The East Carolinian, February 12, 1981






Bhz iEaat (Earnltman
11
Serving, the I aslarolina campus community since 1925
ol. 55 Nu.l
l(� Pages
I hursdav, February 12, 1X1
(ireent illi. Northarolina
( in-iilalion 10,000
High Winds Bring Disaster To Eastern N. C
UHR Nil 1 lM

I


�i Mai
� "It f
a a s ' ler I
ird 1 hen I went
Ma
sa�
. . � � bricks littered the sidewalks and on
ui ly portions of buildings remained,
end Vftet ' itiing the town's main in
vhen large tersection, nothing was damaj
i building about 5
d through were blown ovei When
damage ended
evei hit as left ui
11, � aid i ihn estet. buildings w i
- � apply shop part of a saw mill leveled
� ensivt ige when Police officei K I Bla -
teel beams ripped from the said he heard a loud bi
Jine across the street flash ol light and then a ;
n his business. went dow ill �
Kvidence ol the storm could be tornado
bout one mile from the cit "I wasn't th �
tin roofing was strewn anything but g
he highway and way Blackbut
the town ol Dwight 1 an Nasl
inii

'I
. rip
c hiei
a i irned
� lers in
f La
I Quid �ere
i '

' ' Pinew �
Bi P
.
S3
SI 19,000: N
ntv, SI25,500; Wal
i375,(KK); Hoi ! - "
sn;
; Kin power lines and end preparedness aired
ol.
age va
See VMM). Page 3
Greenville Officials Announce
Change In City Tag Ordinance
� ��V �!��'
� � � �
ft
iu p i I (
IN-
apply
Mt �
Met il
IK'Ct

-V I S VI
'�
.
. �
wa � I d ovei tl ' iximum.
Meel
:
H P - � resi-
gn I the tags to S
ti and to abolish it altogethei next
" 1 ntenti'
. ed HI
I
Students vnill not he required t buy Greenville license tans'
Adolescent Physciatrists Dub Student
Pressures Destructive, Vicious Cycles
South's Business Climate Good
:

mi
i
:
ude
tint 'the qualn
isidered in t
lered
t of it
z mate. at least in
� theabi
f a sta i ke ind
� itei ia used
cost-centered and
lility and are those
ensus ol manul ac
Bv �. , ns, the Southern regi
ranking, followed in
ihe Midwest, West and
Noi
PMO'O Dy GARY PATTERSON
s(, X Prudentharlie sherrod and Iransi. Manager Danny OTonnor stand in front of the S(,A new bus.
smc. 1( IN (SPS)
ious cycle" is wl
: sceni psychiatrists have di I
he pi essures studei I �
day ii school and at I i �n
Grades, parei
choices have caused
� -
pie, but stress can be alleviated w
adequati id ii � �
patience from parents �me,
psychialrists say
Schools must begin to educa
the whole person emotionally,
socially and ind illy
John Dinelli, a St. 1 ouis, Mo.
psychiatrist who treats adolescents.
"C ounseling services are rarely ade-
quate and in schools where there are
enough counselors, all they do
schedule planning Schools need
professional personnel trained
deal with adolescent stress, he .idd
ed.
I ack ol adequate counseling ser-
vices has been well documented. A
Vice-President's I ask Force Report
found that the national � ol
guidance counselors to high school
students is one to 350 with some
schools reporting figures as low as
me to 800.
Besides hirin g q uali I i ed
:ounselors, schools can do
something else to ease the stress
one down the academic pressure.
Even achie ing students lose in com-
petitive classrooms, according to
)i Bernard Miller, directoi ol
Huntei College Schools in New
York. Ihe schools only accept
itudents with IQs ol more than 155
md Miller found the highei the in
tellect, the strongei the students'
spun ol competition. el. Millet
aUo found that when students work
foi rank in class rathei than to
discover new knowledge, learning
gets lost in the battle. 1 O! this
reason. Huntei College Schools
have eliminated all grades and class
rank.
I-ew schools have taken such ex-
treme measures to alleviate stressful
situations for students, but more
educators are beginning 10 recognize
the problems and dangers of stress.
Stress affects young people
physically as well as emotionally.

blood
.
i
combina h othei
conditions ii a
disea - - s hold.
Medical studies on stres no
simple ns Mechanisms
i i predominantly m
I n a test - can st
mones coursing through the
bloodstream to altei ot
psychological pi ocesses.
Di 1 dward Kessiei. din
Children's Psyc i Services
Georgetown University Hospital ex-
pla descents experience
stress in three distinct phases "In
early adolescence the stress is break
ing the tie ol the parents and
recognizing that they can't depend
on the comforts ol childhood. In
middle adolescence there is a strug
ain sell esteem through peei
ap since they can! gel it from
parent s anm ore. In latei
adolescence there is an internal con-
frontation. 1 his is when young peo-
ple are expected to establish a work
identity, a sexual identity and a
social identity. Late adolescence is
pai ticularly dil ficult
But whethei today's teenagei
faces more stress than any othei
young pei son growing up is
debatable.
"1 don't think (they 're) experien
cing more stress than they would
have m 1931 said Jean Sperlock,
an American Psychiatric ssocia-
tion psychiatrisi " 1 he media is jusl
making them more aware they are
At the same time, she recognizes
the difficulty in growing up in socie-
ty today. "Adolescents face a cross-
roads at this point in then lives, t ol-
lege and careet opiums are more
ipiex than they were 20 years
ago
Psychologist Donald rubesing ol
Whole Persons Associates in
Duluth, Minn, agrees.
�� 1 here are mam sources of
itress. such as internal or external
succeed, suci.
unrealistic expectations,
leep, money worries, h
nfidence, conflict in
ack ol goals 1 ubes-
"Strt id escent - - largely
� pressure to succeed
�esses on them from
: hnel .aid "Getting good
lesj selecting the right college,
gen - ob - - the whole vicious
cycle - ery destructive
cademic competition in school
js as � ol anxiety foi
students "The competition
as destroyed many talented
students while serving the interests
ol the few high pressure achievers
survive Dinelli said.
� I he atmospl
� day. pai ti. ulai ly in college
preparatory classes, is unbelievable.
It is true that they will encounter
pressures in th� � d' but why
should a 14-year-old have to deal
wnh this?"
Parents a - source ol
siiess tor young people. Dui
adolescence, Sperlock explained, in-
dependence becomes important to
young people Most teens, she said.
lide head-on wnh their patents
over this. Ihe parent-teen relation
ship is a constant cause ol conflict
during this tune.
What san be done to combat
stress? "seek professional help is
the response most psychiatrists give.
Ihe catch is the price. Most
psychiatrists charge up to S5v and
up foi an hour ol consultation. "I
don't think money is an issue where
mental health services are concern-
ed said Dinelli. He charges S" an
hour and recommends weekly visits.
On The Inside
Announcements 2
Editorials4
Classifieds 6
Features 5
Letters4
Sports8
1 ntertainment7





I HI I si CAROI INI AN
FEBRUAR 12, 19S1
Announcements
RUSH
varna Gamma Rho Sorority
mc Rush Sunday Feb 15 at 7 00
p m Ledoma S Wright Afro
American Culture i enter For
more inform on . all Faye
Elliott 750)56
(AHPAT)
eo Heai�r Professions
A H be offered at
1981 Ap
ink! i , �o be com
maiiel to the
C rp MM I �5�l
�. � - � arrive
ition DianKs
I ano
� New V ex i
1981

r .
SCHOLARSHIPS
oia'
SIGN LANGUAGE
The Sign Language Club will
have its regular bi monthly
meeting on Sunday Feb 15 begin
nmg at 6 p m m the multil
purpose room of Mendenhall
Stuent Center There will be a
covered dish dinner before the
inq ana a captioned film
afterward This week s film is
The Getaway AM members are
urged to attend and any interested
persons are invited you need not
be a member
ANNOUNCEMENTS
� subm.tt.ng an
i ' lay at 5 pm
lor Mh ' , e&day issue an
at noon for the ThursiM, iSSUC �"�"
nouncements submitted after
these ii ad lines will not be printed
An annc. ,1 be dou
type "� 'i Or
� . �� s b, II ,nch
paper Messag s should be kept as
ntatn only
"tiai information The person
Sub" " . �� . 'enf
shoul � le his name am:
nottom of
BUTTONS
photos magai ne cut
� �� . �" n ' a' mater a1 ano
� � own personalized
e button Magazine f lipp
os 'ars leathei . Iti
� ' a ;e on hand 10
� � . . � Fl ' � � : I i in the
studenl l o tore lobby Spon
sored by raftsma - as! Oru
;� '� are 75 ci " ��. �
PREREGISTRATION
"ang
prei . ration ao.
� �, � �
i me school of . � . . .
ai' Mu'CS
� idpletion �� ,ttion
BUSINESS MAJORS
� ' A ' �
.IVCF
: ' � -� � � lees I naking n ' � � . � � � � . c hr � � wshif a meet ri � ' �� jSt stu week � rla Balk peat Every one is
� � �
SLAP
The Eleventh Annual Speech
and Hearing Symposium located
at the Belk Building Auditorium at
ECU will be held Feb 26 and 27
The Symposium will augment the
professional growth ana
knowledge of those who provide
services to the language
disordered child The Sym
posium s main session concerning
The Language Disordered Child
Clinical Applications of
Pragmatics' will be given by Lyn
da Miller Ph D Mini sessions will
include The Language Station
Approach to Language Therapy'
given by LaRose Daniels, M S
CCC SP and Larry Livenqood
MAti as well as Tom Hawley
R M T, who will be speaking on
Must as a Fat ihtat.ng Modality
� and Language Develop
� ei'it All interested persons afi
invited For further information,
comae I the E C U Speet h and Hear
mg Clin
TUTORS
The Accounting Society w II
tutor accounting 2401 and accoun
. 2521 every Tuesday and
�"� ' � � � i � in Rawl 339 from 4 00
5 00
CAREER CHOICE
Career by Choice not Chance
a hwo part mini series on how to
assess systematically one's career
options, .s being offered by the
University Counseling Center
staft STuaenls may participate in
one of two groups rhe first group
will meet on February 9 ana
February 25 the second group on
. 10 and February 26 The
groups ai meet rom 3:00p.n
5 00 p m in 201 A right A
� RO'C Auditorium '��
Campbell Vocation
� a . of i in
; ai' pant:
ten ' in
� �� : to all
� " i- two
i t'ong
retea dur
R eso
jdents m
land
sessions Resu
Campbell will !
rtg the second
available to
ai � � � �� e a
explore I Tin �
� . �
lerested I k
LOU �
� �� � � -itormat.on No
Q Stral on is required Vou ma
partic.pate by attend Ing II � �
group meeting ol � fhi I ! i
INTERNATIONAL
nternal -iai Dinner sponsorec
' ' " 'udents
57 666L for
BKA
Beta Kappa Alpha, the Banking
and Finance Fraternity will hold
its February meeting on Wednes
day February 18, at 4 00 �n Room
221 of Mendenhall Student Center
The guest speaker will be Mr Tom
Jones from Branch Banking and
Trust Company All interested
persons are mvited to attend
PLACEMENT
The Placemen! Test in foreign
languages will be given Thursday
Feb 12at3 30pm This is the only
date on wh.ch it vv 111 be given
before p' e r e g i s t r a 11 o n and
registration for Summer School
and I all Semester ivsi
Placement by the Placement
Test s prerequisite to students
enrolling tor the first time m a
foreiqn lanquage they studied in
high school Students intending to
��"�� "� lest on February 12 must
register for it in the Foreign
Language departmental off �
Brewster A43I on � .
Wednesday F ebruary 11
See Official Announcement No 8
on Official Bulletin Boards m
Classroom. Buildings foi furthei
information
SWIMMING
An organizational meeting � tl �
ECU Synchronized Swimming
Club will be heic: T yesd ty, Fef
ii'6 00pm ,n Mem. rial Gyn i
All nteresl person:
.ouraqed to a
DELTAZETA
There is an important mi efing
of an Delta Zeta big brothers II
Sunday Fel 15 at 8 30p
house Pleas fry fo bi . .
i i i a tivity fei
FELLOWSHIP
ivaiial � �
- ' ��'� Resources
'�' ' 5 available tr m March l
l�8l through Dei
science or matt �� � �, , mputer
� ludentoi
' � ' ; � I
tor the fa . : �
ind $2400 tor thi "���
rhe p . 5
preparation of t , �� ,
' 'nputer anc statist
procedures Familiar �. a tl
reseat I � � ��� � �� .
i ana FORTRAN �
Anyone interested
Use'
WORKSHOP
Careers tor North Carolina
women interested in science.
mathematics, engineering and
social science are the topic for a
one day workshop at Meredith
College in Raleigh on Saturday
April 4
Resarch Triangle institute s
conducting the workshop under a
grant from the National Science
Foundation
Applications should be made as
soon as possible by calling coiiim t
to Research Tnanqle institute
staff members Mary Ellen Taylor
at 919 541 6324 or Carol Place at
V1V 541 6318
AOTT ARTHRITIS
' a carnation gram tor a'
thntis On Feb 9 12 8am 3pm
m front of the student store Send a
message and flower to your
a.i theart friend on valent.n. �
Day for $2 00 We deliver'
REVENGE
� 'Stry class frustrating?
Come and release that pent up
anger and throw a pie at the
hemistry faculty of your chOKe
' � American Chemical Society
' Affiliates is sponsoring a
Chemistry Faculty Pie in the
' � ' Feb 5 ?30 9 30
pm at the Flbo Room Aamis
Sion is 50c along with reduced
prices on part, beverages So
i ome and seek your
ELECTION
. ' . ' �
SC . � on contact
� � �'�� �' . . or Eula
Mo(� . it 752 8981 The dead
"��� � ' . Ivf � � . posit
are pr, � . ,
�� is i. nf si '����, treasurer
� � historian
ess. �
should
contact
-
�"� 688
ADVISOR

