The East Carolinian, March 5, 1981






(Bhe la0t Carolinian
XL
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 N
li
10 Pages
Thursday, March 5, 1981
(Greenville, North Carolina
( irculalion 10.0(H)
Phthisic Beats Forbes;
Other Races In Doubt
B PAUL COLLINS
Wednesday's SGA election has
resulted in only one clear winner,
and a recount will be held rhursda)
morning in three ot the races.
Denise Phthisic has been declared
the winnei in the race tor secretary.
Phthisic received 1,866 votes to "SO
tor her opponent, Lou rine
i orbes.
Ihe tallies in the races foi presi-
dent, vice president and treasurer
were close enough to call tor a re
count.
The top two candidates in the
races foi treasure! and vice presi-
dent were each within two percent
� one another, and. according to
SGA rules, a recount is automatic
recount will also be held in the
presidential race. Though the vote
between the top two candidates was
not within two percent il was close
enough for the eictions committee
to call for the recount.
In the race 1 ester Nail finished
with an unofficial count of 1,070
votes, and Russell Overman had
1.012. Ben Singleton finished a dis-
tant third with 500 votes, and Cms
Dixon had 108.
I he top two vice-presidential can-
didates were Marvin Braxton and
Peggy Davison. Braxton received.
unofficially, )6 votes and Davison
892.
Byron Nickens finished with 530
votes and write-in candidate Jay
Nichols trailed with 34
Ihe two candidates tor treasurer
finished within 20 votes of one
another. Incumbent Kirk Little
received 1,418 votes to Angela
Pepe's 1,398
It. alter the final count, the top
candidates are within two percent a
run-off election may be requested
by the trailing candidate.
II held, the run-otJ would be
March 18. the first Wednesday after
spring break.
A total of 2,816 votes were cast,
with 26.8 percent of the student
body voting.
Polls at the Croat an, Jarvis and
Tyler were late in opening, but
Patrick said all were open by 9:30
a.m.
"It took us longer to get all the
ballot boxes to the polls than we an-
ticipated he said. "Also a couple
of poll tenders were late. That was
the main problem
Patrick added that the late open-
ings would not affect the results. "It
affects all the candidates equally
He felt that overall the election
was a success. "1 thought the elec-
tion went real smooth. It was an ex-
cellent turnout
Students are shown otiny in Wednesdays SGA election. Ihe results of three of the four races are still in
Reagan Administration May Reinstate Draft
WASHINGTON (SPS)�The
Reagan administration mav be mov-
ing toward resumption of the draft
because ot the failures of the all-
volunteer force, according to
Washington lobbyists and military
policy experts.
"We see a real possibility of a
ft reinstituted at the end of the
year said David Rosenteld. staff
member of the Committee Against
Registration and the Draft. Added
Washington Peace Center Co-
Director Joe Miller, "It's in the
cards
Since the election. Reagan has
ret used to end registration,
although he promised to do so dur-
ing the election campaign. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger told
the Senate Armed Services Commit-
tee last month that the administra-
tion wants to keep the registration
svstem in place.
The secretary assured the panel
that he and Reagan would not
hesitate to recommend the draft if
thev thouuht it was necessary.
some military experts, however,
worry that the decision has already
been made. "There's no question
that he would like to bring back the
draft said Miller. "The question
is whether he will have the oppor-
tunity to do it. He could use interna-
tional issues- hke the struggle in
Poland� as a pretense to bring
back the draft
Meanwhile, the Selective Service
has recent Iv issued proposed regula-
tions for a fast mobilization draft
which would require vounc men to
report for induction within 10 davs
of notification. The Selective Ser
vice savs that these new regulations
are part ot the military's quick
response plans for dealing with thiid
world conflicts
The National lnterrehgious Ser
vice Board tor Conscientious Objec-
tors is concerned that the 10 dav
time period is too short. Draft
Counselor Charlev Maresca said,
"The limitations of time will no;
allow registrants to look into ex-
emptions and deferrments
Aycock Keys Open Unusual Doors
B Elaine Poole
1; mav be wise to pack up your
valuables along with the bathing
suits and skis this spring break.
Some rsidents ol the men's
dorms. especially lories and Aycock
feel that the secuntv isn't all it
should be.
�r. Hinton and his roommatre
v raig 1 amm said that main of the
room kev- m Aycock will open
other doors in the dorm as well.
"Lots of guvs can open someone
else's room with their own room
key said Hinton. "Some kevs will
slip into other locks very easily,
others you jusl have to jiggle a bit
Hinton had several pieces of
stereo equipment and a color televi-
sion removed from his room over
Thanksgiving. He said that no
evidence of a forceful break-in was
apparent.
ccording to Hinton, the door
wasn't damaged and the transom
was still nailed shut.
"Ihe only thing we found was
that the screens were off the win-
dows said Hinton.
Hinton and I amm requested thai
their lock be changed, and accor-
ding to Don Joyner, Aycock Direc-
tor, since Hinton and I amm had
� �
Sherrod To Visit
Education Secretary
B PAl LCOLLINS
si.s Editor
SCA President Charlie Sherrod
will travel to Washington Friday for
a conference with Secretary of
1 ducat ion Terrel Bell.
Sherrod is one of approximate
80 student leaders from around the
country that will be meeting with the
secretary to discuss the issues related
to higher education.
According to Sherrod. one of the
main topOics of discussion will be
the Reagan administration's pro
posed cutbacks in financial aid.
"My big concern is the cutting ott
of financial aid he said. "I just
want to hear fist hand some of Bell's
plans for education. If they're not
the kind of thing that students want
Winners
Announced
The winners of the four Pentax
1000 cameras given away in the
raffle to those having their year-
book pictures made for the 1981
Buccaneer are:
Robert Jordan
Amby Darr
Sherrie Grimsley
ZelleM. Phelps
Students can pick up their
cameras Thursday from 12-5 or
Friday from 2-5. Proper iden-
tification is required.
J
to hear I think he's going to get his
ear bent
Ihe agenda for the conference
will include a kevnot address by
Bell, in which he will discuss his
plans tor the Department of Fduca-
tion. Financial aid will be among the
topics discussed.
The Reagan administration has
announced plans to reduce financial
aid 20 percent by 1982 as part of its
budget cutting plan.
The conference was originally
scheduled last year by the Carter
White House.
Sherrod indicated that the new
administration had seemed intent on
cancelling the conference. As a
result plans for the conference still
have not been finalized.
Other activities at the conference
will include workshops and lectures
on such topics as the future of
minorities in education and counsel-
ing skills.
In an interview Wednesday after-
noon Sherrod also discussed the up-
coming meeting of the board of
trustees.
Among the topics the trustees will
be discussing on March 16 will be
possible increases in student fees
and the proposed seat for the presi-
dent of SOULS on the Media
Board.
Sherrod felt that the trustees
would take a hard look before gran-
ting any increases in student fees.
According to Sherrod, "The
board of trustees is very sensitive to
the students at the university. They
won't pass any fees that aren't
greatly needed
been burglarized. E I should pick
up the tab for the new lock.
"Dan Woolen and the Housing
Office have been very happv to
change locks on the rooms that were
broken into, it requested said
Joyner.
It a resident loses a kev and wants
to have the lock changed, he must
pav a tee of S12. according to
Joyner.
Hinton said that main people
don't turn in their keys as is re-
quired at the end of the year. "Some
guvs still have their room keys from
the previous year said Hinton.
Don Joyner admitted that it was
impossible to tell if a resident has
actually lost his key or not. If a resi-
dent does not turn in his key for
whatever reason, he is required to
pay a small fine.
When asked about the possibility
of a pass key being used to gain en-
t ranee into the dorm over
Thanksgiving, Joyner replied that
none of his resident advisors in
Aycock are allowed to have pass
keys.
The head resident, the programm-
ing assistant, the head janitor and
the director are the only ones who
have pass keys according to Joyner.
"We have not lost any keys, but 1
can't -peak foi the rest of the
do: ms. Some of the dorms allow
their advisors to have pass kevs in
order to let residents in when the)
have forgotten their kevs
Joyner felt that secuntv would be
tighter if all advisors did not have
pass kevs
When Lt. Rose of campus securi-
ty was asked about progress in fin-
ding the stoien goods and those
responsible tor the break-in. he said
that all their leads had been ex-
hausted Ihev have no suspects or
witnesses, according to Rose.
Rose confirmed that the outside
locks on the men's dorms had been
changed but that the inside room
locks had not.
Rose also added that the men's
dorms were old and that the locks
and keys of the rooms were pro-
bably worn down.
Don Joner said that he put up
posters reminding residents to take
their valuables home at Christmas.
"I put up so many reminders to
the guys, that if anyone were to have
broken in over Christmas he would
have been discouraged
Seventeen separate incidents of
theft were reported as the result of a
crime wave that hit College Hill dur-
ing the Thanksgiving break.
I l,e call tor reinstitution of the
draft in recent weeks has come from
Capitol Hill as well as from lobbyist
organizations. Said Senate Armed
Services Committee Chairman John
lower. R-Ix "We may ultimately
have to face the problems of serious
shortages in active dutv and reserve
personnel All signs point to this
and we might have io go to a dra'f "
"In anv case Tower said, "we
should keep the registration p
gram in place. The biggest reason is
to have it for mobilization purposes.
It could save us some more critical
vtari n- davs m a crisis -n move
now to abolish the program would
nd the wrong kind of signal to our
allies and our enemies
"Registration has onl been a
token said Gen. J.M. Roberts of
the Reserve Officers Association.
" hat we need now is classification
for a draft, which would involve
physical and mental tests so we
could see who we really have. A lot-
tery system would be the only fair
way� if your number is called.
you're classified.
