidewalk.
He brightens in a moment,
however, when a well-dressed
woman walks in his direction.
"Hey, lady. ome 'ere. I gots to
show you somethin
The woman pity, curiosity,
revulsion on her face stops.
The old man wobbles toward her.
He wears a tattei t) suit coat
that may once have been, tweed. 1 he
pants thai hang horn his waist are a
nondescri green, laded beyond
recognition.
His boots are as battered as his
gray-bearded face, and with a
toothless smile he approaches the
woman.
Ton reaches into his coal pocket
and pulls out a small medicine bot-
tle.
"I isten, tad) he sa)s, "I gots
o I can buy my
Tickets went on sale Monday for Cheap Trick's Saturday, April 4 concert in Minges Coliseum. Also appearing with to get some mone
Cheap Trick will he special guest UFO. The concert will hegin at 8 p.m. Tickets are S6.50 and S8.50. medicine
The Legion Lives On
But Without Camels And Desert Forts
BAGNl . fiance � The
camels have been replaced by four-
el drive vehicles or parachutes.
Headquarters has been moved from
Sidi-bel- Abbes in the Algerian
desert to the less glamorous en-
virons ol Marseille. And even the
men man) of whom still have
something in their past they don't
talk about - have changed with the
times.
Hut the essence remains, a
"tamilv" held together by a long
tradition of camaraderie, service.
honor and fidelity. The French
Foreign L egion has not changed
since King Louis Philippe signed it
into being 150 vears ago � March
10, 1831.
The 8.000 or so legionnaires who
have pledged to defend the interests
oi trance anywhere in the world are
undoubtedly the toughest troops at
the disposal of the French govern-
ment.
The government has called on the
ion often. In its 150 years,
legionnaires have fought and died
on Five continents. It last saw com-
bat in May 1978, when 600 members
of the 2nd Legion Paratroop Regi-
ment jumped into Zaire's Shaba
Province to help fend oii an inva-
sion bv Katangan exiles living in
ngola.
le I egion museum at head-
quarters here in Aubagne is filled
with memorabilia from campaigns
in Mexico, North Africa, In-
dochina, Norway and Madagascar.
Throughout its history, France
has had a tradition of foreign troops
in its army and today nearly half of
the men in today's Legion come
from outside France. More than 35
nationalities are represented.
And, of course, all are volunteers
� an important political fact in a
countrv where it takes a vote of
Parliament to send a unit composed
oi conscripts out oi the countrv.
But the days of Beau Geste are
gone. There are no more lonel)
desert garrisons. No more romantic
campaigns against treacherous
rebels on horseback. Not even a de-
cent oasis to defend.
"Except for a few oldtimers. Bel
Abbes is nothing now but another
part of the Legion's history says
Gen. Paul Lardry, commander ol
the Legion, nodding toward a legion
monument transported from
Algeria to the parade ground here
after the final pulloul from Sidi-bel-
Abbes in 1962.
Today's legionnaire is different
from his counterpart oi the past,
says Lardry. He is a reflection ot the
society in which he has grown up.
But the reasons for joining what still
is viewed as one oi the toughest and
most highly disciplined military
organiz.atii.nis in the world are not
all thai much different.
"There are main motives tor a
man to join the Legjon, but mone)
is certainl) not one oi them. He is a
young man who likes action, who
likes arms. He is a young man who
ma) have problems � political pro
blems in his home countrv. tamilv
problems, love problems or even
legal problems.
"The) like the idea oi living
under a rigid regime, and not feel
Kst or isolated. We speak of the
Foreign I egion family. It realh is a
tamilv where the ensemble oi the
corps, the officers, non-
commissioned officers and legion-
naires feel linked together. They feel
that their leaders are interested in
them
The Legion is picky these davs
about those it accepts into this fami-
ly. Three out of four candidates are
rejected. What's more, those ac-
cepted are given a couple of weeks
to think it over before making the
decision final.
�ttei a series oi physical,
psychological, intelligence and
securit) checks, the new legionnaire
is packed oii to boot camp in
Castelnaudary, near Toulouse,
where he spends four to five months
before assignment to a regular regi-
ment. Although nearlv halt oi the
recruits have previous militarv ex-
perience, all start their training from
tch.
I ardry, who has spent aboui halt
ot his 3o year militar) career in the
1 egion, savs what makes command
here so interesting is the wide vunetv
ol personalities and cultural levels
among the men. Among the
volunteers arc to be found manual
laborers, butchers, writers, teachers
and engineers. 1 here is even a
former rrappist monk in the ranks.
I he 1 egion on duty is spit and
polish; off-duty there is unusual in-
formality. Officers, non-coms and
legionnaires mingle iieciv.
Inendlv relations cut across rank.
�"Io command somebod) today,
you have to like the people you com-
mand says the general. "And to
like them, you have to know them.
It's important to talk with the
legionnaires. You learn a lot.
Perhaps even more todav than in the
past, human relations play an im-
portant rote in command
1 ot men who are disappointed
with ordinarv lite, who have trouble
with ordinarv pursuits, who are
haunted bv personal tragedy, the
I egion's mix ot rigid discipline with
the rough warmth ot a substitute
tamilv often provides contentment.
Perhaps (hat's win nearlv 60 per-
cent re-enlist after their first five-
year hitch.
As il to emphasize the urgency oi
his request, he shoves the pill bottle
in her face.
Though she has a dubious look on
her face, the woman silently opens
her purse and hands I ony a quartet.
She then hurries away, glad to be
gone as quickly as possible.
1 ony, triumphant, places the com
carefully in his pocket and declares,
"Shoot, that was eas
As someone else approaches I onv
begins his spiel.
"Hell, man the approaching
teenager replies. "I know what kind
ot medicine you're buying
onv shuffles away muttering
something about uppity.
"I reckon I'm about 65 years
old Tony savs. " been at this
(panhandling) for neat 20 oi 'em. It
ain't much fun
lon is a wino who spends his
days bumming mone) on downtown
streets. He figures he makes enough
mone) to afford a bottle every two
or three davs.
"I don't buy none of that cheap
stuff neither. Can't abide it, tastes
just like koolaid. Don't catch no
buzz on it neither
lonv enjoys catching a buzz.
"Helps me forget my troubles he
puts it.
"1 ost my job in '62 and I ain't
worked since. I looked for a job for
a while, but wouldn't nobod) hue
me. So 1 nisi give up
lonv had worked as a janitor in a
store in Wilson, but it closed in
1962.
"I been driftin' ever since
loin's wife left him shorilv after
he lost his job, taking their six