CIRCLE K
VOLLEYBALL
ha e 1
� of im Rt Serv �
nviti . Ei students, fa
staff 1 -
'�� ' oppor
AKA


� � � � � �����.�.�
� � � .
i- per pei ana S3 00 per cou
Mill be hi
�' ' �� ' � � hmen
a �� ri of the
pi � � led tothi ted
'� . � � � . aance
� irt ��
PHOTOGRAPHY
Two photograf , a
"���' " � lay evi
Easl ti . Imversity this
will meet Fel March 17
Camera meet? March 31
April 28 Oass sessions eacl
� ' � � � p m on
pus
Part.c.pants
should have ther own cameras
preferably 35 millimeter or larger
information ai Iratioi
I � " � . thei
' na c our. . �
� . �� . �
� ' � ; ' �

COUPON
'
ECGC
B S.U.
A
A � ,
EXPERT STYLING
FOR BOTH MLN
AND WOMEN
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY 752H55
SHIRLEY'S
KUT & STYLE
301 EVANS ST. IVIALL
MINGESBLVD. SUITE 206
oet� 14 Houit
Wholesale Retail
Ice Sales
SPECIAL REG �q(
s LB BAG 89- 'J'
with this coupon
Expires April 1 1981
Ktgl Ice Deliver y
10th a Ev�ns S1
752-877?
COUPON
VOTE FEB
MIXED
DRINKS
GREENVILLE RESTAURANT
ASSOC.
Ti
SURF CLUB
- will be a surf . lot)
meet rg tonight at 7 00 m room 238
Mendenhall An � : , .
sons are invited 10 ah
COMICS
All pel . �. .imics
fantasy a � � � �
vited to attend an in!
� ' "� ECU Com
Club Thursday Feb lv 8 00pm
ai �� � Nostalgia Newsstand m
Dicknson Ave Topics wnI include
plans tor the upcoming 7th Annual
on in Mar � �
anything
yaki. in ai out A. n � . prepar
ng a bo klet 1
in
tans art �.� wi tei
il � - �
SOULS
'�'�� will be a SOULS
n eetii . m Thursday i �
i?8) a' 7 p m the i tural
Cent Plan ti itti
OFFICIATING
��
� ' � r


� � . V
days, Feb 16 �
will providf
. � ' . .

-
Troi.i . � .�.�
.
c luo- the 1970 Nal
M
pionsl : . .
by the N ��

'
�. . �
� . �
mith. El
� �

A
. Se
' ' �

� ' �
. � �
redit
� �
N on

' . � �
APA
� .
. � ��
AD TT
-
SPEEDREADING

A ft
'
'
'
'
y:
r T
Horn Jo, rhll.
free
Earpiercing!
w purchase oJ our
pien ed earrings available
in white or yellow fur
v.)) plus tax.
264 Bypass est
I Irs. I0am-6pm MonSal
CATALOG
SHOWROOM
SALE 40 OFF
p
H
Group of Ladies' Salem
Ladies' Knit Tops
Ladies' Wrangler Tops
Men's Sport Coats
Men's Suits
Men's Male Pants
now 12.52 to 36.60
- � . . �- now 7.79
now 7.79
now 21.90
Reg 56 95 NOW 34.1 7
� 16 95 NOW 10.17
ACROSS FROM NICHOLS
East loth Street, Greenville, N. C.
Open 9:30 5.30 - 6 Days a Week Call 758 2433 Mastercharge and v.sa Accepted
MILL OUTLET CLOTHING
I
Bea
JIMMY
BUFFETT
PR
Sat Feb. 21,1981
8 P.M.
Minges Coliseum
fm
TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE:
Students $6.50 (in advance)
Public $8.50
GET YOURS WHILE YOU CAN!
Note: The Central Ticket Office will be open this weekend
during the FREE FLICKS to give students a chance to get tickets.
mm
STUDENT UNION
i�i (uouu wvmm
h
B
1
Cat
I





IMF I AS IAKOI INIAN
FEBRUARY 12. IWI
Teen Minimum Wage Expected To Be Hot Issue In Congress
WASHINGTON
(SPS) Paying young
people less than the
minimum wage will be
one of the hottest issues
discussed in Congress
- yeai nd with the
Senate Kci ublican ma-
joritj in charge, the
pi ospec I s are e en
Sen Orrin Hatch,
K I tah, the new chair-
man ol the I aboi and
Human Resources
Committee, will in
troduce subminimum
wage legislation
sometime in February,
according to Rita Peil
fei, C'hiellei k for the
1 aboi and Human
Resources (. ommittee.
1 he legislation siill
will need a House spon
sor, but as Professional
Statt Member foi the
Senate ! aboi c ommit
tee Kris Iverson said, six month training
"It is a verj poputai period if it had passed,
proposal among the J he minimum wage
congressmen and increased from $3.10 to
Hatch is committed to S3.35 on Jan. I.
the idea A major reason tor
Similai legislation paying young people
proposed in last sear's below the minimum
congressional session
would have allowed
em ployers to hi re
youth, ages 16 to 19, at
"5 to 85 percent ot the
minimum wage tor a
wage is io offset the
high unemployment
rate tot young people,
17.7 percent tor 1V80.
" mployers need an in-
centive to hire young
Projects Result In Scandal
i n e p e r i e n c e d
workers vet son said.
The subminimum wage
will give employers the
chance to train young
people on the job and it
will give the young pet
son a sense ol
"self-worth Iverson
added.
" 1 here is no ques-
lion thai the sub-
minimum wage would
increase the employ-
ment ot teenagers h
2 or 3 percent said
Research Associate foi
the National Bureau ol
1 ducational Research,
1 aniel Hammermesh.
CHARLOTTE
(UP1) rwo pas ing
panies were fined
5,000 and tour cur-
ot former com-
y executives were
. . and given prison
oi up to foui
s Wednesday foi
� bids on North
v ai olina highway pro-
l s. District Court
Woodrow W.
Jones, who presided Bai
ovei two trials in the
past week, said the '?�
prison sentences � e
brief but he I
pelled to impost
sentences be, a
men repeatedly
to taKe stater.
In a surprise
ment before Jon R
Reynolds of Winston-
Salem was sentenced. �
mis attornev, . Bai
;aid Reynolds Re nolds w a
i n
ad filed a lawsuit
the North
Department
I 1: anspoi tation in
�76 but that the
wsuil was withdrawn
"veiled threats"
mmunicated to
attorneys b
k-es ol the
North
lerested in having it
made public that fixed
bids were common in
the industry and that
some companies were
apparently extorting
money from other con-
ti actors in exchange for
favorable bidding prac
tices.
ha.
� aid
Winds Cause High Waves
Continued From Pajje 1
and Moore County,
$750 000 to SI million.
. estimates were
a .iliable from
(. umbe I ounty
Powei and
spokesman
i 1 : : is said the
� i i w e i
!le said
� ei had
rm, caused by
intense low pressure
: . was expected to
erosion.
. atarolina
Beach said high waves
pounded one of seven
structures condemned
earliei this veai and
PRESIDENT'S
DAY
SALE
Monday, Feb. 16
Another Plus
from
Shirts
FREE
� it
"American
Transfer
(Rain Checks Given)
You saw the
former hostages
wearing it on
TV � now you
can wear it
with pride
Shirts
Bargains
at
12 PRICE
Shirts
Carolina East Mall
Don't forget �
FREE
art work on
custom
transfer thru
Feb. 28
,t a travelers ak
Carolina, I e
caused minoi
throughout the �
pai ts oi th
I he last Carolinian
i
� � �
. �

jufcsti iption Kdtis
i sor I oi the moun
because oi a
rm mo ing into
he region. Weather
service personnel said
Foui inches ol
til toda
some ol the moun-
areas.
- 166 6 36? 6JJ
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If you need rroney for fail clothes or football tickets, now Is a
good time to seil your gold and silver valuables. And here s a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN!
$
Almost everyone has a high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and tiring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
(air prices and good service.
Wl PAY CASH ON-THI.SPOT
FOR JfWELRY, VALUABLESANYTHING
MARKED ION - I4K - 18K.
S GOLD $
� RINGS � NiCKlACES � WATCHES � DIAMONDS
� CLASS IINCS � WIDDIRC BANDS � DENTAL
COLD � BRACELETS � BROOCHES � LOCKETS
� CHAINS � LICHTERS � CUES LINNS � EARRINCS
PAYING ON-THIf POT
CASH FOR ITEMS MARKED
STERLING SILVER
RIGARDLlit OF CONDITION
COFFEE SERVICES � GOBLETS
RINGS � SPOONS � TRAYS � KNIVES
FORKS�NECKLACES�BRACELETS
' FRANKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE
$
OP eY SAlES C�v INC
401 8. EVANS ST. WB"S:31
i nurvkir ti
� EVANS ST OPEN9 30-5 30WUN bAI
wony house south) PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
Mm a major argument
against paying young
people a lower wage is
thai adults with low
paying jobs would lose
them to teenagers,
Hammermesh said.
In his report to the
Minimum Wage Study
Commission, a con-
gressional) established
committee to study the
social, political, and
economic consequences
ol the minimum wage,
Hammermesh said "a
highei minimum wage
has been shown to
reduce youth emplo)
ment significanth
The Department of
labor under the Carter
administration was op-
posed to the sub-
minimum wage pro-
posal, according to
D e p a r i m e n i
spokeswoman Bett)
Hayes. "A touch and
go situation" on the
proposal is m effect
with the new ad-
ministration coming in,
Hayes said.
The subminimum
wage proposal drew
harsh criticism from
Bei nai d Andei son,
Director ol Social
Science o f t he
Rockefeller Founda-
tion. "I am in favor of
the largeied Jobs Tax
Credit as an alternative
to the subminimum
wage I he income lax
credit is given to
employers who hire
people in one of seven
targeted areas such as
low income youth,
youth who participate
in a vocational educa-
tion program, Vietnam
vetrans under 35 years
old, and handicapped
persons.
Anderson said that
the tax credit progrlm
is not being used bv
employers because the
government does not
publicize it.
"Equal pay lor equal
work' is a no t hei
reason Anderson is
against paying young
people less than older
people. "Why should
an 18-year-old woman
who types 1(X) words
per minute with 10
mistakes be paid less
than a 21-year-old
woman who types 40
words per minute with
10 mistakes just
because ol the accident
of their birth?" Ander-
son asked.
Beautiful New il
Fashion Jewlery
Downtown
Pitt Plaza
14Kt. Gold Floating Hearts
small hea
med. he
Remember
your love
with a
heart this
Valentine's Day.
MON-TULS - AVAILABLE hUK PRIVATE
PARTIES PAPA KATZ WILL CATER
ANY PARTY OR FUNCTION. WE ALSO
HAVE A MOBILE DJ hOR ANY PARTY
ANY TIME.
WED. - ORIGINAL LADIES' LOCKOUT"
- 8:30-10:00. LADIES ONLY - GENTS IN
AFTER 10:00
THURS. - SUPER COLLEGE NIGHT SPON-
SORED BY THE S1G EPS. DOORS OPEN
FROM 8:30 TO 1:00. SHAG CONTEST
OVER $300.00 IN CASH AND PRIZES.
ERI. - PIZZA PIC KIN - SPONSORED BY
THE ALPHA PHIS AND GODFATHER'S
PIZZA - DOORS OPEN AT 3:00 - FREE
BEVERAGE OVER 800 SLICES Oh PIZZA
FROM 4:00 TO 8:00 �2?i�i
River Blutt Kd.
Behind Putt Putt
B5
SAT - LADIES' LOCKOUT II" - LADIES
ONLY FROM 800 to 9:30 GENTS
ALLOWED IN AT 9:30
SUN - WITH ECUS PARK'S AND RECREA-
TION DEP1. - GET ON OU1 FOR THE
LARGEST NEW WAVE DANCE OFF IN
GREENVILLE - $250.00 TO WINNING
COUPLE. COME OUT FOR TOTAL INFO
AND REGISTRATION.
MEMBERSHIP
APPLICATION
1980-81
You have a unique opportunity to become one of
the members of an exciting new nightclub for those
of us 19 and over.
All members will be entitled to 3 guests per even
ing. Neat dress and proper identification will be re
quired of all members and guests.
This special INTRODUCTORY MEMBERSHIP is
only $1.00. All applications and dues must be return
ed to this address: P.O. Box 1943, Greenville, N.C.
27834. NC State Law requires a thirty-day member
ship waiting period from date of application for
clubs with brown bagging permits.
jri w f .
ise were the
I put in then
keep one by
one else did,
ooded by a
B poster was
1 in the cor-
e interesting
being an art
up all night
ial known as
. the teacher
M (often at a
in.), put art-
and then rip
bees. (In a
ly literally.)
To Myrtk
The Student Union Travel Con
mittee is sponsoring a trip to one
the Carolina's most famous hi
spots, Myrtle Beach. Soul
Carolina. The trip is scheduled ft
Easter Break (April 17 to April 2�
and costs only S99.
The retreat is being ottered to a
ECU students, alumni, faculty aa
staff. Reservations are requested b
March 2 with a registration f
payable to the Central Ticket Ottif





Bift East Olarolttitan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
CHRIS LlC HOK, fitmnst Managti
JimmyDupree, ��,�
� �" www Paul Com ins. ,���
Dave Severin, ���,� ��,�� Charles Chandler v�.
Anita Lancaster, Wmmit David Norms, � ,��
Paul Linc ki
I ebruan 12, 19NI
Opinion
Pane 4
fflWfm
City Tags
Council Gives Students A Break
It good to know that the citizens
and students of Greenville are in-
terested in actively participating in
the government and are not afraid
to take a stand on the issues. The
event that caused the most recent
uprising of the students was the ci-
ty's apparent attempt to get addi-
tional revenue to balance its budget
this year by hitting on the students
for a $5 city tag for their
automobiles. Fortunately, enough
students and citizens of Greenville
complained that the tax now only
applies to permanent residents of
the city.
The charge for the city tags this
year represents a 500 percent in-
crease over the $1 fee that has besen
charged in the past. The ordinance
has always applied to students, but
the city had never attempted to en-
force it locally until the higher fee
was proposed. The city suddenly
decided to cover expenses by mak-
ing all students who have cars pav
the S5 tax. With the help of some ir-
rate reactions, they saw that they
were wrong.
It is now wonder the students
were angered at the thought o pay-
ing this fee. To park their cars on
campus, they already have to pav
S25 to the University; a high price to
pay indeed when finding a parking
space on campus is next to impossi-
ble. If this new ordinance had gone
into effect, every student with a car
would have been charged another $5
by the city to park on its streets
where it is also very difficult to find
a space.
Luckily, the city realized how
unreasonable and unfair it would be
to fine every student who has a car
in the city of Greenville 55 and
make them put city tags on their
cars when they are not even
residents of the city, much less the
state, and are probably alrady pay-
ing taxes on their automobiles in
their hometown. What were the
lawmakers here in Greenville think-
ing of when they proposed that this
tax would apply to students?
H.P. Streeper, owner of the Cor-
ner Car Wash, was one of the many
Greenville residents who helped
fight this tax. He urged people to
sign a petition that reduced the tax
to $2 this year, and docs away with
it altogether next year. He was
definitely against the application of
this tax to students. With the sup-
port o the citizens of Greenville,
the city has reviewed its decision,
and the ordinance will not be effec-
tive against students.
The city does deserve some credit
for changing its decision in favor o
the students. It is unfortunate,
however, that they did not think
through their decision more careful-
ly before they announced it.
Thankfully, the students here at
ECU are not afraid to fight unfair
legislation like this city tax or-
dinance.
VZZ HEMMED IF THE CITYMKESgMW
�Campus Forum�
3
'Fair Weather3 Fan Responds
4 MMBfc ITS BETTER THAT IT D�dnT U ,160ft
1 wish to reply to D.W. Ho well's letter
in the East Carolinian, concerning the
attendance and cheerleaders at home
games at Minges Coliseum.
First of all, 1 would like to sav that 1
am happy that the ladies' basketball
team is as excellent as it is. The students
at this university should be proud. 'Set
on this same note I would like to sav that
1 did not come to ECU to watch basket-
ball games. 1 do not know if Mr. Howell
came to school to be a basketball major
but I came for an education, like most
other students.
1 have attended mosl oi the home
games and am planning to ride on the
bus to the N.C. State game this Thurs-
day. 1 have been lucky in the fact that 1
do not have any night classes or an early
morning test. last semester, however I
did and was forced to miss a few home
games. If this makes me a fair weather
fan then I guess I will be one for as long
as I am in school, because studying and
clases come before any sports events.
Mr. Howell also deemed it necessary
to attack our cheerleading squad. I think
the presence of our cheerleaders is a
good thing, and the crowd response
wouldn't contradict my views. If Mr.
Howell is so upset, why doesn't he get
on the floor and lead the crowd himself.
Mr. Howell calls it foolishness. If get-
ting into a game and letting the team
know you have spirit is foolishness then
I am a fool and damn proud of it.
In conclusion, I would like to wish the
Lady Pirate basketball team all the luck
in the world, and to Mr. Howell I would
like to think that he has realized his
narrow-mindedness.
M.C. BURRIS
Phvsical Education
More On Liquor
Comments concerning the letter writ-
ten to the "Campus Forum" by Charles
Shavitz on Tuesday, Feb. 10. 1981:
Mr. Shavit stated that brown bagging
and liquor by the drink could not exist in
a social establishment together. Mixed
Beverages Regulations adopted bv the
NC ABC Board and the Ratified Bill, it
voted in, will allow brown bagging and
liquor by the drink together in a social
establishment. Bv partitioning of! an
area and designating that area as a social
establishment, a restaurant can have
both liquor by the drink and brown bag-
ging. Mixed Beverages Regulations re-
quire the auditing o restaurants to in-
sure that 51 percent oi income is from
sale of meals in order to maintain mixed
beverage permits. Brown bagging will
not be eliminated and therefore
restaurants can decide to have both.
NC Department of Crime Control has
74 agents that not only have to enforce
liquor by the drink bul also have to take
charge of all drug traffic across the
state. 100 counties are included in the
state which means that there is less than
one agent per county for enforcement.
The 74 agents will not be concentrated in
the counties with liquor by the drink on-
ly. According to Burley B. Mitchell Jr
state crime control secretarv, he must
ask the 1981 General Assembly for
substantial increase oi personnel for
alcohol law enforcement. Mitchell said.
"Liquor by the drink has caused an in-
credible increase in the workload Li-
quor by the drink will not be adequately
enforced.
Pitt County spent $9.572,160. on
alcohol related problems based on a
study by the United Health Services oi
NC. not $9 billion. Mr. Shavit mis-
quoted the Concerned Citizens as say-
ing. According to Dr. Ewing, director oi
the UNC Center for Alcohol Studies, the
taxpayers of NC are paying some $634
million a year because of alcoholism and
the taxpayers of the US are paying S60
billion a year because of alcoholism.
There are as many as 200,000 alcoholics
in NC and in addition about 69,000 per-
sons are from ages 10 to 19. In Pitt
County alone, taxpayers are spending
S12.95 on alcohol related costs for every
SI.00 received in alcohol revenue. In
Mecklenburg County where liquor by
the drink was permitted beginning Nov.
78, the whiskey sales tor Oct. '78 was
$1,980,695. in comparison to Oct. '80
which was $2,706,491. The figures show
a 36.6 percent increase in whiskey sales
which is an undisputed result oi hqm-r
bv the Jnnk. Mecklenburg was also
mentioned as om; oi the counties where
driving under the influence has decreas-
ed. Highway Patrol rroop "A" which
covers the 23 counties ot eastern North
Carolina has reported a decreasing trend
in incidents oi driving under The in-
fluence tor those counties. Hut and Mar-
tin counties which are included in the 23
counties and neither of which have voted
in liquor bv the drink are also reported
for 1V79 and 1980 a decrease in driving
under the influence incidents. Needless
to say. it is not liquor bv the drink that
has reduced 1)1 I incidents in the coun-
ties, whether Put or Mecklenburg. In
areas where liquor by the drink has-been
voted in, there has been reported an in-
crease in sales and m consumption, and
with an increase in consumption then an
increase in alcohol related problems.
One oi the basic founding principles
oi this country is individual freedom. Li-
qu r by the drink does not give the
freedom to choose for oneself since it ef-
fects the whole community bv increased
alcohol problems and costs, individuals
must realize that with freedom also
comes a responsibility. No individuals m
the public will be forced to drink or even
patronize an establishment with liquor
by the drink, but the public as in-
dividuals will he responsible tor any tax
related costs. What about the freedom
oi the individuals thai would prefer to
see their taxes used more beneficially in
the community than towards liquor by
the drink that will profit the restaurants?
DEXTER WINGF1EI D
v
UVa President Presents Views On Institutional Responsibility
Rv fUUL I IJIULmnn in . �
By FRANK L. HEREFORD, JR.
From time to time in recent years institu-
tions of higher education have been urged
to adopt specific positions on political or
moral issues which arise in the course of
our society's evolution. I should like to
share with you and your colleagues my
own thoughts as to how a universitv should
respond.
A university is a community of
scholars having as its central'pur-
pose the enrichment of the human
mind by stimulating and sustaining
a spirit of free inquiry directed to an
understanding of the nature of the
universe and man s role in it.
The university community will recognize
the preceding paragraph as the initial
assertion in the Statement of Purpose of
the University of Virginia. I believe that
our society today fully recognizes that the
established success of universities to pursu-
ing the above-stated purpose flow from
reasoned, dispassionate study to ideas and
propositions relating to the human situa-
tion and our natural environment.
Such objective study can proceed only in
a setting in which there is openness to all
points of view, tolerance of arguments
propounded by even the smallest minority,
and a willingness to doubt conventional
wisdom. This setting is imperative, if in-
tellectual freedom is to flourish.
However, the setting can remain viable
only if a university avoids com-
mitment�as an institution�to any
specific goals of a political, ethical or
societal nature. This does not mean that a
university is without influence in the pur-
suit of such goals. Rather, it means that it
should not adopt them a priori as an in-
stitution. To do so would inevitably
destroy what I think of as the academic
freedom of a university.
Should a universitv yield
commit itself to some goal,
feel pressure from opposing
institutional commitment u
ticular goal, would not it
university supportive of i
evitably become favored?
points of view of individual
considered in hiring faculty
ting students? As an institt
of a public interest group, c�
ty likely perpetuate opennes
for all points of view? C
becoming politicized? I thii
If this postulated course
extreme, it should be rer
during their first 800 year-
19th century�virtually i
operated under religious
monarchical control which
f
into their academic affairs. And even
recently, during the past three decades,
universities have experienced political
pressures through the imposition of loyalty
oaths, with hunting by anti-subversive
groups, violations of freedom of speech,
and at least one situation when certain
government officials considered
withholding legitimate federal support of a
university because its president had made
statements critical of a government policy.
The forces to exert the pressures are there.
In what specific ways then should a
university exert influence in the establish-
Gil goals? I
purse of its
trough the
freedom,
must enjoy
�r her points
er. The op-
study and
: institution
essence of
faculty and
to associate
committed
Note: The Cen!early'each
. . t� Jifticipate in
during the FREE Fciety.
y can come
sus of its
c programs.
his way. A
dozen years ago at the university there was
no academic program in environmental
sciences or in Afro-American studies. The
establishment of programs and the subse-
quent influence of graduates in such
emerging disciplines may well constitute
the most effective means wherebv institu-
tions of higher education contribute to the
advance of our civilization.
As another example, consider the conti-
nuing growth in the number of black
students and their involvement in the life
of the university. In this case, the universi-
ty community contributes by example and
through education to societv's goal of
equal opportunity.
The University is influential also in its
interaction with the community in which it
exists, and it does from time to time adopt
positions�only, however, on issues which
affect the university directlv. It does not
commit itself to positions in areas of com-
munity affairs which have little effect on
the university, although its members and
some of its services may be called upon for
participation in such communitv affairs.
Another instance in which universities
appropriately influence external affairs in-
volves the federal government. Along with
other university presidents I engage in
meetings from time to time with members
of Congress and federal agency officials
but always on issues which have direct
bearing on the welfare and effectiveness of
the nation's institutions oi higher learning.
Usually, the issues involve protection from
governmental intrusion into academic af-
fairs or the need for national recognition
and support oi universities as a major na-
tional resource.
However, universities have generally
resisted proposals that they adopt par-
ticular postures on issues which do not
bear upon the intellectual freedom and
welfare oaf the institution itseli ox upon
that ot higher education in general.
I believe this policy is sound and wise. It
a university should yield lo pressure and
commit itself�as an institution �to a posi-
tion on a particular moral or political
issue, by what rationale shall it decline
commitment on other such issues? Shall its
position be pro or anti with respect to
domestic policies, foreign policies with
respect to repressive regimes, communism
tree enterprise? It must be neither The in-
tellectual freedom oi a universitv is
precious, but it is fragile.
Editor's note: Dr. Herejord's statement
on intellectual freedom was issued in the
form of a memorandum to his ad-
ministrative staff recently.
t
I