"Ihe real question behind
reinstitution of the draft is whether
we want to increase the sie of the
military structure. Our military in-
volvement should not be large scale
enough to warrant a draft
former Secretary of the Army
Clifford Alexander agrees. "At this
time there is no need to return to the
draft. If we get involved overseas,
though, the Reagan administration
will call for the draft
Reinstitution of the draft is a sen-
sitive political issue that could result
in widespread protest across the
country. Concedes Defense
Secretary Weinberger, "It might
dissipate the kind of atmosphere in
which we could re-arm America. It
ATES
would not be possible to do
everything that needed to be done to
beef up U.S. defenses in a totally
hostile environment
Opponents of the draft are
alreadv gearing up to fight ad-
vocates of the draft in Congress. A
national convention to counter the
"renewed and dangerous spirit of
militarism in Washington, D.C
was sponsored by CARD last
month. At the convention, anti-
draft leaders called for national
demonstrations in March and April
to counter the new pro-military ba-
in Congi -
Because il is such a controversial
issue, Reagan will not officially call
tor a draft until after his economic
proposals see congressional action.
according to White House staffers.
Said Doug Bandow of the Domestic
Policy Staff. "The economic
package is of prime consideration
now. Bv April we will see some ac-
tion on this issue
Bandow said some of Reagan's
options are continuing registration,
calling for a draft, or looking at
some other alternatives like pay in-
centives and or educational benefits.
As the Reagan administration
takes command of the Pentagon,
these options are being considered
because of their view that the all-
volunteer force is faltering under the
burden of increasingly severe man-
power, morale and management
problems.
The renewed call for a draft
comes at a time when the Army's
own internal studies indicate that it
may now be dangerouslv un-
prepared for combat. The report.
Human Readiness No. 5, concludes
that among the Armv's most severe
See DRAFT. Page 3
Work Study Students
To Take Legal Action
Photo By JON JORDAN
The phone pictured here, which is not operated by coins,is one of two that
have been installed on College Hill. The phones are intended to be used
primarily for collect calls.
B OTIS ROBINSON
and PAIL COFFINS
A group of work studv students
has taken steps to begin legal action
against East Carolina regarding the
termination of the program.
"Our purpose is to organize
students so that we have backing to
hire attorneys to represent us said
Nancy Feague. a work study student
who is coordinating the effort.
The group has begun to circulate
nine petitions on campus among
work study students.
Students signing the petition will
be asked to contribute $5 to help ob-
tain legal services.
Feague said that the group had
already contacted the law firm of
Howard and Duffus but that $200
would be needed to retain the firm's
services.
The group's goal is to have the
program reinstated.
Feague said she hoped the matter
could be settled through negotiation
with the university. "We would be
happy if the matter were settled by
the time we get back from spring
break.
"But if we are forced, our lawyers
are prepared to take other legal ac-
tion she added.
According to Feague, many work
study students were upset that thev
were not given more notice that the
program was being terminated.
"The delay in letting us know
wasn't handled well. They knew last
fall there was a problem with funds.
They should have given us some
more notice of the termination
Students were notified Thursday
that the program would be ter-
minated as of Sunday, March 1.
Financial Aid Director Robert
Boudreaux said that his office was
continuing its efforts to place
students in jobs through the Self
Help program.
"We have identified about 175
students who are on Self Help he
said. "These students won't lose
their jobs, but they would have to
work shotter hours
He added that students will know
after spring break whether or not
they will be employed by Self Help.
Richard Poole, of Howard and
Duffus, said, "If students come up
with a retainer, we will investigate
the case. We will negotiate to come
up with a suitable agreement for
See WORK, Page 3

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1 Ml I s .ko N1AN
1 ARC H 5, luM
Announcements
HUMANITY
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MUSIC
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Phi I la Sigma will meet on
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rm 2J1 Mendenhall Topn for the
mee' rtg a be . n nation of of
MAN IN THE
UNIVERSE
m the Universe A Criti
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meetino of the East
Man
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March 5
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HARASSMENT
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ID ITEM
POLICY
b� r�sdlty
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RETAIL
I Ml I AMAROl INIAN
MAK( H 5, 1981
Return Of Draft Looms,
Military Experts Say
Media Board Inquiry
Photo By JON JORDAN
The Media Board met Wednesday to hear allegations against The East
'oilman. Tim Mertz, who published The Student's Press, claimed that
the paper committed fraud when it reduced circulation without notifying
advertisers. He also questioned the validity of a trip to Reagan's Inagura-
tit n taken h two statt members
Students Listed By Race
PRINCI ION. N1. (CPS)�The
College Entrance 1 xamination
ivided ai least 11 col-
leges with requested iiis of only
black or only white high school
students, winch the colleges then us-
ed in their own recruiting programs
during the 1979-80 academic year
m Harvey, head of the Siudent
vey, the College Board's
eton subsidiary that actually
� the lists, says the computer
match-ups of colleges and the kinds
ol students the) want is "looked on
as a service, not discrimination
She added that requests for lists
ot students of one race or another
arc not uncommon. "Usually she
says, "it's because the) offer special
minority scholarships or cur-
riculum, and the) want to reach the
right market
Harve could offer no explana-
tion ol win a college might want a
list ol exclusively-Caucasian
students, but emphasized the Col-
lege Board's Education Testing Ser-
vice (1 I Si.
Galuska stresses that registrants
choose to simply ignore the
questionnaire or just answei some
o! � test ions.
1 lie College Board, through its
Student Search Survey subsidiary,
then sylls the information in list
form to College Board member in-
stitutions and government-
sponsored scholarship programs for
12 cents per name
In breaking the story of the race
listing in its February 18th issue, the
newspaper "In These Times"
charges the lists enable colleges to
"overlook minority students and
concentrate on whites only
Hare disagrees, saying the
system works "very much to the
students' advantage because it
helps ihem learn of available pro-
grams and scholarships.
The lists, moreover, have drawn
charges that the College Board
engages in a different type of
discrimination altogether.
The privateK-owned American
Student List Company sued the Col-
lege Board in 1975 because of its
refusal to make the lists universally-
available to anyone willing to pay
the price.
"Oh, it's been going on forever
Harvev says, "but the College
Board decides the policy.
Work Study Students saad-sshoe
To Retain Lawyer
RfcPAIK
11 3 GranaV Avc
7 MM 228
Quality Repair
Continued From Page I
problems is a growing
feeling among officers
that there is a large
number of "low-ability
personnel" among the
offices.
Weinberger told the
Senate that the Reagan
administration would
increase U.S. military
power by "enough�
and I hope in time� to
redress the inferior
position we now oc-
cupy compared to the
Soviet Union. Our
highest priority in re-
arming America is
manpower
A major cause of
these manpower pro-
blems, according to
analysts in and out of
uniform is the all-
volunteer force. When
the AVF officially
replaced the draft seven
years ago it was widely
assumed that the new
system would be better
than the old. Gl's who
voluntarily signed up
would be more
motivated than
draftees. This would
lead to higher morale
and more
reenlistments. These
arguments, however,
appear to have been
misguided. Said
General Roberts, "The
ABF has been damn
near a disaster
The problem is more
complicated than the
raw numbers indicate.
In 1980, recruiting
results show that the
Pentagon achieved 99
percent of its objective.
The reason for the up-
turn: the battered
economy. " T h e
military quotas are be-
ing reached because of
high youth unemploy-
ment said Steve Dag-
gett, of the Coalition
for a New Foreign and
Defense Policy.
Even though enlist-
ment figures are up, the
number of officers who
quit the armed forces is
also climbing. "The
fundamental issue is
( ontinued From Page 1
ides
" 1 am looking at the
papei work involving
tinancial aid said
university attorney
David Stevens. "1 am
not convinced that we
have a binding con-
tract.
The federal govern-
ment makes the money
available. We allot the
students to work part
time. This is a part of a
total f in anci al aid
package
Ruth Kai. associate
director ol Joyner, said
that a number of work
stud) students in the
library had been ab-
sorbed in the Self Help
program.
"We looked at the
number ol hours we
had lett in Sel! Help
she said "We figured
we could continue if we
limited the students to
10 hours (per week).
We found we were able
to add six students who,
work in the music
library
r
Free
Earpiercing!
w purchase ol our
pierced earrings available
in white or yellow lor
$5.00 plus tax.
264 Bypass West
Hrs. 10am-6pm MonSat.
lioore
CATALOG
SHOWROOM
Farmville
CHAPS, INC.
HWY. 258 NORTH
KINSTON, N.C. 28501
Eastern
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Fri March 6th
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Sat March 7th
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Sun March 8th
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compensation said
Joint Chiefs of Staff
Chairman David Jones
"When trained people
leave, the process
creates other problems.
You get into a vicious
cycle. Votx lose people
and then von have to
move the rest more
often or you have to
keep them deployed
more
The volunteer force
concept was designed
to compete, by and
large, with civilian
salaries. But since 1972,
when the armed forces
received their last ma-
jor pay boost, com-
parative earnings have
been sliding. Pentagon
experts calculate that
the average military in-
come, when adjusted
for inflation is about 11
percent below what it
was in 1972. For many
first-term enlistees who
make only S448.80 a
month basic pay, hour
ly earnings are substan-
tially less than the
federal minimum wage.
Said Major General
William Acker of the
Air Force Mihtarv
Training Center at
Lackland, Tx "A
good, sharp youngster
can do better working
at McDonald's
The declining birth
rate is also causing pro-
blems for the AVF. In
1978, according to Pen-
tagon estimates, 2.14
million American males
reached age 18. 1
year, the figures will
decline to 2.13 million
and bv 1992 it will fall
to 61 million. "The
Armv recruits men and
women under the age
of 19 and this group is
3.5 percent smaller now
than it was in 1979
said former Assistant
Secretary of Defense
for Manpower, Reserve
Affairs and Logistics
Richard P a n z i g.
" ompeting with the
whole range of public
and private employees
and with colleges, we
must now recruit one
out ol every five
qualified males in this
group
Another issue is
quality. Though the
Pentagon is filling its
quota of numbers in
the ranks, there is a
broad consensus in
Congress that t h e
members of today's
armed forces do not
match those ot the days
before the volunteer
force. The education
level of recruits has
been dropping as the
services strain to meet
recruiting quotas.
