The East Carolinian, February 10, 1981






She ?Eaat
'i
c
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. J9
10 Pages
Tuesda, February 10, 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Students Subject To
City Tag Ordinance
Bv I'M I COLLINS
S, � t .til.ir
arolina students who do
. ireen ille city tags by
� face couri and othei
than $30.
.s Greenville parking or-
person who keeps a car
14 days in any year is rc-
cit license tags.
years (he cosl was SI. hut
n council has raised
s
he same ordinance we've
explained Gail Meeks,
and managemenl of-
always applied to 1 (. I
1 Meeks, the council
. wing the city budget
additional revenue was
. cil then asked the N.C.
V semblv in its 98( special
IOI
lie anuuini cities
cense la. 1 he
Assembly complied by laising the
limit lo S5
Validation stickers cosl $5 each,
with the metal tags costing $2.0.
Metal lags will be supplied tree ot
charge to owners ot newly regisiercd
vehicles. Meeks said.
Students are subject to the or-
dinance, according to an interpreta-
tion b the Greenvillle city attorney.
Meeks said that students who live
m cities other than Greenville will
also be subject to ordinances in their
hometowns. "Some students may
be required to buy two sets ol tags
she said.
Enforcement will begin on Feb.
16. according to Police Chief Glenn
c annon
"We enforce this just like we do
any other law he said. "We
generally set up roadblocks every
yeai
Cannon added that enforcement
fas not been much of a problem in
the past. "With the price at $1 it
wasn't really worth it Cannon
said.
Court costs for drivers who do
not have stickers will amount to
S27, Cannon said.
H.P. Streeper, owner of the Cor-
ner Car Wash, has launched a cam-
paign to fight the increased cost.
"A 500 percent increase is
ridiculous Streeper said, referring
to the tax. "And now they're star-
ting to hit students too
In a Feb. 1 letter to the editor of
The Daily Reflector Streeper wrote.
"In the past three weeks. 1 have per-
sonally talked to at least 1500
Greenville citizens about the S5 city-
tag tax. Most remarks were unprin-
table
In the same issue Streeper ran an
advertisement stating his intention
to begin a petiton to send to the city
council. The petition calls tor a
See TAGS, Page 3
pn0to By JON JORDAN
I his sign in Iron of the Corner Car Wash urges citiens to protest the city tag ordinance.
Secretary Promises Change In Desegregation
MONUiOMl KY. Al A. (C PS)
. escape the dismal fate
most Mask colleges in states
re tederal desegregation pro-
s, have been enforced, a group
� faculty members, students and
es o predominantlv-black
Alabama State University has sued
ake over the administrations ol
uburn and Trov State universities.
which are also in Montgomery.
In its lawsuit, the group asserts
i state "has not only failed to
dismantle the dual system ol higher
education in Montgomery but has
keep all three schools racial-
able by makmg sure that
"white students would not be at-
W
rts to desegregate col-
late � hav e focused on
ig duplicate college pro-
. thin certain geographic
i ice, the policy has ef-
fectively drained historically black
colleges o their best students, who
find t h e m selves enrolled at
neighboring, predominantly-white
schools.
To prevent that from happening
in Montgomery, the ASU group
proposes that the three local colleges
be merged into one school under the
ASl administration.
The idea is not a new one. In
December, 1979. the Alabama
Commission on Higher Education
suggested a merger of the three col-
leges. However, none of the govern-
ing boards ol the colleges wanted to
go along with the idea.
This time, they may have to
cooperate. Soon alter the ASU
group filed its suit, the U.S. Depart-
ment ol Education warned Alabama
educators that they had made un-
satisfactory progress in getting rid
o' their old separatist college
system.
The warning letter told the
Alabama commission it must
change "white colleges and black
colleges into just colleges
The commission must submit a
new desegregation plan tor ac-
complishing that to the Department
of Education by March 7. If it fails,
Alabama colleges could theoretical-
ly lose all theit federal fundinj .
The same warning, issued in the
waning days of the Carter ad
ministration, went lo higher educa-
tion commissions in Kentucky.
Missouri, Pen n sy 1 va n i a and
Florida.
The Department o' Education's
Office of Civil Rights (OCR) deter-
mined that Pennsylvania's and
Florida's previously-approved
desegregation plans were not work-
ing.
The OCR also told Kentucky and
Missouri higher education officials
that it had found traces i segrega
tion in their systems.
At the same time, Department o
Education Assistant Secretary for
Civil Rights, Cynthia Brown, for-
mally accepted Texas' new
desegregation plan.
While recognizing Texas' efforts
to "comply voluntarily with the
law Brown said college-level
segregation still exists in as main as
ten states.
Additional vestiges o segregation
could be found in the way states
allocate money to black and white
schools sharing service areas, she
wrote.
The latter vestige concerns the
Alabama State group, which charg-
ed in its suit that it is identifiably a
black college because the state
duplicated the university's programs
at Auburn and Troy State.
Only days after the Carter ad-
ministration issued its warnings to
Alabama and the other four states.
new Secretary of Education Terrel
Bell promised the Senate "a
dramatic change" in desegregation
policies.
At his confirmation hearings. Bell
cited the government's responsibili-
ty to comply with the law, but
hoped the Reagan administration
could strike a balance between being
too oppressive and "giving and
undermining progress already made
toward equalizing educational op-
portunity
Freshmen Subject Of Survey
SGA Bill Supports Kappa Delta
Bv PAUL COLLINS
Nt�s 1 riilor
I he SGA 1 egislature passed a bill
Monday giving tinancial support to
kappa Delta Sorority in its legal
tie to buy a house on Fifth
Street.
With only one legislator dissen-
ting, the SGA voted S500 to help
Kappa Delta defray the cost of legal
fees.
Speaking in favor of the bill,
president Charlie Sherrod said,
"Each year the merchants all put up
'Welcome Bask Students' signs.
What they're welcoming back is our
wallets.
"It's part of a whole chain of
events in Greenville that seem to be
going against students he added.
Sherrod also told the legislature
about a city ordinance that requires
students to buy Greenville license
tags. "It just seems like there's an
unwholesome attitude toward
students
In other business, Al Patrick was
elected spring elections chairman.
A move to make the elections
amendments voted last week effec-
tive this year was defeated.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor for
student life, indicated to the SGA
that increases could be expected