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1 Ml I SI t XRul INIAN
Features
11 Bki xrv 12. jshi
Page 5
A Look At Reagan's Hollywood Career
Bv JOHN KM.FK
When movie mogul .lack Warner
heard thai Ronald Reagan was run-
ning foi governoi of California in
1966, he supposedl said, "No, no,
no, no. You've got it all wrong.
Jimnn Stewart tor governor,
Ronald Reagan foi besl friend
Foi throughoul Reagan's film
career he was always a bridesmaid.
nevei a bride. He played best friend
to some of the biggest stars in
Hollywood, but was never reall) a
star himself until January 20. 1981.
"Ronnie always played Ronnie.
He was typecast - the young
American, the boy from the
Midwest. He was always the good
guy1 ailed Ronnie's big brothei
Neil, ed in "Esquire Ronnie
was "Dutch Reagan, a locally
pop - announce! m 193
when I . � - united to make a
sci een test.
"MAYB1 YOl DO HAVI
POTENTIA1 STAR IN YOUR
lll)s 1 DU UN Rl GAN
1 OCA1 SPOR is NNOUNCI R
SIGNI D 1 ONG 1I KM WARNER
BR( S CON! R AC I FRIDAY
CONSIDER HIM
CREATES! HI 1 SINCE
1 A ! OR telegraphed a friend to
Reagan's home town newspaper.
"That's m boy. Ihafs my
Dutch. I hat's the wa he is at
homeHe's no Robert laloi.
He's just himself cried Mama
Reagan when she saw het son's first
picture, "Love is On the Air in
the low-budget film Reagan played
a go-getting radio announcer who
uncovers political corruption.
Max Arno, Warner Brother's
casting director recalled, "That was
his big sale, his warmth and his
voice Reagan's natural sincerity
and warmth did shine through in the
film. So did his radio-trained voice.
" 1 he test of his debut performance
was a curiosity noted Film Com-
ment magazine (July-August, 1980).
"He took a rigid stand in from ol
the camera and swung his arms in
meaningless gestures. He expressed
angei hv lurching forward at a
precarious tilt but seemed generally
unable to sustain physical motions
throughout a line of dialogue, and
instead just tossed them in tot ac-
cents. Simultaneous actions like
unbuttoning his pajamas and
shouting into the telephone, were
beyond him
Ihe initial enthusiasm tor
Reagan, which may have been
studio hype in the first place, wore
of I after his first picture, lor the re-
maindei of his first year in film
Reagan had bit parts in eight more
"B" movies. In several o them he
played announcers of some sort. In
one, "The Amazing Dr. Clit-
terhouse he played a voice on the
radio, nothing more, not even a
screen credit.
Ron's big chance came in
"Brother Rat a bestter than
average film. He played one ot three
military cadets. Unfortunately, he
was the siiaight man, the best
friend. "My pan was easily good
enough to provide a stepingstone to
stardom. "Reagan himself later
said. "Unhappily, I learned another
lesson. 1 here is room tor onlv
discovery in a picture. Eddie Albert
siole all the honors
Reagan was already typecasl as a
nice guv nobody. Throughout 1934
he portrayed these parts in such
killet B's as "Angels Wash Theii
laces "An Angel trom lexas
"Brothei Rat and a Baby "Hell's
Kitchen" and "Secrel Service of the
An
Feeling pity perhaps, Warner's
gave him a good comic role in the
Bette Davis classic "Dark Victory
Clad m furs and silky scarflets, Ron
plaved an effeminate friend ot
Bette's. He couldn't handle the role;
he blew it.
In 1940 there came a role more to
his liking: football hero George
dipp in "Knute Rockne-All
American Reagan went all out on
a campaign to get the role. He talk-
ed, hustled, carried around a college
football photo of himself.
He got the part and the rest is
history. He was quite effective as
the dying gridion stasr who urged
coach Pat O'Brien to "win one for
the Gipper a line, a role, a film
that became pure Americana.
Reagan literally became an over-
night star. The morning after the
premier of "Knute Rockne" he was
told to report for work on a big
budget Errol Flynn film. Though he-
was cast as-you guessed it-Flynn's
best friend, at least he had made il
to the class "A" pictures.
Ihe new star never shined more
brightly than in "King's Row"
(1941). Though not the lead per-
former, he stole 'he show with his
acting as devil-may-care rascal
Drake McHugh. Reagan's greatesl
scene came when the wastrel woke
up in a hospital after an accident, to
find he'd lost both his legs.
"WHERE'S THE KLSI OF
ME? he wailed. Reagan later said
he had relentlessly researched the
role, talkine to doctors and real am
r
Ronald Reagan
and the troubled
Shirley Temple
are united in the
heartwarming
conclusion of
'Thai Ha yen
Girl' (1947).
hailed as one of
the worst films
of all time. As
Reagan observ-
ed in his
autobiography:
'Yon are left to
guess as to
whether we are
married, just
traveling
together, or did
I adopt her
putees. He had rehearsed his big line
over and ovei agam. practicing it to
perfection. He even used the hue a-
the title o his 1965 autobiography.
Soon after this stunning success
however, his brief shooting stat
began descending, WWII erupted
sending Reagan into the service,
where he made training films. After
the hostilities, Reagan's good guy
See REAGAN, page 7. col. 1
Writer Of Baseball's Anthem
Had Never Attended A Game
olanda king, daughter of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr will ap-
pear in Hendrix Theatre on Ihursday. February 26 at 8 p.m. M�. King is
scheduled to gie a dramatie lecture entitled "Black Theatre: Moving Is
Higher The leeture is part of the Annual Black Arts Festival slated to
run from February 22-28. The festival is sponsored b the Student Union
Minoritv Arts Committee.
Betoie you know it the major
league clubs will be starting spring
training. Once again, the bands will
si: ike up " 1 ake Me Out to the Ball
Game
About 20 years ago 1 spent several
hours with the man who wrote that
song. His name was .lack Norworth.
Norworth was SO veais old when
we talked in the pleasant southern
California town ol Laguna Beach,
where he and his wife resided.
Seated ai the piano, Norworth alter-
nated between talking about the
mam songs he had written and sing-
ing some ot them foi me.
In his prime, he had been a great
Ziegfeld star. He had been in
vaudeville lor 10 years, as a singer
and monologist, where he cleared
the fence with his "ball song A lot
ot people puzzled over the fact that
the man who created the most
popular oi all baseball songs didn't
know the difference between a bunt
and a pop fly. (He had never seen a
baseball game and was not to attend
one until 34 years later.)
"So what lie shrugged.
"Robert Louis Stevenson wrote
Treasure Island but there was no
such place. Harry Williams wrote In
the Shade of the Old Apple Tree,
and 1 am sure he never saw a blade
o grass. He spent all his life in Tin
Pan Alley
For that matter. Norworth wrote
his most popular hit. "Shine On,
Harvest Moon without ever hav-
ing spent an hour on a farm. Both
that song and "Take Me Out to the
Ball Game" were written in 1908
"Well said the genial, white-
haired Norworth, explaining how he
came to write his baseball ditty. "1
was on the New York subway one
dav and my eve got caught on a
poster that read, 'Come to the Polo
Grounds.1 An idea flashed across
my mind. 1 figured there had never
been a baseball song, so 1 pulled an
old scrap of paper out ot mv pocket
and started writing. Ihirty minutes
later I had it�and still made my sta-
tion. As I walked upstairs the music
came to me
I hat "old scrap o paper" is now
a prize exhibit at the Cooperstown
Baseball Museum.
Next afternoon Norworth in-
troduced the song at the Amphion
Theater in Brooklyn. A friend ask-
ed. "How did it go?" "Lousy
replied Norworth. "but I'll give it
anothei trv tonight Ihe evening
audience applauded madly, and
from then on. "lake Me Out To
The Ball dame" cleared all bases.
No sooner had the song scored
than Norworth learned that there
had been 30 baseball tunes before
his. He estimated there were then,
when we talked, about 300�"but
you never hear any except mine, for
which I am very grateful
Norworth had no idea of how
man) copies of "Take Me Out To
I he Ball Game" had been sold. "It
was over the million mark years
ago he said. "Now, nobody buys
sheet music
Still, his baseball song and "Shine
On, Harvest Moon" kept him in
comfort through royalty payments
he received from the American
Soci etv of Composers and
Publishers (ASCAP). Every time
one o' his songs was played on the
radio or television, ASCAP gave
him "credit and the quarterly
checks kept rollin in.
Norworth saw his first baseball
game when he was 64 years old. It
enraptured him. By the time I
visited him, he was up to his neck in
the sport. Seven years before he had
organized Little League Baseball in
Laguna Beach and was honorary
president o' the kids' circuit.
Having Artistic Talent
Has Some Drawbacks
b damdnorris
1 lived a somewhat normal life un-
til 1 was 11 or so; then. 1 started to
become an artist. There are lots of
advantages to being an artist� I
don't have to trace things I want to
draw, 1 save money by giving pic-
tures for presents, and 1 can draw
Valentine cards instead o' buying
them. 1 here are also disadvantages
to being an artist, like having to
draw a dozen Valentine cards in two
davs.
People expect alot from artists.
I he expect an artist to be an ac-
complished painter, a perceptive
portraitist, an expert caihgrapher,
and a master o ceramics and
sculpture. (I can't handle paint,
often trace portraits, and mv efforts
at ceramics and sculpture by all ac-
counts are unmitigated disasters.)
Sometimes, people ask artists
trivia questions, like "Who was that
French guv in the I700's or 18(M)
or something who painted all those
people?" If you don't know, the
person who asked the question
walks oft thinking "And he calls
himself an artist
Another common, but hard to
answer, question comes from some
belligerent types who corner artists
at parties and demand to know,
"How dues that guy Picasso get
awav with drawing soup cans and
calling it art? Huh? And, what do
you think of all this modern art gar-
bane ?" Explaining all the trends
that have evolved in the last century
of art is hard to do with people like
that.
Vet another question (people ask
artists lots ot questions) concerns
someone wanting to borrow a set ot
delicate watercolor brushes to paint
a chair with, or wanting to borrow
some kind ot expensive art supplies
so thev can totally ruin them.
One of the great ironies ot being
an artist is artists, who appreciate
great art, can never afford to buy
any artwork themselves. I know
people who can afford to pay
thousands for a painting because it
"looks nice whereas 1 can barely
afford to buy a color postcard o' the
same painting.
Pleasing everybody with a work
o art is hard. I've done a few things
that some of my art teachers here
have liked, but my friends didn't.
Some things that my friends liked
were junk to the teacher whose class
I'd done it for. Sometimes, though,
it is possible to create something
combining the previously mentioned
possibilities to produce a picture
that everybody hates.
Part of the trick of pleasing peo-
ple with artwork is finding the right
subject. Lor instance, crying
clowns, tiery sunsets, sailboats, cute
little children with big sad eyes
holding little kittens, oi two lovers
holding hands by a misty waterfall
are popular for lots o the general
public. But, for art classes, they like
students to come up with somewhat
less hackneyed images.
Art was much easier in high
school than in college. High school
art consisted largely of copying Yes
album covers, drawing a barn or
something that the teacher made
you do. 1 used ; i draw stagecoach
holdups and cattle stampedes,
which was really sort of avant-garde
for mv class.
One nuisance in high school art
classes was people asking me to
draw things for them when the
teacher was out o the room. It
might be the still life that the class
had to draw, or it could be a
magazine centerfold, but one thing
was the same�they wanted it done
while 1 was already busy, and they
never mentioned the magic word
"money
Posters are another thing artists
get dragged into doing from time to
time. 1 used to do lots of them when
I lived in the dorms, advertising
socials I didn't have time to go to
and hall meetings that 1 never in-
tented to appear at. Some of them
looked pretty nice; those were the
ones people swiped and put in their
rooms. I finally got to keep one by-
grabbing it before someone else did,
and my room was flooded by a
broken water pipe. The poster was
leaning against the wall in the cor-
ner, and no has some interesting
water stains.
The roughest part of being an art
major (besides staying up all night
doing projects) is a ritual known as
a critique. In a critique, the teacher
and the entire class meet (often at a
ridiculous time like 8 a.m.), put art-
work all over the walls, and then rip
everyone's work to pieces. (In a
critical sense, not usually literally.)
Vviilwi
WtSK
Scenic Myrtle Beach, S.C. is the final destination of a trip scheduled for Easter Break by the Student Union
Travel Committee. Deadline for registration is March 2.
Student Union Sponsors Trip
To Myrtle Beach This Spring
The Student Union Travel Com-
mittee is sponsoring a trip to one o'
the Carolina's most famous hot
spots, Myrtle Beach. South
Carolina. The trip is scheduled for
Easter Break (April 17 to April 20)
and costs only S99.
The retreat is being offered to all
ECU students, alumni, faculty and
staff. Reservations are requested by
March 2 with a registration fee
payable to the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhal! Student Center,
Travel Plans
Travel accomodations are being
provided by Carolina Tratlways.
Chartered buses are scheduled to
depart trom Mendenhal! Students
Center at 5 p.m. on Lriday, April 17
and arescheduled to arrive at the
Holiday Inn. downtown Mvrtle
Beach at approximately 10 p.m.
All room accomodations are be-
ing provided by the Myrtle Beach
Holiday Inn and include three days
and nights of lodging. The $99 fee is
tor quad occupancy rooms only.
The vacation concludes on Mon-
day, April 20. Busses will be leaving
Mvrtle Beach that afternoon and the
return trip features dinner at world
famous Calabash, NC for an even-
ing of seafood.
?
r