While 68 percent of the
enlistees without prior
military service had
high school diplomas in
1979. only 58 percent
did last vear.
Technical
Electronics
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756-1387
Audio,Video,
& 2 a
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Services directed b a Ki
( las M licensed techni-
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Phvsics ai I asi aroiina
I nivirsils.
Convenietel) Located
1 : Block Off Campus
Pick-1 p and Delivery
Available
90 )a Warranty
Period
TkMawQS
ona I, novn
Charg� Groceries Ber Wine
on Master Charge Visa Of
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mM I IT
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MOST IS 50� o OFF
APPLE RECORDS T-SHIRTS j
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i r-avonre Beverages
oo-o I 2 1
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$1.00 OFF on any Pizza
h redeeming this coupon
offer expires March 15, 1981
N
IMITMITTTITTTTTMimilllTIirr
MONTUES. - AVAILABLE FOR
PRIVATE PARTIES - PAPA KATZ WILL
CATER ANY PARTY OR FUNCTION. WE
ALSO HAVE A MOBILE D.J. FOR ANY
PARTY ANYTIME.
WED. - ORIGINAL LADIES' LOCKOUT
- 8:30-10:00 - LADIES ONLY - GENTS
IN AFTER 10:00.
THURS. - "SUPER COLLEGE NIGHT-
SPONSORED BY THE SIG EPS - DOORS
OPEN FROM 8:30 to 1:00 - NOW WITH
THE BIGGEST SHAG CONTEST IN GREEN-
VILLE. COME OUT FOR THE DANCE OFF.
MAIN DANCE OFF ON MARCH 19th
WITH OVER $300.00 IN CASH & PRIZES.
FRI. - ESCAPE THE DOWNTOWN
CROWD & INFLATION - JOIN THE
CROWD AT THE KATZ FOR AN AFTER-
NOON AND EVENING OF ENJOYMENT.
DOORS OPEN AT 3:00 & NEVER STOP.
MUSIC BY REQUEST. FREE ADMISSION
TILL 7:00.
SAT LADIES' LOCKOUT II" - LADIES
ONLY FROM 8:00 to 9:30 - GENTS IN AT
9:30.
SUN. RECORD BAR SPONSORS "NEW
WAVE NIGHT" AT THE KATZ WFOUR
PRELIMINARY DANCE OFFS EACH SUN-
DAY - $50.00 TO THE BEST DANCERS
AND $25.00 TO THE BEST DRESSED.
MAIN DANCE OFF ON APRIL 5th FOR
OVER $500.00 IN CASH & PRIZES.
COMING � MARCH 27 & 28 - LIVE
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MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
All members will be entitled to 3 quests per evening Neat Cress
and proper identification will be required of all members and
quests
This special INTRODUCTORY MEMBERSHIP is only $1 00
All applications and dues must be returned to this address P.O.
Box 1�43 Greenville. N C 27834 N C State Law requires a thirty
day membership waiting period from date of application tor
clubs with brown bagging permits
There's More
Elbow Room in
Our Attic!
Nome
MEMBERSHIP
I Address
Telephone No.
Birthdota
. Occupation
j Hobbies
"I
Music preferences
DATE
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l
.J
?





$lj� ?Ea0t (Karoltmati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris Lk :hok, imp
JlMMY DuPREE, im�i�i
Paui Lincke. � Pa11 Collins,
D-wi SEVI kin. bWtaw CHAR1 ' S CAN1)1 � R �"�
Anita Lanc ash r, m. - v Da id Norris. viu.� i,�
March 5, lsM
Opinion
Page 4
Fall Break
Faculty May Approve For 1983
Our SGA has proven that cam-
paign promises do not necessarily
always go unkept. This year, with
the perseverance of the president
and other officers, the Student
Government was successful in
scheduling a two day fall break, ten-
tatively to begin in the Fall
Semester, 1983.
The first step they took in secur-
ing this break was to print survey
forms and have them handed out to
the students during the elections last
fall. According to Charlie Sherrod,
the 1980-81 SGA President, the
percentages were overwhelming.
The majority of the students
surveyed, 93.5 percent were in favor
of a two day break in October.
With the help of some students
from Chapel Hill, Mr. Sherrod then
devised a survey to use in polling the
faculty. The results of this survey
were also encouraging. Sixty per-
cent of the faculty were in favor of a
fall break on a Thursday and Friday
in October. Sixty-five percent said
yes and 31 percent disapproved of
beginning classes two days early; 55
percent approved and 42 percent
said no when asked if the exam
period should be extended to
facilitate the fall break.
The break has been tentatively ac-
cepted by the Faculty Senate Calen-
dar Committee. The plan in its pre-
sent form has scheduled the first fall
break on October 17 and 18, 1983.
The next meeting will be held on
March 17, 1981, and at this time the
full Faculty Senate will vote to ap-
prove or disapprove this schedule.
The statistics indicate that both
the students and faculty are in favor
of a fall break, and there is little
doubt that the new schedule will be
adopted for 1983 by the Faculty
Senate at their next meeting.
Since the majority of faculty and
students are in favor of the break,
why wait for two years to bring the
new schedule into effect? Next
week's spring break, for example, is
a good time to unwind from the
books for a short while, and get
mentally prepared for the second
half of the semester. This same kind
of break is also needed in the fall.
It should not always be necessary
for the implementation of new pro-
cedures to be delayed for a couple
of years. Let's hope to not only see
the approval o( a two day fall
break, but also have it scheduled to
be in effect for the Fall Semester,
1981. Since the elections yesterday,
let this be an encouragement to our
new SGA officers as well, for their
diligent efforts in the year to come
to see their campaign promises
fulfilled.
Sketchy Election Results
Well, the Student Government
Association elections are behind us
now and we have a new administra-
tion to rally our support behind.
Right? WRONG
With only about 2,800 out of
13,000 student at East Carolina
voting in the 1981-82 cabinet elec-
tions, the only race which was
decidely tallied was that of SGA
secretary. Denise Phthisic managed
to out-distance Lou Ann Forbes in
that race by a margin of 1,086 votes.
Beyond that, only Lester Nail
could manage to establish a margin
of more than 20 votes, as he forged
a 58 vote lead over Russell Over-
man.
Without a doubt, the decision on
the vice-president and treasurer
races will have to wait until a re-
count is performed. Even then it is
probable that at least one office will
have to be decided by a run-off elec-
tion.
With less than 22 percent of the
student body participating in the
original election, how many people
may be expected to return to the
polls for yet another try at deciding
these offices?
So rhu, 1 -rotd Yt�n &oot EdST CaM-nU Cycmoq a f a
ofl&V, and ht staws VauaVun' hue ToVd Irvm That TVxtX
wefts, cyonna WL-teta Cost c�eoowMfc acvn 0ft Sorrh w.
'
Tax Proposals Meet Same Protests
WASHINGTON � M has been
fascinating to observe the reaction to
President Reagan's proposals to reduce
both federal spending and Federal taxes.
I here have been the same old protests,
from the same old sources, that "the
poor" are being hardest hit. while "the
rich" are being scarcelv touched.
This is demagoguerv. Several important
questions need to be borne in mind as the
debate proceeds. Among them:
1. Who is hardest hit by inflation?
2. What has caused our inflation and
unemployment?
3. How can we reverse these conditions?
ANSWERS � The answers to those
questions should be obvious. First of all.
everybody agrees that the poor are hardest
hit by inflation � and espeuallv the
unemployed poor.
What caused the inflation that today
threatens to paralyze our economy? The
answer to that is simple: Deficit spending
bv the federal government has been the
greatest single cause. The federal debt to-
day stands at almost one trillion dollars.
The interest on that federal debt will cost
the taxpayers, this vear alone, in the
neighborhood o 90 billion dollars, lust
iwo decades ago, the total cost o
operating the entire federal government
cost approximately the same amount that
it today costs merely to pay the interest on
monev alreadv borrowed and spent by the
Jesse
Helms
federal government.
And, it we are ever to turn the country
around, we must stop this federal waste
and extravagance, balance 'he federal
budget, and begin to reduce the federal
debt.
REACiAN � And thai is precisely whai
Presideni Reagan has proposed. It the
American people have the national will to
insist that n be done, we can avoid
economic collapse. But if we. as
Americans, are unwilling to make the
necessary sacrifices, disaster lies ahead.
Many political attacks are being made
on Mr. Reagan's pioposaU to cut taxes. I
have been gratified, however, thai the vast
majority o North Carolinians from whom
1 have heard have expressed support foi
the President's proposals, both as to cut-
ting federal spending and cutting taxes.
1 or my part. 1 believe I hat federal spen-
ding can he cut bevond what has been pro-
posed by the President � without harming
the truly needy ol our society.
1 A (.1 I � Many North Carolinians,
most ot them average wage earners, have
told me that they would be willing to
forego a lax cut it it would help stabilize
our economy and stop inflation. But they
insist that federal spending must be reduc-
ed and they are right.
It inflation is allowed to continue to
climb, the tax cut won't help the average
citizen. The real benefit that anv tax cut
should provide lies in whether small
businesses - in tact, businesses in general
will be allowed to retain enough monev
in increase productivity and create addi-
tional jobs.
Anv lax cut that doesn't do those two
things will do more harm than good.
IRY � It is certainly worth a try. One
thing is for sine: The old pohev o ever-
increasing federal spending and federal
debt hasn't worked. It never will. The free
enterprise system needs a shot in the arm if
ii is to survive.
So when you hear political rhetoric
about "the poor just bear in mind that
the poor people o' our nation have the
most to gain if our economy is revitalized
and strengthened. If we don't do the job
now, we may not get another chance.
r� Campus Forum
Mistake Prompts Withdrawl
1 am writing this letter as a caution to
all students before preregistration
because no one should have to suiter the
hardship that 1 have just experienced.
As a result of one single clerical error
in the transfer of my records from
General College to the School o Nuts-
ing. 1 have had to withdraw from
school. Now I realize this appears to be a
severe response to a simple problem, but
by no means is this at all elementary.