next year in student fees, tuition and
housing costs.
Meyer said that a plan to increase
athletic fees about $10 could replace
Athletic Director Ken Karr's plan to
charge students for home football
games.
He added that increases o $2 for
mtramurals, $4 tor Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, $2 for the Student
Union and $6.25 for the Media
Board, were what students could
probably expect.
Dorm rent is likely to increase by
SI65 per year, Meyer said. This
would include a fee for telephone
service.
Sherrod announced the delivery
of the SGA's new bus. The bus is
the first new one purchased since the
SGA created its transit system in
1972.
Transit Manager Danny
O'Connor noted that the bus is an
automobile and that reduces the
chances of an accident, he said.
(CPS) � "As far as political
labeling is concerned, students con-
tinue to move from left to center
says UCLA Professor Alexander
Astin oi' the results o' his 15th an-
nual survey o' college freshmen.
Of 291,000 freshmen questioned.
60 percent describe themselves as
"middle of the road" politically,
which Astin says is a record percen-
tage. Those calling themselves
"liberal to far left" declined almost
three points from last year, to 21.7
percent. The number of conser-
vatives rose to 18.3 percent from 17
percent.
In the last few years, the survey
has found students to be increasing-
ly concerned with financial security,
women's issues, and "obtaining
recognition Margo King, assistant
to Astin, notes that these trends
continued this year, with "no new
surprises
Almost two-thirds (63.3 percent)
of this year's freshmen, compared
to 44 percent in 1967 and 60 percent
in 1978, say that "being very well-
off financially" is a very important
goal in life.
A slightly higher number agree
that a good reason to go to college is
to be able to make more money.
As students' values change, Astin
suggests, their career interests shift.
Women show a greater interest in
traditionally male fields every year,
he says. This year, 30 percent of
women queried are now pursuing
careers in business, law, engineer-
ing, and medicine, which King calls
the male-dominated fields.
By contrast, the number of men
pursuing careers in those four fields
is almost unchanged (from 49 per-
cent on 1966 to 50 percent in 1979)
in the last 15 years.
Astin attributes these trends in
part to the women's movement,
which has influenced both males
and females. This year, 93.3 percent
of the class of 1984 support
women's rights to equal pay for
equal work. Additionally, there was
equally strong support of increased
advancement opportunities and a
life outside the home for women.
Although the most affluent
freshmen still enroll at highly selec-
tive private universities (slightly less
than half come from families mak-
ing $40,000 or more per year),
meeting tuition costs has become an
increasingly big worry for all
students. Reliance on federal
Guaranteed Student Loans and
Basic Educational Opportunity
Grants (now called Pell Grants) rise
drastically each year, King points
out.
Residence Hall Improvements
May Increase Room Charge
Housing Announces
Dorm Reservations
Students who plan to return to
East Carolina University Fall
Semester 1981 and wish to be
guaranteed residence hall housing
are required to reserve rooms
during the week of Feb. 16-20.
Prior to reserving a room, a
student must make an advance
room payment of $60. These
payments, which must be accom-
panied by housing applications-
contracts, will be accepted in the
Office, Room 105,
Building, beginning
Applications-contracts
obtained" from the
residence hall offices.
Room reservations are to be
made in the respective residence
hall offices according to the
following schedule (Exceptions:
Assignments for Fleming Hall
will be made in the office of Jar-
vis Hall and those for Umstead
Hall will be made in the office of
Slav Hall:
Cashier's
Spillman
Feb. 9.
may be
Monday, Feb. 16 and Tuesday,
Feb. 17: Students who wish to
return to same rooms they
presently occupy must reserve
such rooms.
Wednesday, Feb. 18, through
Friday, Feb. 20: All other return-
ing students will be permitted to
reserve rooms on a first-come,
first-serve basis.
The hours for room
assignments will be: 8:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m 1:30 p.m. to 4:00
p.m.
Returning students enrolled
Spring Semester will have priority
for residence hall housing for Fall
Semester 1981 only if they reserve
rooms during the week of Feb.
16-20.
Based on this, returning
students who do not reserve
rooms during the week of Feb.
16-20 probably will be unable to
live on campus Fall Semester.
Photo By JON JORDAN
Housing Director Dan Wooten says that renovatons may increase dorm
rent.
By OTIS ROBINSON
SUff W rilcf
A number of ECU's residence
halls are expected to undergo
renovation for the 1981-82 school
year, according to Dan K. Wooten,
director of housing operations.
Wooten said housing im-
provements are being considered for
Cotten, Fleming, Jarvis, Garrett,
Slay, and Umstead residence halls,
and that additions are expected for
each of the dormitories.
Included in these improvements
are carpeting, air conditioning, kit-
chens, bookshelves, and rewiring.
"We would like to carpet some of
the dormitories as it now exits in
Jarvis said Wooten. "We are con-
sidering air conditioning for the lob-
bies and basement of all dor-
mitories. I think air conditioning
will help our program.
"We also hope to get more kit-
chens in the residence halls. This
would probably be one per floor or
one per two floors
Although major improvements
are not official, Wooten stated that
several of the residence halls require
immediate attention. "Some of the
ceilings need to be replaced he
said. "Cotten and Fleming dor-
mitories have a circuit breaker that
goes out. If it is a building that has
to be repaired, it has to be
repaired
The additions, however, would
cause an increase in students' room
rent. Wooten said the increase
would not be Jrastic, but that room
rent would increase over a period of
years. He stated that the im-
provements could be financed
through bonding.
"We would like as much student
input as possible concluded
Wooten. "Any idea the student has,
we will run it through the entire
residence population. If the students
want it and we can sell the bonds,
we would like to do it
A survey including all of the
students living in the residence halls
will be taken on the suggested im-
provements.
A survey will be distributed the
first of next week in the residence
halls. This survey will ask students if
they want more coed dorms, and, if
so, where.
The survey will also deal with the
reasons why students choose to live
in a certain residence hall.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds10
Features5
Letters4
Sports8
Entertainment6
! '
wt fMtm '





