The East Carolinian, February 19, 1981






Mt
(Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. 43
10 Panes
Thursday, February 19, 1981
(.reenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,(MM)
Liquor By The Drink Vote
Succeeds Easily In Greenville
Liquor By The Drink
Referendum Results
Precincts For Against
B lU IOl I INS
Greenville votei decided b an
overwhelming majority Tuesday to
bung liquor h the dunk to the city.
In the referendum approximate!)
61.5 percent oi those voting were in
favoi ol the sale oi mixed drinks.
In ui il tabulations 4,148
pie voted in favor of the
measure, and 2.599 against. The
Its will be certified today at 11
he Pit) County Board oi
1 he t it) Council, acting on a re
ireenville Restaurant
, decided las! November
to allow the - ot Greenville to
voie on ilie mattei
A county-wide referendum on li-
quor by the drink had failed in 1979.
but Greenville met certain condi-
tions that allowed it to decide the
mattei separately.
Turnout for the referendum was
about 45 percent, according to the
Board oi Elections, and seven of
Greenville's nine precincts returned
votes in favor.
Greenville becomes the 27th
municipality in the state since 1978
to adopt the sale of mixed
beverages.
A heated campaign by groups on
both sides oi the issue preceeded the
referendum.
The Greenville Restaurant
Association, which favored the
measure, and Concerned Citizens,
which opposed it, conducted exten-
sive advertising campaigns in the
weeks before the referendum.
Bob Sauter of the restaurant
association said, "We thank the
people oi Greenville for having the
good sense to pass liquor by the
drink. It is the best oi the possible
alternatives
Sauter predicted that the matter
would be forgotten within two
weeks. "It'll all be blown over by
then he said.
"I'm very disappointed that it
passed said Frank Steinbeck, a
member oi Concerned Citizens. "1
tried to give the facts to the people
in a clear and concise manner
Steinbeck said that Concerned
Citizens would monitor reactions to
liquor by the drink and probably br-
ing the matter before the City Coun-
cil again in two years.
As a result of the vote, only
private clubs will have the option to
continue brownbagging.
Restaurants will be able to serve
mixed drinks, but brownbaggmg
will be ended in such establishments
after April 30.
All restaurants and clubs that cur-
rently have brownbaggmg will be
eligible to serve liquor by the drink.
Most oi the downtown bars fre-
quented by ECU students will not be
affected by the change since they
would have to become private clubs
in order to serve mixed drinks.
� �
� � � �
Greenville 137
Greenville 3143
Greenville 4
Greenville 5
Greenville 6
Greenville 7
Greenville 8
Greenville 9
GreenvillelO
.189
.997
.270
.735
.803
.530
.444
TOTAL4148
� � �
80
118
199
598
206
534
312
341
211
2599
Task Force To Study Possibility Of Coliseum
B I 1 IM pooh
suit V nli l
big as a coliseum
come true in (ireenville?
( ount) commissioners, Green-
ville icials, the Greenville
rea (
1 asi (
he,
ol Commerce and
arolina administrators have
sing and working toward
coliseum a realitv for
ail man
Centei la
we've had tor a
aid Reid J Hoop
the Cireenville Area
sk Force and vicepresident
Wachovia Bank and Trust Com-
a 11 v .
. i proposed coliseum would be
big enough to host ice shows, con
ventions, circuses, concerts and in-
tercollegiate sports, especially men's
and women's basketball. Hooper
said.
Chancellor Thomas Brewer ha,
been a member oi the civic centei
committee since coming to ECU.
"East Carolina University of-
ficials swayed the thinking oi the
committee from a civic center to a
coliseum type building he said.
Brewer expressed hopes that the
proposed coliseum would provide
bigger and better facilities for inter-
collegiate sports. "If we want to
build our basketball program up, we
need a new playing atmosphere
said Brewer.
"Minges and Memorial cannot
provide for all the students' ac-
tivities, mtramurals and instruc-
tional needs
He also mentioned that the new
coliseum could be used tor Com-
mencement in place oi Ficklen
Stadium, which is susceptible to
adverse weather conditions.
Brewer stressed that the center
would be an eastern regional center,
not just one catering to Pitt County.
He added that there is no such
facility in eastern North Carolina.
and the (ireenville area would be the
most likely site for one because ot
the university.
The Pitt County Board of Com-
missioners has asked the Mid-East
Survey Shows 25 Percent Deficient
Commission m Washington, N.C.
for a Coastal Plains Regional Com-
mission grant to help fund a studv
to determine the .easibility ot con-
structing a coliseum.
A $45,000 grant is needed for the-
study. The study will cover site
analysis, projected atiendance for
activities, design and presentation
ot the building, financing needed
tor construction and maintenance
and economic impact.
The economic impact on the
Cireenville- community is the most
important factor that will be ex-
amined, according to Hooper.
"The coliseum facility will hold
conventions and attract new
businesses to the Put County area
Student Writing Problems Called Massive
SHINGTON
rwenty-fiv e percent ot
students have massive
problems according to the
National Assessment of
: al Progress writing surve)
released last month.
I he survev reports there has been
no major improvements in writing
skills in the last decade and writing
skilK are stabiizing at this low level.
I eii among students showing
competence in writing. NAEP
Director Rav Forbes said a decline
m writing quality and analytical
thinking was evident. "I feel very
good about what's going on with the
more basic skills, but I'm fearful
we're educating a generation oi
non-thinkers
The results combined 900,000
writing samples from the 1969-70,
1973-74 and 1978-79 surveys oi
students aged nine, 13 and 17.
"This plateau of achievement is
neither a validation oi current
methods nor an auspicious omen for
the future said Graham Down,
Stockman Seeks To Reduce
Aid To Education By 1982
executive director of the Council for
Basic Education. "I don't see many
signs of excellence in the national
assessment
"The achievement of our students
appears to be stabliing at a
discouragingly low level just at a
time when the prerequisites of
literacy are increasing, both in
number and complexity Down
said. "What passes for functional
literacy in 1981 will not suffice for
the year 2001, when these students
will be at the peak of their careers
The assessment showed that
students who wrote well "appeared
to have had amore writing
assignments in school Neither
13-year-olds nor 17-year-olds
receive much writing instruction in
school, the report found.
"What turns kids off to writing is
the short-answer writing, not real
writing said Charlotte Brooks,
Washington, D.C. representative of
the National Council oi Teachers of
English. "Students are not given
enough opportunity to write longer
pieces and they fee penalized by-
constant red marking of their com-
position papers
WASHINGTON, D.C.
(C PS)�Making good on promises
to try to re-structure and cut back
on federal education programs, the
Reagan administration wants to
reduce its support for education by
20 percent by 1982, and in the pro-
cess sharply decrease financial aid to
disadvantage, minority and
middle-income students.
Those are the highlights of budget
recommendations made by the Of-
fice of Management and Budget
chief David Stockman in a con-
fidential preview obtained by the
Washington -Vast
The preview, distributed to
members ot congressional budget
and appropriations committees, ad-
vocates undoing much of the Middle
Income Student Assistence Act�a
measure that took the Carter ad-
ministration two years to navigate
through Congress�and replacing
most college programs with two
huge block grants.
One legislator, Rep. Carl Perkins
(D-Ky), chairman of the House
Education-Labor committee, vowed
to "use his last breath to defeat
the budget cuts, says one of the con-
gressman's aides.
Specifically, Stockman wants to
consolidate some 57 school aid pro-
grams into two "block grants
which would be given to state and
local authorities with few strings at-
tached. The local politicians could
Virtually all the special aid pro-
grams for low-income and minority
students would be included in the
block grants. Among the programs
are $3 billion in Title 1 aid, $1 billion
in handicapped student aid (which
helps pay for making campuses ar-
chitecturally accessible to disabled
students), and money to help
desegregation, bi-lingual education
and school libraries programs.
Millions of other students will be
touched by Stockman's recom-
mended cuts in Guaranteed Student
Loan (GSL), National Direct Stu-
dent Loan (NDSL) and Pell Grant
(formerly Basic Educational Oppor-
tunity Grants) financial aid funding.
Under the Stockman plan, in
which the government underwrites
loans to students and parents at low
interest rates, money would be pro-
vided only after remaining sources
of aid were accounted for in deter-
mining a student's need.
The government would also drop
"in-school interest subsidies
Under the current system, students
repay back loans for tuition at nine
percent interest rates, while the
government pays the difference bet-
ween nine percent and the regular
interest rates banks charge other
customers.
If the Stockman plan is approved,
students and parents will have to
pay the regular market interest rates
he said.
Hooper's enthusiasm was not on-
I) for the welfare oi the city ot
Greenville but tor ECU and it's
students
He telt that the Student Union
would be able to book more popular
concerts and speakers since the col-
iseum would hold more people than
Minges does.
He slated that the coliseum
should be a shared interest of
Greenville citizens and ECU
students. The activities at
Mendenhall and Minges such as
speakers, tree movies, concerts and
sports have been as important to the
citizens oi Greenville as to the
students of ECU, according to
Hooper.
All the people involved in the
civic center project want to expand
what the university now titters,
combine it with the city's needs and
come up with something special, he
said.
"It's been a real love affair bet-
ween this community and ECU he
said.
Hooper expressed the importance
oi ECU and its students to the city
of Greenville and Pitt County. A
coliseum would be "the icing on the
cake Hooper surmised.
Some people feel that Greenville
can't afford the tax money for this
type of project right now. Hooper
said.
A recent tax re-evaluation of the
Greenville community has caused
property values to rise, therefore
raising taxes on many homes and
farms.
"It more money is needed tor the
study, Pitt County is willing to pro-
vide S5,000 'in kind Hooper said.
"In kind he explained, "is pro-
viding services toward the stud)
would normall) cost a
monev. Such in kind contributions
would be office space. se
help, etcetera, tor the res
doing the studv while in Green-
ville
Once the Pitt Count) C ommis-
sioners get the CPR( gram appi
ed they will tlsk five or six com-
panies to bid on it. rhe compan)
best suited to carry out the study
will he chosen, the studs should
hem at the end ot March 01 earl)
April, according to Hot
I as! year, Hooper, Brc m
ty commissioners and Greenville ci-
ty officials went to the Mid I asl
Commission in Washington, (
to ask for a written grant request.
They then went to the Econo
Development Administration in
Raleigh where the grant was approv-
ed.
From there it was sent to Geoi
for final approval and fund
"Almost simultaneously, President
Carter decided that the country was
spending too much money, which
meant many cutbacks
Hooper. The grant request was
denied.
The community oi Greenville is
behind the commissioners and are
helping the task force any way thev
can, said Hooper.
He went on to say that everyone
from Gov. Jim Hum. who ap-
preciated the need oi a center in the
eastern part oi the state, to the-
county commissioners, Chamber oi
Commerce and private citizens len-
ding their support in various ways
were conscious of a community
need, the importance o ECl 's ac
tivities and their combined expan
sion and erowth.
Gas Prices Rise Sharply
Across North Carolina
spend the education grants largely on the loans, which at this writing is
as they saw fit. at about 20 percent.
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
The Long Goodbye
.some students will do anything to avoid going to class
CHARLOTTE (UPI) Gasoline
prices in the Carolina increased
nearly 10 cents a gallon in four
weeks to an average oi $1.43 a
gallon for unleaded full service, the
Carolina Motor Club reported
Wednesday.
In North Carolina, the average
cost for a gallon of gas increased 9.5
cents and in South Carolina the
price jumped 9.6 cents.
In a survey of 175 service stations,
the club said unleaded full service
gas in North Carolina was selling at
an average price of $1.43 per gallon,
and regular was selling for $1.38 per
gallon. Prices in South Carolina
were $1.45 cents for unleaded and
$1.40 for regular.
At $1.36 per gallon for unleaded
and $1.30 for regular, self-service
prices trail full-service prices an
average of 7.2 cents a gallon in
North Carolina. South Carolina
self-service prices are an average of
8.5 cents less at $1.37 for a gallon of
unleaded and $1.31 for regular.
Average increases for both
unleaded and regular grades ranged
from only 5.4 cents a gallon by Shell
to over 11 cents a gallon by Texaco
dealers. Shell's lower increases
resulted in their having the lowest
average prices for both regular and
unleaded in the two states.
Some station operators interview-
ed by the club predicted gasoline
will cost $1.60 per gallon by June.
"Because oi all the publicity, 1
think my customers have become
accustomed to the increases, and
believe it's just the way things ate
said a Greenville, S.C Exxon
dealer. "They don't seem to be buy-
ing any less gas than they did
before. By the first of June, prices
will be about $1.60, and by
December 31, thev'11 be around
$2.00
Diesel fuel prices increased 9.9
cents to $1.31 in North Carolina and
4.8 cents to an average of $1.293 in
South Carolina.
The highest price gasoline found
in the survey was at a Durham full
service station where unleaded was
selling for $1.55 per gallon.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds7
Features5
Letters4
Sports g
t