Allow me to clarify the situation.
When 1 preregistered last semester for
spring semester 1981, 1 was advised to
take chemistry 2620 and 2621, and 1 was
advised correctly according to the infor-
mation in my transcript. However, in
the transfer of my records from one
department to the other, my credits for
CHEM 1160 and 1161 somehow failed
to follow. Because of that, 1 began this
semester taking four hours o what 1
thought were required chemistry
courses.
After completing 4 and one-halt
weeks of school (and 2 chemistry tests), 1
received a note from the Veteran's Ad-
ministration office on campus slating
that there was a conflict in my courses,
and that they needed to see me im-
mediately. Further investigation reveal-
ed that I was taking a chemistry course
which 1 had now been given credit for.
The disturbing fact about the change in
my chemistry status was that it occured
without my knowledge of it.
Here's what happened. The V.A. of-
fice received a list of required courses
from the School of Nursing. CHEM
2620 and 2621 failed to appear on this
list, thus, the conflict. Because 1 was on
a V.A. scholarship, 1 needed to take a
minimum of 12 hours of required
courses. This mistake resulted in a drop
to 8 hours. After further investigation I
was dropped to 2 hours. Obviously 1 was
no longer entitled to full V.A. benefits.
Upon the advice of counselors, and alter
several hours o tears and though I
decided to withdraw
Realize this fact: 1 acquired all this in-
formation in one afternoon. My total
lifestyle chanced within 24 hours, and I
had no control over it.
I am angry ai the university because ol
this mess, bin I am also angry ai mvselt.
1 cannot consciously impute full blame
upon the university for my having to
withdraw, but 1 do feel that the univeisi-
tv should assume its share o the respon-
sibility. I am paying a high price, both
monetarily and emotionally, because ot
thai clerical error. To say that 1 am
devastated would be an understatement.
I'm not saving that the V.A. would
not have found a conflict in my schedule
if the error had not been made. Needless
lo say, the matter is complex. However,
the principle o the matter is that all ot
this could have been avoided if the in-
volved departments had dieir facts
stiaight from the beginning. The univer-
sity is to be justly condemned for its ac-
tions.
KELLY DAVIS
Freshman, Nursing
Gymnast Upset
The decision has been made, and
nothing can be said or done to change
the fact that gymnastics has been drop-
ped from the athletic program at ECU.
This letter will only serve as a vent for
emotions inside of me. that would other-
wise go uncared about by those people
involved in the cutting ot our program.
I just cannot believe it. 1 have been a
member of the ECU Women's Gym-
nastics team for two years and I have
watched Coach Jon Rose build a pro-
gram that, though young, has become
one of the strongest division II teams in
North Carolina. Washington, D.C
Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina,
and Kentucky. We began the 79-80
season with a team score of 103 points,
and have developed, this season, into a
consistent 120 point team. This weekend
we hosted the NCA1AW Stale meet and
won the Division 11 championship, scor-
ing an all time high o 124.45.
Our seven competing freshmen have
done an outstanding job. They comprise
3 4's of our competing team, and have
the potential to further their gymnasiics
development, possibly into national
caliber gymnasts. Next year, national
competition was definitely within our
reach. But now there won't be a next
year.
Gymnastics is such a beautiful sport,
combining athletics and art. It is such a
shame that Mr. Karr did not have the
chance to ever view any of our fine
young gymnasts in action during our
home meets. It is also sad that he
couldn't find time to sit in on one of our
practice sessions and see how much the
sport means to all of those involved with
the ECUieam. Gymnastics has been a
huge part of my life for the past 8 years,
and 1 really cannot imagine what it will
be like next year.
Coach Rose, all 1 can do is thank you
for your devotion to our program. It will
remain in my mind and the minds of all
my teammates forever.
ANNIE LOESCHKE
Junior, Phys. Ed.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
E
Shortlv ati
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husband sij
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HI 1 M K( t l
Features


li V
ECU Med School To Begin Genetic Testing
Shortly aftei she Finished college,
ickie knew she wanted to establish
herself in a careei before she and hei
husband started a family. Bv the
time she was 33, promotions had
put hei almost to the top of hei coi
porate ladder, and she and her hus
band kept saying lmaybe nexl
when the) discussed having a
baby V the back of then minds.
however, was the realization that
kie's biological time clock was
ticking away and increasing her
chances oi having a baby with a
congenital defect
ickie's name is fictitious, but hei
situation is similat to that of main
couples today who are postponing
pregnancy because oi careei goals
and financial considerations More
ie birth control methods
make this possible, and couples who
ofessionally ambitious ap
iate being able to control the
oi a family. But for women of
advanced childbearing age. the stark
ty is thai pregnancy carries a
highei incidence of chromosome ab-
malities. I he good news is that
prenatal tests are available which
ale physicians and parents with
information on the health of the
fetus.
1 he sophisticated tests are per-
formed in a cvtogenetics lab such as
the one being established at the Easl
Carolina University School of
Medicine. Women in Eastern Ninth
Carolina requiring prenatal testing
aie presently referred to the Univer-
sii ot North Carolina School ot
Medicine, but as early as this spring,
many ot the procedures will be con
ducted in the new cvtogenetics lab
here in the Developmental Evalua-
tion Clinic, a division o' the medical
school's pediatrics department. 1 he
lab will enable ECU to provide ad-
vanced genetic services for the
state's 33 eastern counties.
Genetic counseling and prenatal
tests are routinely recommended for
prospective mothers over 35 years
old. according to Dr. rheodore
Kushnick, professor of pediatrics
and DlC director. Although resear-
chers are unable to pinpoint why
women over 35 ate at an increased
risk, statistics do show that they
have a one to one and one-half per
cent risk of having a baby with a
chromosome abnormality. After 40,
the risk is two to five per cent for
example, the incidence of Down
Syndrome increases dramatically
tor the women over 35 to one in 280,
compared to one in 750 tor women
between 30 and 34 years old.
The main purpose ot prenatal
testing is to detect abnormalities
early enough in gestation so that
parents may make an informed deci
sion on interrupting the pregnancy.
Kushnick savs 98 pet cent of the
tests show no abnormalities and
thus relieve couples of undue anxie
ty. When a genetic disorder is iden
titled, only 1.7 per cent ot parents
choose to end the pregnancy, lor
parents deciding to continue a
pregnancy with a known tetal ab-
normality, the prenatal diagnosis
helps them prepare tor the arrival ot
the child and aids the physician in
managing the pregnancy
"When all the statistics are com-
piled, you realize that we mainly
give parents good news said
Kuishnick. "For every lOOpregnan
cies, 98 healthy children are born,
for the other parents, we .tie able to
provide them with information to
make an informed decision regar-
ding termination
I hat information comes from
tests conducted in a cytogenetics
lab. Under the direction ot Dr.
Kathleen Rao, the new lab will even-
tually offer many of the tests that
may be used to detect fetal defects.
Ot the 2.(KM) genetic abnormalities
that have been identified, nearly 50)
may be detected bet ore birth.
Basic to testing ot the fetus is am-
niocentesis, a technique for remov-
ing a sample ot the fluid that sur-
rounds the fetus. Although am-
niocentesis is not currently perlorm-
ed at ECU for genetic counseling.
Dr. larlath MacKenna, assistant
professoi of obstetrics and
gynecology, does about 6(K) pro-
cedures a vear to evaluate fetal lung
maturity. In the future, however,
samples ot the fluid he obtains will
be hand delivered to Rao and her
technicians in the cytogenetics lab
tor genetic evaluation. I he fluid is
veiv delicate, and testing must begin
immediately after it is removed.
In the lab the fluid will be spun in
a centrifuge to isolate the cells,
which are then put in an incubator
foi 10 to 14 days to encouraee
growth. From lha
may be manipulated in �
to aid the study i �l chiamiisome In
preparing slides tor the microscope,
different stains a ployed to
assist the technician m counting the
chromosome- and tudy
shapes and sizes Imaj
chromosomes are cut and pasted
to a karvotv pe. an ai I anger
chromosomes thai identil
of some bit th d
1 or exampl . I h w i
the most prevalani of chron
abnormalities causing m
dation, shows uj an
chromosome in the ol a
total of 4" chromosomes, rathei
than the normal 46 i I Syn-
drome, ot rrisomy 18, is identified
by the presence ot three nun bei 1 8
chromosomes, a onditioi
usually causes death
of three month- kaiv
show balanced tran ot
chromosom the pr
number is preseni bu I the
genetic material is wrong
place. In addition, ique
identities missing : ol
chromoso mes
chromosome material
Neural tube defects in the forma
lion ol the skull oi spine may also be
! if led before birth. I hese
defects, which occur about one
month after conception, include
! hitida and meningomyelocele,
which may be diagnosed
hemical test tor alpha-
iprotein. Other specialized
laboratory procedure are applied to
g n o s e r rare genetic
disordei
nothei technique is used to iden-
chromosome abnormalities in
children with birth detects and
adults with reproductive problems.
blood sample, a non-invasive and
expensive method ot genetic
. may also be used to do a
It the blood karyotype
does not i the symp-
ed by the physician, a
skm biopsy may be taken to identify
suspected detects as well a- diagi
metabt die disorders.
Ka and technicians in the
ib will select a techni-
� the chromosmes
See Ml. page 6. col. 1
fi
� r,
t

Occasionally, Insomnia
iKeeps Everyone Awake
Practice Makes Perfect
students practice in a Ja II class in the drama building.
Phc'i. by GAR t PA1 1 f HSON
By DAVID NORKIs
� "Dei you occasionally have trou-
ble getting to sleep
countless numbers 1 V commercials.
losi people would answer yes, it
they were one of those ho are
clined to talk back to then television
sets
1 here are all kinds oi reasons that
keep people from tailing asleep
when they wan; to. Some teachers
talk so loud in class that they keep
everybody awake the whole period.