I HI LAST CAROLINIAN
KfcBRUARN 10. IWI
Announcements
WORSHIP
An episcopal service of Holy
Common,on will be celebra'ed
Feb 10 m trie thapei of the
Method.s' Student Center iSth
Street across from Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at 5 30
p m with the episcopal Chaplain
me Rev Bill Hadden celebrating
RECITAL
h lutisl Dena Blombert a sen,or
���� ECU School Of Music will ap
. ,n recital Friday. Feb 13 at
p m ,n the A J Fletcher
tal Hail
PARKING
C Parking Author,
l) at 3 p m inCi
RUSH
Rush Mon
0 and An:
� ��, , ' star
i 10 If i
f you
CO OP JOBS
Co op Office has current .n
- at,on concern,ng career
,�hi vsork exper.ences tor both
undergraduate and graduate
students during summer, fall and
�esers with Doth public
and private agencies including the
tagon Dep' of the Interior
Service Dept of
t-ooerai Pnson System
. se i � �� dm nistra
� � . ate organizations include
Duke Power Co Burrouu's
me and others
� lents are urged to come by
Co op Office to review iob
and to talk to a Co op
concerning iob
poss bilitii V iny positions have
approaching deadlines therefore.
ents should not
(AHPAT)
The Allied Health Professions
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat March 7, 1981 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to the
Psychological Corp 304 E 4Sth
St New York NY 10017 to arrive
by Feb 7 1981 Application planks
are also available at the Testing
Center Speight Bldg Room 10S
ECU
SOCANTH
Dating behavior rape myth.
il harrassment and more on
sexual behavior will be presented
by the Soc Anth Club The
� ng will be held on Feb 11 in
vvr B lO.1 7 to 9 p m All m
� �, m �� � I �
mahon call Jim tie 5004
VOLLEYBALL
An organ,lational rneetino. oi the
ECU volleyball dub will be held m
room 104 of Memorial Gym on
Tuesday Feb 10 at 7 p m Anyone
interested p'ayng volleyball is
it '
BEACH BLAST
Every Wednesday at the
Chapter X you will hear the best of
your favorite beat h tunes Special
prices too SO cenls admission SO
cents beverage Sponsored by
Sigma Nu Fraternity Pa'N
begms a1 9 00 See you there!
RUSH
� � ��
il
� Afro
For
TUTORS
SCHOLARSHIPS
The La'ne, vV Pittard. Jr
Memorial Scholarship and ttM �
A Thomas Jr Accounting
Scholarship will be awarded dur
ing spring � ' he scholar
ships will be tor approximately the
amount of tu,t,on for resident
students
Students interested �
application should secure toi
from the Accounting Departmen
tal Office Raw V, � r the f "an
, i'iOOS
must be submitted to Ruth Jones
Raw: 334 chairman of scholar
ship committee in the Accounting
Department, by Ma-
Recipients will be selectee on
the basis of schoiarsh.p citizen
ship and need m that order In
addition, the permanent
ot a candidate for the Latne A
p.ttard jr v- moria I -
� p should be in Eas��� N rtt
Carolina , East of h gl �
any county west of H �' 95 ,n
a � '� p ttai d ar � Perry Iru
. � . i an ah �
f . election w � � made c�
Api by the E l
Scholarships. Fellowships, and
f ,nan a A,d Committee �
Bus
BUSINESSMAJORS
The Max R Joyner Alumn
Scholarsh,p will be awarded dur
ing the spr.ng semester to a tun
time student who is pursuing a
degree in the School of Business
The scholarship will be tor the
amount ot tuition and tee � � a
resident student
Students interested n a ing
application may secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office ��'
from the following department of
. . . o -h, c, hool ol Business
� ki Departn enl R32S
Economics Department R238
Finance Department R343
Marketinu and Management
Department R 137
All applications must tx submil
led to Ruth Jone R
Chairman ol r I v � ' ' '
Business Scholarship Comm
by March 1
Recipients will be ��� � '�
the basis ot schoiarsh.p ai I
� ;ensh,p Final selec'
made by April 1 by the ECU S1
it Scholars � Fel si I
and Final � Aid � " n �
fro ' ��� on "� ' ' " '
Committet : � " � D '
Sc hool ot Bus "
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The deadline for submitting an
nouncements is Friday at 5 p m
for the Tuesday issue and Tuesday
at noon for the Thursday issue An
nouncements submitted after
these deadlines wll not be printed
All announcements should be dou
ble spaced and typewritten or
neatly printed on 8 by 11 inch
paper Messages should be kept as
short as possible and contain only
essential information The person
submitting the announcement
should include his name and
telephone number at the bottom of
the page
PREREGISTRATION
�� ral College hashang
rn some preregistration advising
procedures Students should see
OH'Oal Announcements no 6 and
no 7 tor information on adv.s.ng
appointments and on procedures
� � ompletion of prereg.stration
IVCF
�� � arsity Chr ,s' .an
Fellowship win meet Thursday
� I at 7 30 m the Methodist Stu
dent Center Thisweefc I f a Balk
w,ll speak on love I r ��.