Ill I M � KOl INI
I I HKl K 1. 1 S I
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
�� is
tot me T uesdav ssu i
.if , ' � , - � � �.
rhesi i �
ble spaci i I '� �'�
� � �
ADVISOR
SCHOLARSHIPS
trie Ldtne, W Pittard Jr
Mi �� i ial s holarship and the E
�� 4. � Atcountiny
. � , a be ,fA,rOed dor
� - i h si Molar
� , �. � approximately the
�evdent
pnl "J Oepar'men
R3VS . 5 or the Finan
� � . . application
� ���,�� Ruttl Jones
� n ot Si holar
�� . i( counting
itnei a
SLAP
�� �
and
n
� � �
BUSINESS MAJORS
��Jed du'
�o in ��
'
� � �
ELECTION
Anyone interested m running m
SOULS election, contact
Gracce Wells at 72 9802 or Eula
Moore at 752 8981 The deadline is
March 12 1981 The positions
available are president, vice
president secretary treasurer
parliamentarian and historian
SPEEDREADING
Speed Reading a class for
students and other persons in
terested m reading more rapidly
with increased comprehension
will be ottered on Thursday even
ings at East KCaroima Un.vers
Feb 12 April 16
' � . . lass will meet from ' t( 9
p m Continuing Education units
for partic ipa'mq professionals are
available
Further information ancl
registration forms are available
from the Office of Non Credit Pro
grams Division of Continuing
Education, ecu Greenville N C
telephone 75' 6143
PHOTOGRAPHY
photography ccw- a
be offered on Tuesday evi
East Carolina University II
semester
Camera " � I �'
wiii meet Mai ' ��
� Camera II meets Va-
April 28 Class sess.ons
. st. v.i tor 7 9 p m on
DUS
Participants m each course
shnu'd have their own � �
preferal � 15 mill metei m � �
formation anfl ran Irat i
materials �r these ann other
eveninq course offerings ar
available trom the Office of N i
Credit Programs Division of Con
I ng Education ECU Gree
. � tl � I I ne 757 6U3
OFFICIATING
S iening, classes m ott .
all sottbai' and so. t
SURF CLUB
SWIMMING
There W'll be a surt il
meeting on Thursday Fel - -
7 00 in rm 247 Mende .i1' ' '� 5
meeting is mandato. lot all
members Important I
as the f lot da It ip wn be di!
ed Be there
PAUSE
I on bW al ' (X B m ' �' ' ii '
Union a I v. II�
in us i
� . . � '
: � � 11 mei
El �
b will be � ' � '
at 6 00 p n
��.��, ei s are i
raged f
UNITARIANS
na Whtttey a Kacen � �
. . � . . show a
Africa a �- empha

arving Meet l beg
(he
Room of I
����
TWIG FELLOWSHIP
People leai i the I
��
�� . .
help themselvi . �
�-� ��
A

v
k rt
2 4 F i � � 26 I
AD TT
GENERAL COLLEGE
U N I T E D W A Y
NAG I- WANTED
N T E kNSH
RUSH
MODEL UN
ELECTIONS
� ��
for SGA pc
I . .
irea
Vi" �� �
later n �
p m
V � 'ator,
POETRY
fry toi
Fel - �� - �
248 B
FRISBEE CLUB
SOFTBALL

RECITALS
CO
OYSTER BAR
JTTTTTTT T T T Y TTTTTTT
NO W OPES!
TUTORS
i
CAREER CHOICE
;arolina
Qntt
16 narch 3
. � �. a �
' pOSOnS vOicI
��'��� pi eta'iOn, ta
:ails � fnt
r is John (0 � �
"A (treat
Seafood
Restaurant
HELP WANTED
INTERNATIONAL
federation ana founder ol It �
envillc Soccer Club, will in
struct the course
Both classes w� He gned to be
I only 1
ten �� I � " It . II i Bami
WORKSHOP
COMICS
reresti
e fiction a
� c r m a i

'
� 6
tmi Ed
. . s �. i phon.
STD
Sigma Tau Delta Eng si '
. �, a have a meeting
I ursday Feb 26 at 7 00 p n
'32 Susan Donalds
leruta Erdmann ot the Engis'
gram or Seascapes '�'� �
and Whitmar A short bus "
� ng a.ii precede the progr,
Ai . h rested person is - '�
itt
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974
providing private, understanding health care
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy testa
Very early pregnancy testa
�venJng birth control hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us.
anytime.
Can 781-SSSO in Raleigh
THE FLEMING CENTER
J
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday Plus X
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
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o
Wednesday
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Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
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Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday �
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
CALL FOR OUR
NIGHTLY SPECIALS
REDUCED RATES IN OYSTER BAR (TUES. THURS.)'
TUES WED THURS (OYSTER BAR ONLY i 1 DOZ
HALFSHELL OYSTERSSTEAMED OR R AWi
AND A MUG OF YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE
$099
F0SMCKS
1800 Seafood
EVANS ST. EXT GREENVILLE
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t The Best Pizza in Town (Honest)
Lunch Specials
Every Day t
3 00;
XXJLUJLIIIIIIIXIIIXJlIUL
so
CD STEM
POLICY
ich erf theee ad�artiaeC
nema it required to be raadlty
jvaitable for ul� m aech Kroge Satr-oo
e�cept aa epeclftceily rxrted in thie ad if we do
� jroulo an itawn �� aril! ofla yow you' cfxxca oi a
conparabia t whan available raMactlnfl tha aama aavmgt v a
ramchack which will antitia yoo to purcha�a tha �dvartlaad Ham al tha
advartiaad prtca within 30 dat
Items and Prices
Effective Th.jrs Feb 19
thru Sat Feb 21.1981
Copyright 1981
Kroger Sav-on
Quantity Rights Reserved

V"
T-i
a�


10
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Before, During &
After the Game
Kroger Sav-on
lias everything
you need!
SHAMPOO
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REGULAR OR LIGHT BEER
Black
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. ii i
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Tube
12-Oz.
Cans
16-Oz.
Ret.
Btls.
PLUS
DEPOSIT
DUNCAN HINES
Brownie
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4� "
ALL-MEAT SLICED
Oscar Mayer
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lawa��S.
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32-
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8-Oz.
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Chopped
save
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OPEN 8 AM TO 10 PM
UfcN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031