Drinking stufl with caffeine in it all
day is a good way to stav up a
night, even it you don't want to.
Sometimes, for no particular
reason, you gel one ot those nighis
when you just can't sleep.
Io get to sleep, lots ot folks have
their own personal methods. (Some
ol these, unfortunately, keep others
from getting to sleep).
Some
radio loud �
tills lulls ;i . �
I �' cm
to profanity
I illy I

mils
It.
My p
an electik

set ve
is aro
�e
1 hei
as a
Underwater Archaeology To Be Studied
bmerged cultural resources in
New Bern harbor will be studied this
summer during a specialized tield
school in maritime history and
under w a rchaeology sponsored
by I asiarolina I niversity and the
N t I M ot Archives and
History.
Ih week program, set to
begin May 18, will provide students
with an introduction to historical
research, American maritime
hist. -nd scientific research
methods and techniques used in
recovering underwater historical
data
field school survey activities will
result in the collection ot data tor
the cultural resource management
program administered bv the state
division's Underwater Archaelogy
Branch.
According to Dr. William Still ol
the EC I history faculty, the harbor
may hold historic cultural material
from the earliest periods of Euro-
pean settlement in North Carolina,
since the Craven County town was
settled early in the 18th century.
Of particular interest is the
possibility that shipwrecks and
vessel remains may be "well
preserved'1 beneath the mud and sill
of the haibor bottom, he said.
Still, a maritime historian, and
underwater archaeologist Gordon
Watts will direel the field school
Students participating will attend
lectures and workshops to gam
practical instruction in such aspects
ot underwater archaeology as
photography, marine architecture.
mapping, artifact preservation and
cultural resource management.
Fhev will also learn the use of
electronic remote sensing equipment
and techniques of underwater sue
testing. Each student who completes
the program will receive six hours of
graduate or undergraduate level
credit.
Tuition and tees for in-state
residents will be approximately
$387, while non-resident tees will be
$673. Included are lab fees and ex-
penses o room rental and meals.
I urther information about the
field school is available from Dr.
William Still Jr Department o
History. ECU, Greenville, N.C .
27834.
seasonal. since you
winter withou rsell
Also. 1 hat a tan one
so loudly i'
the betit
hum.
Room
I
people like a hot,
other s li)
blowing in
dow . (Soi
electric fa
hum and
breeze.) If a v
stuffs room � i
in the dorm,
trouble.
1 find it easiei
not supposed � the
afternoons I! iked the
Latin V
siesta.) I he tin is in the
mornings when I need to be getting
up and goinj - or d
some work th ll ofl from
the day before. seems like 1 never
toss and turn ! ing to
again aftei the alarm clock goes "
It's roueh when . � e an eai �
� spend
f entit
"wo
I six h �urs of fluff -
geting in
. eight hours
�P
chool, I was
: to westerns that I'd stav
on the late show.
igh 1 had to get up it
lay I
tood westerns that
id shape
classes. It was a
�r me to doze
� tlv during geometry class.
C front row
5 desk
Pe kinds ol remedies
curing ins the least
v idespi � excessive dnt �
to bed. Many ex
ponents ol :hnique rea
passing out is not quite
same as going to sleep.
UCLA Shirts
Selling Big
In Japan
UCI is number one in lapan, ii
sales of sports clothing and equip-
ment bearing the U. ol California
I os Angeles logo is any indication.
le American campuswear in
general is big abroad. . shoes.
I -shuts and other items bearing the
UCLA symbol are bv far the biggest
is In fact, sales ot Bruin gear in
lapan te.ish.ed $17 million last yea
Rocking The Coliseum
Springsteen Dazzles Greensboro Audience
B MIKK HIGIISMIIII
staff Writer
I he Boss came, he saw. and lie
conquered. That is the only way I
can describe what happened in
Greensboro last Saturday night.
Playing to a packed house of
psyched-up. hell-raising fans, Bruce
Springsteen jammed through two
sets of high energy rock and roll foi
a total ot over three and a half hours
of music.
He opened the show with his well
known rocker "Prove It All Night
and followed that with "When I'm
Out On I he Streets and then his
ever popular "10th Avenue Freeze
Out" where he went out into the au-
dience and played for a few
minutes
Bruce's singing was true to form,
and the quality of his music that
night sounded as good (it not better)
than the music on his albums. One
thing that I noticed about Bruce
during his performance was the
respect he had for each individual
member of his audience He would
lump on one of the speakers at the
rear of the stage and plav for a tew
minutes for the people behind the
stage who couldn't see too well.
I've only seen one other per-
former do something like that, and
that was Stephen Stills with Neil
Young, and then he did it again
when he came back with Crosby and
Nash. I his shows, me that they en-
joy plav ing to every member oi the
audience.
Along with showing us what a
fine musician he is, Springsteen also
displayed the control he had over his
audience and his compassion for
those people sitting in the back of
the auditorium by asking us to sit
down and get comfortable for the
long show ahead. Lveryone follow-
ed his suggestion and sat down as lie
made a short speech about his rela-
tions with his father, and then went
into the song "Independence Day"
Springsteen didn't stick to just
songs he had written himself, but he
played an old tune by Creedence
C learwater Revival and a Woody
Guthrie song, "This land Was
Made For You And Me after say-
ing a few things about patriotism.
He also played such classic tunes as
"CC Rider" and "Good Golly Miss
Molly and he ended the concert
with an old Beaile tune, "Twist and
Shout
One of the highlights of the even-
ing came when the whole audience
sang the entire first verse to
"Hungry Heart which sent chills
up my spine. All Bruce did while we
sang was stick the microphone out
to the audience so that we could
hear ourselves. I have not seen au-
dience participation oi that
magnitude since every person in the
auditorium helped Crosby, Stills,
and Nash sing every word to "leach
Your Children which brought
tears to my eyes.
Another highlight came when a
young girl made her way onto the
stage, gave Bruce a big kiss, and
danced with him on stage tor a cou-
ple oi minutes Another girl tried
that very same thing but she was
pulled oii stage bv a roadie.
Bruce ended his first set with
"Thunder Road took a 25 minute
break, and came back to start his se-
cond set with "Cadillac Ranch
"Sherri Darling "Hungry
Heart "I ire "I ook But You
Better Not Touch "Sandy" and
"1 Came For You as well as his
other classic tunes. "Wreck On The
Highway "Racing In The
Streets "Candy's Room and
"Rosalita
I had always heard that Springs-
teen put some enerev into his per-
formances, but I didn't expect him
to almost kill himself tor us. At one
point during an encore song, he col-
lapsed on stage as the whole au-
dience went wild. He laid there
spread eagle on stage for a minute,
then Clarence Clemmons picked
him back up to finish the song.
For his first encore he did "I'm A
Rocker and then went into
"Jungle Land His second (and
last) encore lasted over thirty
minutes, starting with one of his
most famous songs, "Born To
Run He then went into a five song
medley starting with "Devil With
I he Blue Dress" and ended the
show with "Twist And Shout
The last 20 minutes of the show
was played with the house lights on.
It was then that the entire crowd
could see how much everyone was
into the show. After that last song,
when everyone knew ii was over, I
could hardly move. My body was
drained of every bit of strength. 1
can imagine how Bruce felt. I am
looking forward to the next time he
comes to North Carolina, you can
bet that I'll be the first one in the
Mcket line, because it is worth every
penny.
Last Saturday night. Bruce Springsteen dazzled a sell-out
Greensboro oliseuni with a over three and a half hours of
crowd in the
rock and roll.






I Hi- I-ASTCAROIINUN
MARC H 5, ls�Sl
LeAKiG AooKsr Collcgc Thc Hfco jjj
OW jOV KOOIaJ THAT"
Gf&VOMO fS SPWJ5H
v
Q,
PtOrYe TuPiajg
OWT 0� tIPLM�S
J
Classifieds
FOR SALE
Call
Art News: Senior Show, Lecture
Art work in various
media by Ann Davis of
Raleigh, senior student
in the hast Carolina
University School of
n. is on display in
Mendenhall Student
Center through March
S.
Her exhibition,
which includes graphic
designs, photographs,
and batik and tie-dyed
fabric works, is entitled
"The Brass Ring
Miss Davis is a can-
didate for the Bachelor
of Fine Arts degree in
communication arts
with a minor concen-
tration in fabric design.
She is president of
Design Associates, an
ECU School of Art stu-
dent organization, and
a member of the art
school's Visual Arts
Km urn.
Upon graduation she
plans to pursue a career
in graphic design and
advertising
Her parents are Ml
and Mrs. Joseph C.
Davis of 5040 Kaplan
Drive, Raleigh.
Color-
historical
modern
and its
effects�
ed by
Marcaret
its use in
interiors, its
applications
psychological
were discuss-
writer-editor
Walch of
Albuqerque. N.C at
an last Carolina
University interior
design program Feb.
21.
Ms. Walch was the
featured speaker at the
1981 Rally of the
Carolinas Chapter of
the American Society
of Interior Designers.
She is a former 1 ondon
correspondent and cur
rent associate editor of
"American Fabrics and
Fashions" and author
o' "The Color Source
Book" (Scribner's.
1979).
Other speakers were
Don McKerrer and
Judith Marsh from the
Atlanta design firm
McKerrer, Walker and
Graham, discussing the
variety of materials and
furnishings available
today.
The annual rally in-
cluded a chapter board
meeting, discussion ses-
sions, an address b
ECU School of Art
iacuity member Melvin
Stanforth and a recep-
tion at the home of
ECU Chancellor and
Mrs. 1 fiomas Brewer.
One hundred interior
design professionals
and students from the
C arolinas attended.
FOR SALE Parade drum
Premier, chrome in encellent con
dition Call 7V 3310
FOR SALE Aalerbeds direct
from mqt complete with
everything needed e�cept sheets
13 year warranty 179
David 7S8 1475
FOR SALE Hitachi D 330
cassette deck Dolby noise reduc
tion great shape S�5 Call alter
noons tor David 7S3 4379
FOR SALE Becker stereo
speakers new 33 watts
Superscope power amp 11 50 firm
Call 758 1773
FOR SALE Hawaiian Tropic tan
mnqoils Sellinq at one halt price
Royal t3 75 Professional S3 35.