SIGN LANGUAGE
The S,qn Language ClUTJ �
have its regular b monthly
t.ng on Sunday Feb 15. begin
nmg at 6 p m ;n the ma '
purpose room of Mendenl �
S'uent Center There will OC �
covered d.sn d.nner before M I
�� � � � ng and a caption
ward n
� � . ��.� �'� membei ire
rged I ittend a la � 'en l
persons a mvited � need
SOULS.
Chen -s ne a S O U L S
198: at �
Cen r Plan 1
PAUSE
let about tonight's
7 00 p m at the Baptist
Student u- � Bth Street next
to Wendy red Purceii. ampus
iei an I pi ' i �' n c s u
a :�� speakmg on i �
. �� Don't miss it1
SPEED READING
i Reading a i lai I i
Si tents and o'her persons
� , �, �ading more rapidly
�� . ed comprehension
on Thursday evei
H nivei
Fel 13 �'�'��� 1
The . �� ��� meet fi i ' �
pm Continuing Education i I
lor pan �'�

rn ition and

ACADEMIC SKILLS
Is surviving academically and
enioying college life a reasonable
goal for college students' The
University Counseling Center
Staff believes so and are offering a
two part mini series on Time
Management and How to Avoid
Test Anxiety
Students may participate m any
or all sessions The first sessions
on Time Management will be con
ducted Monday and Tuesday
February 9 and March 24 from
300pm 400pm in Room 305
Wright Annex The sessions on
How to Avoid Test Anxiety will be
conducted Tuesday and Wednes
day. February 10 and March 25
from 300pm 4 00 p m m Room
305 Wright Annex
Sessions are available to an
students free of charge interested
students may call the university
Counseling Center 757 6661. for
further information Registration
is not required
AOTT ARTHRITIS
Send a carnation gram for a'
thntis On Feb 9 12 8am 3pm
m front of the student store Send a
message and flower to your
sweetheart friend on valentine's
Day for S2 00' ! We deliver1
REVENGE
Chemistry class frustrating1
Come and release that pent up
anger and throw a pie at the
chemistry faculty of your choice
The American Chemicai Society
Student Affiliates is sponsoring a
Chemistry Faculty Pie m the
rhursday Feb 5 730 9 30
pm a' the Elbo Room Admus
Sion is 50c along with red.
prices on party beverages So
com. �
ELECTION
l
� if
from � �
D.
' ' It
' � ' '
Pro
4 -
An, � sted in running m
SOULS election contac '
Grac Well" il '52 9802 or Euia
Moore at 752 8981 The dead
v � 198! The positions
available arr- president. � �
president secretary treasurei
pan.a" � � ai and histor,an
FIELDHOCKEY
rnei nterested 1 ; ay -no
I . � key pleas �"� 1
an organizational meeting on Feb
11 at 7 00 p m in room 221
hall H you are unabu I
tact Oebbit Har
� M S181
its
Delight
ACRl;AMPAft
VALENTINES DAY CARDS
WE HAVE THE ZAN I EST, CR AZI EST, Wl LDEST'
VALENTINE'S CARDS IN TOWN (NOT TO MENTION
THE CUTEST, SWEETEST & NEATEST)
WE ALSO HAVE
THE BEST ICE CREAM
TREATS, HOTCIDER,
HEART SHAPED COOKIES,
AND BIGGEST HEART COLLECTION
IN THE WORLD! COME & SEE.
752-5878
UNIVERSITY ARCADE
NEXTTOH. L HODGES
NOON MIDNIGHT
EVERY DAY
r
You are hereby invited to our VALEN
TINE'S DAY PARTY. You must wear a
heart (even a homemade one), and we'll
give you FREE our special VALEN
TINES DAY ICE CREAM CONE. Feb. 14
- 2 4 pm FREE
Rising Prices Got You Down?
v
�'
SW

��-�
Ik
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J
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Your money will not buy as much as it used to?
We Can Help!
Beginning February 10 through February 14,
we are having a pre-inventory sale
featuring such items as records, tapes,
gift books, shirts and jackets. Come
on in and take advantage of the savings.
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
East Carolina University
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each ot these advertised items ,s required to be V Vo'ec.lic'allvnot"1 "
below the advertised price m each A&P Store, except as specifically noie
in this ad �
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT FEB. 14, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, NX.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERSOTHLSAIRSii�b-ib
Highway 264 By-Pass Greenville Square
Shopping Center, Greenville, N.C
Great Steak Giveaway
Register to Win s10000 Worth of
Steaks or Meat Of Your Choice!
Drawing Will Be Held Saturday Night At 6:00 P.M. To Determine
n0000 WINNER in Each A&P Store In North And South Carolina
(Except Aiken & Beaufort). Winning Ticket From Each Store Will
Be Forwarded To A&P Charlotte Office. Winner Will Receive By
Mail As10000 Gift Certificate For Steaks or Meat Of YourChoice
No Purchase Necessary You Must Be V�
16 Years Of Age To Enter A&P
Employees And Dependents Not
Eligible To Win.
ENTRY BLANK-GREAT STEAK GIVEAWAY
NAME
STREET ADDRESS
CITY
TELEPHONE
ENTER OFTEN � NO PURCHASE NECESSARY
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
WHOLE
Bottom & Eye (�����)
Round Roast
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF-FRESH
Ground 3orsib
VRollPkg.
y
ANN PAGE
ANN PAGE 2
Tomato Soup lowfat
100 MILK $189
5
10V2OZ.
cans
Gallon Jug
45' COUPON
I CONTAINS RICH BRAZILIAN COFFEES
! Eight O'clock Instant Coffee
AP
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT . FEB U. AT A&P IN GREENVILLE. N C
10 oz.
jar
314i
W 648 �
70 COUPON
1
I KRAFT �tt' I
i Miracle Whip Salad Dressing . IJIJ
I
LIMIT ONE WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT FEB 14. AT A&P IN GREENVILLE. N C
P�o" miSHMiss �no savings
FLORIDA SWEET & JUICY
649 �
Oranges 15
WASHINGTON STATE-EXTRA FANCY
FLORIDA
Apples
Crisp Celery
Save21�!
stalk
only
48
Tt
( otttin i
U
I
i
-v
?
� m mmmm





V
J
4
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I
S
Tag Prices Increase
i onlinued rora Page I
ec been trying to may decide to lower the
publicize this thing tax or do away with it
Meeks added that the altogether. The current
tag tax was a measure is just tor this
seai to-veai thine calendar year
this
it next

She said the eit council
would hae to decide
w hether 01 not to con-
'�u! tinue the tax as it cut -
om renth stands.
,i
Meeks said that
main cities throughout
North Carolina had
similar laws and that
they are used as a
was basically a method ol vehicle iden-
b alanci ng tification.
Meeks said. Funds from the tax
' I he cit council lias go to the general city
discussing this and fund, Meeks added.
I HI I V i XkOI INIAN
t t HKI K 10, 19h
Amy Carter Stumped
ADSt
1010
itsw
iniii
V
' ' � B . ION JORDAN
UM Survey Shows
Drug Use Increases
In High Schools
H.P. Streeper is fighting to have the cit) council abolish the Greenville
license tag.
FBI Probes Donovan
l I'l - Annartei
homework ma have
cost the government
hundreds oi thousands
ol dollars during one
weekend ol limmv
('artei's presidency
It began on a I nda
w hen m got stuck on
a question .(bout the In
dust rial Revolution
reported t he
Washington Post in its
VIP column Sunday.
Ann took the ques-
tion to m n i liei
Rosalynn who didn't
understand it eithei and
asked one ol her aides
t od a 11 the labor
Department.
On Sunday aftei
hi Kn a truck arrived al
the V lute House load
ed with a computer
printout giving a lull
answei to what so-
meone in the depart-
ment had considered a
serious question from
the president. I'o com
pile the printout t he
1 aboi Department kept
a full computei team
worl vei tune din �
ine the weekend
SAAD'S SHOfc
KLPAIR
113 Grande Ave.
758-1228
Quality Repair
BENNIES
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Alignment
Al! Types of
Auto Repair
Foreign & Domestic
Reasonable Rates
2900 E 10th Street
Phone 758 4224
W
ON 'Above aver a e
use oct m s among
- less successful in
to the educa-
environment, as
I by truancy
. 's, those
Ii d � even-
' i reci cation
heavy
tments to a
and or (have)
A high in-
said ' he repoi t
d in the I -
: e mt rican
ol Public
"Drug use is below
seniors
rong
i con