I HI I -SIAKOt 1NIAN
FEBRUARY 19, 1981
do

o a
I
Leaks ' Welcome' Reagan To Washington
WASHINGTON
(UP1) Welcome lo
Washington. Mr Presi-
dent.
Only a month in of-
fice, and Ronald
Reagan is already
somewhat annoyed at
the published "leaks"
about his programs
"We get surprised at
some o' the things we
r e a d in t h e
new spapers he
recently told a coalition
o conservative leaders.
1 he seem t o
always be looking foi
splits m the tanks he
said, but added thai tic
was "happ and en-
thused about the team
he has brought together
to fulfil! the primuses
ot his presidenc.
His complaints
againsl the press conic
with the tint, and those
before him often left
the White House with
bitter sears. Soon after
he took office, John
Kenned) said, "Tin
reading more and en-
joying it less
1 yndo n J o hnso n
blamed the press often
when reporters pin-
pointed his credibility
gap. Richard Nixon's
problems with the press
go back to the first year
he ran for congress in
the "40s. and they only
grew worse through the
eais.
Gerald lord manag-
ed to keep a
philosophical Mew of
the press, although his
aides were mightil)
unset over stories that
he was accident prone,
bumping his head.
Jimmy Carter will
tell his side ot the stor)
in his million-dollar
memoirs. But whenever
he met with groups ol
i si tmg editors, he
complained about the
W lute House press
corps, which he said
did not ask relevant
questions. He held his
last news conference in
October 19K0, some
three months before he
left office.
Reagan has held one
full-dress news con-
ference so far, and
another is promised tor
next week. But he also
has had a couple of ses-
sions with smaller
groups of reporters.
Before departing for
California he hosted a
break last briefing tor
125 out-of-I o w n
editors.
Since assuming the
p r e s i d e n c y, he is
achiev ing what I B.I
longed for: to be on the
from page nearly every
dav with a photograph
showing hum at work
or meeting with impor-
tant leaders
Reagan read- the
Washington Post and
the New York Times in
the morning. Also on
his desk every morning
is a news summary
prepared from
newspapers and broad-
casts the night before.
Photographic oppor-
tunities with Reagan,
those two-or three-
minute smiling ses-
sions, abound. The
cameramen have found
a president who
understands what
they're about, who
knows lighting and who
has patience with them.
But there is little or
no give and take with
the press, except on
rare occasions.
Reporters also are be-
ing kept farther away
from him, but still
within shouting
distance. The president
is insulated, so much so
that he asked his
friend, Nevada Sen.
Paul Laxalt, what was
going on in the world
outside the White
House.
Despite occasional
leaks, the Reagan ad-
ministration is keeping
control of the direction
of the news out of the
While House. The
press has focused on
nothing but the presi-
dent's economic
package in the last four
weeks, and in many
more weeks if Reagan
has his way.
They have managed
to do so by shunting
other foreign policv
subjects such as the
Polish crisis, the civil
strife in HI Salvador,
the Iranian hostage
agreement review, out
of White House news
briefings
White House press
secretarv Jim Bradv is
Library Considers Extending Hours
holding his own so far.
A couple of times he
has muddled through
or come to a dead
standstill when
reporters knocked
holes through his infor-
mation, particularly on
Reagan's tax pro-
posals.
But he gets by with a
lot because of his
geniality. "I've shot
myself in the foot; 1
don't want to blow my
leg off he laughingly
told reporters when
they nailed him.
Brady has access to
Reagan and there is no
question that the other
top aides in the White
House have programm-
ed him on what he can
and cannot say. But in
terms ot the climate in
the press room, there is
none of the hostility ot
some past administra-
tions, and so far
everyone seems to be
feeling his way.
The president, mean-
time, is getting what is
called m the trade "a
good press
�?'TW3-
President Reagan
Bv l)()l GQUEEN
Staff W nlrr
'The key word, the
operative word, for an
academic library is ac-
cess -aid V) c e
Brock rnann, head of
the circulation depart-
m e n t a I J o v n e r
I ib
Access was the topic
ol a meeting Friday,
among Dr. Eugene
Brunelle, director of
Joyner, Dr. Ruth Katz,
associate director. Dee
Brockmann, and Lester
Nail. SGA Attorney
Cieneral.
Nail, familiarizing
himseli with various
campus institutions,
vailed Brockmann re-
questing information
concerning a possible
extension of library
hours on the weekends.
Brockmann arranged
the meeting with the
directors of the Hbrarv
to discuss with Nail the
mission of Joyner
I ibrary w ithin the
university structure.
I he library ad-
ministration, according
to Rat, i very in-
terested in extending
hours of operation on
the weekends to pro-
vide the access
necessarv for a growing
educational institution.
Brunelle has planned
extensively for the
hbrarv to assume a
greater role in aiding
scholarship on ECU'S
campus, he said.
The problem in im-
plementing something
relatively simple as an
extension of hours,
Katz explained, stems
from a serious lack of
funds.
The libra r y h a s
essentially the same
budget year alter year,
hut inflation has taken
a devastating toll on the
money allocated to
hbrarv services. This
means that there is less
actual money for the
regular services, hence
the near impossibility
of new, more efficient
services being offered
to the faculty and
students of ECU in the
fulure.
Therefore, with less
actual money t o
operate with, it is dif-
ficult to schedule staff
members to cover addi-
tional hours of opera-
tion, Katz said.
Brockmann explain-
ed that the slate's hir-
ing freeze has tem-
porarily excluded the
option of adding new
staff members to super-
vise the intended exten-
sion of hours.
Brunelle and kat
agreed that it is in-
convenient for the
library to close at 5:00
p.m. on Saturdays and
open at 2:00 p.m. on
Sundays. They
therefore urge students
interested in longer
hours to make the
chancellor and trustees
aware that the desire
for improved library
services exists.
The Fast C arolinian
sum v
Published every Tuesd�� ag
Thursday ay ncj the academy
yen and every Wednesday Our
ing the s'j'imer
Efls� Carolinian the ot
newspaper ot Easl
Cao'ina Univer; �,
: � � -td. and published for and
by the students ot East Carolina
Un . � �
Subscription Rates
Business 135 ��� m .
All o" i?S -
! class pos'age pa
� N C
T 'if E ast Caroiin.an oft � ��.
i' ll " � Old Sou'h
Building
Telephone 757 6366. 637 630
Chapel Hill Studies
Curiculum Change
JIMMY BUFFETT
T-Shirt Winners
STUDENT Ticket Numbers:
Chapel Hill-il.P.)
An addition to the
�'Thornton Report" on
the undergraduate
curiculum allowing for
e x e m p 11 o n f r o m
uniform General Col-
e requirements is the
result ot a series of
:ommendations b
the administrative
board- of the Cieneral
College and the College
of Arts and Sciences,
I niversity of North
Carolina. (The Com-
mittee for
He the
highest paid
lover up
Beverfy Hills.
He leaves
women feeling
more alive
than they've
everfeh
before.
Except one.
Undergraduate c
ricular Reform is
chaired bv English pro-
fessor Weldon Thorn-
ton).
The change would
allow degree programs
to petition tor a reduc-
tion ot perspective re-
quirements from nine
courses to six. I he pro-
posed curriculum
would redd me science,
humanities and fine
arts requirements into
perspectives
categories.
81110174
337540650
6767701053
114514121753
195817292004
LXPERT STYLING
FOR BOTH MiiN
AND WOMk
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY J52 u�55
SHIRLEY'S
KUT & STYLE
301 EVANS ST. MALL
MINGESBLVD. SUITE 206
NEW YORK RAVED IN 1979
NOW IT'S COME TO GREENVILLE
The East Carolina Playhouse Presents
GETTING OUT
by Marsha Norman
"The Best Play of 1979"
Studio Theatre
8:15 p.m. - February 18-21, 23-25
General Admission � $2.50
ECUSfudenfs - $1.50
For ficket reservations call 757-6390

� T-Shirts must be claimed at �
� �
� the Central Ticket Office by �
� 6:00 P.M. Friday. �
STUDENT UNION
t.ST ;lKm�l UWVttVT'
ABOUT 10�I VP TO
PRIONANCY
176 oo ���� MMMr
proanoftcy Wtt, Mrtf con
�rol. MX) p�-oti�m prognon
:y counowino For turthor
iffor�n�tKo call �j 8SJ5
(toll ' froo nvmhor
100 Itt-NMI bftwMn t
A MS P.M wMtdirt
ROlOtO Mr��0�'t
HooffcOrtMMunon
t� MM Morton if.
He's coming to Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre
this Frida and Saturdav night at 5, 7:15, and
9:30 P.M. Courtesy of Student I'nion Films
jQm&ujccut,
1st Annual
SIG-EP
Shag Contest
Over $300.00
inCASH& PRIZES
Begins Thursday 26th
Papa Katz
Information at
the Dorm
CHAPS, INC.
HWY. 258 NORTH
KINSTON, N.C. 28501
Eastern Carolinas
Newest And Finest
Private Club
Fri Feb. 20th
CATALINAS
Sat Feb. 21st
MAURICE WILLIAMS
AND THE ZODIACS
Sun Feb. 22nd
CLIFFORD CURRY
Wednesday Night's
are Ladies' Night
Members and
Their Guests
Welcome
Ail ABC Permits
From
5:00-7:00pm
Be sure to see Jimmy Buffett in concert,
February 21 at Minges Auditorium.
Pitt Plaza
Carolina East Mall
?





I
(Hlje Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
CHRIS LICHOK. C.tnrral Manager
JlMMY DuPREE, Managing Iditor
Paul. Lincke. d�� ��� Paul Collins. r eon�
Dave Severin, b � Charles Chandler v e
Anita Lancaster. praAM mmi'
David Norris, t,mur,stdnur
February 18. 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Liquor Passes
Despite Efforts Of Local Groups
The days of the brown paper bag
are finally over. Ther residents of
Pitt County finally came out of the
dark ages and approved the referen-
dum tor liquor-by-the-drink on
Tuesday, February 17, 1981, by a
vote of 2 to I.
The acceptance of this bill was a
blow to the efforts of the local
groups that, prior to the voting,
spread the propaganda insinuating
that liquor-by-the-drink would br-
ing more chiid-abuse, prostitution,
and other sordid evils to the area if
it was approved. It was possibly this
same group who had young children
carrying signs with this message
picketing outside the polls on Tues-
day These kids, as young as
elementary school age, could hardly
be old enough to understand the
meaning behind the referendum,
much less picket against it.
It is scandalous that these in-
dividuals, some of them religious
groups, would resort to using
children to advocate their ridiculous
and biased assumptions about the
effects of this referendum. For-
tunately, their scare tactics worked
to no avail, and the sale of liquor-
by-the-drink will soon take effect
throughout the county.
From now on it will no longer be
necessary to carry an entire pint or
fifth into the bars and restaurants in
this area to have a couple of drinks.
Instead, it will be possible to order a
single mixed drink or glass of wine
bv itself or with a meal.
'Congratulations, Pitt County!
Welcome to the Twentieth Century!
Women's Basketball
Displays Excellance
Last evening's victory by the East
Carolina women's basketball team
over N.C. State marked a high point
in the school's athletic year.
The 95-87 triple overtime win
came in a game that may go down as
one of the best and most exciting in
the history of women's collegiate
basketbalf in North Carolina.
The win could, and should, push
the Lady Pirates back into the na-
tional rankings come next week.
ECU fans and students should feel
proud.
The 1980-81 Lady Pirates have
become a symbol of how things can
be. With all the apathy that has
been present on campus concerning
athletics, it is refreshing to know
that a women's team has captured
the hearts of the student body.
The Lady Pirate phenomena is
hard to explain. It came about,
though, at a time when ECU most
needed it.
Remember the year's occurances
in women's basketball well. They
will be talked about for many a
vear.
rCampus Forum
Topless Bars Doubted
Recently, an advertisement supported
by Mr. Van Dale Hudson and his Con-
cerned Citizens Committee appeared in
The Daily Reflector. Hudson and his
committee printed the ad in protest of
the controversial liquor-by-the-drink
referendum. Although 1 have my opi-
nions on the bill, this letter does not con-
cern supporting or protesting the issue.
It concerns a statement by the Concern-
ed Citizens Committee.
It seems that this coalition of Green-
ville residents believe that if liquor-by-
the-drink is passed, an abundance of
topless establishments and social clubs
will start taking over Greenville's
nightlife. Granted, this might be a
possibility. However, the ad went on to
say, "With ECU located here, you can
imagine how intense the effort will be to
open these 'Private Clubs
As a decent and hard-working student
of the University, 1 resent this
generalization. 1 personally have no
desire to patronize a topless bar. That is
not to say that some of the students will
not patronize these clubs � some pro-
bably will. But 1 dare say that many
Greenville citizens will also go to places
such as this. 1 feel that the majority of
the ECU students are mature young
adults who are here for a purpose � to
get an education so that we, too, may
have a chance to survive in the real
world. Contrary to some people's belief,
we are not here to drink, cause
distrubances, and go to parties.
By the time this letter is printed, the
referendum will have already been voted
on, yea or nay. But like it or not we the
students of ECU are a part of your com-
munity for at least nine months out of
the year. And I am one student who is
proud to stand up and say to Mr. Hud-
son "Please treat us (the students) as
adults and try not to generalize all
students with stereotypes. After all, we
are here to get an education so that we
may better the world. We are not here to
spend the night in bars and wreck your
town
Donald "Rusty" Rains
Music Education
CURSES FOILED AGAIN
Capitalism Succeeds In USA
Appropriations Changes
This is an open letter to raise student
interest and involvement in formulating
the policies of the S.G.A. Several pro-
posals to change the appropriations
rules and policies will be coming up at
next Monday's (Feb. 23) S.G.A.
meeting.
When I was appointed as chairman of
the appropriations committee earlier this
year, things were in a state of disarray.
No written guidelines were being used in
determining the qualifications to be met
for students and groups to be able to
receive funds.
Procedures to tentatively approve a
group's budget in the spring need to be
established. This would expedite final
approval when the fall session of the
legislature convenes. By setting up
things this way groups can plan their ac-
tivities further in advance which in turn
will directly benefit students and their
organizations.
Since the S.G.A. no longer controls
the fees allocated to transit, and because
the year was started with such a small
amount of money in the S.G.A. general
fund, money has been tight. The conser-
vative nature of this year's legislature,
along with some inexperience and
sometimes poor judgement have also
contributed to money problems. Not
everyone who wanted money received
any, and some of those who did were
severly cut back. However, all of these
factors have created an atmosphere of
learning and have restored the S.G.A. to
a sound fiscal basis. Therefore, No Fee
Increase was requested by the S.G.A.
this year.
Please join me in setting up some
good policies and procedures to allocate
your money by getting involved and
voicing your opinion.
BEN SINGLETON
Chairman, S.G.A. Appropriations
When shallow critics denounce the
profit motive inherent in our system
of private enterprise, they ignore the
fact that this is the economic support
of every right we possess, and that
without it, all rights would soon
disappear. Their conclusions em-
phasize the results: more and more
bureaus, more and more taxes, fewer
and fewer producers, and finally
financial collapse and the end oj
freedom.
�President Dwight D. Eisenhower
Did the critics of the profit incentive
save millions of American women from
back-breaking work by inventing the
vacuum cleaner and washing machine�or
was it the businessman looking for a pro-
fit?
Did union bosses create modern life-
giving drugs, or was it the shrewd man
looking for a profit?
Is it government bureaucracy or profit
seekers who generate the millions of jobs
in America paying the highest wages in the
world?
Was it the welfare state or men who
wanted to become millionaires who
developed the automobile and the hun-
dreds of thousands of jobs that followed?
When those who criticize and attack
profit and prosperity can equal this record
for their country, it will be time to listen to
them. But not until.
"Profit" and "incentive" are not dirty
I words. This great nation and our un-
paralleled standard of living are the result
.of one, and only one motive, profit.
Perhaps the most important economic
theory to understand is: "there's no such
thing as a free lunch If you want to
dance you have to pay the band.
Capitalism is one of the great bulwarks
of a free society such as ours. If Russia
could buy our free enterprise system and
adhere to the profit motive, they wouldn't
Robert ML
Swaim