1 HI I sl I KD M I I UK I K 1 i: 1981
LtAftOAKx OUT LOLLtGt TH6 WfW JVrVf
6V PMD AJ0tf
5
OcTHIS UW STtJ�t �
ft
afe w

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7i MM
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1H
7
Senior Recital Scheduled
1 Iui isi Dena 'Eai
B i miberg oj 1 ei na S �i
dina Beai h, Florida ' '�
senioi in iln Ea I Har
Carolina Univei � �
School ol Mu u "Du !
pei form in recital 1 i P i
day.m hen 13 ai 9 Sh
p.m. ii
Musi Centei R
II I �
11 � � p r o g r a n � 11 i n a
Bl
elude 1 -i .chei I ii
M,
II
Getting Credit Cards Can
Be Difficult For Teenagers
VISA

1
�res' cop ���� can
tiisi. and 1 pi ess ompan ,
ihe Public Affairs Depart
like meni. mei ican 1 h
� J a nd press Plaza, New oi k,
national M . 10004
d s like
I v p, ess 1 ntenman sugj
: ei edit checking lo il
a salan foi sp
v 000 -i prograi
V

Woman
Stages
Holdup
i he last stagecoach
robbed in American
histors was held up in
the 1890s m Globe,
Ariz b Pearl Hart, a
ung womai a
went out Wes eai
ire.
in in
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
lues. Kish hrv
Wed. bhrimp ireat-
ii an Lai NX ith A Mug
te Beverage. $3.99
usr�!abrtsh Shrimp NX ith hrenrh
Ihur. Family Night � ith Calabash
� ed Crab$4.99
I ues,Wed, Ihur. (Oyster Bar Only) I Doz. Haltshell
Oysti Mug ' H our Favorite Beverage
$2.99
International known author and film producer Jens Bjerre will appear in Hendrix I heatrt- tonight i� p
Uler Mao I In film, which is part of the Mendenhall rrael-Adenturv Eilm Serie will begin ai K
F�-f- O !?���� advKli��l
imi Ii raqu �- N t radlty
available 'ex aal� in aacti r.roQf S�-on
aicap' as ap�� 'Ot�3 tni� aC 11 �� do
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rncha� whlcr �'�'� 10 purchaaa tha �d��rtt�
FOSDKKS
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Phone 756-7031