children with hei.
"1 ain't seen none ot them in
Yolanda King Gives
Dramatic Lecture
In Hendrix Theatre
B OTIS ROBINSON
v�ff Wrilrr
Yolanda King, daughter of the
late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr
gave a dramatic lecture Monday
night in ECU'S Hendrix Theatre en-
titled: "Black Theatre: Moving Us
Higher
With emphasis on progress for
blacks, Miss King quoted black
American writers and civil rights
leaders. She began her presentation
by reciting "A Dream Deferred" by
Langston Hughes. She stated the
poem emphasizes everyone has the
"freedom to dream
According to Miss King, it is im-
portant for blacks to remember
their ancestry. "In the words of
Malcolm X she said, "A people
cannot know where they are going
unless they know where they have
been
Miss King explained there is a
need for blacks to pursue a course
of unity. She said: "The common
goal has been as Ben Hooks, presi-
dent of the NAACP, put it, "to get
all you can. . .can all you get. . .and
sit on the can. . We need to join
hands and work together
On civil rights. Miss King quoted
her father on the issue of non-
violence. "Either there is non-
violence or there will be nonex-
istence. Quality, not quanity is the
measure of one's life
Miss King, who was 12 years old
when Dr. King was assassinated, ex-
pressed her feelings about her
father's death. "I was not sad at the
death of my father. I only thank
God for sending a r an like Martin
Luther King Jr She added later,
"If we can observe April Fool's Day
and Halloween, we can certainly
observe Martin Luther King Day
The lecture ended on a note of en-
couragement to students in the area
of politics and education.
"Voting does make a difference.
If you get behind them
(Congressmen), they will work for
you
"It is important that black
students seek all of the knowledge
they can get
Miss King received a bachelor's
degree in Theatre Arts from Smith
College in North Campton, Mass.
She received her master's of fine
arts degree from New York Univer-
sity.
The lecture was sponsored by the
Student Union Minority Arts Com-
mittee.
Parting Is Such Sweet Sorrow
This couple enjoys a sentimental goodbye scene on campus.
more than 15 years. Ven
know where the) at. Sometimes I
wondei
"Wanda (his wife) wa d
woman. I don't blame her none
leavin' me. I was drmkm" h
the time, (mess 1 drink h
When f onv tires i 1 � me ' w n he
simplv leaves. He estimat tha he
usually siavs m a town al
weeks at a time. He thi i heads tor
another, but he
eastern Viiharolina.
"I got me a brothei in K
Sometimes I stav with
don't like to imp
mostly I just sleep �
comfortable
1 onv sleeps in pai k . i
buildings, m tram
buses, in abandoned
wherever he can find
fords him protection
elements.
"Winter's the hard-
place. Got to look tor a
warm. Ram don't h
much. I can always find me
to stand under
Part ot rony's n
does go tor tood. He will
food when he cannot get
way.
"Sometimes people
or sometimes i find it.
throws awav lot- of good food.
"But I don't steal n
don't take nothin' from
ment neither. 1 ma) be a bun
least 1 don't take nothin'
don't want to give me.
"Well. 1 got to go get mt
more money lonv savs ambling
a way.
He). man. (
ou
'�'
These Jobs Are
Especially Tough
NEW YORK, I PI � Manv
Americans complain about their
jobs but People magazine has put
together a list of the six people who
"eminently qualify" tor the six
"Worst Headache" jobs in the na-
tion.
In its latest edition the magazine
says David Stockman, 34, director
oi President Reagan's Office of
Management and Budget, has a
tough assignment working an 110
hour work week while cutting $48
billion from federal programs and
making powerful enemies.
The magazine said other
"headache jobs" are held bv: �
� O.A. "Bum" Phillips. 58, new
coach oi the New Orleans Saints, a
team that claimed one "win" last
season.
� dale Hovey, 48, director of the
crippled Unit 2 reactor at the Three
Mile Island nuclear power plant in
Pennsylvania.
� Robert F. Thompson, 55,
aeronautical engineer, strugglii
get the much delayed Space Shi
oii the ground.
� Ruth Love, 48, the superinten-
dent oi Chicago's trouble beset
school district, who makes $120
a year, while coping with a v
million deficit.
� And entrepeneur E. Sterling
Hunsaker of Salt Lake City, Utah,
who is $613 billion in debt � a
figure about two thirds of the na-
tional debt. People magazine said
Hunsaker. who has found and lost
40 businesses and easily qualities tor
the "crowning award" r job
headaches is philosophical about his
problems.
"I may be wiped out he told the
magazine. "But if worse come-
worst there's always the Guinness
Book oi World Records
It's Those Little
Things That Really
Drive You Crazy
By DAVID NORRIS
r eitliirri r dilor
I suppose everyone has their per-
sonal list of little things that other
people do that drives them crazy.
Ranging in seriousness from
knuckle-cracking to scratching up
borrowed albums, these little an-
noying things can add up to alot of
headaches (or, alot of laughter,
depending on how you look at it.)
I hate coming u to play a pinball
machine and finding cigarette ashes
all over the top. It doesn't really af-
fect the way the machine works, but
it's still a disgusting sight.
Another thing 1 hate is having to
read a letter shown on a TV show
that is halfway cut off by the bot-
tom of the screen. It's especially bad
if the letter is an important plot
device, and they don't read it out
loud or explain it later on.
Most entrances to buildings on
campus have a set of two doors.
But, it never does any good, because
one of the twin doors is always lock-
ed. 1 always try to go out the locked
door first, and usually run into it
pretty hard before 1 realize that it's
not going to open.
Lots of annoying things can hap-
pen while going to a movie. Having
to go to the bathroom during an im-
portant part oi the movie is one:
another one (1 especiall) hate this) is
having to sit behind people who are
much taller than 1 am, blocking half
oi the screen.
I hate forms and coupons that sav
"tear along dotted line and then
rip down the middle when you try to
separate them.
I don't really like writing checks
because of the number oi mistakes 1
make on them. There are probablv
dumpsters full of torn-up checks o
mine where 1 had written "Pay to
the order to Twelve dollars and
thirty-five cents" or some such
foolishness.
Did you ever loan a pencil or pen
to someone who returned it with
toothmarks all over it? Or, have you
ever loaned a book to somebody
who gave it back scuffed, tattered
and with loose pages? If you have,
then you can see why these things
are high on my list of things to hate.
Light bulb packs always say on
the side that they have an average
life of 2,000 hours or some such
claim. I think 1 always get the sick
ones that conk out after a couple of
See SOMK, page 6, col. 9
n
t