have to buy our gram.
When you are tree, the human desire to
improve your lot and that ol your family
shows itself. Io improve your own lot, you
have to do something better than others do
it. If you succeed, you benefit (make a pro-
fit) and in the process you benefit the
public as well. No wage is too high it the
worker earns it.
The Wealth oj Nations, written a few
hundred years ago b Scottish economist
Adam Smith, has proven over the years to
be a brilliant economic philosophy. Smith
was a strong advocate ol 1 aissez-Faire
economics. He argued, quite correctly,
that those individuals who seek to shower
themselves with riches will inadvertently
make prosperity tor their fellow men. I his
theory is based on the assumption that all
people have an innate desire to accumulate
wealth and to prosper.
Following this instinct, people will supp-
ly whatever there is a demand for if they
can further their goal o accumulating
wealth; whether the demand be tor their
labor or their wares and products. It they
s you see. it is an endless cycle of pro-
ductivity and prosperity for all who pro-
duce.
I his miracle known as capitalism is simply
the result ol some "greedy" person who is
hokme to izel rich
hat if nobody wanted to make a profit
or accumulate any wealth More than like-
ly we would still be living in caves and
chasing animals around with sticks trying
to get something to eat.
Personally, 1 would rathet climb into my
Mercedes, Irive to a posh restaurant, have
in a d eai a S50 steak.
uldn't y
I iv lei those who denounce profit and
making a buck go to Russia where they
belong. Only communists and their sym-
pathizers oppose tree enterprise and our
system thai allows an individual to sell his
talents and the fruits ol his labor for his
own betterment.
1 say let every man have what he earns.
It is no sin to prosper, rattier it is a sign o
complishmenl and dignity.
Forum Rules
The I as! Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorls. Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages.
are selling their labor, then obviously they double-spaced, or neatly printed.4ll let
must produce something. What they pro
duce will fulfill a demand and hopefully
turn a profit for the business. In turn, thai
profit will pay the wages o another
worker. These wages will be spent on a
variety of other goods and services.
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
days.
Opinions Add To Newspapers
ByFERRELGUiLLORY
It would be possible, of course, to
publish a standard American daily
newspaper without an editorial page. But
what kind of newspaper would it be then?
Readers of this page sometimes write to
tell us in no uncertain terms where we
might go and what might be done witht he
paper on which these words are written.
Nevertheless, readers also regularly raise
tough, but worthy, questions about the
role and purpose of editorial pages, about
how editorials come to be and about bias.
Early American newspapers did not
have editorial pages. In colonial times,
pamphlet, rather than newspapers, were
regarded as the proper medium for
disseminating views on major issues.
There were, to be sure, a few newspaper
editorials, such as Benjamin Franklin's
famous "JOIN, or DIE" editorial calling
on the colonies in 1754 to unite. But much
newspaper commentary came in the form
of letters and essays sent to the editor.
Sometimes, historian Frank Luther Mott
has pointed out, editors wrote letters to
their own newspapers, signed with fic-
ticious names � that's a technique modern
editors couldn't get away with.
Both before and during the Revolution,
American newspapers spiced their news
reports with editorial comment. It was not
until the late 1790s that editors, with Noah
Webster among the leaders, began putting
editoials under the name of the newspaper.
And it was not until just before the Civil
War that Horace Greely launched the prac-
tice of an editorial page as a distinct
department of the newspaper.
Since then, it ahs been a fundamental
precept of the traditional American daily
to put news on the news pages and
editorials on the editorial page. While let-
ters to the ediotr have long been a feature
of American newspapers, the political col-
umn in which someone expresses his
own viewpoint, not necessarily that of the
newspaper itself � is a relatively recent in-
vention, growing out to signed articles bv
Washington correspondents in the second
decade of this century.
If editorial pages were to disappear,
readers would undoubtedly search for
what were called in the London In-
telligencer in 1633 "conveinient Hints and
Touches" within the news columns. There
would be reading between the lines and
suspicions about where an editor was
leading his readers.
Thus, in a sense, an editorial page is the
place where a newspaper bares its soul to
its readers. As an institution in a communi-
ty, a newspaper has a certain responsibility
for community leadership � and the
editorial page is the vehicle for the exercise
of community leadership.
Given the history an that framework, it
becomes easier to understand why
editorials are not signed in most
newspapers. A signed editorial becomes
one person's opinion. An unsigned
editorial is the institution's voice. On this
newspaper, editorials, while usually writ-
ten by one person, often reflect the think-
ing of several persons, editors and writers,
who meet daily to debate issues and who
read each other's copy. In any case, the
persons ultimately accountable are 'isted in
the box in the upper left cornet of this
page.
Since editorials are expressions ol opi-
nion, it necessarily follows that they aie in
effect "biased thai choices have to be
made, some people and their actions prais-
ed. some criticized, some supported, some
opposed. There is debate among
newspaper people about whether editorial
pages should endorse candidates. But most
do, as part ol their community leadership
function, and thai means they make a case
for the candidates of their preference and
against their opponents.
Of course, newspaper editorials are try-
ing to exert influence. But even a
newspaper like this one, with a tradition of
stating its opinion forcefully, understands
thai it is nearly impossible to eommard
people how to think.
Nevertheless, strong editorials can serve
both those who agree and those who
disagree. Opinions neither challenged nor
nourished grow flabby. Strong editorials,
bolstered by sound research, ought to
cause a reader to examine his or her own
thoughts.
Few modern editorials match the one
Herb O'Keef, a wise man and the former
editor of The Raleigh Times, cites as the
work of one of history's first editorial
writers. In the Old Testament, Nathan ex-
coriates David for killing Uriah the Hittite
and taking Uriah's wife. David immediate-
iv confesses that "1 have sinned against the
Lord Seldom do editorials thunder like
Nathan's or get that kind of quick
response.
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1 HI I s i H) s
Features
1 HKt H is 1981 Pace
Black Arts Festival
Starting Next Week
Margarita Man Returns
A Black Arts Festival, featuring
the arts, culture and cookery oi
American black people, will be held
at East Carolina University Feb.
22-28.
I he week's events begin with a
"soul food" dinner in the campus'
Ledonia Wright Afro-American
Cultural Center Feb. 22 at 2 p.m.
An illustrated lecture, "The
Plight of the Black Artist will be
presented by ECU School ol Art
faculty member Clarence Morgan
Feb. 2 at 8 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center.
"A Man Called Adam a film
exploring the world o the black jazz
musician, will be screened at 8 p.m
I eb. 24, in the Student Center. The
film stars Sammy Davis Jr Louis
Armstrong, Cicely Tyson, Frank
Sinatra and Ossie Da, is.
A variety ol talent�ranging from
comedy to dramatic readings �will
be presented in a cabaret perfor-
mance in the Student Center Cof-
feehouse Feb. 25 at 8 p.m.
Yolanda King, daughter of the
late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr will
appeal in ECU's Hendrix Iheatre
Feb. 26 in an 8 p.m. dramatic lec-
ture. "Black rheatre: Moving Us
Higher
Scheduled for Feb. 2" is a musical
production, "A History o Music in
the Black Church 1 he program,
to begin at 8 p.m. in the Student
Center, is written and narrated by
Ronald Maxwell, president elect ol
the 1 Cl Student Union and a stu-
dent in the be U School o Music.
Yolanda King, daughter of the late Dr. Martin I uther King. Jr will ap-
pear in Hendrix Theatre on Thursday, February 26 at 8 p.m. M King is
scheduled to give a dramatic lecture entitled "Black Theatre: Moving Us
Higher The lecture is part of the Annual Black Arts Festival slated to
run from February 22-28. The festiviT is sponsored by the Student Union
Minority Arts Committee.
A capacity crowd is expected for the Jimmy Buffet! concert this Saturdav at 8:00 p.m. in Miages Coliseum Student M axwe11 ls tne son o1 John R
tickets are S6.50 and will be available in the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall until 5:00 p.m. Saturdav All Maxwell �' 3159 Dawnshire Ave
tickets at the door will be $8.50. c harlotic.
Che production will trace the
music ol American black cl
from the slave spiritual to contem-
porary gospel songs. Performing
will be the EC! Gospel 1 nsemble.
Concluding the festival is a Feb.
28 dance in Wright Auditorium with
"The Third Generation
d
rickets to all events ma) be pur-
chased at the door or in advance at
the I Cl Central Ticket Office.
Morgan art lecture, the jazz film
and the church music program are
open to the public tree of charge.
Some Variations On The Hot Dog
Some
unusually great appea liege
students. Such foods usually, have at
least two things in common:
cheapness and convenience. Peanut
butter falls into this category. So
does lunch mea loes jusi at
every kind ol canned food known to
man. Probably one of the mosl
popular cheap convenience foods is
the great American hoi dog. I know
of one fellow who. after having
been given a hot dog cooker foi
Christmas, lived mi them for no less
than three months.
At some point, though, it you eal
a lot of hot dogs, you're bound to
get sick to death ol them. There's
only so much you can do with a hot
dog, right?
Not so. A hot dog is good tor a
lot more than being slapped between
two slices of bread or a bun and
covered with catsup and mustard.
Let's consider the creative
possibilities of hot dogs.
I o begin with, there is more than
to cook hot dogs. ou may
be lot lunate enough to have a hot
�ker, one of those cute little
appliances designed with college
students in mind. It not, you have
several options. You can boil hot
ting them out in cold
watet is best, and letting them boil
foi live minutes or so�or fry, bake
or boil them until lightly browned.
You can cook them whole, or cut
them up. As far as the best kind
ii hot dogs to buy goes, your money
and taste preferences are about the
only factors that must influence
youi decision. If you're between
eighteen and twenty-two, chances
are you've eaten enough hot dogs m
your life to know what you like. If
you've never tried chicken dogs,
though, I feel you should give them
a chance. Several well-known com-
panies make them, and the price is a
lol easier on the wallet than, say. all
beef hot does.
lJlWlMHIl I' "��'
So you've got your hot dogs and
you're ready to cook them. But you
don't want to just envelope them in
bread. What do you do with them?
Here are some suggestions.
HOT DOG PIZZAS (Serves 4 to
8). You'll need: 8 hot dogs, 8 hot
dog rolls, butter or margarine, one
half pound mozzarella cheese (or
any kind you can afford!), 1 cup
canned tomato sauce, canned
Parmesan cheese. Split the rolls and
spread them with butter. Toast
lightly before placing a strip of
cheese on each roll. Split hot dogs
lengthwise and place half a hot dog
on each half o roll. Top each with a
tablespoon of tomato sauce and a
short strip of cheese. Sprinkle with
Parmesan cheese and broil until the
cheese melts.
POLYNESIAN BARBEC I I
(Serves 4). You'll need: 8 hot dogs,
1 (10 ounce) can of crushed pineap-
ple, 8 slices of bacon, toothpicks.
Slice the hoi dogs lengthwise to
form a pocket. Fill the pocket with
drained pineapple. Wrap a slice of
bacon around each hot dog and
secure the ends with toothpicks.
You can barbecue these over
medium heat in a hand grill, if you
have one, or broil them, hither way,
turn frequently and cook until the
bacon is crisp.
HOT DOC, NUTTY FRITTERS
(Serves 4). You'll need: 8 hot dogs,
8 tablespoons o peanut butter, 8
strips of bacon, 8 toasted hot dog
rolls. Slit the hot dogs lengthwise to
form a pocket. Fill pockets with a
level tablespoon of peanut butter.
Richard Gere Starring In
Free Flick 'American Gigolo'
This Friday and Saturday night in
Mendenhall Student Center's W-n
drix Theatre, the Student Union
Films Committee will present the
film "American Gigolo" at 5, 7:15,
and 9:30 p.m. Admission is by ID
and Activity Card or MSC Member-
ship.
Life grows ever more com-
plicated. Now it seems that, the old
song notwithstanding, it is impossi-
ble to be just a gigolo. This curious
little movie actually persuades one
to believe that male hustlers have
feelings, problems and pain just like
everyone else. That is no small feat,
considering the attitudes one tends
to bring to an examination of a
gigolo's life and hard times.
Julian (Richard Gere) makes his
living in the nicer precincts of bos
Angeles by providing sexual services
to well-off middle-aged ladies. He is
pretty, smartly dressed and inar-
ticulate when any serious subject
comes up; yet one can understand
what a neglected wife might see in
him.
His power with women derives
not from being aggressively male
Richard Gere
but from being ingratiatingly sweet.
He is good at his work and is suffi-
ciently self-aware to understand that
his exceptional talent is ultimately
self-defeating: he can give pleasure
but never receive it.
Indeed, the film's major
psychological twist occurs when
Julian discovers his capacity to
believe in and accept the love of a
decent woman (Lauren Hutton).
The passages between Gere and
Hutton � thanks largely to the lat-
ter's open and vulnerable playing �
are the most affecting in the film.
She actually convinces one of her
passion, despite its unlikely"
sociological grounding. There are
moments when American Gigolo
looks as if it might develop into a
sober Shampoo.
Paul Schrader is an earnest film-
maker (he directed "Blue Collar"
and wrote the screenplay for Martin
Scorsese's "Taxi Driver"), but
"American Gigolo" gives the im-
pression that he was distracted by
the looks of things in the picture and
allowed himself and his audience to
become tourists of these expensive
places and people.
Perhaps sensing the absence of
anything serious or moving at the
end of the road, he more or less gave
up on the search for Julian's soul,
and instead involved his hero in a
sadomasochistic murder, a silly
frameup, and a brutal accidental
See RICHARD, page 6, col. 1
Illusionist Andre Kole will perform in the Hendrix Theatre on Monday,
Feb. 23 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are $4 per person, with discounts for groups of
ten or more.
Wrap each hot dog with a strip of
bacon, securing ends with
toothpicks. Starting with the split
side down, you can grill them over
hot coals (if you have a grill) or
broil. Litticr way, cook until the
bacon is crisp. Serve in hot don
rolls.
If you don't like to go to a lot o
rouble, but still want to do
something a little different with
your hot dogs, try the following:
Cut one to eight hot dogs
(depending on how many people
you're serving) into approximately
o'c inch sections. Cook in a skillet
or pot over medium heat, using a
small amount of butter or cooking
oil, until lightly browned. Then add
one can of baked beans or one can
o spaghetti and heat until hot
throughout. Or you can add the hot
dog slices, with a little sauteed
onion, to macaroni and cheese.
Magician
Andre Kole
To Perform
Illusionist Andre Kole, the
"magician's magician will display-
some of his unique and elaborate ef-
fects at East Carolina University
Monday, Feb. 23.
Kole's performance, set for 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre, is spon-
sored by the ECU Campus Crusade
for Christ. Tickets are $4 per person
with discounts offered for groups of
10 or more and are available each
weekday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
in a Mendenhall Student Center
booth.
During a tour of the Phillipines,
he investigated "psychic" surgeons
and later testified in a U .S. Court on
behalf of the Federal Trade Com-
mission's efforts to halt psychic
healers in this nation.
The veteran of seven world tours,
Kole has performed for more than
70 million people in 73 countries. In
his program, says Kole, there is "a
fine line between fantasy and reali-
ty.
"The world of illusion sometimes
appears more real than the world of
reality