I HI t AS I (. AKOI INIAN
FEBRUARY 12, 1981
Happenings
CAMPUS EVENTS
Thursday 12
� P.m. Intramural Co-Rec Bowling Team
c aptain's Meeting, Brewster B102
30 p.m. Mcn Basketball: Delaware State
Minges C oliseum
� 8:00 p.m. T-A Film: .lens Bjerre-China-Atter
Mao, Hendrix Theatre
Friday 3
� 5,7, and 9:(X) p.m. Movie: "When A Stranger
C alls Hendrix Theatre
� 11:00 p.m. late Show "The Song Remains
I he Same" Hendrix Theatre
� r:30 p.m. Women's Basketball: 1 enoir Rhvne
c ollege, 1 enoir Rhvne, NC
Saturday 14
� 5, 7, and 9:(X p.m. Movie: "When A Stranger
Calls Hendrix Theatre
� Valentine's Day
Monday 16
� 5 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Weight Lifting
� 5 p.m. American Home Economics Associa-
tion, Van 1 andingham Room
� 7:30 p.m. Men's Basketball: UNC-
Wilmington, Minges Coliseum
� Feb. 16-27 Intramural Wrestling Entries Due,
Memorial Gym 2()4
� Feb. lh - Mat. 5 Intramural Co-Rec Bowling,
Mendenhall Student Center Bowling Center
� 8:(X) p.m. FCC Fine Arts Production, A J
Fletcher Rec. Hall
Tuesday 17
� 2:10 p.m. Faculty Senate Meeting,
Mendenhall Student Center, Room 221
� 5 p.m. Young Home Designers League, Van
1 andingham Room
� ' p.m. Student Nurses Association, Nursing
101
� p.m. Intramural Weighi Fitting Partici-
pant's Meeting, Memorial Gym 104
H ednesday 18
� 1:00 p.m. Children's Orchestra Concert,
Wright Auditorium
� 5 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Co-Rec
200n-2n-2 Basketball
� 7 p.m. Psi Chi Meeting, Speight 129
� 7:30 p.m. Women's Basketball N.C. State,
Raleigh, NC
� 8 p.m. Movie: "Breathless Hendix Theatre
� ECU Playhouse Cabaret Production,
Mendenhall Student Center Auditions, Room 244
SCHOOL OFART
Jan. 15-Mar. 15
� Annual MFA Thesis Exhibition Show for
graduate students finishing in the spring.
SHOO OF MUSIC
� Feb. 13 Terri Svec, oboe; Andy Gilbert, trum-
bone. Senior Recital, 7 p.m. Dena Blomberg,
flute; Janice Joyner, piano. Senior Recital, 9
p.m.
� Feb. 14 High School Solo Day, All Day
� Feb. 16 Feigh Stevens, Percussion Guest
Recital, 8:15 p.m.
� Feb. 18 Faculty Chamber Concert, 8:15 p.m.
� Feb. 18 ECU Symphony Orchestra Children's
Concerts, 10 a.m. & 1 p.m Minges Coliseum
MOVIES
Plaza
� "The Incredible Shrinking Woman" (PG)
Shows at 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, and 9 p.m.
� "Any Which Way You Can" (PC) Shows at
2:45, 5:00, 7:15, and 9:30 p.m.
� "Brubaker" (R) Shows at 2:30, 4:45. 7 p &
9:15 p.m.
� Starting Friday at the F'la.a: "The Ja
Singer" (PG), "The Incredible Shrinking
Woman" (PG), & "The Bloodv Valentine" (R)
Hucaneer
� "Nine to Five" (PG) Shows at 1:15, 3:15,
5:15, 7:15, and 9:15 p.m.
� "A Small Circle of Friends" (R) Shows at 1,
4, 5. 7, & 9 p.m.
� "Goodbye Emmanuel" (R) Shows at 1:10,
3:10, 5:10. 7:10, & 9:10 p.m.
NIGHTLIFE
Attic
Thursdav: CHOICE
Friday: CHOICE
Saturday: THE EAZE
Sundav: THE EAZE
Tuesday: BUFORD T.
Wednesday: SUPER GRIT
Carolina Oprv House
Thursday: FOOTLOOSE
Friday: FOOTLOOSE
Saturday: FOOTLOOSE
Wednesday: SNUFF
C hapter A
Thursday: Pi Kappa Phi, "Evening Delight"
-10 p.m.
Friday: A Nu Pi "End of Week Party" 4-8
.m.
Saturday: Best in Beach Music
Sunday: Kappa Alpha "Nickel Night"
Tuesday: Sigma Phi Epsilon "Ladies Night
Wednesday: Sigma Nu "50,50 Night"
Elbow Room
Fhursday: College Night
Sundas: Ladies Night Valentines w Peter
Adonis
Tuesday. Kappa Sigma Li! Sis Fund Raiser
Wednesday: Mens Arm Wrestling Semi-Finals
If you have anything you would like to see in
Happenings, please send it to: Nancy Morris, The
Fast Carolinian, East Carolina University,
Greenville. N.C. 27834.
American Art Exhibit
Opens At Gray Gallery
Important paintings
b nationally promi-
nent American artists
will be on view at Fast
Carolina University's
Museum ot Art 'Gray
Art Gallery Feb. IS .
March 15.
"The exhibition is on
loan from the perma-
nent collection ot the
Mint Museum ot Art in
Charlotte.
According to gallery
director Randolph
Osman, most of the
paintings are large in
sie, averaging tour b
six feet, and include
works dating from the
past 25 sears.
Represented are such
noted painters as
Robert Natkm, Frank
Faulkner, Stanley Box
er. Dons Keeper, Ben
Schoeneit and Carmen
Cicero.
The exhibition will
open at 1 p.m Feb.
15, with a public recep-
tion in the gallery.
Refreshments yyill be
served to all attending.
Cray Gallery,
located in the east end
ot the Leo W. Jenkins
Fine Arts Center on the
main campus, is open
each weekday from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. and
on Sunday afternoons
from 1 ti) 4 p.m.
The Kappa Sigma Lit' Sisters
Reagan's Film Career
Continued from pajje 5
inocent imago didn't yvork for au-
diences m the new cynical, war-
wear) world.
With his film career winding
down, Reagan's political one began.
It yyas at this point in his life he
became active in politics, starting i
th the presidsency of the Screen Ac-
tor's Guild.
He still made films foi years, in-
cluding "That Hagen dul (194)
with Shirley lemple. "Cattle Queen
oi Montana" (1954) with Barbara
Stanwyck, "Hellcats ot the Na"
(1957) with Nancy (First lads)
Davis and "Bedtime tor Bono"
(1951) with Bono.
In this far-famed film Reagan
played a scientist who tries to raise
and rehabilitate a chimpanzee, only
the chimp made a monkey out of
Reagan. This film raised more
Johnny Carson jokes and embarass-
ment than any other.
Reagan's last film was "The
Killers" (1964). In what was likely a
joke, liberal director Don Siegel cast
Ron as a despicable villian, the only
out-and out heavy he ever played.
And so, 17 years ago, Ronald
Reagan's film career came to an ig-
noble end. Yet, paradoxically, here
he is now, a superstasr. Hoy ill he
be lisied when the final credits roll
by? Will he be a leading oman or an
inconsequential best friend? Will he
clean up the toyyn with his blaine
six-shooters, and ride off into the
sunset a hero? Or, like so many
times in his past, will it all be a bad
B movie? The curtain is open, his
greatest audience ayyaits.
FREE
You can own
pictures and synopses
of all 27 Spring Semester
Student Union Free Flicks
by simply picking up the 1981
Student Union Films Poster
at any of the many locations
around campus or at
Mendenhall Student Center
FREE
Sunday Night Feb. 15th 7:00-9:30
Doors open at 6:30 - Show Begins at 7:00
General Admission S5.00 - Students S3.00
TA('Rl'AM PAR -
FREE DRAWINGS:
FOR T-SHIRTS
SPECIAL BALLOONS
STUFFED HEARTS
ICE CREAM A
i
Come celebrate alentine's Day with Hearts Delight where
it's Valentine's Day every dav! On Saturday. February 14
from 2 p.m4 p.m. bring us a valentine or wear a heart and
we II serve you our special valentine ice cream cone (made
locally bv Carolina Dairies) hKLL!
We always feature the best ice cream
this side oi the rainbow and more than
25 taste tempting toppings, so you can
� ��
PLENTY OF PARKING have an tee cream fantasy come true
El WE ARE OPEN EVERY DAY
(INCLUDING VALENTINE'S)
FROM NOON TIL MIDNIGHT
752-5878
7
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Olafitel tattnmt $c it?ga
sj ITALIAN FOOD NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA
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p22A SICILIAN C V W
14" 16" (16"xl6") jfllf.ir"
CHEESE4.75 5.25 9.00 Jjf
1 ITEM5.35 6.00 9.75 V
2 ITEMS6.10 6.75 10.50
3 ITEMS6.85 7.50 11.25
4 ITEMS7.50 8.25 12.00
5 ITEMS7.50 9.00 12.50 WE DELIVER w
CASTELCARINI7.50 9.50 12.50 FROM 9:00 P.M. TO 1:00 A.M. I w�
SPECIAL (THE WORKS) 756-8704 &
ITEMS: PEPPERONI, MUSHROOM, HOT PEPPERS Carolina east mall
SAUSAGE, BLACK OLIVES, ANCHOVIES ONIONs' Greenville
GREEN PEPPERS, GROUND BEEF, MEATBALL & CANA- Sjf
N
We Aim To Please
So, you didn't get your picture
taken last week . . . how about an in-
centive? A 35-mm camera will be
given away to 4 lucky students who
have their portraits made for the
1981 yearbook. What have you got to
lose? Traditional poses will be made
at no sitting fee charge. A contem-
porary (34 length, close-up, profile,
etc.) will be made for a $3.00 setting
fee charge. No appointment is
necessary. All seniors having their
portraits made will have their 1981
Buccaneer delivered free of charge.
DAYTONA BEACH
Feb. 9-13
Scott Basement
Social Room
?075S ATLANTIC AVE DAYTONA BEACH SHORES FL 32018
904)?57-19M
?
f
I Ml ' Hi
mmm
Mk.





Sports
Is ODU Holding Conference Back
l ike sands ol the I ass, time could not be woowed into the new
is slow 1 i uniiii
an aih
1 c
particutai naskei
the V
! i V t
� milted
Kl. Wi
Ms
R
. VMI
Eat
'ii the forma confeience.
inference f Virginia Tech is a firm member ol
basl the strong Metroonference, whose
he 1981-82 champion last yeai (1 ouisville) also
was the national champ. No way.
VCl is one ol the strongei teams
an b� ivoj by in the Sunbeli Conference. 1 ha;
joe- school is not willing to make a move
H . the until the proposed conference gets
: the gifund.
I his left ll and Navy. Key
irrently members ft the conference forma
1 the lion committee set out to pull ai
least one ft the two in. Both reacted
Mad coldly. though.
Both MI (now in the Southern
hat the al i ence) and Navy (an Indepen
;i dent) cited foi theii preseni
non revenue sports as reasons foi
not making the nun e
N( regulations state thai con-
ference competition must lake place
in al leas! six sports. 1 he two
schools feared that the remaining
Charles
Chandler

four ol the i i iginal five appeal -�
ing it1 allow one ol the two in
Foui oui ol five. I hat's 80 pei -
cent. Enough support, i ight n
with the conference.
Wrong, dead wrong. I he i me
school thai has supposedly come oui
against both George Mason and
I N( -W joining is ODl And thai
spells trouble; with a capital " i "
Without the Monarchs the con
ference is nothing. ODl is really the
only one ol the five schools present-
l m agreement thai has anv son ol
!
i e h,
five spoils aftei basketball might
vary from what is presently in ex-
istence al their institutions.
"here is belief, though, thai both national prestige,
schools would strongly consider a ftei all, ODU ha won the
move to the conference if and when two national championships in
ii got oil the ground, situations women's basketball. Hie men I
to VCl 's. not fared to badly either, mal
What the five schools are left with the NCAA tourney a yeai ago and
is iwo institutions thai are very in- defeating the then-numbci one-
terested in becoming the sixth ranked DePaul Blue Demons earliei
member. this yeai.
Both George Mason and UN Old Dominion's argument is tl
Wilmington are drooling to eel in. neithei (All oi I N W
Moi
noth
Ideally I f the 1
tioni � Wi
ferenc , ODl
Cj Washii � '�'
well ' DA
curn ! � '
i ij In.
So If I

faced with
( pV oi s
D1 :
epi (All oi I N W
1(1 V
I
15
"Any!
e Ka
(l)l
m Bt




:
Lady Bucs Win,
Riley Gets 1,000th
ol Ri .� � ai d M n i Denkler, spurted . isi break which led to the even-
r t -
oui to a 28-4 lead midway the first tual ;l poin! margin.
WILMINGTON Si jod. The game was never in ques "I was pleased with the defense in
lion aftei that I W go) no the second hah ndruzi con-
ei than is points aftei that. ued. "Bui we won't beat N.( .
Ii was the 20th win against five Stale playing like that
losses foi the Lady Pirates, a East Carolina's 55.2 per cent field
. � id straighi 20 win season, iccuracy broke the I ady
ai tai �'� u I tas read ites out ' a foui j ime shooting
me evei asi year. slump, lones, who had suffered
"Wc were very disappointed in thi ub-par shooting found !
� � ay Coacl Call 13 shots in the
: . tid. "Wih art.� e.ind hall.
md didn't w nany "he Pirates outrebounded the
.c didn't make ihem smallei Seahawks, 48-35,
! nd Denkl
me
. I ; � i vv lm . was led
San
i v,
- i
Heid wen, I il
Barnes � J�H mos with 18 point;
veai
Sherri rumplei scored 14

n, formei Ayden-
. iberous I N V Grifton Hij St player, scored
ip its fast � early 11 pom bounds foi
ii � second half. the 8 ' ad Seahawks.
Point guard Laurie Sikes, with East Carolina gets a week's break
is, and reserve Lydia lo vnc foi 'hen Feb. IS
ree, with fiv a . sparked showdown at N. . State.
Savs Odom After Loss
Pirates 'Must Win'
ByM K1 hCHANDI LK
sport I ditor
Following his team's 86-75 lost to
i an Monday night, 1 c I
I basl ba ich Dave (dom
� game with
I i ire State tonight f 1 hui sd
as a "must-w in situation
1 he loss to Pan Am dropped
record to 1111 on the
I he team has bui four
remaining, two home and
ECU's
season
Kan es
two a
(do
�,��.
Charles
Watkins
s goal all season long has
been foi the Hues to finish no lower
� ; the .500 mark I herein lies the
oning foi the importance being
placed on tonight's game.
Alter tonight, the Pirates host
I NC-Wilmington next Monday
before finishing oui the season on
the toad. 1 he final two contests are
at Richmond on Saturday, February
21 and at Illinois State the following
Saturday.
I he Pirates will mosl likely be
underdogs in each of the last two
contests, making the two home mat-
chups crucial to the hopes ol a non-
losing season.
"These two games at home are
certainly the most importani we've
played all year Odom claimed.
"In view ol out record and what lies
ahead, we need them badly
Odom added thai he was not
pessimistic about the two road trips.
"We're not conceeding those
games bv any means. But I'd like to
keep the pressure ofl oi our guys (to
have a winning season) during those
last two games, it possible
In Delaware Slate Odom savs the
Pirates are lacing a quick team thai
will resemble Pan Am a great deal
defensively.
"1 thought we were ready to play
when we went to Pan Am he said.
"But they changed defenses on us
and we didn't plav well until we
made some halftime adjustments.
"I torn what I've seen Delaware
Stale will probably change defenses
quite a bit also, much like Pan Am
did
rhe Bi ?fore been go-
ing through rigorous practices in
ordei to prepare foi then Thursday
opponent, and prevent a repeat ol
Monday's loss.
"We've winked very hard
(dom said. "We went over
everything we know aboul them
1 he second-yeai 1 c I mentor
claimed that his team would have to
be enthusiastic to claim win number
12.
"We musi be feisty it we are fo
win he said. "1 also feel we must
get the ball inside effectively
1 c I and Delaware State, 6-13,
have bui one common opponent,
thai being Baptist College. 1 he
Pirates struggled to a 65-59 overtime
win over Baptist while Slate fell
62-61.
1 he Pirates are paced by guard
Charles Watkins' 13.2 average with
the other starting guard, Barry
Wright, adding ten points per con-
test.
Centei John Wright, a 6-5 junior,
paces Delaware State with a 13.6
average, forward Jeffrey Gumbs
adds ll.y points per game. Local
native William Hill of Kinston
averages an even 11.
Gametime in Minges Coliseum
for the contest is 7:30 p.m.
y
i
ECU'S kath Rile One Of Seven 1,000 Point scorers
Unbeaten Revils Rolls
On The Air
I he big ECU-N.C. State
women's basketball game next
Wednesday in Raleigh will be
carried by local Pirate sports
network affiliate WOOW . it
was announced this week by
network officials.
The game is a rematch of
the overtime thriller played in
Greenville two weeks ago.
ECU won that contest, 78-77.
Jim Woods will be doing the
play-by-play for the contest.
Airtime is set for 7:10 p.m
when a Cathy-Andruzzi pre-
game show will be aired.
By WILLIAM YELVERTON
Tin I c I wrestling team's trip to
Norfolk this Monday didn't prove
too rewarding as the Pirates
diopoped a 25-19 decision to ODU,
but the team's two stars keep gam
ing momentum as they head tor the
national championships nexl
month.
Butch Revils defeated ODU's
John Nowland 14-4, as the nation's
fifth-ranked 177-pounder boosted
his record to a sparkling 21-1).
"I his was Revils best match ol
the year" said coach Hachiro Oishi.
"His opponent was verv good, as is
Butch. He's in verv good condition
this yeat and is being more
agressive
Sophomore James Ellison won
his 21st match of the year agamsi
four losses with a pm ol the Monar-
chs' Phil Brashnear.
"James is gaining much con
fidence as the yeai goes on Oishi
said ol Ins 190-pounder. "He is the
mosl improved wrestle: on the
team
1 he Bucs 1 34-pound 1 ony Mit-
chell and heavyweighi Mindell
I v son wete the othei Pirates vic-
tors Mitchell's win was by decision
while I yson's came on a pin.
Oishi stressed the faci thai his
team's 3 8 record does not reflect its
ubiliu. "it is very 'haul foi oui team
to gel up foi a match since the p
gram is being terminated. It's
especially tough on the youngei
guvs We've had a vetv lough
schedule foi such a young team
I he Pirates must put the ODl
deteai behind them and turn then
attentions to a Saturday night clash
with the powerful Wolfpack oi N
State I he Pack has a 11-1 record to
go along with its number 13 national