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lilt K u I I
t Kl H I lws
Happenings
H KPI N1N IS
( ttm i i cnt
da 19
Men - H iseball v lemson, Han
� s

I i e
miul I tack & I ield Meet,
sv a Phi Biolog 103
S ' ball ll'ie Reason &
v Brewstei B102
P e Season Softball
1 )i essed to Kill"
��1 ei li Be" Hendrix
"Dressed to Kill"
� ei li Be" Hendrix
c Slate

I uesda 24
V00 p m Men's Baseball Pi ! I
1 ield
5:00 pin N ounjj Hom I '
.in I andingham Room
5:00 i1 in I ainiK c hild Assn Hi i V-
5:00 p m Deadline. Intramural c o ki Innei
ube W atei Polo
8 15 p.m. Voice Faculthambei Pi
VI Fletchei Rev Hall
March 24 pril 24 Intran
Minges (. i m
Wednesda 25
i oo p.m Men's Baseball I field 11
igton I ield
5:00 pan Deadline' Intramura
1 earn & Individual)
. k Intramural tiolf C'ki
lndi idual) I earn t aptains' & Pai
Meeting, Brewstei BK)2
School oj Art
� March 22- pnl 12 I a
National Competition: Works
' juried competition sponsored
Vale (2) Harrington School of Medicine and School ol n
the 1 as! v arolina rts F� al V
School t Mush
el Hill, Home aua, 19 Sigma lpha Una 1
Musicale, 7 30 p.m.
� March 20ynthia I I
Recital, 7:30 p.m.
ball ream (dp � Jennie Watson, violii
Officials' Clinic, Senioi Recital, 9:00 p.m.
� March 21 Northai 1 M 1
i ble( oncert, ssociation, All Da
� March 22 Donna Colemai
nis Mixed Recital, 1 5 p.m.
Ciym 2 � March 22 I Hawk
s i. ampus Recital, s. Iv :
� March 2; 1 1 n I
j ft ball p.m.
March 25 lauilt hambei oncert, 8 I
p. m
M
� I 1
Da I I law k ins. oboe I a. ult
; Pei 1 u ion I nsemble C 01 - !s n
Mai
P "
1 i uh y c hambei c oncei 1. -
Movies

Buccaneer
People" (R) Show - al 2:00, 4 U), � I
IK) a m. N1 'V
Bull" (R) Show I . 15 � I
M V ,I
Long" (R) Shows al I, 3, 5, 7 & K
M .11
11 nlisc
Some Pet
Peeves
( ontinued from paw
1
like i
I noi only hate,
n whei
ifl
IDD1 I
Dl I
1)1 i
11
Plaza
R) a 5, 7 & 9:00
e" (R) Shi I 20, 5 15, 7:10�&
(P i) SI, iw al 2 ?0,
Lridax 'real N � L-vil" (R) Show
(R) Shows al 3:20. 5:15, 7:10 &
( R 1 S( �� a 1 1:15, 5:15,
m.
n,n 11111
ttic
II ss B( )1 1

10 pan
-
i
Cinema Society
Showing 'Orpheus
GNC
neral Nutrition
America's Best Nutrition Values are at
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1 't'ir i 1-
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vitamin O ij RAISINS HONEY vitamin C
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39
STRESS?
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$C99 fsUPFR GARLIC 2o8r,VITAMINBl?l221 fi49
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Departmeni
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Hendrix
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ents and
I DDuurc aaeau�I. � it r 11 Lii 1 � .li i m .i i i � �a
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89: YOGURT Juices chips
BROWN
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lentils g�s shmpo� �s 'wsr1
69 �� sl09 s
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Green 1 '7V Af 11- C oa?
Scheduled Sunday
General Nutrition Center
Caroliiia-tast Mall
1.
ATTIC
Thurs Jesse
Bolt
FriSat
Pegasus Plus
Tues. in the
Phoenix Room
Tommy G & Co.
only Greenville
appearance
in almost half a year
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
AC OS1 Youi favorite
00k. I he famous alligator
111 lots ol lahuloiis colors
. ol the rainbow
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(All ring styles are also
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March 23, 24, 25 bLU St. I Supply Store Lobby
M
Pit
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Ma





I HI t SI KOl IN1AN MARCH 1st, WM


iWjndrush
LaJIsjc teour Cottar. Tut Hep lAi
ft pw.c AJwejus
IT1!) rTHGooplLBUvi
l' yTpoT cqTiJ
HAS Comffttvy I
mill v
Music Recitals Planned
Soprano Mysa Smith perform in recital lit
of Cairo. Ga and day, March 20. in the
violinist Jennie Watson Fletcher Music Centei
Raleigh, senior Recital Hall here.
students in the Fast 1 heir program will
i arolina University begin at 9 p.m. Both
School ot Music, will are candidates tor the
Fabric Workshop
Planned Next Week
Joan 1 intault, of the
University ot Illinois,
will be gimg a two-da
workshop in
photomedia techniques
on fabric on Monday,
Match 23 and luesda.
March 24 in the Jenkins
1 ine Vrts Center.
Monda evening,
there will also be a slide
presentation given be
Ms. l intault in the
Jenkiiu Auditorium.
The workshop and
lecture are organized by
Craftsmen Fast and
sponsored by the Visual
Aits Forum with funds
from the SGA.
Bachelor of Music
Education degree, and
Miss Watson is also
pursuing a second
degree program in
music therapy.
Alvsa Smith will per-
form "The Blessed
Virgin's Expostula-
tion" by Purcell,
C hausson s "Fes
Papillons Massanet's
"Adieu. Notre Petite
Table" from
"Manon Brahams's
"In W al desei m -
samkeit, Fanny
M e n d e 1 s s o h n ' s
"Sehnsucht two
Aaron Copland songs
and "Nancy Hanks"
bv Katherine Davis.
She will be accom-
panied by pianist
Elizabeth Braxton.
Miss Smith is a stu-
dent o' Virginia Finn
o the ECU voice facul-
ty and the daughter of
David and Faye W.
Smith of Cairo. Ga.
Jennie Watson's por-
tion of the program will
include the Adagio
movement from Sin-
ding's Suite in A
Minor, Opus 10:
Handel's Sonate da
Camera, No. 12 in F
Major; Stravinsky's
"Duo Concertante"
and Felix
Mendelssohn's I
Waited for the Ford
Her piano accom-
panist will be Stephanie
Tingler.
Miss Watson is a stu-
dent of Dr. Rodney
Schmid of the ECU
School . f Music strings
faculty and daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. J. Perry
Watson o' 4208 Union
St Raleigh.
Ready to teach
home nursing, first aid,
parenting, child care,
water safety, CPR.
Redross: Read for a new century.
j
The Fleming Center hae been here for you slnoe 1974.
providing private, understanding health oare
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hoars
Free pregnancy tsst
Very early prefnanoy tests
Bvenlnf birth control hoars
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
Pan 781-SeSO in Falrijh anytime.
THE FLEMING
H M C
A Pu:� - e ot This Newspaoei i'� A I. � � -unai
m
Electrolysis
REMOVAL OF
UNWANTED
HAIR
SUNTANS �
PERMS
$20.00
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COUPON
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Wholesale & Retail
l Ice Sales
SPECIAL REG
I
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t
39c
8-LB BAG 89-
with this coupon
Expire April 1 1981
�Hl ic Dai'1
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Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shnmp With trench
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Tues,Wed,Thur(Oyster Bar Only) 1 Doz Halbhell
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Ot Your Favorite Beverage
$2.99
41
10th l��n� SI
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Ph. 756-2011
iUbOUi
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SPRING SAVINGS DAYS
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On These Newest Fashions For Spring
Coupons Redeemable Today Thru Sat March 21
CHEENO WORK PANTS $3 $4
Get $3 Off Any Style
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DESIGNER JEANS $4
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$4
D.A. Kelly's
Downtown and Carolina East Mall
Phone: 752-8965 - Downtown
Phone: 756-8242 - Mall
Greenville, N.C.
F � RECORDS 4 TAPES m SjjJS
Record Bar
SOVSDS DELICIOUS
presents
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every Sunday at
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A
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ri
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Sale Starts Friday At 3:00
Saturday All Day!
WAREHOUSE
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Tremendous Savings In All
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Running Shorts and Tops
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Jerseys Fishing Lures
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Located In Parking Lot Behind
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210 E. 5th St.
Greenville, N.C.
BOND'S
SPORTING GOODS
j