in
othei drug use.
Blacks reported
lower drug use than
whites, but the report
said this might be
because blacks had a
higher school dropout
rate than whites and
black seniors may have
had less trust in resear-
chers asking them to
report di ug use.
I he most dramatic
sliitt in drug populari-
ty the sure found,
involved cocaine with
its use among high
school seniors increas-
ing from 5.6 percent in
the class of 1975 to 12
percent in the class ol
1979. However, the
stud found that most
ol those who reported
using cocaine did so on-
. few times a yeai.
C igarette use among
high school seniors ap-
pears to have reached a
peak in the classes of
lri and ls"
WASHING ION
(UP1) New allegations
of links between labor
Secretary Raymond
Donovan and organiz-
ed crime will be ex-
amined but not formal-
ly investigated bv the
Senate 1 aboi Commit-
tee, a spokesman for
Chairman Sen. Orrin
Hatch says.
"There are no plans
to reopen an investiga-
tion said Ed Darell,
an aide to the Utah
Republican.
"The committee will
look at the charges
Darell said. "It it"s
something new, we'll
pass it on to the FBI. It
it's just a rehash
Five Democratic
senators asked Hatch
to reopen the investiga-
tion that preceded
Donovan's Senate con-
firmation, spurred bv
what thev termed new
allegations that ques-
tion the thoroughness
oi an Mil probe
Donovan, approved
by the Senate 80 17 last
week, called the latest
flareup ot controversy
"scurrilous
I he request came
from Democratic sens.
Edward Kennedy ol
Massachusetts,
Clai borne Pell ol
Rhode Island, I homas
1 agleton of Missouri.
Donald Riegle Jr. ol
Michigan and Howard
Metenbaum ol Ohio.
I he new allegation
concerns Donovan's
'old firm, the Schiavone
Construction Co. oi
New Jersey, and the
1968 purchase ol lop
oil allegedly
i �t iginating from public
land and illegally sold
to Schiav one.
Also sited was a
report by the Bergen
(N.J.) Record that an
organized crime figure
found by the FBI to
have had no contact
with Donovan had
ac know ledged doing
work tor Donovan's
: u m.
In a weekend state-
ment, Hatch said "All
allegations . will be
tullv gone into and
ealuated in a
thoroughly bipartisan
mannei ' by the com-
mittee staff. It war-
ranted, he said, thev
w ill be turned over "to
the appropriate federal
ot ficials
muni
A�MY MVV STOUT
Bckpacki. � 15. South
i F.rid, Deck. Flt�hl Sno
J.ck.H. Pe.ro.tv Pirkav
S0�l Comkil Boot Plwt
tsoi S Ev.nt Street

s
JUwi- Due
OPTICIANS
opticians
�KXigtinr
A arwtca
EYEGLASSES
COUPON
i1 l
� i1
COUPON
10
Save MO00 i10if15 Save M500 '15i
ON COMPLETE EYEGLASSES I I
COSTING UPTOS40 � I
ON COMPLETE EYEGLASSES
COSTING OVER $40
1 COUPON PER PAIR OF GLASSES ' � 1 COUPON PER PAIR OF GLASSES
MUST BE PRESENTED AT TIME ! MUST BE PRESENTED AT TIME '
ORnFR IS PLACED ORDER IS PLACED �
ii CLEAR VUE OPTICIANS ;
CLEAR VUE OPTICIAN
I l
OFFER GOODTHRU FEB. '81
510 OFFERGOODTHRUFEB 81 s10 I s15
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
jRtENViiLf N C
PHYSICIANS QUADBi
BUILDING A
W05W 6TMST
Greenoille Store Only
752-1446
� ftCfNTTO Ml
OFFiCl MOUAS
Mk 4 MP M
MON TUCS THUkS Fkl
I A M -1k M
WEOMESOAV
S
Love's In Bloom!
This Valentine
Say It With Flowers
Greenville Horist
Association
Cox Moral Service 758-2183
Greenville Mower Shop 758-2774
lna s House or Mowers 752-5656
Jerierson Morist 752-6195
John's Mowers 752-3311
Julienne's Mowers 752-5216
Mowers bv Koselind 756-401 I
Place orders earlv tor I hursdav.
Fridav. and weekend deliveries
I SHIRTS INC IMl
This Valentine's give
personalized shirts from
Himrs
110 Carolina East Mall
SPECIAL- 12 PRICE
Boy a shirt for your valentine � Get one for yourself at 12 PRICE
DON'T FORGET - FREE
Art work on custom transfers thru February
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nightly 'KlXJ-OOpm
Tues. Fish Fry- Ail The fish You Can Lat With A Mug
Ot "tour Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shrimp With French
Fries, Cole SlaW and Our Famous Hushpuppies$3.99
Thur. Family Night A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp. Fried Fish. Ovsters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tues, Wed,Thur(Oyster Bar Only) 1 Doz. Haltshell
Ovsters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Ot Your Favorite Beverage
$2.99
k
F8SDKK5
Ph. 756-2011
Or i�v,tjs6 SMr cjtrfw. t
AOTT
SORORITY
RUSH
MonTues & Wed.
February 9, io,&ii
80S Johnston ST.
Call if you need a ride
or if you need directions
Starting at
7:00 pm
BE THERE!
758-4290







2U?e East (Earnliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris Lie hok, cmm mmh
Jimmy DuPREi. ��
Pxt I 1 INC M . � PAl I C()ll INS, ,��
Dave Severin, ����,� ����� Chari i s Chandi er v.��-
Anita Lancaster, p�,� km David Nokris. F�n���
I i-hiuaiv 10. lVHI
Opinion
Page 4
Student Apathy
Campus Grounds Suffer Abuse
When running late to class,
students usually try to find the
quickest way to get across campus.
Unfortunately, they disregard the
sidewalks and blaze a trail across
the grass and through the shrub-
bery.
According to the university's
frustrated superintendent of
grounds, Doug Caldwell, "every
year we spend a fair sum on things
that have just been walked over
Many of the existing sidewalks and
across the mall area were laid after
the paths were cut by students.
Wright Circle, which originally had
only four sidewalks, has had several
branches added over the years to ac-
commodate the paths treading
across the grass and through the
hedges.
Mr. Caldwell says that low shrub-
bery has to be replaced quite often.
One year, right after he had replac-
ed some of the hedges around
Wright Circle, "the whole thing was
just obliterated by a crowd wat-
ching some streakers run through
the area.
Last spring, some small azalea
beds were planted to beautify the
area around the new parking lot on
Ninth Street. They were placed so
that it would only take two or three
steps to get around them and they
wouldn't interfere with traffic pat-
terns. However, Mr. Caldwell
reports that there are already paths
thoughtlessly tracked through these
bushes.
The Grounds Department has
placed signs in problem areas in an
effort to keep students on the
sidewalks. They are working hard to
make the ECU campus an attractive
one. Instead of walking over their
efforts, the students would show
more support and pride in the cam-
pus by taking a few more steps to
avoid the shrubbery and stay off the
grass.
RU&glAN ROULETTE
JSTRIKE
STRIKE
� .
J
is'ipsii' v�kz�fii
Tt5-
A
? k
I
o
k