I he
V
Oisl
defending nations
167-pound we
be some match1
lame-
againsi Grej Co
weigh: class v
when the two n
season at the M
tourney.
In the 118-p
freshman Jefl 1 eal will knocl
agamsi second � :hris W .
I he biggesl task, in evei
the woid, will be on the shouldei
heavyweighi Mmdell yson I �
will take on State's ncni
400-pound freshman fab 1
? �� I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 12. 1981
9
�� A X
Is
lid
Open
Wen.
inch.
ECU Goalie Steve Brown
Mile Relayers
Finish Strong
B WH.I.IAM
YELVERTON
tstl NporU hrtilfir
East Carolina's in-
door tracksters capped
a weekend of competi-
tion with a second-
place finish in the mile
relaj at the prestigious
Knights of Columbus
meet in Cleveland,
Ohio Sunday.
On Saturday, the
Pirates ventured to
New York to par-
ticipate in the
Wanamakei Games
and game awa) with a
fourth-place finish in
the mile relay behind
Farleigh Dickinson.
Mars land and Seton
Hall. Coach Bill C ar-
son called the perfor-
mance "poor
"It was the worst
performance there b
an last Carolina team
in the last four years
Carson said. "We
shold hae run better
on that track in front of
r.S(H) people
The Bucs were clock-
ed in a time of 3:19.7,
but even with the time
Carson noted that
C r a i g R a i ney ran
"fairly well
Carson was pleased
with the effort o' the
mile-relay team in the
Knights of Columbus
meet. "We ran a
3:18.87, which is a
good tune on a con-
siderably slow track
the head coach said.
"Charlie Watkins did a
real good job leading
o and by the third leg
we were leading
Michigan, which had
qualified for the na-
tionals, b two yards.
1 he Pirates fell
behind the Wolverines,
though, losing the meet
as Michigan posted a
time of 3:18.78
Carson was pleased
with the efforts of
Carlton Bell. "Carlton
ran the open quarter
and got fourth place
with a 49.8. He didn't
have a bad time in the
relay considering he ran
the quarter first
The Pirates will com-
pete in the Delaware In-
vitational this Sunday.
Carson said the team
will be without the ser-
vice of Bell, but added
he is "excited about the
prospects of footballers
Clint Harris and Eric
Redmond par-
ticipating.
'They are both look-
ing good Carson
said.
The head mentor ad-
ded that Keith Clark
will run the quarter
mile with Craig Rame
and Shawn Laney com-
peting in the 600. He
also said he plans to
run Ray Diekerson in
the half-mile.
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113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
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FEB. 9,10,11,1. 8T04
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Daily
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Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
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Wednesday
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Thursday
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Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
ECU Soccer Report
Booters Take
Second Place
By TIM WILLIAMS
Muff Writer
The ECU Soccer
Team participated in
the Elon Indoor Soccer
Tournament in Burl-
ington last weekend
and came home with an
impressive second place
finish. Sixteen teams
participated in ihc
tourney.
The Pirates lost in
the finals to an ex-
tremely tough NC State
team. This loss came
after three tough wins
in Sunday's single
elimination round.
Playing some of their
best soccer of the in-
door s e ason, t h c
Pirates posted victories
over Campbell Univer-
sity 5-2, Erskine Col-
lege 4-3, and Pfeiffer
College 7-6.
The two latter vic-
tories were achieved in
a sudden victory
shootout after time ex-
pired with the teams
deadlocked. The
shootout is very ex-
citing with one man
having five seconds in
which to score in a one-
on-one situation with
the goalie.
In Saturday's com-
petition, the teams
divided in four divi-
sions of four teams
each, and laved round-
robin to determine Sun-
day's matchups. ECU
also fared well in this
competition, smashing
High Point c ollege 5-0
and easing by Chowan
College 4-3, while los-
ing to highly-touted
UNC-Greensboro 4-1.
In the finals Sunday
against State, the
Pirates had to plav with
only ten minutes rest
after the Pfeiffer game
while State was well
rested having trounced
Campbell University in
their semifinal matchup
earlier by an
outrageous 14-3 score.
Individually for the
Pirates, junior Brad
Winchell scored 10
goals while Keith
Johnston won the tour-
nament's Sportsman-
ship Award. Bill Mer-
win added six goals foi
the Pirau-s a n d
goalkeeper Kerry
Lovitt guarded the net
very respectably.
In other soccer news,
the spring season o the
North Carolina Soccer
League begins this Sun-
day with the first
week's action pitting
the two Greenville en-
tries in the league. This
game will pit the
Pirates' Soccer Team
against the East
Carolina Soccer Club
(formerly the Green-
ville Highlite Soccer
Club).
These two teams arc
in the Mid-bast Divi-
sion of the League
(NCSL) which also in-
cludes Atlantic Chris-
tian College, NC
Wesleyan, Wilson Soc-
cer Club, and Green-
field Academy Soccer
Club.
This is probably the
toughest and most
balanced dh ision that
there has been in
eastern pan ol the state
in the NC Soccei
1 eague's history.
Sundav's game bet-
ween the two Greenville
rivals at 2 p.m. at the
ECU soccer field.

Valentine's
XWW
AMBTMMntPTO
imwiati�
MIMMAIICY
tm&amt int. Mrff c�
iM�nait�� can niMH
(��H � �r�� wmMi
IN HI IWI HhMtn f
A.M t.M Wltliri
?If I
p k SUPER
a A COLLEGE
J l NIGHT
18 & older
Free Beverage All
Night Long
Sponsored
By
Sigma Phi Epsilon
'J, Adm.
Bud Patrick
Memberships 4Z.jgliyS
At The Door q i n c � i
Available 3 I . ! girls
CHAPS, INC.
HWY. 258 NORTH
KINSTON, N.C. 28501
rFor Valentine's Week
send our FTD
learfe
Eastern Carolinas
Newest And Finest
Private Club
i wers
i uquet
Valentine's Day is
Saturday, February 14.
n.
b. I 3th
Satreb.
Fat Ammons Band
(Played At President Keagans
Inauguration Ball)
4th Beach and Top 40
With Mike Jones
Sun.Teb. 15th Fantastic Shakers
Wednesday Night's
are Ladies' Night
ilembersand
Their Guests
Welcome
Happy Hour From
All ABC Permits 5:(X).7:OOpm
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758-2774
If HI I l U S ll it f I jl
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night
at Chapter X
Every Thurs. 7-10:30
Bring Your Nickles

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OW-
Fast
Service
Great
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Enjoy Our
Big Screen
TV
Lunch Specials
Every Day Until
3:00pm
300 K. 10th Street
(Across From MeDona'J's)
The Best Pizza in Town (Honest)
Use Our Convenient Hours All Of Your
11:00-11:00 u D
Favorite Beverages
�� eekdays "
Kri.Sat 758-6121
Ff

SUMMER JOB OPENINGS FOR CAMP COUNSELORS
at Camp Sea Gull (boys) and Camp Seafarer (girls). Serving as a
camp counselor is a challenging and rewarding opportunity to
work with young people, ages 7-16 Sea Gull and Seafarer are
health and character development camps located on the coast
of North Carolina and feature sailing, motor boating, and
seamanship, plus many usual camping activities including a
wide variety of major sports. Qualifications include a genuine
interest in young people, ability to instruct m one phase of the
camps' programs, and excellent references For further infor-
mation and application, please write a brief resume of training
and experience in area(s) skilled to Don Cheek Director,
Camps Sea GullSeafarer, P.O. Box 10976, Raleigh, North
Carolina 27605
Drive-Up Window For
To-Cio Orders
Pitt Plaza
CLINIQUE
There is something special
for you at the Clinique
counter this weekend at
Brody's Pitt Plaza
NEW YORK RAVED IN 1979
NOW IT'S COME TO GREENVILLE
The East Carolina Playhouse Presents
GETTING OUT
by Marsha Norman
"The Best Play of 1979"
Studio Theatre
8:15 p.m. - February 18-21, 23-25
General Admission � $2.50
ECU Students - $1.50
For ticket reservations call 757-6390

-
!