1 HI 1 sl (. R 1 1
Sports
Clemson Homers Down Pirates, 14-4
.s
K'l Baseball Coach Hal Baird
1 radiiional N A tournameni
participant Clemson banged out 14
tins, including three home runs, and
capitalized on five East Carolina ei
rors en route to a convincing 14 4
win ovei the Pirate baseball team
Wednesday ai Harrington Field.
1 he 1 igeis. now 15-7, got thh
going in the second enning, taking
advantage ol two Pirate errors
score the first three runs ol the
test.
The tnsi Clemson homei came in
the fifth, when Hob Paulling la
ched .i three-run round-trippei to
pui the I igei s up 6-0.
1(1. now 5-3, got back in the
game in the bottom ol the fifth
when 1 odd 1 vans hit a bases loa
triple to score three Pirate urns.
The Hues nevei threatened aftei
thai point, though, asleim i
tinned to la it on the Cireemille
d,f,
I
1 1 �
I Mill
Sweeps Twin Bill
u
w awAyA'yA,r Aw A �y
rrvurwmsm
Bombs Wesley a
Wmm mmmm Revils Falls
First Round
Hn Ml II M M 1 l KUIN
k y M
i 1 . Davis led girls went two foi lour;
: a homer as shows me a lot abo .
� irled the win. " 1 hese two garner
hitters include n tbout where w -
a 2-4 as did infieldei defensive!) and iffensively
N.
W .
n.
. cond game, the I ad)
. ame out smoking as
, ted three runs in the se
. more in the thud.
Melod) Ham, a
Snow Hill, led the
� mei in the fourth.
continued. " M! in all, the I
shaping up as expeited
Dillon also impressed w.
pla ol freshman first I
I amm) Pai ham. "She i
some clutch plays for us she
1 he I ad l'n ates takt
this weekend as the) will pan
ft VH&4
Davis added hei second ol the in a round robin tournan
� e seven N.C state. 1 oes includ i
leanette Roth picked Western Ca ind
� the 1 ad) Pirates as state, along with the Wo
rd improve to 5-1. rhe 1 ad Bucs also pla i
Dilkn was impressed with the doublehead �' N.C . State on
n's offensive punch. "Hall our Sundav aft�rm
fy&&4
� R SR
Spring Drills
Set To Begin
A
: day.

M I

M SH II M I N I H ins
H
I Ha
4 si unj Split end (ierald
came in at 4.2 while
ic Redmond ran a 4.54.
les and Mike Davis
� �p finishers among
nan.
and 4 67, re
until the Vpi
Purple-Ciold game.
Riley Switching Sports
Kaihv Kill vsit from Ihe
completion ol her -jkv-
slmlikti senioi season on
Hie I ad Pirate basketball
team, now is set i� join the
1(1 softnall team.
Walden, Johnson Head Signee List
s H Kl I s( II SI)I IK
tiona �
1 as' (
a n I I
1 d I
: ol 2s
Pirate fos,p.ii.
-
Walden, from V
1 Hi School
had
I I
e came
w her. he
erioved
i .
Sport I
"Kko :
it .
Ml the 5-1 fbacl
i ,575 �). in 121 can
a z ' i ansl;
ime 13 � �'� pei -�
Walden's biggest i
,ga : Rockinghan Hi
rush' � i
on!) 11 tan ies
ton
(bv iouslv. I "1' i) i
with oughts ol having al
iund for foui yeai
"He' I Finitely one of th I � �
premiei runt backs in the
I the second yeai n o,
he has a keen desire to pla) earl)
H �h( �uld help us right awa)
I he recruiting race foi Walden
reported!) same down to ECU,
N State and Auburn
nothei true blue ; ei was
also mked b Emory and his stall.
being 6 4, 275-pound defensive
tackle 'sieve ohnson from Brevard
High.
I mor listed the all-state pet
former as one oi the top two deten
sie linemen in the state Such
powers as Southern C al. Alabama
t Dame joined nearly 100
a ho ol fered lohnson
p In the end. K'l beat
it N tharolina foi the stalwart.
re's no reason Steve should
� one Emory said.
"He I and runs like a deer.
c Mas a high sense ol com
a id wants to play and
. now
I moj een went so tar as to
honor- foi the Brevard
nati.
Su has a great chance to play
make honors as a freshman
a d "He really has a chance at
V America freshman team
I he II coach called the sign-
ings ol Johnson and Walden "a
great honor tor our program Moth
players have been selected to play in
the Slit me Bowl game.
I he third all stater mked by the
Pirates is Greenville's own c urtis
spell.
I he 6-5, 230-pound Ros�, High
was named all-state at defensive
tackle, with Johnson giving ECU a
lok on that position on the all-star
squad
Spell's athletic abilities are well-
respected, Despite his sie, he runs a
4 7 4( yard dash and high jumps
6'9
Othei award-winning piepsters
the Bucs mked include a couple ol
out-of-state stars.
Defensive end Aaron Carter (6-3,
21M hails from Gaithersburg, Md.
and was named to every All-Metro
team in the D.C. area He was
recruited by every major college in
the country.
W ide receiver Ricky Nichols from
Chesapeake, Va. received second
team all-state status and was named
the ridewatei area playei ol the
year.
1 he Pirates also signed i
brotheis ol former N.C . State
Ricky Adams, Calvin and Stefon.
Calvin was named all-conference
at quarterback at Sou! Invest
Guilford while Stefon gamed 1,270
yards for the same team.
During his final two high sch i
seasons Stefon tallied ovei 2,000
vards rushing and scored 4!
touchdowns.
Besides Calvin Adams, the only
other quarterback signed bv Emory
was All-l ast perfoi met raig
Brown oi Goldsboro High Brown
is also an excellent baseball player.
Brown, who threw tor over I.immi
yards and 13 touchdowns on the
gridiron this past season, is so good
on the diamond thai Emory tears
losing him to a pro baseball con-
tract.
A number ol junior college
signees also dot the list of Pirate
signatures. Several are expected to
contribute immediately
Tops among the .IC newcomers is
6-3, 225-pound defensive end lody
Schulz.
Schuiz, a former Chowan c ollege
standout, was named to the junioi
college All-America team this past
year and was recruited by all majoi
colleges in the nation.
Emory expressed satisfaction with
his second recruiting class, though
he said he would like to have signed
all the blue-chippers he sought
"1 think this is the best recruiting
year hast Carolina has evei had
he boasted. "For once we went attei
the kids everybody else did and
,a
Ste
er
Fred rrett
Br � t
Stev n
peatc�
Tba
Uillia
St
Ri ky ' i ch
Kenny PI I '
Damon P
Ld
JuJ ius
Jody Schulz
Thad Smith
Curt i s Spell
Aroos Twitt y
Ji �
�: � 'alkei
St 'in t