� A r i � v
� jJJi5 .
WE FOUND A WAV TO KEEP STUDENTS FROM -JJ
UALKING ON THE GRASSLAND MINESl &
rCamp
us Forum
Liquor Draws Differing Views
In regard to the Concerned Citizens
Committee letter which appeared in
"Campus Forum" Thursday. January
29, 1981. I otter the following rebuttal.
The author(s) distort t AC I when
referring to social establishments being
able to have BOTH liquor by the drink
and brown bagging. If a count) or
municipality approves mixed drink
sales, a restaurant must decide which
route to follow: liquor by the drink or
brown bagging. The law docs NOT
allow both to exist simultaneously at an
one establishment. And, contrary to the
letter, restaurants are strictly audited to
insure that food sales account for over
51�'o of total revenues.
While it may be true thai the N. C.
Department of Crime Control has onl
74 agents for enforcement, less thut 15
counties statewide have liquor by the
drink. This averages roughly 5 agents
per countv . . . not the "� less than 1
per countv � to deal with liquor-by-the-
drink Opponents o mixed beverage
sales often resort to distortion o
statistics to try to make their point oi
view look more desirable than it is.
Pitt County earns nearly $750,000 an-
nually from Alcoholic Beverage Control
store revenues. According to the Con-
cerned Citizens1 letter nearly 9.5
BUT ION dollars are spent on Alcohol
related problems. Not hardly! I, and 1
hope other informed citizens, am not
gullible to this distortion of figures.
Although 9 billion dollars may be spent
nationwide, over one-third of this figure
is fixed costs for vital, non-alcohol-
related health care services.
Finally, liquor by the drink DOES
NOT lead to "an increase in alcohol
related incidents Figures available
from Guilford, Mecklenburg. Wake,
and Orange Counties indicate that since
approval of liquor by the drink, driving
under the influence charges have
decreased, along with alcohol-related
traffic accidents.
In closing, this country was founded
on the principle of individual freedom,
the freedom to choose for oneself. Just
because a vocal minority opposes liquor
sales, does not mean individuals such as
myself should not be able to enjoy a
mixed drink in our favorite restaurants.
No one will force the public to drink or
even patronize an establishment with
mixed beverage sales.
The choice is simple. In voting YES to
liquor-by-the-drink on February. 19, ou
are voting for the privilege to have the
availability of mixed drinks. In mv ex-
periences with liquor bv the drink in
Guilford County, I have vet to see an
establishment force a non-drinker to
partake, but I have seen drinkers denied
the right to even choose, because of
unavailability, caused bv narrow minded
moralists who attempt to legislate the
public's collective mind.
C HARI ESSHAV1TZ
Business
In a recent editorial the issue of Li-
quor by the Drink was debated. The
editorial made reference to a previous
letter that had stated that New York has
suffered economically due to its
overabundance of bars. The editorial
disputed this by saving it was faulty
reasoning. I recently read a letter in a
local newspaper from a native New
Yorker, which pertains to this subject.
This citizen of New York wrote in to
say that "apparently Greenville has not
considered the cost-per-person to
rehabilitate the alcoholic, which in his
case amounted to over $7,000 for rehab
programs Of course, we all know that
the cost would come out of tax revenue
from the city. Everyone that drinks does
not become an alcoholic but all of us are
affected in one degree or another. It may
be tax revenue spent on rehab programs,
family members affected by the disease,
or it may even be ourselves in the long
run. He also stated that "10 percent of
the population are alcoholics so Green-
ville could expect, according to
statistics, around 3000 alcoholics to help
rehabilitate
He concludes with this statement,
"based on New York's cost to
rehabilitate us, is Greenville ready to
spend $36 million per year just in the
name of accessibility for profit?" We
should realize that this man is a citizen
of New York and he is talking from the
reality of the situation in his community.
New York could not handle the cost of
liquor by the drink, and Greenville is not
any different. In conclusion the future
effects of liquor by the drink do hurt the
pocketbook and do destroy the com-
munity contrary to the opinion of the
editorial.
JOE I MERRITT
Freshman, Art
Columnist's
Opinion
Questioned
I am writing in response to the
editorial entitled "Militarj Preperation
Essential" bv Robert M. Swaim (Feb.
5). Today, in the United States, twenty
cents out of ever tax dollar goes to
defense. In the next five years, defense
spending alone will reach one trillion
dollars. Alarmists, such as Mr. Swaim.
feel that such spending is justified in
order to create great stockpiles of
military hardware and weapon systems,
which will deter the "communist
threat
The Vietnam War and the recent
hostage situation in Iran showed clearly
that militarv strength does not impose
our will on the world. A fear of a first
strike by the Soviet Union against the
United States is unjustified as well. A
fleet of strategic-ballistic-missile sub-
marines, which when submerged are
nearly impossible to detect, act as an ef-
fective deterrent.
Mr. Swaim supplies a list of the coun-
tries that have "fallen under the cruel
yoke of Communism but he fails to
mention that the Soviets themselves have
lost Egypt, Indonesia. Guinea, Somalia,
and the Sudan.
He also fails to note that Afghanistan
is far from stable. So with Mr. Swaim
proclaiming the cry o' the I950's
"Better Dead Than Red look at reali-
ty. He advocates increased defense spen-
ding and proposes that the taxpayer cut
his own neck bv increasing inflation and
lowering the buying power of the
American public.
He advocates that this "greater
defense" will make "might right bu:
fails to point to the fact thai the onlv
profits reaped bv this will be by the in-
dustries that manufacture these weapon
systems.
MIKE WI SI
Sophomore, English
NBC Distorts Helms' Views Of Food Stamp Program
WASHINGTON � I am often intrigued
by reminders that the attitude and percep-
tion of millions of Americans concerning
various issues of our time are the result of
something the people have heard or seen
on radio and television, or read in the
newspapers. We pride ourselves that
Anericans are the best informed people on
earth. Sometimes I wonder if we are not
also the most often misinformed.
I am often asked by visitors from back
home about various media personalities.
All Senators see the various media people
on a fairly regular basis. I know most of
them personally, and I enjoy working with
them from time to time. I have never called
a news conference in Washington since I
became a Senator a little over eight years
ago. I prefer the "one on one" basis, and
tha. is how I respond to requests for inter-
views.
TREATMENT � Except on rare occa-
sions, I have found the national media
Jesse
Helms
people quite objective and fair. That does
not mean that I like everything they write
or broadcast, but I level with them and
they level with me. Things have worked
out fairly well.
But there was one instance recently that
puzzled me a bit � a so-called "in-depth"
story on NBC News on January 30. The
subject was the food stamp program, and
when I saw the NBC newscast I was
astonished at what seemed to me to be a
cheap shot.
ADVANCE � Three weeks or more in
advance of the newscast, NBC sent a
reporter and camera crew to my office for
an interview about the food stamp pro-
gram. I didn't time the actual filming, but
I'm sure it ran at least 20 minutes. I ex-
plained in detail that I had no intention of
cutting out food stamps for the truly
needy, but that I did intend to continue to
do everything possible to remove
freeloaders from the program.
Bear in mind that this interview occurred
weeks before the January 30 newscast.
When the interview finally appeared on
NBC, my comments had been taken out of
context, and reduced to less than a minute.
Meanwhile, NBC had gone out across the
country and interviewed a number of food
stamp recipients, including an elderly lady.
The newscast said flatly that 1 intended to
cut off food stamps to the lady, and to
other needy people. I very clearly had not
said that. In fact, 1 don't even know any of
the people whom NBC interviewed, or
anything about them.
WAGON � I did say that far too many
people are riding the federal welfare
wagon, and not enough people are pulling
it. But, over and over again, 1 have em-
phasized that the truly needy will not be
hurt by any action that 1 take � the elderly
who cannot care for themselves, the sick,
the crippled, the blind and so on.
On the other hand, I don't feel that the
working taxpayers of this country should
be required to support able-bodied people
who simply do not want to work. 1 do not
believe that people who walk off their jobs
in strikes should be eligible for food
stamps. I do not believe that college
students from wealthy families should be
eligible for free food stamps.
But the NBC newscast left the impres-
sion that mv desire to tighten up the tood
stamp program is designed to deprive trulv
needy people of help. 1 have never said
that; I have said preciselv the opposite
NBC failed to use any part of the inter-
view in which I emphasized that the
strongest criticism of the food stamp pro-
gram has come from administrators on the
local level who see, firsthand, the manner
in which the taxpayers are being ripped
off. These local administrators are locked
into a system that requires them to issue
food stamps to virtually everyone who ap-
plies. I do not feel that such a system is fair
to the working taxpayers of this country �
and, NBC News notwithstanding, I intend
to do my best to reduce the cost of the pro-
gram.
Welfare ought to go to the truly needy
� and stop there. Able-bodied people
ought to be required to work for a living,
just as you have to do.
I
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Features
ECU Playhouse Presents
Norman's 'Getting Out'
Mil! pi
lexas Professor
Becomes Authority
) Kissing's History
Some Ideas For
Valentine Sweets
�'
Show Opens In Mendenhall
VH() smiK
Iit I he Blueap), is pai n v
iduati ol iht 1(1 n, hool dI
illi � tnd ases in Mendenhall :
Coping With Peanut Butter
s.
����
Ma
i I
litti
ad mini
Mai
H
'
I �
It' 11 V
�i. ted rcsj B
irl a
I