10
1 HI 1 SI C K()I IM S I HKl R 12, 1981
ECU Foreign
Swimmers Take
To New Pools
B BOBBhs()
I t t sport. Inforantioa
It vou happen lo wandei ovei Minges
Natatorium ai Easl Carolina University on any
tnoon. you would see 2J men and
�usl working out in the pool tor an
upcoming sw im nu
. 29 athletes are three special peo-
ple V es( th ee swim In. you can't help but
:olorful sw imming uipv As one
es his flip nun, a canary yellow swim cap
s tedish Hag pops above (he surface.
In lane five and six, two mote very colorful caps
hreak 1 hese caps display Norwegian
Who are tl ree special people' 1 he are
la Carolina I niversity's international swim
Ian W iklund ol axjo, Sweden;
Bjorn i thai I Bergen; Norway and Dordi
� Norway come to the United
s es seeking an education and the chance to
. against top Division I swimming talent.
ccording to oui foreign swimmers, there is no
such thing as a collegiate swim team in their coun-
tries. "There are no university swim teams in
Sweden commented iklund. "If you want to
swim competitively at the college level you must
join a � - im club
W'iklund swam foi Vaxjo Swimming Associa-
' Vaxjo Sweden this past summer. As
v- rwegian swimmers, they were faced
ime situation in Norway,
�'i swam to; my hometown club, but the com-
, was with that swim club was
ke what 1 have met here in the United
commented Johansen.
� ee have had to make States, only one com tnd thai per -
. countryabits att foods you people
i .dinj to Johansen and
uppeiconsists ol a piece ol
choii Olboiled potatoes and
.a v y)
s �11 Sla . Johansen
�e. weij "To many
p! lined.
.ns theforeign u immers had knes� "Tl e
Buses To Game
To Be Available
E a s I a r o I i n a
students and other in-
t ed Greenville
residents are being of-
anspoi la-
the Lady
Pirates' he game with
N . C. Stale nexI
W ednesday night.
rwo buses will leave
Minges C oliseum at
5: ?0 p m. Wednesday
e, sel tor
7:30 in Raleigh's
Re noids C'ohseum.
g a m e i s a
o! the over-
time thriller held in
Minges jusl two week-
ago. ECl won that
game by a single point.
78- .
Student prices tor the
trip include a $5 bus fee
and a SI admission
charge. Non-students
will pay Sfr and S2.
respectively.
The buses will leave
tor Greenville im-
mediately following the
game, and are expected
back on campus at ap-
proximately 11:30.
Interested persons
should contact the
Minges ticket office at
757-6500
204 E. 5th Street
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEKS SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT -RELEASES
$7.98 for
$4.99
38 SPtUAL
KOCK PlLt
MCOLETTE LARSON
NAZAKtTH
DAVID ALLAN COL
.8.98 for
$5.99
JIMMY BUrhtl
KOD SItWAKI
STYX
CHtAP 1RICK
LONHJNK5HUN
$13.98 for
$9.99
JOUKNLY UVt
HtAKI LIVt
$14.98 for
$10.98
IHt CLASH
f-Lfctl WOOD MAC
ALL PARAPHANALIA ON SALE
MOST IS 50� o OFF
i
APPLE RECORDS T-SHIRTS
Regularly S4.50
$3.99 WITH COUPON
WE BUY USED ALBUMS
I he East Carolina I Iniversity sw im team is cur-
rently practicing twice a day. The Pirates hold
practice in the mornings and the afternoon.
In comparison with the competition overseas
and the amount ot work they aie putting in here
at E( I . the workouts seem to exceed those they
were accustomed to back home. I he three admit
practices and weighi training are more strenous
and demanding.
"1 didn't do as much weighi training in Sweden
a- I am dome now said iklund. "but with
sufficient taper, it seems to be making a dif-
ference
Henriksen, who jusl arrived from Norway this
semester, admits to a tougher workout schedule
her a: E( I "1 am doing twice as much yardage
now than I as dome in Norway, and I did no
weighi training at all back home
Both W'iklund and Johansen had scholarship
otters from other colleges and universities in the
south but decided to attend ECU because ol then
financial positions and the feeling that they could
keep ECl swimming standards high. Henriksen
became interested in ECU aftei Johansen wrote
home and told hei about ECl 's swim program.
Now, three quartets ol the way through the
season, all three international swimmers are turn-
ing in qualifying times tor either the AIAVY Na-
tionals or the Eastern Intercollegiate Champion-
ships. Henriksen has qualified hei 50 and 200but-
terfly tor the AlAW nationals at Northern
Muhigan I niversily. She has also been a membet
of a 2(H) medley relay team which recorded a time
good enough !oi nationals.
As tot the two men. they have been turning out
impressive qualifying times too. W'iklund has
qualified m the 2ki and 500 freestyle tor the
1 astern Intercollegiatehampionships to be held
at Cleveland State I niversily lohansen has also
had some good limes. His I �i the 2K) but-
tei fly and Z'H) backstroke are good enough foi the
Eastei ns.
1(1 head swim coach Ra Scharl !�- very pleas
ed with his foreign swimmers. "They aie among
out hardest working swimmers on the team
said Scharf. "They are very dedicated athletes
ccording to Scharf, the three foreign swimers
help m the ppool as well as in other ways
'They bring something extra to the team. Not
good experience lot ihem to come to
'� States, bui ,l help out American
. illu It ta
�nee.
STARTS FRIDAY
PITT PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
STARTS TOMORROW
ECU FOREIGN SWIMMING STAEWARTS:
From L-R � Jan iklund. Dordi Henriksen, Bjorn Johansen
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Brand new Maranti
compact stereo system Still m
carton S520 retail sen tor 1400
754 787-1
FOR SALE Parade drum
Premier, chrome m excellent con
dition Call 757 3210
FOR SALE Triumph Spitfire
1976 red, overdrive good condi
tion Must jell. S2295 Can
758 9571
FOR SALE Lark banio Almost
new. hardshell case Earl Scrugs
bocik included 1125 Call Keith at
758 7878
FOR SALE Four month old Fer
rit 145 Can 752 5744
FOR SALE Sleep sota Yellow
qreen. white plaid Good fair con
dition S50 756 0085
FOR SALE Surfboard 6 6 long,
Challenger roundtail 565 Call
75 4598
PERSONAL
FRED You know we ve had our
GOOD times and we ve had our
bad but somehow someway I
think they will all mend in the end
Remember The Walks and The
Talks. The Smiles and The
Laughs the Sunny Days and The
Rainy Days welt they may be
gone but the memories will live
forever1 You will be receiving a
package tommorrow and with This
package will be an envelope
Read the contents of the envelope
carefully for it says things enact
ly how I feel them I truly hop
can get together sometime next
week but until then Remembei
who s thinking about you Witti
all my love Ralph
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
cheap rates Call Amy 758 699j
COUNSELORS for western North
Carolina co ed summer camp
Room meals laundry salary and
travel allowance Experience not
necessary but most eniov living
and working with children Onlv
clean cut non smoking it
students Reed appi. Foi auplir.i
tion brochure write Camp
Pinewood '801 Cleveland Rd
Miami Beach Fi 3Ji4i
WANTED IN KINSTON Wo
meone to commute with Monday
through Thursday Call 522 1146
We speak TURABIAN Profes
sionai typing editing pro
ofread.ng WRITE RIGHT
756 9946
TEEGGY The 69 club informed us
of your initiation Congratula
tions! We knew you would come
throughi The DING DONGS
RICHARD O Hey hot
stuff rendeivous in the laundry
mjl'
KATHY Where have you been
hiding? I miss you King fish
arrive Love DE AN
GOOCHIE Happy 20th Birthday'
Best of luck with JB Let s all get
together and raise a little hell Got
an F try harder'
BETH Ah seen all good people
turn their heads these days so
satisfied I m on my wa. Wish
you would come DHB
S PICKARD In the Great b.cy
c'i race of love " you are definite
ly SENIOR all other women (to
me) are lust INTERMEDIATES11
DMJ
JIM B Happy Buthdav Love
S B
FOR RENT
APARTMENT Fo' rent
rooms modern bath an" -
study Call ?S: 3020 aftei 6 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Tar Rivei
Apartment Call Lisa 752 0653 or
758 5679
ROOMS FOR RENT S75 per
month utilities mcludf I i into
call 75J 3480
ROOMMATE WANTED 2
bedroom Eastbrocn s I hji'
utilities Call 758 6693 or '62 9616
FEMALE ROOVMATES Nf
ED House I block from campus
5100 OC mo everything .ncuded
Call 758 3318 ask for Anita
FOR RENT Large house 12
' oorr s ; seths ideal fo
qroop 1500 plus utilities 'i, 52V6
FOR Rt � : bedroom
apts Call ' - � Moo Fn
10 00 4 �it s�n I 00 6 JC
FEMALE ROOVMATES
WANTED C press Gardens half
mile from campus Call 752 5947
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED To share 3 bedroom
house 580 mo plus third utilities
Call 756 0838
MALE HOUSEMATE WANTED.
1 blocks from Attic 565 rMl one
lourfh utilities private room
752 3199
NEEDED Female roommate to
share 2 bedroom apt close to cam
pus Half rent half utilities If m
terested please call Donna at
758 7728
VALENTINES
AS THE WATER CHURNS I ve
made up my mmd it s soccor all
the way His name is Roger not
vulture The old one s been
repaired soy Pitt s Number 1 No
Id rather sit up thank you Yes. I
do love my personal trainer No I
haven t have you' Hend'
Theater Feb 21 keep dream,nq
With a little luck you il pick up a
lew pointers! Happy Valentines
Day' Love All
TO THE SOCCOR TWINS Happv
Valentines Da, Lo always
your roommates' PAC MAM
BO So mavb you are a little
cocky bu I line vou an
Happy Valentine s Day' JG
FANTAW MAN Happv Va'en
imt s Day I want to b.te vou
HEH Ever moment is a
special moment yth you Ha
had some great times, keep it up'
Would you be my Valentine'
Always DMD
DEAR JAYBIRD Prei'Ous and
U '� arc guv1- cute and sweet as
Luv ya lots' Your valentine
Rat
BRADLEY it s been great' Men
good times to come You re very
special S.eyasoon' aw
J 1 lovi- you' Happy Valentine s
Oi, XXOX Vickie
DP Da you e .
- . � .
you that 1 thin you re a real
swettneart and I'll help you with
ECON anytime Happy
v alcntine s Day EC
BETSY Happy valentines Day
Love GEEP
MOM Grandmothers make
valentine s Day a real special
day Love GEEP
BOOPSEY You re the greatest
Happy Valentine s Day Love
MARK Y BABY
DAWN Esse aut non Esse, Amare
aut non Amare Sine vester amate
ero in per petuum dolor Amo tu
WENDELL
TRR The last sit we'e great but
the next six will be the bes' I love
you SLL
HAPPY VALENTINE SDAY ED
DIE AND NASH We love you
always and forever LYNNE and
DIANE
HONEY BUNNY From history to
boat cleanings and all the
shadopws ice cream and
snowstorms m between I love
you THE VELVETEEN RABBIT
LENNY Not iust on valentines
Day but always. I love you And
thanks for the big one PSK
LSC Thanks tor the 1' months Be
my valentine TRP
PATTI Hugs and kisses
Squeeies and pinches Happ,
, ant,ne s Day ' PABL C
LANE I love you more than words
rr sav' Glad .ou re mine on
entine � Day TIM
HAPPY VALENTINE S DAY to
my giea' big wonderful green ted
d� bear I love you' KATHY
HAPPY VALENTINE S DAY to
my gorgeous sweet star JRS I
love , 0 u ' Always'1' For
yours DONNA DONUT
KIMM Y R There s onl,
HUNK for you' No moongoor
� ither Love ME
ELIZABETH You re the star ol
my heart Thanks for being what
you �re Keep on thinning abou'
us One together forever I love
((11 CHRIS
BETH Be my valentine this
: We 11 haw a C1AV
PAGNE JAM'
K IMMI Lad 1 my sw I
I m as close as I can be
swear to you our time n�
begun it wouidn t be a v-
tines Day without the giving
heart Wen I gave you mil
long time ago Happv �a-f
Day' I love you Charles
MITZI Be my va'i�- '
weekend and I m 'on � ,
All I want for vaienim.
own personal MGB D' �'
JCA
LISA Champagne Breaklas'
weekend Please '�est up for il
you 9 00 a m Saturda, A
CDL
BRENT Thanks for ,
understanding and your can
make every dav sp�-c a
KELLY
DELAINE Past few mon'h
great the months ahead look
ter Love JB
classified os can be � -
chased .30mfat
the eas1 carolinian of
FICE
Pkt
R UGB Y
SAT. 14 2:00
EAST
CAROLINA
UNC
Victory Party Afterwards
Shows Daily
2:50 4:55 7:00 9:05pm (PG)
At P.Bs
FEB.
14 UNC
21 NC State
28 Cape Fear
MARCH
28 Ft. Bragg
4-5 Wake Forest
11 Winston-Salem
25 Dan River
ECU RUGBY
H 2:00
A 2:00
A 2:00
H 2:00
ATBA
A 2:00
H 1:00
Home Games Played Behind The
Allied Health Bid.
?
'





Title
The East Carolinian, February 12, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 12, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.110
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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