.
' ft
T
H
LB
LB
tv
LB
Dl
LB
RR
.
C
ro,
-
t. i
i
5 r
I 190
� � �
e
i
:
; �
I -
MCA.l
l
i s
�no
2 ?. 5
220
5-10 I
11 1

6-3
6-3
s t
teville, N'( i st
iston-Salem, !
irritu
ike VA Great
, nv Llle UC ' Chowan tint i
Athens GA t e Central
HS
Currit uck urri tucl
jtei " howan Junior Colle
h Point , i'lC ' "in
vill
t . r SC'Chowan Junior
r i nsl oro , MCAlort heast Cui " I i
� J.I .
� i
' V :
J'ini oi Coll ��. i i
ava w ni.
l i k, if 1 had known when we
came here last yeai we would
have tins sort oi yeai 1 probabl) continued recruiting success it the
would ha �' Pirate program reach sup-
building in Greenville
1 moi v said it ' i!
portet s expect;
"We nee.
yeai s like this � back I
back. We are definitel) headed in
right direction, thoufi
"





mi i sikoi iman
M K( H IV, 1981
d
Lady Thinclads'
Season To Begin
i
Buc Tennis Team In Action
MAI1HAN1)KK
SUII Wrilrr
1 ast Carolina's
MAW track team
starts out its season this
Saturday, traveling to
Gainesville, 1 la. to
compete in the 1 ady
Gatot Relays.
I his year's team,
with 11 members, is
relative!) smasll. It is
also young. I he Pirate
tracksters return only
tso seniors and one
junior. I he rest oi the
cam in evenly spin bet-
ween sophmores and
freshmen.
Seniors Catherine
Suggs and Daw n
Henderson hold, and
a c held for the past
three years, the top two
spots on the relay team.
Suggs and Henderson
both run the 1(H) and
200 meter sprints also.
Junior Ros Majoi
runs on the relax team,
and also competes in
the long jump and high
jump.
Rounding out the
'cam aie sophomores
Eve Brennan, Gwen
Dane). 1 isa Gray, and
Debbie Mulvey,
Newcomers include
Margie Rose
B u m garner, A n n e
H a r t m a n, Carol) n
Moore and Felicia
Warren.
Due to bad weather
the 1 ad) tracksters
have not had a smuch
pre-season experience
as they had wanted.
1 he) were only able to
compete in three in-
door meets. Instead,
the) have been concen-
trating on weight train-
ing programs
"The girls have
responded very well to
the weight lifting said
coach 1 auric Arrants.
" 1 hey're beginning to
see results and I think
that the weights have
really helped us
This year's schedule
is also different from
before
"1 tried to schedule
meets with mostlv
southern schools this
year so the team would
get a chance to compete
in good weather said
Arrants. "Our schedule
also is stepping oft in
high lime. We start ol f
against much suffer
competition
1 his weekend the
ti ack team will compete
in all events, except foi
the 100 and 200 meter
sprints.
' I his meet is going
to be high!) com-
petitive Arrants said.
"We don't reallv ex-
pect to score very
highly. This is just a
chance to compel e
under good weather
conditions, arid
eliminate some oi the
pre-season butterflies
� � ' ' -
-rrr
I -� � . -
I'iji f- ���;�
ECU Tennis Action
State Women Advance
K AI EIGH, NX
lead North Carolina
State past Georgia
State 85-66 in the first
round of the A1AW na-
tional women's basket-
ball tournament.
The Wolfpack trailed
11-5 in the early going,
but Rouse came in and
Angie Armstrong ad-
ded 13 points and eight
assists while Beth
Fielden had 10 points
lor the Wolfpack,
whose record went to
21-4. N.C. State ad-
vances to the AI AW se-
cond round at Cheyney
State College in
Cheyney, Pa.
Georgia State, the
A I AW Region 111
champion, was paced
by Terese Allen's 18
points. Sherry Stin-
combe had 13 points
and Denise Lloyd and
Sheryl Martin had 12
apiece for the Panthers,
which finished their
season at 28-5.
The East Carolina
men's tennis team takes
its 3-2 record to Wilm-
ington today
(Thursday) in hopes of
continuing the momen-
tum it picked up during
last week's spring
break.
After losing its
opener to North
Carolina, the team
rallied to win three of
four matches while
most other ECU
students were vacation
ing.
The most recent vie
lory came this past
Sunday over High
Point, 5-4.
Ther other wins came
over George
Washington. 7-2, and
Lehigh, 6-3. The loss
c a m e a gainst
Presbyterian. 8-1.
In the Sunday win
over High Point, Steve
Peterson. Ted Leppei
and Kevin Covington
all gamed singles wins.
The teams of Mark
Byrd-Jeff Farfour and
1 epper-Norm Brvant
picked up wins in the
doubles competition to
give the Bues a win.
1 epper and Brvant
competed in the last
match of the day with
the match tied, 4-4. The
1I duo fell behind
High Point's twosome,
losing the first set of
the match 6-7, before
battling back to take
the next to sets, 6-4 and
6-2. to give the Bucs
their third win ot the
young season.
Following today's
match with Wilmington
the Pirate netters host
Salisbury State on the
Mmges tennis courts
Saturday, with action
beginning at 2 p.m.
Lacrosse Club At Richmond
Lacrosse Club
1 he 1 acrosse Club
began its season with a
game W ednesday .
March 4 against Fer-
rum College of Ferrum,
Virginia losing bv a
14 margin. I he game
was played on the field
at the bottom of Col
lege Hill Drive.
The Lacrosse Club
travels to the I niversit)
of Richmond this
Saturday March 2! to
tangle with their next
opponent.
NC Soccer league
There will be a match
this weekend between
the two Greenville en-
tries in the NC SI .
but Rouse came in and I � f f � J f
hit s.xot seven shots to I rf S S II PQS
put N.C. State ahead "�wwi � � WW 4�r
M.17 �
P
23-1
Georgia State was
thin six points several
�he second
wi
times
Golf Tourney
Set; Changes
umes m i ne second
hall, but could run gel
closet as N.t State
graduallv pulled awav
to the 19-poinl win.
Still
Made
The Department of
Marketing and
Management in the
1 CU school oi
Business is still holding
Us golf tournament ai
Brook Valley April 16,
but a tew changes have
been made.
The tourney will be a
Iwo Man Best Ball
lour Handicap com-
petition. Contestants
may choose their own
partners instead ol be-
ing assigned one as in
the original format.
rhirty-two players
(16 teams) are needed in
order for the tourna-
ment to be field. The
first place team wili
receive $200 dollars,
while the second place
team receives SKK) and
the third place finisher
wins $50.
1 here is a S2( entry
tee. and the deadline
for entries has been ex-
tended to Wednesday,
TUH.WQS
April 1. Applications
mav be picked up at the
Department oi
Marketing and Finance
and must be turned in
lo that department
bet ore the deadline.
To be eligible for this
event, you must be an