Dark il 75 Dark with screen il 75
All are new and have never been
opened 1st come, 1st serve
Call 756 5409
FOR SALE 73 Ford Torino, 303
straight drive e�cellent condition
New tires. 33 mpg hwy S800 or
best offer Call 758 4870
FOR SALE 1973 Toyota Celica
rebuilt enqme. speed loaded
S3350 Car in Raleigh, seen by ap
pointment Call 753 8955
FOR SALE J C Penny 8 track
tape player E ncellent condition
S75 Call 753 4379 and
Keith
is' i-ai inmvei
MELODY
ask for
ECU Med School To
Begin Genetic Testing
Continued from page 5
based on the physician's diagnosis
and description of the patient's
family history. "The major thrust
o' genetic counseling is diagnosis
said Rao during an interview in the
lab. "We can't tell parents the risk
ol having a child with a genetic
defect until we know the cause of
the problem. Usually in prenatal
diagnosis we le�ok for everything,
but there are still many problems
that can't be identified by the tests.
"This is extremely specialized
work, and we have to place a lot of
emphasis on detail because some
deletions may be so tins. Because ol
the important consequences of er-
ror, our equipment must be working
perfectly and strict quality control
standards must be maintained
Rao said blood samples and skin
biopsies will be the first tests per-
formed in the lab. and she noted
that amniotic fluid studies will begin
when the lab is fully staffed. In ad-
dition to Kishnick, Rao and
MacKenna, the ECU genetics team
also includes Dr. Sudesh Katana.
assistant professoi of pediatrics and
primary genetic counselor, and Dr.
Charles E. Boklage, an assistant
professoi of microbiology and
genetics who is responsible for
statistical risk assessment. Boklage.
an internationally known expert on
genetic characteristics ol twins,
coordinated the development of the
lab.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT Large house. 13
rooms 2 baths Ideal for studt n!
group SS00 plus utilities 753 5396
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Two bedroom duplex
18C9 E SmthSt Close to campus
Call 758 6599
ROOM FOR RENT Large house
on Memorial Dr S90 month plus
one third utilities 756 6797
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED To live off campus
summer and (or) fall iyou can
help choose where) Call im
mediately 753 8085 ask tor
Phyllis
ROOMMATE WANTED Toshare
large house at 1410 Dickinson Ave
Contact Mike or Dwaine in person
Apprommately $100 a month
ROOMMATE NEEDED V85 mon
thly plus one third utilities 7
blocks from campus 757 '06-
anytime Available now
PERSONAL
RIDS WANTED TO NORFOLK
A Over spring ureak Must be
there atter 5pm Friday March
6th Will pay for gas expenses,
etc Please call 753 7488
FREEYoqa exercise and mdita
t,on classes Call HI 3076
SUMMER HELP NEEDED 30
students who can leave the Gif"
c area lonq hours qood pay
Send nfnie and phone no to Sum
met Placement 43 Creekwood
Court Franklin Tn 37064
FOUND Set ot keys 3 dorm keys
on horseshoe type keyring Come
by East Carolinian and identity
numbers on ke,s
RC Hello! I ve almost lorqutt.n
the color ot your eyes C.PJ
Award winner love YOUR
ROOMIE
MARSHA You re the sonq that
the trees smq when the wind
blows JEFF
SAMMY Happy
sary � I love you '
MR C Hope I didn t come on too
stronq on Tuesday but Id like to
spend some time with you Maybe
after Spr inq Break'
VICKIE Conqtatulations' I m so
proud Of you NS Award winner
Love. YOUR ROOMIE
TOKERMIT Have a qreat birth
day We II be takmq hits lor ya the
entire day! Think ot us in the hot
sand while you re stuck here
without a tan Your 3 buddies from
515
LOST 3 month old yellow Lab
puppy qreen collar answers to
Sam Vicinity ot First ' Jarvis
Reward offered Please call
753 9809 anytime
SKILLED UNDERGRADUATE
ASSISTANTS needed to help in
developtnq instrument computer
systems tor handicapped science
students If you can do drafting
computer programming
(FORTRAN ana assembler) or
digital electronics and want a
part time Ob, call Robert Mor
rison or David Lunney at 671
NEED PROFESSIONAL TYPIST
for your term paper thesis
manuscript etc � Call Susan
Byers 758 8341 or 758 5488
WOMEN S LACROSS CLUB
organuational meeting Tu
March 17 at 6 pm in Brewster
C 306 All levels of ability and ex
perience welcome
EMPLOYEES WANTED Hat
teras Hammocks is now taking ap
plications Students preferred Ap
ply m person 1104 Clark St
Greenville Phone 758 0641
LOST Set of keys on leatn. .
Budweiser key ring It found
please call 758 4640 or call 919;
738 4766 (collect, dunnq spring
break
TYPING DONE At home du' ng
. nmq hours and on weekends
lor students businesses or items
of personal nature 527 7645 (
Kinston area Call alter 6pm
SUNSHINE STUDIOS Ottering
ballet ian yoqa and exercise
classes to students at a discount
Also offering a very special belly
dance in preparation tor the
Greenville Arts Festival Ad in
terested in learning the art or
helping in anyway piedse contact
Sunshine at 758 0736 Classes
begm soon I Sping b'eak 'aken in
to account .
PRICE 11 00 for 15 words 05 for
each additional word
Make
Carolinian
checks payable to Thf I �
Kodacolor
ipatible Film
Developing
WITH
COLOR
PRINTS
20 exposure $3.79
24 exposure 4.19
36 exposure 6.29
n
h 1
i
KODACOLOR
FILM
DEVELOPING
3.79 ; 4.19
949:
6.29
VALID MARCH 16 20,
81
J
STUDENT
SUPPLY
STORE
WRIGHT BLD.
CONGRATULATIONS
PRIZE W UUKERS
M
Kf K
V
Alpha Xi Delta
Pictured left to right: Joyce Hutchinson, Social
Chairman; Laury Young, President; Terri
Bosher, Campus Rep Miller Brewing Co.
Sigma Tau Gamma
Pictured left to right: Dennis Whitehurst,
Social Chairman; Jim Moeller, President; Terri
Bosher, Campus Rep Miller Brewing Co.
Kappa Alpha
Pictured left to right: Franklin Clark, Social
Chairman; Hank Little, President; Barry Hern-
don. Campus Rep Miller Brewing Co.
Phi Kappa Tau
Pictured left to right: Doogie Johnson. Social
Chairman; Pete Montcastle, President; Barr
Herndon, Campus Rep Miller Brewing t o.
The Miller Reclamation Program scheduled during the
Fall Semester of 1980 was rewarding for the registered
organizations who competed in our Pick 'Em Up program.
The Alpha Zye Delta Sorority qualified for the Grand
Prize in the open division and selected the cash sum of
$1,000.00.
vV
IJ
& Bottles.
too.
In the fraternity division, the Sigma Tau Gamma fraterni-
ty qualified for the Grand Prize and selected the cash sum of
$1,000.00. The Kappa Alpha fraternity and the Phi Kappa
Tau fraternity qualified for the Runners-Up Prizes and both
selected the cash sum of $500.00.
Prizes were awarded in January 1981 to the winning
organizations. The Miller Brewing Company would like to
thank all the organizations who competed in our Fall 1980
Miller Reclamation Contest.
NEW MILLER COLLEGE
RECLAMATION PROGRAM
Here's how your campus organization could
have won exciting prizes, such as stereos, wide
screen TV's, and other valuable prizes. Not on-
ly that, but cash could have been collected on
a weekly basis Any recognized campus
organization was eligible to participate (NO
PURCHASE NECESSARY)
Points were awarded tor Miller cans and Dot
ties (where legal) turned in each week. Bottles
were awarded one (1) point per pound, and
aluminum cans were awarded ten (10) points
per pound.
In addition, each organization could have
received the current cash market value per
pound ot all aluminum cans turned in each
week.
Groups competed in two divisions tor grand
prize: the Fraternity (included all Fraternities)
and the Open Division (included all Sororities,
dormitories, and other campus organizations)
The top tinisher in each division won a choice
ot a grand prize (eligible tor a super grand
prize it the point requirement is met)
Regardless ot division, the next three top
groups with the highest point totals won an ex-
citing runner-up prize.
lo be eligible to have won a prize, a group
must have reached a predetermined minimum
point level as tollows Super Grand - 7,500
points, Grand - 3,000 points, and Runner Up
- 1,500 points
The Miller Pick Em Up Program ended one
week betore tinal exams commence and win
ners were notitied immediately thereatter
Prizes were awarded at the beginning ot
January 1981

t
I





J
I
I HI S1 c ARol IN1AN
Sports
1K( H 5. 1S�SI Page 7
Lady Bucs Take 3rd After Upset
B CHARLES CHANDLER
111 AIM 1 H11 1 Easl
Carolina's l7th ranked women's
basketball team came back from a
heartbreaking loss luesday night to
North Carolina in the semi-finals ol
the NCA1AW championship tour-
nament to annihiliate Appalachian
State ednesda in the consolation
round to keep its hopes of a regional
berth alive.
1 lie lady Hues watched a firs!
half 11-point lead fade away lues
da) as UNC used some strong inside
play to down ECU, 89-83.
1 he Lad) Pirates got back on
lrack against the I ad) pps,
though, in rolling to a 103-40 con
solation win.
i. Suite's 16th-ranked I ad)
Wofpack won the tourney, the
team's sixth straight stale cham-
pionship, b) del eating Carolina
"0-50 in Wednesday's title game.
State's 1 rudi laces was named
the tourney's most valuable playei
and headed up an all-tourney team
that included two Pack teammates.
Ginger Rouse and Angie Arm-
strong, along with UNC s Henrietta
Walls and ECU'S Kathy Riely.