r
4 S f �







I HI I AM C AROl 1NIAN
FEBRUARY 1. 1981
Richard Gere Stars In 'Gigolo'
Continued from page 5
killing: television-series
stuff.
Richard Gere is a con
siderable actor, given
the propei Kind of
material, but in
"American Gigolo" he
has no place to go.
literal!) and in our im
agination.
He and Lauren Hut-
ion are so good-looking
thai we stare at them
blankly, without the
distraction of accompa-
nying thought, which is
the way we are meant
to look ai fashion
models.
Miss Hutton is a very
famous model, ol
course, and even as v.e
want her to do well up
there in her acting
career, the slack movie
loses us and ue gae in
wonder at her
beautifully distributed
teeth, her splendid.
ever so slightly crossed
eyes, and her loose-
wristed, laid-back,
almost-ready-to-fall-
down cool.
Other actors � Hec-
tor Elizondo, as a bald,
reptilian, skinny detec-
tive, and K. Callan, as
a faded, sweet-faced
customer of Julian's �
are given better oppor-
tunities for acting than
the two stars, and make
the most of them.
Band Gives Concert
1 he 53-member Sm
phonic Band of the
East C arolina I Iniversi-
i School ol Music will
perform in concert
Sunday. Feb. 22. at
8:1s p.m. in Wright
uditorium.
Conductor of the
hand is Tom Goolsby
of the ECU music
ult . who also
directs I Cl 's mar-
i ng band, the
"Marching Pirates
The band's program
includes K a I p h
a ug han W111 iam s'
folk Song Suite
(arrangements ol tradi-
tional English folk
tunes), Vincent Per-
s i c h e 11 i ' s
"Divertimento lor
Band "Elegy" b
John Barnes Chance,
and Ciail Kubick's
" S t e w b a 11: Three
Variations on an
American Folk Tune
lo r
Free
Earpiercing!
w purchase ol our
pierced earrings available
in white or yellow' tor
$5.00 plus tax.
264 Bypass West
Hrs. I0am-6pm MonSat.
CATALOG
SHOWROOM
Farmville
Sorry!
We Missed Our Target!
The BUCCANEER Staff would like to apologise for any in-
convenience caused by the sudden location change. Please
remember that this is your last chance to have your yearbook
portrait made!
Traditional poses will be taken free off sitting fee charge. A
contemporary pose package( 34 length, profiles close-ups, etc.)
will be taken for a sitting fee charge of S3.00. All seniors having
their portraits made will have their 1981 yearbook delivered
free of charge.
Buccaneer Office Feb. 16-20
Publications Center 10am-5pm
He s the highest paid
lover in Beverly Hills.
neral Nutrition Centers!
GNC
America's Best Nutrition Values are at GNC-Over 800 Stores from Coast to Coast
I VITAMIN!
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WHEAT
TMOMPSO
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$119
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iTf MS �! ; . 'UlN W�l t lM"f I 1 fi ONI I At M I'l R C 11 " Mt H Wll M f OUP'JNi S.
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urmat
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60�7o REDUCTIONS
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REG.$10-$23
SHETLANDS, VELOURS,
ACRYLICS
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REG.$14-$23
WOOL BLEND, CORDUROY,
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I