ECU student or faculty
or staff member.
Members oi the ECl
golf team are not eligi-
ble.
It will he an 18-hcle
tournament, and the
entry fee includes cart
and ereens fee.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Snare drum Pearl,
lop ol the line Extra deep Ex
cond Call 757 3210.
FOR SALE Becker stereo
speakers, new. 32 watts
Superscope power amp S200 Call
758 1773
FOR SALE J C Penny 8 track
tape player Excellent condition
475 Call 752 4379 and ask tor
Keith
FOR SALE Weddmq gown and
veil Ivory Size 3 pettite Call
758 4238 alter 6pm
FOR SALE New 14 K gold one
third carat diamond engagement
ring Appraised at 4800 Will take
SSSO Call 758 1084. ask lor Mike
FOR SALE Bike Peugot ex
cellent condition New tires
tunes, brake pads 5180 Call
757 3156 or 758 7699 ask lor Steve
FOR SALE One Western Wood
Caribbean slalom water ski 530
One pair ol Cypress Garden
Mustang skis 420 One underdash
8 track player 510 Call 758 9889
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large house. 12
rooms. 2 baths Ideal lor student
group 5500 plus utilities 752 5296
ROOMMATE NEEDED 185 mon
thly plus one third utilities 7
blocks Irom campus 757 1064
anytime Availiable now
ROOMMATE WANTED Room
tor rent m trailer to gay person
Will rent only to responsible per
son Will share kitchen 425 per
week Bellstork Rd Call 756 9504.
ask lor Danny
APT FOR SUBLEASE During
summer Irom mid May to mid
August 600 Georgetown Apts
Call 758 0323
FOR RENT Spacious 12 room
house 2 blocks Irom campus
4500 plus deposit Call 752 5296
ROOMS FOR RENT: Kitchen
privileges 470 per month Call
756 8657 alter 4 30 pm
ROOMMATE WANTED
3 bedroom duplex near campus
483 a month plus one third utilities
Call 756 9456
PERSONAL
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
cheap rates Call Amy 758 6994
TYPING DONE: At home during
evening hours and on weekends
(or students, businesses or items
ol personal nature 527 7645 (
Kmston area Call alter 6pm
FREE Yoga, exercise and medita
tion classes Call 752 2076
SUMMER HELP NEEDED 20
students who can leave the Green
ville area long hours, good pay
Send name and phone no to Sum
mer Placement. 43 Creekwood
Court. Franklin, Tn 37064
OHM 14 KOVll
Che'ge Groceries Bee' Wine
o Masle- Charge Visa or
Oadit Cards
in- - i i- -i-i n rwoi'lii
mm ��
OB �� �w- a. ��� �� - ' "
mm I. ii.
W I mi I Wy
Keg 1 ice Deny
'tit A Ivan Si
rtl-IHI
at you want.
Your ArtCarved representative will be on campus soon to show you the
latest in class ring designs. With dozens of styles to choose from, you'll be proud to select
your one-of-a-kind design. Just tell us what you want. And be on the
lookout for posters on campus to get you where you want.
March 23, 24, 25
ECU Student Supply Store Lobby
Technical
Electronics
And
Maintenance,
Inc.
756-1387
Audio,Video,
&2VNa
Communications
Maintenance
(Preventive to
Overhaul)
Services directed h a W
( lass Klicensed techni-
cian. Mudenl of Applied
Phssics ai l-ast Carolina
t niursitv.
C onvenietelv Located
1 j Block Oft Campus
Pick-l pand Delivery
Available
90 Dav Warranty
Period
Ladies' Wrap Skirts
by Wrangler Sizes S,M,L
Ladies' Wrangler Knit T-tops
Jrs. Shirtmaker Dresses
Sizes 5 6 15 16
Men's Knit Shirts by Oxford
Men's Hooded Sweatshirts
zipped front Sizes S,M,L XL
Men's Lee Jeans on cotton)
264 By Pass Greenville N.C
Across From Nichols
Hours: 9:30 to 6 00 Mon Sat
MASTER CHARGE ana VISA accepted Call 756 1474
MILL OUTLET CLOTHING
t
r
SUNSHINE STUDIOS Offering
baliet, ia2i. yoga, and exercise
classes to students at a discount
Also ottering a very special belly
dance in preparation for the
Greenville Arts Festival All in
terested in learning the art or
helping n anyway please contact
Sunshine at 7S8 0?36 Classes
begin soon Sping break taken in
to account
NEED PROFESSIONAL TYPIST
tor your term paper thesis
manuscript eel Call Susan
Byers 758 82J! or 7S8 S488
WANTED Someone to record an
album on 8 track cartidgt- Call
758 8338
BASS PLAYER GUITAR
PLAYER WANTED For Part
time money making Top 40 beach
band Vocal ability required Can
757 3210 or 752 9288
WANTED TO BUY SPEAKERS
Small pair ot used Bose or Infinity
speakers Will pay resonable
price Call 757 3210.
YOUR CAREER What are you
doing this summer to prepare for
it? Find out why I BM, Xerox, Pro
ctor and Gamble. Upiohn and hun
dreds of others want students that
have worked with us For inter
view call 758 4513
TYPING DONE Term papers
thesis, resumes etc Call Jane
Pollock at 752 �71�
FEMALE PUPPY NEEDS GOOD
HOME 5 months old Call
756 5671 after 5pm
HAS REAGAN S BUDGET CUT
CAUGHT YOU SHORT' Then
get a high paying summer iobwith
a good Ob recommendation For
interview call 758 4513
J GREEN You re more then a
number m my little black book'
Hope you had fun in Lauderdale I
wish i could have seen more of
you E Queen
WANT TO BUY SELL OR
TRADE Comics artwork
albums, posters. magazines ect ?
Come to the 7th annual Greenvill
Mini Con at The Attic. Sunday
March 22 Dealers tables are tree
For further information call Th.
Nostalgia Newstand at 758 6909
SUMMER WORK Must be in
dependent and willing to work
hard For interview call 758 45U
PRICE SI 00 for 15 words OS for
each additional word
Make checks payable to The Eas
Carolinian
Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and
hyphenations
MAIL TO
The East Carolinian
Classified Ads
Old South Building
Greenville. NC 27834
Floyd G. Robinson
Jewelers
Greenville's
SEIKO Watch Headquarters
Diamonds Loose and Mounted
Gold-Filled, Sterling,
and 14K Gold Jewelry
Cash Paid for Diamonds and Gold
Dealers for J.O. Pollock
Fraternity & Sorority Jewelry
F,oyd G.Robinson va' Horns
Mike Robinson
Phone 758-2452
Downtown on the Mall
Independent Jewelers
204 E. 5th Street
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEKS SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT RELEASES
7.98 M)R 4.99
STEVE W1NWOOD
LOVER BOY
ELVIS COSTEI 1 O
NAZARETH
GARLAND II FFRIES
DAVID AI I AN COL
YARBOROUGH &
PEOPLES
8.98 m.k 5.98
ERIC CLAPTON
WII I II NI 1 SON
PAT TRAVERS
TED NUGENT
ISI LY BROTHERS
STYX
AEROSMITH'S HITS
9.98 mm, 6.99
Mil DIAMOND
STEELY DAN
13.98 m.k 9.99
HEAR1 I IVI
I U,l ES I IVI
15.98 h,k 10.99
BRl CE SPRINGSTE1N
ALL PARAPH AN OJA ON SALE
MOST IS 50�o OFF
j APPLE RECORDS T-SHIRTS
Regularly S4.50
I $3.99 WITH COUPON