Riley had a fantastic tourney,
scoring 62 points despite playing a
total of only 44 minutes in the two
games combined. The latter figure is
onl) four minutes over the regula-
tion 40 minutes that make up a
single contest.
The senior all-state performer was
the big star in last night's rout of
ASU, scoring 35 points in only 20
minutes o action. During one
stretch earl) in the second-half Riley
scored 13 points in two and a half
minutes.
I he Lady Pirates took third place
m the tournament with aggressive
defense and consistent offense.
It was the defense, though, that
was mosl impressive. ECU held the
1 ad) Apps to but two field goals in
the entire second halt. During the
second period Appalachian an in-
credibl) pitiful 8.3 percent from the
flooi.
On the other hand, the I ad) Hues
were fancying then wa) to their
23rd win against six defeats. One
school record was set and another
tied in the process while two others
Four Pirates Chosen
Seniors Kathy Riley of East
Carolina and Trudi Lacey of
N.C. State the onlv unanimous
choices to the 1980-81 NCA1AW
Division I first team, as voted by
the six coaches.
Joining Riley and Lacey on the
first team were ECU senior center
Marcia Girven, Duke senior for-
ward Barb Krause and North
nearly fell.
Senior point guard Laurie Sikes
equalled her own school record for
assists in a single game, dishing out
14. Lydia Rountree had four steals
in the win to eclipse Rosie Thomp-
son's career mark of 176. Rountree
now has 177.
Riley's 35 points are only four shy
of Thompson's single game mark of
39, set on two different occasions.
Following the contest Lady Buc
coach Cathy Andruzzi said she was
very proud of her club's efforts,
especially since the win came after
Carolina sophomore forward
Kathy Crawford.
The second team was compos-
ed of Pirate senior guards Laurie
Sikes and Lydia Rountree, Ap-
palachian State junior forward
Muriel Higginbotham, N.C.
State sophomore guard Angie
Armstrong and North Carolina
senior guard Aprille Shaffer
1
such a disappointing loss as the one
to UNC.
"I thought we played an absolute-
ly great game she said. "We
showed a lot o class, poise and
want alter losing in the semi-
finals
Andruzi said the club had been
very upset following the Tuesday
loss
"We were all very hurt she
claimed. "The girls were really out
of it. Nobody was talking.
Everybody was just real silent. After
seeing the wav we plaved tonight.
though, 1 have to be very proud.
This was really a great comeback
from the loss
The third-year ECU coach said
she feels confident of her team's
chances of receiving a bid to the
regionals of the AIAW champion-
ship tournament. She ret used to
believe that the loss to I N(
eliminated those chances.
"Our regional chances are like
this she said just prior to the
UNC-NCSl title game. "It Stale
beats Carolina tonight the) ate real
good
Of course, the Pack did go on to
down the Tar Heels rather im-
pressively.
"We've been ranked tor tour
weeks Andruzzi said, "and have
the best record in the state. We're
the only team with 20 wins in North
Carolina.
"I we don't go to the regionals
she continued, "it would be like
N.C. State beating North C arolina
in the ACC (men's) tournament and
Carolina not getting a bid to the
NCAA's. I he reason the) have at
large bids is in case ol upsets like
ours last night
Regional bids are be announced
Sunday at 7 p.m.
I he 1 adv Hiio started oil the
semi-final matchup with the Heels
in fine fashion, their lead reaching a
peak of 1 1 points when lydia Roun-
tree hit a jumper to put ECU up
29-IS with 6:32 remaining before in-
termission.
( arohna fought back, though,
and narrowed the Buc margin to
42-38 b) the half.
1 C I 's lead was hack up to ten, at
50-40, in the second half when
Rountree connected on another
lumper with 16:01 remaining.
1 he Heels outscored the Buss
19-7 over the next tour and a half
minutes, though, to take a 59-57
lead.
1(1 came bak and regained the
lead when Riley canned a bank shot
with 3:50 remaining to put her team
up. 78 77.
Riley fouled out seconds later.
though, as I began to smell vic-
. With Rilev out. the Bucs lost
momentum as I NC rode on to vic-
tot V .
Compete In Florida Invitational
Softball Team Set For Opener
ft �� .fr .
�. �
Williams Raps One Of Her Many 1980 Hits
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
XssKlanl sports tilttm
Okay, sports fans, get out your
pencils and paper, and get ready for
Spring Sports Quiz No.l.
Question No.l: What is the winn-
iitgest team in the history of last
Carolina sports
Question 2: What team won the
State Division 1 Crown, the State
Open Division championship and
the Region 11 tournament, only to
be stopped because there was no na-
tional tournament to participate in?
Question 3: What team defeated
N.C. State six times in the same
season?
If you answered all the above
questions with the 1980 Last
Carolina Women's Softball team,
you get an A.
Last season was a great one for
the Lady Pirates. The team finished
the season with a 37-5 record, and
capped off the record-breaking year
by defeating Northern Kentucky to
win the Region 11 tournament held
at Graham, N.C. The only thing
that stopped the Lady Bucs receiv-
ing national attention was the fact
that there was no national tourna-
ment to participate in.
The Lady Pirates will work very
hard to equal last year's ac-
complishments, says luad coach
Alita Dillon. "There will be no ex-
cuse for not performing well she
insists.
The team opens the season tomor-
row when they travel to Florida to
participate in the Florida Invita-
tional with Auburn. Florida State,
Florida, South Florida and Central
Florida
Dillon has high hopes for the
season. "I'm super optimistic about
this yearshe says. "Our girls have
more confidence this year because
everyone knows we are the team to
beat. The talent is tremendous
Indeed it is. Returning this year
are five All-State performers: left
fielder Kathv Riley. first baseman
Shirley Brown, short fielder Yvonne
Williams, shortstop Mary Powell
and second baseman Ginger
Rothermel.
Riley led last year's squad in ha-
ting with a .588 average, a club
record, and also set school marks
with 59 RBl's and 12 homers. Cat-
cher Fran Hooks was another
outstanding performer, as she hit
.414 and had a fielding percentage of
.900 compared to Riley's .996.
Riley and Hooks, as well as out-
fielders Lillion Barnes and Lydia
Rountree, will not be with the team
tor a couple o more weeks because
of basketball. Rountree is in her
first season with the team.
Dillon said that basketball season
should be a definite advantage for
these players. "They'll probably be
out another three weeks, but when
they return they'll be in good shape.
For them, playing softball will be a
slow-down compared to what they
were doing. Rilev and Hooks are ex-
cellent players
The I adv Bucs face a big
challenge in replacing hurler Mar)
Bryan Carlyle, who pitched ever)
game in state and regional tourna-
ment competition. "No one is going
to do a mirror job on Mary Dillon
said, "but we have two pitchers in
freshman Jeanette Roth and
sophomore Angie Humphre) who
both have done well in
preseason. Angie will benefit from
the experience she gained last
season
The entire outfield returns for the
lady Bucs this season. Center
fielder Miti Davis. Williams and
right fielder Cynthia Shephard give
the team a heavy-hitting threesome
to go along with the all-everything
Riley.
This year's squad has a good mix-
ture of veteran and younger playei 5.
According to Dillon, freshman Jo
Landa Clayton will see action in the
infield, probably at third or short.
"We have a whole lot of talent, but
we also have some real good
freshman recruits Dillon said.
"Rountree has never played here
before, but she will get some playing
time this year
Dillon looks for the defense to
hold this year's squad together.
"The infield and outfield are in-
tact she said, "and Clayton will
make us even stronger when she
plays third
Fast season's team set a ton of
school records, such as hitting at a
.355 clip, belting 28 home runs and
having fielding percentage.
I he team may be hitting better in
the preseason this year than last.
Dillon pointed out.
Speed is another important area
for this year's squad. Speed mer-
chants include freshman Melody
H am and Williams, w hose
nickname is "Flea Dillon said
that Shephard has good speed, as
does most o the outfield.
I he veteran infield consists of
Brown. Rothermel. Maureen Buck
at third and Powell. Brown set a
school record with her 191 putouts,
as did Powell with her 85 assists
Dillon said thai this season's
schedule is a tough one. "We're cut-
ting down on playing Division 11
teams she pointed out, "and we
also are playing a round robin tour-
nament at N.C . State
The round robin is one of the
reasons the I adv Bucs onlv have
tour games. Dillon said that the
tournament takes care of some of
the home and awa) games.
The onlv reason the team's sc. son
ended earl) last vear was because
there was no national tournament.
Well, this vear there is. and that will
probably mean trouble for any team
that tries to gel in the Lady Pirates's
way if they have a season compared
to last year's.
Veteran Clowar Fights Adversity
i
By BOBBKNSON
K I spurl Infnrmalion
He went from competing in the
Cherry Bowl to competing in the
NCAA finals. He's Fast Carolina
University ace sprinter. Jack
Clowar.
The Cherry Bowl, for those
who are not familiar with it, is a
swim meet held in Cherrv Hill,
NJ for the youth of the town.
At the ripening age of 12,
Clowar was already turning
heads, as he was crowned cham-
pion of the 100 yard freestyle and
200 yard individual medley at the
Cherry Bowl swim meet.
From that level o competition,
Clowar moved up a talent notch
and joined the AAU affiliated
Jersey Wahoos. While with the
Jersey Wahoos. Clowar kept
heads turning as he placed second
in the state in both the 200 and
500 yard freestyle. Along with his
swimming honors, Clowar also
collected the South Jersey Diving
Championship.
At this point, Clowar really
begin to make waves on the
swimming scene. His swimming
talent was churning up questions:
Who is this Clowar kid? Is he
worth recruiting?
These questions were quickly
answered as Clowar enrolled at
North Carolina State University
and started swimming for the
W'olfpack. Once involved in col-
legiate swimming, Clowar's times
dropped considerably. He
became an important element on
the Wolfpack swim team.