! � "All I k
' ' id





I HI I AS IAKOl INIAN
N HKl. Akl 10,
LcAtoiM AftouT Coccf THr fVwo lw
tH Vf)9 fbMib
TH 605 HoMfc 50

TW &err Ateioo
7 AJefXT S��K�roO ?
io-n
MH THIT STUPID C4K
caajt cwv Aof rMO
Students Holding Recitals
Pianist Catherine mance. she is a student
Syron of l)ais. a of Henry Doskey of the
sophomore student in ECl keyboard faculty.
the Past Carolina Her parents are Mr.
Universit) School oi and Mis. Reginald
Music, will perform in Styron ol l)ais
recital rhursday, Feb. Clarinetist Bari
12, at 7:30 p.m. in the Webster, senior student
Fletcher Music Center in the Past Carolina
Recital Hall. I niversit) School of
Previously scheduled Music, will perform in
for Jan. 30, the recital recital Thursday, Feb.
date was moved 5, at 7:30 p.m. in the
because o snowfall in Fletcher Music Center
Greenville. Recital Hall here.
Miss Stvron will per- Her program will in-
form two Scarlatti elude two pieces from
sonatas (P Major and the Schumann
G Major). the "Fantasy "Six Ger-
Beethoven Sonata, nun Songs foi Piano,
Opus 110 and Voice and Clarinet" b
Braham's "Eight Piano Spohr and the Debussv
Pieces Opus 76. "Premiere Rhap-
A candidate for the sodie
Bachelor ol Music She will be assisted
degree in piano perfor- b soprano Anne Gunn
and pianists Val Parks Bachelor of Music
an Alisa Wetherington. degree.
Hei parents are Mr. Miss Styron will per
and Mrs. Robert D, form two Scarlatti
Webster of 4101 Pagle sonatas (E Major and
Circle, Roanoke, Va. G Major), the
Pianist Catherine Beethoven Sonata,
Stvron of Davis, a Opus 110 and Brahnis's
sophomore student in "Fight Piano Pieces
the Past Carolina Opus 76.
University School o A candidate for the
Music, will perform in Bachelor of Music
recital rhursday, Peb. degree in piano perfor-
12. at 7:30 p.m. in the mance, she is a student
Fletcher Music Center of Henry Doskey of the
Ready toteach
home nursing, first aid,
parenting, child care,
water safety, C PR.
Redross: Ready for a new century.
Recital Hall.
Pteviouslv scheduled
ECU keyboard faculty
Her parents are Mr