WE BUY USED ALBUMS
Club Sport
Review
BY TIM WILLIAMS
I he American
Defendei Soccer Club
sports a 3-n record and
is in second place
behind league-leading
Atlantichi istian Col-
lege, !u own a perfeel
4-0 mark.
Meanw hile, I he
Stroh's Aliens, made
up ot ECl students, is
in 5th place and is of!
to a slow start alter
making the Stae
playoffs the last two
seasons.
I lie E( I game is at
the 1I Soccer Field
at 2 p.m. 1 he public is
united.
V omen's Rugbv
I he V omen's Ru
i lub is taking pai
double match this
Saturday, March 21 in
Greensboro against
UNC-Greensboro and
Reed t reek Rugb)
Club oi Raleigh
I'm sure this will be
quite a gruelling ex-
perience.
CHAPS, INC.
HWY 258 NORTH
KINSTON, N.C. 28501

Eastern Carolinas
Newest .And Finest
Private Club
Kri March 20th
JANICE
Sat March 21st
The Best In Beach
and Top 40 With
Mike Jones
Sun March 22nd
MIGHTY MAJORS
Wednesday Night's
are Ladies' Night
Members and
Their Guests
Welcome
Ail ABC Permits
From
5:UO-7:OOpm
$1.00
donation
from
every
pizza sold
Fast, free delivery
1201 Charles Blvd.
Telephone: 758-6660
Pizza ���
e$l
. � i rdered on dat
send our track tea
I

NCAi
amg
und
. be
lay March
. � S Sunday March 22
196' - � s o� the
' top oertorme'S
in Doth "rack & F.e I
,e a S500 scholar-
sO'ed by
no's Pizza Inc
You can order a ho!
� ' us meal from
Domino s Pizza and help
port our team '
Free 30 minute de .
. . � iiS a call'
sS
IN OS O0.
Drivers carry less than $10
Limited delivery area