on
I Ml I ASI CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 19, 1981
Happenings
L�4e0M6 taour Collzgc- Thc Ump Ni
$y Dfwo AJos
CAMPUS EVENTS
Thursday 19
� 7:00 p.m. Gamma Beta Phi, Biology 103
� 7:00 p.m. Intramural Co-Rec 2-on-2 Basket-
ball Participants' Meeting, Memorial Gym 104
� ECU Playhouse Cabaret Production,
Mendenhall Student Center, Auditions Room 244
to
Friday 20
Drop a Course or Withdraw
� Last Day
From School
� ECU Playhouse Cabaret Production,
Mendenhall Student Center, Auditions Room 244
� 5, 7:15, & 9:30 p.m. Movie: American Gigolo,
Hendrix Theatre
Saturday 21
� ECU Playhouse Cabaret Production,
Mendenhall Student Center, Auditions Room 244
� 5, 7:15, & 9:30 p.m. Movie: American Gigolo,
Hendrix Theatre
� 7:30 p.m. Men's Basketball: Richmond, Va.
Sunday 22
p.m. ECU Symphonic Band Concert,
� 8:15
Wright Auditorium
� Washington's Birthdav
Monday 23
� ECU Playhouse Cabaret Production,
Mendenhall Student Center, Auditions Room 244
� 7:30 p.m. Women's Basketball: Wake Forest
University, Minges Coliseum
� Feb. 23 - Mar. 5 Intramural Co-Rec 2-on-2
Basketball, Memorial Gym & Minges Coliseum
� Feb. 23-27 & Mar. 2-6 Change of Major
Tuesday 24
� 5:00 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Swim Meet
� 5:00 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Co-Rec Rac-
quetball Doubles
� 5:00 p.m. Familv-Child Association Meeting,
Room 143
� ECU Playhouse Cabaret Production,
Mendenhall Student Center, Auditions Room 244
� 8:15 p.m. Faculty Recital: Henry Doskey,
piano, Hendrix Theatre
Wednesday 25
� 4:00 p.m. Intramural Co-Rec Racquetball
Participants' Meeting, Memorial Gym 104
� 6:00 p.m. Intramural Swim Meet, Minges
Pool
� ECU Playhouse Cabaret Production,
Mendenhall Student Center, Auditions Room 244
� Feb. 25 - Mar. 1 Intramural Co-Rec Racquet-
ball Doubles, Minges Courts
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
� Thursday 19 David Merriam, saxophone; Jay
Hurst, trumpet; Senior Recital, 7:30 p.m.
� Friday 20 Stefan Stuber, percussion; Joe
Alexander, tuba; Senior Recital, 7:00 p.m.
� Monday 22 Symphonic Band Concert, 8:15
p.m. Wright Auditorium
� Tuesday 23 David Hawkins, oboe; Faculty
Recital, 8:15 p.m.
� Wednesday 24 Henry Doskey, piano; Faculty
Recital, 8:15 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
NIGHTLIFE
Attic
� Thursday SUPER GRIT
� Friday BRICE STREET
� Saturday BRICE STREET
� Sundav SUGAR
� Tuesday BRECKENRIDGE
� Wednesday SUZANNE SEXLESS AND THE
STIMULATORS
Carolina Opry House
� Thursday AMBUSH
� Friday AMBUSH
� Saturday AMBUSH
� Wednesday BILL LYERLY BAND
Chapter X
� Thursday Pi Kappa Phi "Evening Delight"
7-10 p.m.
� Friday A Nu Pi "End of Week Party" 4-8
p.m.
� Saturday Best in Beach Music
� Sunday Kappa Alpha "Nickel Nite"
� Tuesday Sigma Phi Epsilon "Ladies Night"
� Wednesday Sigma Nu "50, 50 Night"
If you have anything you would like put in
Happenings, please send it to: Nancy Morris, The
East Carolinian, East Carolina University,
Greenville, NC 27834
QW7
" I� � � "Wm � I
THf CWus COPS
f-7 Loud music.
Senior Show Announced
Interior design pro-
jects and needlework
by Cynthia Brewer of
Greensboro, senior stu-
dent in the Last
Carolina University
School of Art, will be
on display Feb.
22-March 1 in
Mendenhall Student
C enter here.
Her exhibition in-
cludes examples o
various types of
needlework�counted
cross-stitch, bargello
needlepoi nt, em-
broidered pictures and
a bell-pull�along with
projects from her in-
terior design classes.
Among these are floor
plans, elevations,
perspective drawings
and furnishing designs
for residential and
commercial buildii
A candidate foi the
BA degree in interioi
design, Miss Brewei
has served a- secretary
oi the 1(1 student
chaptei ol the
American Society ol
Interior Designers.
Her parent- are I)r
and Mrs. James .
Brewer ol Route 11.
ATTIC
WED. o THURS
18th
&
19th
FRI
SAT.
West ern
Greens!
I i a i
20th 21st
O
COMING SUN THE 22nd
at
ASLEEP AT THE WHEEL
w SUTTER'S GOLD STREET BAND
Artist
To Give
Lecture
The Visual Arts
Forum is presenting a
slide presentation and
lecture by Pat Martin
Bates Thursday, Feb.
19 at 8:00 p.m. in the
Jenkins Fine Arts
Center Auditorium.
Born in Saint John,
New Brunswick,
Canada, Bales pursued
studies in art at the
Academie Royale des
Beaux-Arts in Belgium,
the Academie de
grande Chaumier and
the Sorbonne, Paris,
and the Pratt Graphic
Center in New York.
She pioneered in
print-making techni-
ques internationally,
and made the first for-
mal advances in the
1960's in Canada.
Bates has won a
number of interna-
tional awards and has
work in the Museum of
Modern Art in New
York, the Smithsonian
and the San Francisco
Art Gallery.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Parade drum
Premier, chrome in excellent con
dition Call 757 3210
FOR SALE Lark bano Almost
new, hardshell case. Earl Scrugs
book included 8125 Call Keith at
758 7878
FOR SALE: Quilts: 89 year old
Granny makes them to sell JJS 00
each also pillows il 00 and S3 00
plus crochet pieces Call 752 1785
or 752 8850
FOR SALE: 78 Yamaha on off
road 250 Few miles Great condi
tion Call 758 5282 alter p m
Leave message
FOR SALE Utah, 3 way
speakers. 170 00 Large cabinets,
rms. 40 wats. call 758 8493
FOR SALE Waterbeds direct
from mgt complete with
everything needed except sheets
13 year warranty 5179 Call
David 758 UTS.
PERSONAL
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient,
cheap rates Call Amy, 758 8994
COUNSELORS for western North
Carolina co ed summer camp
Room, meals, laundry, salary and
travel allowance Experience not
necessary, but must enioy living
and working with children. Only
clean cut non smoking college
students need apply For applica
t ionbrochure write: Camp
Pinewood. 1801 Cleveland Rd
Miami Beach, Fl. 33141
WANTED TO PURCHASE 47 49
Camaro Phone 754 7712
LAST CHANCE for Springsteen in
Greensboro 2 tickets left best ot
fer Call 752 1470 after 3 00 pm
STELLA It it returns, I will love
it for ever Henry
SR J : Listen to an elder, He is very
wise Is less by March 2nd, and a
dinner on the town I love you.
LLS
KEITH "Betcha didn't know that
you're one in a million I love it
when we're "together Punkin.
BILL: I love ydu and will want you
always You make my day special.
Dawn.
BUMPER STICKERS: We'll print
anything that you'll tell your
mother $2 for one, $5 for 3. Quart
tity discounts available for orders
up to 100. Call 752 1757 between 4 9
pm or send check and 5.50 handl
ing to Bumper Sticker, Rt 7 Box
27. Greenville, N C 27834.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY WENDI Its
a special day to me because its
such a special day to you Always.
Billy
JIMMY BUFFETT IS CRUISING
IN SATURDAY NIGHT. MINGES
COLISIUM 8 00PM WELL SEE
YOU THERE!
RENEE If they ain't looking,
we're with the wrong one GPJ
Poor Fishy, dead and gone.
Left us here to sing this song.
Died in the house, with no heat on.
We'll remember Delta Dawn.
It's to Donna, with our deepest
sympathy
Your sisters in Delta Zeta
WE SPEAK TURABIAN Proles
sional typing editing, pro
otreading WRITE RIGHT
754 9944.
FOR RENT
APARTMENT For rent. Two
rooms, modern bath and kitchen,
study Call 752 3020 after 400 p m.
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Tar River
Apartment Call Lisa 752 0453 or
758 5429
ROOMS FOR RENT 575 per
month, utilities included, for info
call 752 3480
FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED
ED: House l block from campus
5100.00 mo everything included
Call 758 3318 ask tor Anita
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED Cypress Gardens, hall
mile from campus Call 752 5947
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED To share 3 bedroom
house 580 mo plus third utilities
Call 758 0838
MALE HOUSEMATE WANTED
3 blocks from Artie $45 rent, one
fourth utilities, private room
752 3199.
NEEDED Female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apt close to cam
pus Half rent, half utilities It in
terested please call Donna at
758 7728.
ROOMMATE WANTED 5100 a
month, deposit required
Available March 1st Call 758 9964
after 500 MWF or 758 5982 after
5 00 Tu Th
ROOMMATE NEEDED Tar
River Estates. 5120 per month plus
one half utilities 757 3549 Call
between 14 p m. or after 10: 30
PRICE: 51 00 for 15 words, 05 for
each additional word
Abbreviations count as one word
as do phone numbers and
hyphenations.
Make checks payable to The East
Carolinian
MAIL TO:
The East Carolinian
Classified Ads
Old South Building
Greenville, NC. 27834
CASTEL
CARINI
RESTAURANT & PIZZA
NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA
FREE DELIVERY
756-8704
TRY OUR SICILIAN
STYLE PIZZA
Meet Your Friends At The
COFFEEHOUSE
This weekend (Friday only):
The Mike August
Jazz Quartet
February 20th
9:00 -11:00pm
Rm. IS Mendenhall
Admission .50'
SAVE A
EAKFAST
AND LUNCH!
�aaas
rsv"
m&
r
J
r
1
t
"3R

"X
.Cafca. '
Here's a couple of coupons to start
you on your way in the mornins,
and to set you throush the day.
And for less than $3.00! First, the
big taste of Hardee's buttermilk
biscuit. Filled with chopped beef-
steak and fresh scrambled eggs.
Plus a chilled cup of orange
&i&&&W juice. Then for your next
I ICWl full meal, a tender; tangy
w vi5 Hot Ham'N'Cheese, a
regular order of our
famous fries, and a
turnover you'll flip
overall at some real
sweet savings.
3t�&�
w w w
STEAK AND
EGG BISCUIT AND ORANGE JUICE
ONLY'1.09
Please present this coupon before ordering. One coupon per customer, please.
Customer must pay any sales tax. Not good in com-
bination with any other offers. Offer good only
at participating Hardee's. Offer good through
March 4,1981.
ttardegr
HOT HAM N CHEESE,
REGULAR FRIES AND APPLE TURNOVER
ONLY 149
Please present this coupon before ordering. One coupon per customer, please.
Customer must pay any sales tax. Not good in com-
bination with any other offers. Offer good only
at participating Hardee's. Offer good through
March 4,1981.
v.uu(jvi i ).i LUJiwHiti, jjigj.
Vbrdetzr
- r �





llll EAST Kt'l IMAN
Sports
II BKi AK 19. 1981 Ha.
ECU Facing NCAA-AIAW Choice
W " C rhis, says Arrants,
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sports EMM
The recent NCAA Convention in
Miami, Fla. will probably eventual-
K be remembered as the convention
that changed the world of women's
collegiate athletics.
At the January convention a pro
posal was passed allowing women's
teams to come under N A
jurisdiction. At present, women's
athletics operates under the Associa-
tion tor Intercollegiate Athletics tor
Women (A1AW).
The move, of course, does not
eliminate M V from existance,
though it could threaten severely the
strength of the present women's
governing bods.
MAW members are being allow-
ed a five-yeai period in which to
consider a possible move to the
c AA. Each institution is expected
to investigate thoroughly the advan-
tages anddisadvantages ot women's
athletics under both the NCAA and
the A1AW.
Four options are open to each in-
stitution: DDual membership with
both AIAW and NCAA; 2)A1AW
membership only; 3)NCAA
membership only; and 4)NCAA
membership with AIAW' rules.
last Carolina is currently in-
vestigating all tour alternatives and
officials expect a final decision long
before the five-year deadline passes.
' don't know which way we'll
go said ECU Faculty Athletic
Representative Ernie Schwarz.
Ihen
be a split over
which options we should consider
Schwarz pointed out that schools
could compete in both NCAA and
AIAW' championships if they
choose option 1 or option 4.
Advantages can be cited for both
the NCAA and the AIAW
ECU Assistant Athletic for Stu-
dent Life Laurie Arrants is perhaps
the most staunch opponent of the
NCAA's proposal on campus and
points out many faults with the
idea.
"This is another case of 'money
speaks Arrants said. "It's all
political. The power struggle moves
on.
Arrants said she could not sup-
port the NCAA because of its past
dealings with women's athletics.
"Historically, the NCAA has not
favored women's athletics she
said. "The AIAW was formed for
that reason. The NCAA didn't even
support Title IX. It would be one
thing if the NCAA had been neutral
to women, but all along it has been
anti-women's athletics
Arrants credited the sudden
popularity with women's athletics,
especially basketball, for drawing
the NCAA's attention.
"Suddenly, when the AIAW was
offering over 36 championships, the
NCAA becomes interested. Now
they say they want to give women
better opportunities. Suddenly the
power and politics of the NCAA is
on the move
Schwarz, though not opposing
Arrants' view, claimed that the
NCAA could prove advantagious to
women's teams.
"The thing that is attractive
about the NCAA he said, "is that
teams in the championship tour-
naments could receive better reim-
bursements. The AIAW can reim-
burse only on a smaller rale than
the NCAA would be able o
A problem with the move towards
the NCAA that provides the main
area ot concern in ECU'S case is the
fact that the AlAW's "division bv
sport" policy would be eliminated
under NCAA governance.
Currently, the AIAW allows an
institution to field sports in anv ot
three divisions. Foi example.
women's basketball and Softball are
Division I sports while swimming,
track and several others are Division
II.
Upon joining the NCAA, those
latter sports would have to join
basketball and Softball as Divi
sports
rhis, says Arrants, is nonsense.
"We had eight All-Americans in
swimming last year she said "It
they were forced to compete on the
Division I level, many or all ol them
would not receive such recogni-
tion
Arrants claims thai the lack ot
division bv spoil is not m the best
interests of either the university or
the athlete.
"No doubt, the AIAW gives the
instition and the athlete the best
chance. I here's nothing wrong with
not being Division 1 in some ol the
non-revenue sports. I he important
thing is that we give student athletes
the opportunity to .anv the East
Carolina I niversity name in a pro-
ud way
The growing battle between the
NCAA and the AIAW is
necessary, says James Frank, pi
dent of Lincoln University and
SCC p. Id
Lady Bucs Pound NCSU,
Earn Tie In State Race
Lad Pirate Mary Denkler Fires Against State
Meeting With Karr Set
By JIMMY DuPRKE
Managing Kdiinr
It was billed as a rematch of the
two top teams in the state and when
the smoke had cleared in Reynolds
Coliseum Wednesday night, the
Lady Pirates had walked away with
a 97-89 triple-overtime victory over
nationally 15th ranked North
Carolina State.
The Pirates controlled the tap at
the start of the third overtime atter
losing the previous two. Beyond
that point, it was all a matter of the
margin, as ECU capitalized on
Wolf pack fouls and turnovers to
cruise to victory.
Senior point guard Laurie Sikes
opened the scoring barrage with a
20-footer. Junior Ginger Rouse
made the first o the NCSU tur-
novers with 4:17 remaining in the
decisive frame with a double-dribble
violation. The Pirates were unable
to score on that trip down the floor,
but forward Sam Jones drove the
length of the court at the 3:02 mark
for a 91-87 ECU lead.
Senior center Marcia Girven pop-
ped in a field goal and sophomore
Mary Denkler converted a Sikes
assist for a 95-87 Pirate lead. She
later connected on ECU'S final
points of the night to insure victory
at 97-87 with :56 remaining. Only a
field goal by State point guard
Angie Armstrong with :17 to play
prevented the hosts from being shut
out in the final overtime.
The Lady Pirates struggled early
in both halves of regulation play,
falling behind 14-4 less than six
minutes into the contest. Jones
pumped in a shot from the outside
along with a follow-up bucket. A
Kathy Riley field goal pulled the
Pirates to within four and they held
close until the 32-30 deficit at inter-
mission.
The Wolfpack opened the second
half with a flurry supplied by crafty
senior Trudi Lacey and forward
Connie Rogers to build a 47-36 ad-
vantage over ECU with less than
seven minutes elapsed.
Many of the 3,400 in attendence
felt the Pack was on its way to
another Reynolds Coliseum
blowout of the Pirates such as the
1980 contest.
The Lady Pirates managed to cut
to within two points with 7:53 re-
maining in the half, but momentum
began to shift back in favor of
State. When Denkler was called for
a foul against Rogers inside, ECU
head coach Cathy Andruzzi vehent-
Iv protested, drawing a technical
foul from official Lloyd Nelson.
Rogers sank all three tree throws
but the moment un turned once
again in favor ol the Pirates at that
point.
A field goal bv senioi centet Mai
cia Girven with 2:09 left in the se-
cond halt cut the gap to 65-63 Aftei
an NCSl timeout, Rogers fouled
Jones in the act ol shooting. 1 he
poised Jones stepped to the line and
sent both efforts sailing through the
bottom of the net to knot the score
at 65 with 1:10 to pi
With :46 on the clock, the 1 ady
Pirates once again put their faith in
Jones when she connected on a driv-
ing bucket and sank vet another free
throw.
State had the final opp
ice the game during regulation with
:05 remaining and the ball out-of-
bounds at their baseline. The m-
bounds pass went to Armstrong.
who lobbed the ball inside to tower-
ing 6-7 Ronda Falkena. The tall
Wolfpack freshman squared U
goal for the final shot, but threw a
stone that didn't fit in the hole as
the horn sounded.
Girven and Rilev helped the
Pirates build a three point lead in
the first overtime. But less than a
minute later, guard Lydia Rountree
collected tier fifth personal foul,
leaving the game 1:05 on the dock.
Eleven seconds later. Riley also col-
lected het fifth, and the hopes ol
te players and tans began to
dwindle.
State a iumed ai ri 79 lead with
:05 in overtime. E( I 's in-bounds
pass went to Jones at midcourt and
timeout was called. Jones ap-
pearantly was intended to take
final shot tor EC I . but hei lane ol
traffic was shut off. Sikes tired a
lumper over the out-stretched hand
� Armstrong from tl I the
key winch caromed
through the cylinder as the horn
sounded.
Both teams traded baskets in the
second overtime, with R
mg a shot with a secoi d
A futile tip-in effort by 1 acey fell
mlessly to the floor.
Riley led the Pirates wi
points, with Girven adding 24 and
IS rebounds and Jones 21 points
and 10 grabs. Sikes dished out 14
assists and Jones eight in directing
the ECU floor game.
Lacey led the way for NCSU with
24 points and 17 rebounds, while
Armstrong and Rogers contributed
15 points each.
Oishi Making Last Push
By WILLIAM YELYERTON
vMt�nt spor1� EdHof
William "Billy" Sheridan, Dean
of American Wrestling at Lehigh
University, says it best: "No matter
what his weight or build, there is a
place on a wrestling mat for every
boy
No one realizes the importance of
this statement more than Pirate
Coach Hachiro Oishi. He is fighting
valiantly now to save the ECU
wrestling program from extinction
so some of these promising young
wrestlers can bring their talents to
Greenville.
The wrestling program at ECU is
being axed at the end of the current
season because of economic strains
on the athletic program budget.
This year's wrestling budget is
$25,000.
Oishi has received letters of sup-
port for his cause from such schools
as UNC-CH, N.C. State, the
University of Northern Iowa and
George Washington University.
Several ECU alumni, as well as high
school coaches across the state, have
expressed their concern over the ter-
mination of the program.
"I love wrestling very much
Oishi savs, "That's why I'm doing
the best I can to save the program
here v
The letters are not the only
evidence of public concern. A peti-
tion that was circulated on the ECU
campus resulted in 9,000 signatures.
"The students have much interest
in the wrestling program Oishi
points out, "and it shows with the
number of signatures we got. Some
people have said that the petition
won't do any good, but they're
wrong. It shows the students care
According to Oishi, wrestling
builds character. "I agree with
UNC's Coach Bill Lam in that the
real purpose of athletics is to help
educate and develop a young person
to their fullest potential. Wrestling
is one of the few sports in which you
can work individually with so-
meone
The Pirate coach has also begun
asking area citizens for donations
that possibly will help the program.
However, there has not been much
luck so far, he says.
"Wrestling is growing fast in
North Carolina Oishi explains.
"There are some very big and ex-
citing high school rivalries, even
some in junior high school. The pro-
gram was once great here and this is
not the time to cut it. With the
growth of high school wrestling, the
program here could be great again
Oishi said that schools such as the
University of Georgia, Florida and
Alabama that have dropped wrestl-
ing did not have the tradition that
East Carolina has. "These schools
just didn't have the abundance of
competition that we have in North
Carolina he remarked.
According to Oishi, a committee
has been formed to try to resolve the
issue and attempt to save the wrestl-
ing program. A meeting with Direc-
tor of Athletics Ken Karr has been
scheduled for next week.
"I've only been here since Oc-
tober Oishi said. "I wish I'd been
here longer, maybe I could have
helped the situation. I'll tell you'one
thing, though; I've still got hope
that the program can be saved. I'm
not going to give up
FXU's Mindell Tyson Battles
25 000 won l u y �uuu, uUl v .
7-Footer Has Odom, Others Drooling
When this time of the year rolls
around recruiting is always on the
minds of the die-hard college sports
fans.
Just yesterday (Wednesday) was
the national signing date for foot-
ball. Pirate head coach Ed Emory
and his staff were out of town all
day attempting to lure some of the
treasured gridiron prepsters.
Meanwhile, basketball coach
Dave Odom and his staff were busy
trying to lure that big man that
would turn the cage program
around.
The guy that could do it resides in
the small community of Dry Fork,
Va a suberb of Danville.
The young man is Warren Mar-
tin, a 7-foot, 210 pound center that
seems to get better each time he
takes the court.
Martin is a real sleeper and has
shown vast improvements in this,
his senior season. As the year has
worn on he has drawn more and
more attention from schools desir-
ing his valuable services.
To ease himself of some of the
strain of the recruiters, Martin
released a list of seven schools dur-
ing the first of January. The list in-
cluded the final institutions he was
considering attending and was set
up to keep recruiting pressure as low
as possible.
The seven included Virginia Tech,
Jacksonville, Richmond, James
Madison, East Carolina, Virginia
and North Carolina.
The latter two loom as the
favorites to sign Martin. Never-
Charles
Chandler
theless the Pirate coaching staff is
going all out in their attempts of br-
inging a real prize home to Green-
ville.
Martin has led his Tunstall High
School team to a 15-3 record thus
far this season. He leads his district
in scoring (23.9 ppg), rebounding
(13.0) and blocked shots (six per
game).
Martin was interviewed late last
week and stated that he had yet to
eliminate any of the seven schools
listed in January. He is expected to
make a decision soon after the
Viginia state playoffs.
One of the attractive points about
Martin, aside from the obvious, is
the fact that doctors predict he will
grow at least another two inches. No
doubt each of the seven involved
coaches drool at the thought of sign-
ing him.
Virginia coach Terry Holland is
very intent upon signing the big guy.
He was quoted as saying last
weekend that Martin's decision
could affect the decision of Ail-
American Ralph Sampson, who
though a sophomore is being lured
by the NBA.
Holland mentioned the possibhty
of Martin and Sampson in the same
lineup, the ague Sampson moving to
forward to open up the middle tor
Martin.
Martin, of course, is not in the
class of a Ralph Sampson. He is.
though, an ever-increasing com-
modity that no college coach in the
country would turn down.
Odom saw Martin play this Tues-
day night. He or a member of his
staff has but one of the three
designated talks remaining with the
big guy.
Observers close to the situation in
Danville feel that the Tar Heels and
Cavaliers are far and away the
leading candidates to sign Martin.
Holland and LNC's Smith also are
reported to have just one more talk
remaining.
The Pirate basketball team must
win both its remaining two games,
both away at Richmond and Illinois
State, in order to finish the season
with a non-losing record.
Following consecutive home
losses to Delaware State and UNC-
Wilmington the team owns an 11-13
mark.
The odds at finishing 13-13 do not
appear promising. Richmond
disposed of the Bucs easily in
Minges Coliseum earlier this year
while 1SU played third-ranked
DePaul a tough game two weeks ago
before falling, 54-50.
Pi
Bv UN j
VII M Klj
w
ing in!
p e r i I
star
H :
prep
:
�' W �
ourst
The ECt
Graduate!
i
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I HI I AM H(I IM-W
I I Hk I MO IV, 19M
Pirate Nine Looking For Repeat Year
VI
With
ing infi
pei ien
ff, tl
Pi
Ha
pre
Male m
"We'
UIIlM
IMKION
a s
eld
ong return
and an ex
e vi p i u in n
K
�' 1 very where the
yers have g one
i he ' e heard thai this
is i lo eel East
c as olina because we've
lost all those players.
()ui plas ei s ha e taken
thai as a personal
d are
Cionc from last
lad all to
majoi clubs
Bill) B Butch
Davis, Muke Britt
d Raymie Styons
ind Styons will
orel missed
� n power,
B his
rikeoul
M i- ' Britt,
tarter, will
as he
held Pirate records foi stafi will be headed b
mmngs pitched and junioi Bill Wilder. I lie
most consecutive vic-
loiles.
According to Baud.
the strength ot this
seal's club will be the
infield. " 1 oM Hendlev
(Ji.) will start at thud;
Kelly Robinette (So.)
will siait al short; Mike
Sorrell (Jr.) al second,
and Mike Sage (Si.) al
I arboro native posted
a 10-2 record last yeai.
tops on the club.
Baud said the other
top hurlers will be Bob
Patterson (6-2), Rick
Ramev (5-1), both
seniors. The rest of the
stafl is rounded out b
Robbie Harper and
Kuk Parson. "Behind
first. Petei Perisco(Si Lhe number.�ve man
gives us supei depth in
all three of the posi-
tions in the middle oi
the field Baud said.
Band said the
preseason plav oi the
infield has been ex
celleni "We've got ex-
perienced players there,
and the) continue to
get belter
1 he veteran pitching
ft
The ECU Baseball leam Musi Play Without Services Of
Graduated Bukh l)uis i4
Baud noted, "were a
little bit shakev
The Pirate skipper
says the outfield is the
most improved aiea oi
the team. " Todd Ivans
tl i.) will start in left
field. He has hit the
ball super. John
Hallow (Jr.) broke his
hand lasl week, but he
is anticipated to be the
siai tei in righl
I lie race for centei
field is up in the air.
" e've got a battle go-
ing between Robert
Wells (So.) and Charlie
Wavnick (Fr.) Baud
said. "I don i real!)
feel badl) aboul eithei
one ot them playing
there
Baud said thai Ja)
C arrawa) and John
lit g er a I d, both
seniors, are in a dead
heat for the catching
position. 'They're
both plaving well, and I
think the competition
has pushed them a little
harder Baud poini
out.
Band isn't sure
whethei this yeai
squad can equal
vcai's .307 hitting
mar k, a club record.
"I'm not sure we're
as fai alone as we in
to be. How tai a ion
real!) hard to sa
because we' e only -��
ourselves. We're
capable oi being
ot tensive club
Injui ie- are hampei �
ing the Buc's progress
now Hallow's I
will be in a ca
another two to th
weeks "1 believe John
is mil best hitter
Baud said. " I he tact
that he is not in the
lineup lakes a dimen-
sion ol our offense
awa)
Baud also pointed
out thai pitchei Rick
Ramev was hit in the
arm hv a line drive and
w ill be unable to throw
foi al least two weeks.
Mike Sage lias suffered
a strained shouldei.
I he Pirates gol a
ance to test out their
hardware in a 19-inning
immage against Elon
lasi Saturday. Baird
willed the game a suc-
cess because o the
team's ictoi v.
1 here are some areas
thai need work, the
Pii i aid. "We
In'i perform well
:n the number live
pitchei down, and we
didn't hit the ball with
men on base. However,
our first five pitchers
did a great iob, and our
defense looked good and ,h(V ,
Baird said the team's ,
i eu.
attitude has been ex-
� i . I the coach s en
cellent. We have . ,
, . . . thusiasrn is anv mdica
worked them harder
tion ot i ne teai
than any team bet ore,
i hen t fie
Pirati ive al lea;
il to equal last year's
28-7 mark and N( A
bid.
Announcing The Arrival
of
"Ballons Over Greenville"
r- - jr Cj
0 i fc. v
- �
TrTrMJSHkVr M qv-L Trti.K- ft v. hi )Tli jV 9lT
Make - nt happ) with a Bou eied b a
Mined messenger with a soi . nniversary,
Birthday, Gel Well, Retirement, C'oi etc. oi just
because vou love them. ! � x
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Master Charge
yisa . AiiK't lean express
ECU loves
roast beef at
America's roast beef
Yes sir!
0
drbtf
Two more reasons
why you & I
a love Art-s Lea
Ham
and
Cheese
Otter valid thru
at all partu ipal . '�
customer pei visii Sot va
Will!
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I
I
I
w I
?1
ArbvV Roast Beef
Sandwich Wifh
Salad Bar �
Otter valid thru U
al all partic ipating rbV Limii
i ustomei per isil Soi
Greenville Square Shopping Center
ACROSS FROM K MART
Jl
g
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ALWAYS FRESH
DAIRY FOODS
Heavy Western
Beef or T-Bone
Steaks $1"
Lb.
Mountain Dew
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16 Ol cm of 8
$108
Plus Deposit
Frito Lay
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Potato Chips
68
7 oz. bag
Tropicana Pure
Orange Juice
Gallon
Supermarket, Inc.
Jimmy Buffet Concert
Specials
Natural Light Beer
$039
l2oz. cans �6 pak
Budweiser Beer
12 oz. cans � 6 pak
Miller Beer
12 oz. cans � 6 pak
Also . . .
Carlo Rossi Wine
3 liter, Burgundy, Chablis, Rhine, Rose
He sure and call Overtoil 'v for
the lowest keg beer prices in town.
$29
Fox Deluxe Pizza
BUY ONE - GET
ONE FREE
Reg. $1.29 All Varieties
24 oz. loaf
Franklin Old Fashion
White Bread
BUY ONE -GET ONE
FREE 89C
ml
-L