Although his times were steadi-
ly improving, Clowar was still
not receiving any scholarship
money. Dissatisfied with NCSU,
he began looking for a collegiate
team that would offer a scholar-
ship.
Clowar approached East
Carolina University head coach
Ray Scharf in' 1977, and
presented a record of times he
had compiled while at NCSU.
Scharf offered grant money in
return for Clowar's swimming
abilities. When the head coach at
NCSU heard of the grant offer
made by the Pirates, he con-
fronted Clowar with a grant offer
of his own. A decision had to be
made.
"I was faced with a tough deci-
sion explains Clowar. "I
wasn't sure whether to stay at
NCSU or should I transfer and
swim at East Carolina
Clowar's decision was not
easy, but two factors played a big
role in his decision.
"My brother was coming to
East Carolina, and I also knew
ECU had a lot of good
sprinters he states.
While at NCSU, his times had
dropped considerably in the
shorter distances, and Clowar
thought he could add to ECU's
already impressive team of
sprinters.
Not only was Clowar
academically pleased with his
decision to transfer, but he also
got the chance to team up with
such exceptional swimmers as
John Tudor, Bill Fehling and Ted
Nieman. Clowar teamed with
these three in the 400 yard
freestyle relay in the NCAA Na-
tionals in 1979.
"It was great being on that
relay team explains Clowar.
"We just blew people out of the
pool
The following summer, Clowar
traveled to southern California to
work out with Olympic coach
Peter Daland.
"The height of my really being
in shape was when I swam out in
southern California in the sum-
mer he says.
While in California, Clowar
missed Olympic swimming cutoff
times by nine-tenths of a second.
Upon returning from that
adventure, Clowar began to
notice a pain in his shoulders.
"The pain became so intense I
couldn't even get my arm in my
jacket said Clowar. He visited
many doctors looking for the
answer to his problem. All the
doctors prescribed the same
thing: 'stay out of the water
"I went through all kinds of
treatments: ultrasound, ice treat-
ment and anti-inflamation drugs,
but nothing seemed to work he
states.
Clowar, following doctors
orders, sat out until Jan. 12,
1980.
"I became fed up with things.
Things were not getting any bet-
ter he explains. "Finally I
decided I'd rather have my arm
fall off than not swim
Clowar worked hard for seven
weeks before the Eastern Inter-
collegiate Championships.
"1 had to drop my best event,
the 200 yard individual medley,
which I was first in by two
seconds, and pick up the 50 yard
freestyle which I was seeded 15th
in said Clowar.
As the results in the 50 yard
freestyle came in Jack Clowar's
name emerged in the number one
spot. Clowar had won the 50 yard
freestyle. It was some comeback
year, but 1981 is the year for
Clowar to shine.
He is now six-tenths of a se-
cond away from the NCAA Na-
tional Championship cutoff
times. With two meets left to pro-
ve himself, Clowar is confident
he will make the cutoff times.
"At Easterns I'll shave, so that
should give me the boost I need
to get the cutoff times he ex-
plains.
Scharf is confident that Clowar
will make the cut. "Jack is an
outstanding swimmer says
Scharf. He is a member of all the
record holding relay teams. He
holds varsity records in the 100
yard backstroke (53.7), 100 yard
Jack Clowar
butterfly (50.7), and the 200 yard
individual medley (1:54.00)
Scharf expressed a feeling of
reliability in Clowar both in and
out of the pool.
"If I put him ifl a race and tell
him we need the points, he omes
through for us the veteran
ECU coach states.
"He is the kind of swimmer
you need to go to the top. If he
puts it all together, he could be
our first Division I All-
America



9-





8
I HI I STCAROI INIAN
MARCH 5. 1V81
Booters Get Mixed Results
North C arolina
Soccer League
Both Greenville
teams traveled to
Wilson last Sunday to
play Mid-East Division
matches, but they came
home with opposite
results.
The ECU Varsity
Soccer learn, which
picked up the sponsor-
ship of the American
Defender Insurance
i o soundl) defeated
the Wilson Soccer Club
3-0.
The Defender's
tallied once in the fust
half as they worked the
ball down the field with
the final pass coming
from Brad Winchell to
his twin brother Brian
who pushed the ball in-
to the net.
In the second halt.
David Hayes beat the
goalie with a left-
footed shot from 18
yards out. Shawn Berry
booted in the other goal
as the American
Defender's remained
undefeated with a 3-0
record.
lhe Stroh's Aliens
played Atlantic Chris-
tian, the only other
undefeated team in the
Mid-East Division, and
were defeated by a 3-1
margin. The Aliens
played a tough match
against last season's
District 29 (NA1A)
champions with their
goal coming on a well-
placed penalty kick by
Rico Piva.
Men's Ru)b
The ECU Men's
Rugb Club plaed two
Club Sport
Review
BY TIM WILLIAMS
matches last Saturday
against the tough, well-
established Cape Fear
Rugby Club. Both mat-
ches, held in Wilm-
ington, yielded com-
parative results. The
A-team lost by a 30-6
margin while the
B-team was defeated
16-7.
The ECU Rugby
Club is one of only
three clubs in the state
made up totally of col-
lege students, and there
is usually a high tur-
nover of players each
season. Even so, four
plaers (Keith Dixon,
Omar Rafey, Pete
Dockery, and Doug
Reid) have been chosen
to compete for the Col-
legiate Select Side in a
match in Winston-
Salem March 15. They
were chosen in tryouts
at Duke University by
the N.C. Rugby Union
Select Side Committee.
Women's Kugbv
The ECU Women's
Rugby Club won a
"clinic" game against
the Appalachian State
Women's Rugby Club
by a 28-8 margin. They
played 30 minute halves
instead of the regular
40 minutes.
The girls next play in
a double match on
March 21 in
Greensboro agaionst
UNC-G and Reedy
Creek Rugby Club of
Raleigh. The next home
match is April 1 1
against UNC-G.
Held Hocke
Club
The Field Hockey
Club has completed
fund-raising activities
with the selling of
basketball programs at
women's basketball
games. There will be a
Field Hockey Club
meeting after spring
break. All interested
persons are encouraged
to attend or contact
Debbie Harrison at
756-5181.
omen's Soccer
Practice has begun in
Women's Soccer for
the spring season. Prac-
tice is held at the ECU
soccer field on Monday
and Thursday at 4:30
p.m. All interested girls
are urged to attend.
The team is registered
in the North Carolina
Women's Soccer
league and their first
match is against Wilm-
ington on March 28.
Team Handball
The men's and
women's Team Hand-
ball Clubs are now
preparing for the West
Point Tournament
scheduled for March
28-29 at the U.S.
Military Academy. In-
terested students
should contact Bob Fox
in the Intramural Of-
fice or Stuart Brilev-
KENTUCKY:
Young And Strong
AftMY WAVY STOBE
9 Firlf Ofck Fl.qht Snckri �
J i(r P�toli Pj'tn
SKOft CnmtM Boom piu
� 1M1 S Ev�i Sttf
B1RM INGHAM,
Ala. (UP1) � Lousiana
State's basketball team
better make the most o
this year's oppor-
tunities because one
gets the feeling that the
Bengals next year are
going to be back pla-
ing second-fiddle to
Kentucky.
Dale Brown, the
BengaK coach, may
disagree. But it's hard
to see how 1 SI can
lose four of its top six
players � including
11-Southeastern Con-
ference performers
Durand Macklin and
Ethan Martin � and
stil! keep pace with the
V ildcats who have
been playing their only
senior, Fred Cowan,
about half the time.
Brown has said all
along that this should
be LSI 's year and the
Bengals current 27-2
record (which included
a 26-game winning
-treak) and No. 3 na-
tional ranking supports
that claim.
"This team has given
me hope in youth
again1 said Brown
who has seen 1 Si's
cage record improve in
all but one of the eight
years he's been at
Baton Rouge. "This is
the most fun I've had
all along. This is a team
totally without pro-
blems. They aren't
statistic seekers, but
w inners
Martin, recognized
Golf Event
Taking Entries
The A R. Conley of
the American
Marketing Association
is inviting ECl
students and faculty to
play in the Four-Man
Captain's Choice
Superball Golf Tourna-
ment at the Brook
Valley Country Club
on Thursday April 16.
To be eligible, you
must be an ECU stu-
dent or part of the ECU
staff or faculty.
Applications can be
picked up at the
Depart m e n i 0 f
Marketing and
Management at the
School o Business and
must be turned in to
that department before
the March 20 deadline.
The tournament is
limited to the first 80
entries.
There is an entry fee
of $20.
Teams will be chose
by handicaps. The top
three teams will receive
gift certificates from
the pro shop at Brook
Valley.
as one of the best
playmaking guards in
college basketball to-
day, says this LSU
team is better than the
one that won the
Southeastern Con-
ference regular-season
championship in W79
and better than last
year when the Bengals
were ranked No. 2 in
the nation.
"We're mot e
together this year
said Martin. "We're
not concerned with
who's the leading
scorer, who's the
leading rebounder.
who's getting the most
publicity. We're just in
the game to win
But next season.
1 SI will be playing
without Macklin. voted
lhe SEC player of the
year; without Martin;
without center Greg
Cook who ran k s
among the best big
defensive players in the
league; and without
Willie Sims, billed as
"the best sixth man in
college basketball
On the other hand,
Kentucky, ranked No.
8 and 22-4 after beating
BENNIES
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1 SU (73-71) this past
Sunday in I exington,
returns virtually intact
and Wildcats Coach
Joe Hall sees even bet-
ter days ahead.
"Our young squad
(eight of the top 10 are
sophomores or
freshmen) has greatly
improved over ihe
season said Hall.
lhe impro ement
came with experience.
1 tie younger players
have a season behind
them now and are
beginning to learn what
it's all about
Hall wanted to use
Bowie and 7-fool
freshman Melvin Tur-
nm in a double post this
season � just like he
did with Rick Robe)
and Mike Phillips three
seasons ago when the
Wildcats won their
fifth NC A champion
ship.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 5, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 05, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.117
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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