,1
'� I M





10
1 Ml I M l Ki)l IM N
M Ki H 14. 1981
I
y
Government To End
Search For Victims
MONTtiOMl R ,
Ala. (UPI) Seven black
men who were used as
human guinea pigs in i
government expei imeni
on untreated s philis
have another three
months to come tor-
ward and claim their
share of a S million
settlement of the ease.
I S. Circuit Court
Judge Frank M.
Johnson Jr. Tuesday
set a final deadline of
June IS to complete the
six year nationwide
search
"We think between
now and June we can
really wrap it up said
Fred Gray, a Iuskegee
attorney �ho
represented the men
and their heirs. "We
just need this one last
push on it
Gray said he mas
have located t he
relatives of two of the
seven men.
The federal govern-
ment settled a SI.8
billion sun filed by the
NAACP. which charg-
ed that federal and
state agencies inticed
more than 6(X) black
men to join the experi-
ment in Tuskegee in
1932 with offers ol tree
food, tree rides and
cheap burials.
The Public Health
Service studied the ef-
fects o syphilis among
black males who had
less than a sixth grade
education. About 400
men deliberate!) were
given no treatment to
cure their disease even
after penicillin was
discovered as a cure in
the 1950s.
At least 28 men died
from the experiment,
which was terminated
in 1972.
Ciray, who was given
the tak ol finding the
men. said he had found
or confirmed as dead
all but seven of the 62:
men. or their relatives.
who took part in the
studv.
"We started out with
623 and were able to
find 616 he said.
"We've got only seven
left and we want the
opportunity to make it
100 percent
Three ol the seven
men George Anderson,
Alfred Campbell and
Reuben Law son Ruff
are dead, but their heirs
are entitled to compen-
sation.
Information on the
other tour, George T.
Anderson, Will
Blackburn, Shepherd
1 . Jones and I om Rob-
bins, is incomplete and
it is unknown whether
the) are alive. Most of
the men were last
teported in the central
Alabama area.
Gray, who received
more than SI million in
legal tees from the case,
said he believes he may
have found the grand-
child and great-
grandchild of the two
Anderson men.
He said articles in a
black publication. Jet
Magazine, helped find
some of the survivors.
And he has also receiv-
ed help from Sheridan
Broadcasting Co the
black news network.
The FBI and the
Social Security Ad-
ministration were
ordered by Johnson in
1979 to help in the
search, but Gray said
they had provided little
information.
Under the settlement,
the government agreed
to pay $37,500 to each
living syphilitic partici-
pant, SI5,(XX) to each
living participant who
did not have the
disease. $15,000 to the
estates of each deceased
syphilitic participant,
and $5,000 to the
estates of each deceased
participant who did not
have the disease.
EASTERN REGIONAL JETPORT
LIMOUSINE SERVICE
Van Limousine Service available to and from Kinston Jet-
port 7 days per week all flights. 1 person $25.00 - 2 people
$12.50 each - 3 or more $10.00 each including baggage.
Also Charter trips to Beaches in season and other points of
interest.
Call JETPORT LIMO. SERVICE anytime 522-3850
Kinston N.C.
He Pick Up Anywhere, We Go Anywhere
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If you nttd monty for fall clothos or football tickets, now It �
good time to tall your gold and tllvor valuables. And hart's a
good way to gat EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
to COIN & RING MAN!
JP
Outlook Improves
For Bilingual Ed
SUMMER WORK
TRAVEL, EXPERIENCE, HARD
WORK, ADVENTURE
$1,098 per month
INTERVIEWS TODAY
Brewster 103-D
1:00 or 4:00 or 7:00
W ASH1NGTON
(SPS)�The outlook
tor bilingual education
plans brightened this
month after a high level
meeting between
Republican ad-
ministrators and the
Congressional Hispanic
Caucus.
Caucus members
persuaded Education
Secretary Terrel Bell
and David Stockman,
Office of Management
and Budget director.
not to include bilingual
education program in
a plan that would give
the administration of
education money to
states, something ad-
vocates of bilingual
education say would
destroy bilingual pro-
grams
" rhe consolidation
ol bilingual education
programs into a block
grant would have had a
disastrous effect said
Rep. Edward Roybal,
D-Calif "but the
Secretary oi Education
was most cooperative
and has assured me that
bilingual education will
continue to be a
separate federal
responsibility
Last month Bell
withdrew Carter -
supported bilingual
regulations which
would have required
that children who do
not speak English be
taught in their native
language.
Bell called the regula-
tions "harsh, inflexi-
ble, burdensome, un-
workable and i n -
credibly costly and
when President Reagan
announced his plans to
cut funding 25 percent
and give the a d -
ministration of federal
education money to
school districts and
states, things looked
bad for bilingual pro-
grams.
Under Reagan's
plan, states and school
districts would have
complete control of
education money ami
could fund programs at
whatever levels the)
think are appropriate.
The Media Board is
presently accepting
applications for
General Manager of
WZMB
Applications may be picked
up in the Media Board of-
fice in the Publications
Bldg. from 8-1 and 2-5
Monday thru Friday.
Almost everyone has i high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
lair prices and good service.
WI 0Y CASH ON THHPOT
(01 iiWILIT, VAMMIIISAIUHUK
MHKfD 10K - UK - UK.
$ GOLD $
� tINCS � NECXUCfS � WATCNIS � DIAMONDS
� CUSS IINCS � WEDDINC IANDS � DIRTAL
COLD � IIACELEtS � IROOCMES � LOCKETS
� CHAINS � UGNTIIS � CUFF LINKS � EAIIINCS
PAVING ON-TNI-fPOT
CAIHFOIITIMI MARKED
STIRLING SILVER
RICARDUif OF CONDITION
COFFEE SERVICES � GOBLETS
RINGS � SPOONS � TRAYS � KNIVES
� FORKS�NECKLACES�BRACELETS
� FRANKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE
$
I & RING �
Of HE SALES CO
401 S. EVANS ST
OPEN 9 30-5 30 MON SAI
MONY HOUSE SOUTH PHONE 752-3866
V OUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
ABORTION! .� TO
imwtmof
PRIONAMCY
� ��� a .����� tnovtivt
prtefttncr ��?. Mrtf cor,
tro. and probitrr, prvotvao
Cy counseling For tvrtfwr
information call �� osis
(foil ' fraa rwmtcr
100 HI $� t�tw��n
AM 5 PM wHUirt
NatMffh Winwi
MaaH Or�MMi�too
ntwmmmmmit.
Rip & Sew
Alterations
20 its. of experience
Reasonable Rates
714 Dickinson Awe
FREE FREE FREE FREE
WIN A FREE PARTY AT THE ATTIC WITH ALL THE
STROH'S BEER THAT YOUR GROUP CAN DRINK.
HOW?
Enter the
B
HOTO
PECIfUTIES
Stroh's Beer
ATTIC
South' No. 6 1 Rock Nightclub
CRAZY Picture Contest
Contest open to any group including Frater-
nities, Sororities, Dorms Dorm Halls,
Clubs, Professional Fraternities or any
group of 30 or more people.
It's Free � There is no obligation.
All you have to do is:
1. Be a group of 30 or more
2. Pose for a picture between, March 18 thru April 11
The 4 groups that create the most original, creative and crazy
picture will win a party together at the Attic -Plus- all the Stroh's
Beer that you can drink on April 20-Easter Monday.
Live Entertainment
TO ENTER: call Hubie Tolson -758-3658
. �� �� '
- - - �





Grandmas are real particular about their biscuits; but even Grandmas like Hardees Biscuits,
because Hardees is real particular about biscuits, too. They use only the choicest ingredients:
buttermilk, flour, shortening�and every batch is made from scratch every morning-
right on the premises. Then they fill each biscuit with ham and eggs or sausage or chopped beefsteak-
so you get the best breakfast in town, up and down and all around. That's why Grandma
doesnt make biscuits any more�she gets them at Hardees!
� Hardees Food Systems Inc. 1981
. . .





Best Deals InTown
On The Best Eatin'AII Around!
Hardeei.
D
A HAM AND EGG BISCUIT AND
ORANGE JUICE FOR 99
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good Until 10:30 A.M. Through March 25,1981
Za2ei
0
A STEAK AND EGG BISCUIT AND
ORANGE JUICE FOR $1.09
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One-
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good Until 10:30 A.M. March 26-April 1,1981
�Hardeei
H
TWO SAUSAGE BISCUITS
FOR $1.00
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good Until 10:30 A.M. April 2-8,1981
Harde?x.
D
A SAUSAGE AND EGG BISCUIT AND
ORANGE JUICE FOR 95
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good Until 10:30 A.M. April 9-15,1981
Mardeei.
?
TWO BIG FISH " SANDWICHES
FOR $1.69
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good Through March 25,1981
itafi
?
A BIG FISH SANDWICH, REGULAR FRIES AND
APPLE TURNOVER FOR $1.39
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good March 26-April 1.1981
JhM
cjkkjl
n
TWO REGULAR ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES
FOR $1.79
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good April 2-8.1981
Mardeci
?
A BIG deluxe; regular fries and
MEDIUM SOFT DRINK FOR $1.69
Good at all participating Hardee s Please present this coupon before ordering One
coupon per customer please Customer must pay any sales tax due on the purchase
price This coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer Good April 9-15,1981
A UAy"





Title
The East Carolinian, March 19, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 19, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.119
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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