Grade "A" Whole
FRYERS
52
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$100
8 oz
for
Campbell's Chicken
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10 oz. can
28 c
Frito Lay
Ruffle or Regular
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$169
1 lb. bag
K
i

t
"V





10
1 HI l S 1 CAROl 1N1AN
1 t BRUARY 19. 1981
Sampson Still Top
GREENSBORO,
N. C. (UP!)
Virginia's Ralph Samp
son continues to hold
the scoring and reboun-
ding lead in the latest
basketball statistics
released b the Atlantic
Coast Conference but
M ar y I a nd' s B u c k
Williams is challenging
him in rebounding.
Sampson is scoring
19.3 points and grabb-
ing 12.4 rebounds a
game for the second-
ranked Cavaliers.
Williams, sixth in scor-
ing with a 16.4 average,
is second in reboun-
ding, getting 12 pulls a
game.
Gene Banks is second
in the scoring race with
an 18.6 average,
followed by North
Caioima's Al Wood
with an 18.2 averaee
and Virginia's Jeff
Lamp with an 18 point
per game average.
Williams leads in
field goal percentage,
making .653 of his
shots. Sam Perkins of
North Carolina is se-
cond at .645.
Tom Emma of Duke
is the top free throw
shooter in the league,
hitting .870 of his
shots. Lamp is second
NCAA-AIAW
with an .842 mark.
Sidney Lowe of
North Carolina State
continues to lead in
assists, with 8.4 per
game.
In team statistics,
Wake Forest has the
highest scoring offense.
The Deacons are
averaging 78.6 points
per game.
Maryland is second
with a 77.1 point per
game averaee.
Virginia has the best
defense, allowing .59.4
points per game. North
Carolina State is se-
cond in defense with a
62.7 point per game
mark.
o
Virginia is the best
field goal shooting
team with a .535 mark
while North Carolina
has the best free throw
percentaee at .727.
North Carolina is tne
best rebounding team
in the league, getting
6.1 more rebounds a.
game than opponents.
Virginia has the highest
scoring margin,
outscoring opponents
by 16.7 points a game.
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NCAA Secretary reasurer.
�� l he entrance oi the NCAA into
women's sports championships does
not spell the demise ol the Al AW
he said. "It the AIAW continues ;o
initiate and refine its program, there
is ever) reason to believe thai pro-
motion ol women's competition by
more than one governing bod) can
be beneficial to the student athletes.
�"Ihe availability of more than
one alternative for women's com-
petition should encourage excellence
and, at a minimum, will provide
freedom of choice
"Freedom of choice though, is
just what Arranis and others in the
ECU administration tear will not be
present as far as a decision on the
I ad) Pirates are concerned.
"We're verv much affected by
what other schools do Arrants
claimed. "11 the ACC goes NCAA
(and it i expected to) our choices
become much narrower
One of the main problems, as tar
as ECl is concerned, with the ACC
move lies in the fact that the four
ACC North Carolina schools
il NC til. N.C. State, Wake
Fores! and Duke) make up a big
part of the women's athletic
schedules and might would refuse to
schedule ECU in the future, should
the lady Pirates stay under AIAW
governance.
Recruiting is a main difference
between the AIAW and NCAA and
presents another roadblock should
the ACC make the switch.
NCAA rules for women's
athletics will be the same as they are
for men. Coaches will be allowed to
travel and meet with recruits,
though on a limited basis. Under
AIAW rules, off-campus recruiting
is illegal.
"If the ACC goes NCAA and we
don't our recruiting could be
substantially hurt Arrants said.
"It would be hard to explain to a
recruit why the ACC schools are
knocking on her door and ECU is
not. It would look like we were not
interesting when actually we had no
choice
At present the ECU athletic
department is considering all of the
many sides to the vital decision it
must make.
The department has announced
that the Lady Pirates will compete
under AIAW rules next season. A
decision on future years will be
some time in arriving.
Beta Little Sisters 1
PRESENTS
NEW WAVE DANCE
AND
DRESS COMPETITION
DANCE WINNINGS
$250.00
$150.00
$50.00
1st place
2nd place
3rd place
DRESS WINNINGS
$100.00
The ECU Media Board is accepting ap
plication for the following positions for
the 1981-82 school year:
Editor of the Buccaneer
Editor of the Rebel
Head Photographer of the Photo Lab
General Manager of WZMB
General Manager of the
East Carolinian
Editor of the Ebony Herald
Applications may be obtained from the
Media Board secretary in the Publica
tions Center, AA-F from 8 1 or 2 5.
Deadline is Feb. 27.
oV
r
i
COU PON
i Tie Hxpu Q S&t�
OrtM 14 NOUII
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When:
Sunday nights beginning Feb.
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"LAUREN HUTT0N AND
j RICHARD GERE TURN IN
MEMORABLE PERFORMANCES.
J They make sin beautiful. The
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J brought to" brilliantly appropriate
i fruition in American Gigolo' A
superlative job of writing and
j directing by Paul Schrader. It's
i the sort of image to make a
! woman drool, a man envious
i
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i
j He's coming to Mendenhall's Hendrix Theatre
j this Friday and Saturday night at 5, 7:15, and
j 9:30 P.M. Courtesy of Student Union Films
ilS�
If you need money for fall clothes or football ticket now It a
good time to sell your gold and sliver aluables. And here's a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN! 4
Almost everyone has i high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Chock your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. Wore
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
tair prices and good service.
�r Bfcoaos a ta�$ m ease.
Record Bar
Pitt Plaza
Carolina East Mall
$
Wl PAY CASH ONTHIf POT
FOt JIWILIY, VAlUAIlf Sabytwrc
MAtKID 10K - UK - 1IK.
$ GOLD $
� MRCS � SiCKUCfS
� cuss uses
con � auciuTs
� (MAIMS � UCSTHS
WATCH!S � MAMOROS
�ARCS � DWTAl
�MOONS � 10CIITS
caw UM� � jjajejjg
RAYING ON TH1IRBT
CAIN f OB ITUM MARttID
STERLING SILVER
aic AROLit i of mmmm
� COFFEE SERVICES GOBLETS
� RINGS � SPOONS TRAYS � KNIVES
� FORKS�NECKLACES�BRACELETS
� FRANKLIN ANB HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE
$
&RIWG
OF K6V SAIES CO ��
401 EVANS ST. UPtN9 Ms J"MUN bAI
iHAHMONY HOUSt SOUlHl PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER.
V
T
I





Title
The East Carolinian, February 19, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 19, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.113
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57322
Preferred Citation
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