foi Ian. 30, the recital and Mrs. Reginald
date vas moved Stvron of Davis.
because of snow fall in
Cireenv ille.
A student o f
Deborah C'hodacki o
the ECU woodwinds
facult) Miss ebstet is
a candidate tor the
�);� �� � A ivenising Council
m
Tie HiQSbwi
OP1M U HOUIt
Wholesale & Retail
Ice Sales i
SPECIAL reg OQC I
8-LB BAG 89
with this coupon
Expires April 1 1981
� eg ft lea Dei
I
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday Plus t�X
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Mitchell's
Beauty Salon
,
101
i EZCZ33 i
10th i Evan Si
752-�nz
Pitt Plaza
Women Cental
Waves and
Curly Perms
reduced to J O
Mon-1 ues ed.
Otter (iood I hru
756-4042 oi 756-2950 beb. lb"
DauschOLomb
Soft Lenses
vs.
'The Perfect
Vision Device'
RAIHSKELLER
Appearing tor Lunch
Wed. heb. llth
Mark Kemp
Accoustic Musician
Lnjov Lunch and
Music at the
IKATHSKLLLtK
NO COVER
752-I361
The 1981-82
East Carolina
Calendar
wi
be taking
applications
for models � Sunday
afternoon � 3:00 p.m. .
attheELBO
If you are interested please bring
photograph.
For more information �
758-4591
�� n � � : : I Wipei
and straps Wrth Bausch & Lomb Soft
(e v they doi
t Theyi � � ��
ONLY $159 complete
�.�-�� ; a '
disinfectant unit also included
TIPTON ANNEX
226 Greenville Bivd
Greenville N C 7J6 '40-s
()p((nx'trn.
Eye Care Center, R A.
Open 12:30pm-1:30am
109 L. 5th St.
Also Rocky Mount, Wilson
and Goldsboro
Doctors Harrold Barker
Hollis Godwin
P K
A A
P T
A Z
SUPER
COLLEGE
NIGHT
1 8 & older
Free Beverage AiJ
Night Long
Sponsored
By
Sigma Phi Epsilon
D.J ,dm-
Bud Patrick $2.7:) gUVS
Beach & Disco 1 .75 girls
1
NEW YORK RAVED IN 1979
NOW IT'S COME TO GREENVILLE
The Kappa Sigma Lil Sisters
The East Carolina Playhouse Presents
GETTING OUT
by Marsha Norman
"The Best Play of 1979"
Studio Theatre
8:15 p.m. - February 18-21, 23-25
General Admission - $2.50
ECU Students - $1.50
For ticket reservations call 757-6390
ECU loves
roast boef at
Sunday Night Feb. 15th 7:00-9:30
Ooon open ai 6 30 Show Begint at 7:00
General Admn.ion S500 Sludenu S3 00
America's roast beef
Yes sir!
L

rbg
wo more reasons
O loveArbs Lean Trim & Delicious No gristle No surprises
No Sir' It's America s Roast Beef Yes Sir1
2
s I I H I HISOl P� N
Arby's�
Roast Beef
Sandwiches
0.
ilrhys
00
customer per siMt Not valid with anv other otiei � ��
WITH His t Ol PON
Otter valid thru
at all participating rby"s 1 imtl one coupon per
customer per MMt Not valid with any other offci
$o
Arby's� Roast Beef
Sandwich With
Salad Bar
Olter valid thru
at all participating toby's 1 imit one coupon per
customer BCT vistl Not valid with am other otter - :
Greenville Square Shopping Center
ACROSS FROM K MART
$019
f
"�w
I
I
I
I
I





10
p
!
HI 1 S R) N
Entertainment
I 1 HKI H 10. !SM I'
Kubrick And Zeppelin
Highlight Free Flicks
By JOHN WEYLER
SMI Wolrt
This Wednesday night at 8 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center's
Hendrix rheatre, the Student Union
Films Committee will show as pan
oi its special film scries. Stanley
Kubrick's "Or. Strangelove, or
How 1 1 earned to Stop Worrying
and 1 ove the Bomb
Admission is, as usual, b ECl
student II) and Activity Card oi b
Mendenhall Student Centei
Membership (aid tor faculty and
staff members on campus.
Following the film in room 221 oi
the student center, coffee and
doughnuts vmII be served free oi
charge Any students, faculty or
stall seeking a place in which to
discuss the film with others, are
welcome to attend.
i oming this Friday and Saturday
night at 5, 7, and 9 p.m the films
committee will present its regular
weekend film in Mendenhall's Hen
drix rheatre. This week it's the
thriller "When a Stranger Calls"
starring Carol Kane. Also, at 11:00
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre, there will
be special late show presentations of
1 ed Zeppelin's "The Song Remains
the Same I he movie will be
shown as a late show on both Friday
and Saturday nights.
"Dr. Strangelove" is a thought-
provoking and terrifying movie
about a subject even more relevant
and important today than it was
when the film was released in 1964:
the imminent possibility oi nuclear
disaster.
It concerns a psychotic US
general who launches an attack on
the Soviet Union. Once the air at-
tack is underway, the president and
his top officials learn that the
Soviets have developed a Doomsday
Machine that will automatically an-
nihilate the entire earth if their
country is attacked. The plot
follows the attempts oi our coun-
try's leaders to stop their own armed
forces attack before the nuclear
catastrophy. Believe it or not, this
film is an hilarious comedy.
1 he storv is based on a serious
novel. "Red Alert by Peter
m

In a week featuring many fine movies on campus, internationally
kmmn author and film producer Jens Bjerre will appear in Hendrix
rheatre on feh. 12 to present his film. China After Mao
Black A rts Festival
To Include Lecture,
Films, Music, Food
Plans have been finalized for the 19S1 Annual Black Aits I estnal at
last Carolina University. The (estiva which is being sponsored bv
the Student Union Minority Aits Committee, is slated to begin on
Sunday, February 22. and continue through Saturday, lebruary 28.
The testival will open with a "soul food dinner" on Sunday the
22nd at 2:X) P.M. The dinner will be held in the I edonia Wright Afro-
American Cultural Centei.
The meal which is being catered by Bell's Plantation Restaurant will
include such things as collards, chitterlings, yams, cornbread. and
other traditional southern foods. Pickets tor the dinner are available
at the Central 1 icket Office in Mendenhall Student Center and must
be purchased by February 13.
Clarence Morgan, a member of the School o Art faculty will pie
sent an illustrated lecture on " I he Plight of the Black Artist" on
Monday the 23 at 8:(X P.M. I he lecture will be held in Auditorium
244 ot Mendenhall Student Center and there is no admission charge.
On Tuesday, I ehruarv 24. the film "A Man Called Adam" will be
shown at 8:00 P.M. in the Multi-Purpose Room of the S Indent
Center. The world of the ja musician is explored in this drama of a
jazz trumpeter who finds himself unable to cope with the problems of
evervdav life. I he film stars Sammy Davis Jr Louis ARmstrong,
Cicely Tyson, frank Sinatra and Ossie Davis. There is no admission
charge.
A caberet of talent will be on display on Wednesday at 8:00 P.M. in
the Student Center Coffeehouse. Selections will range from comedy to
dramatic readings. Admission will be S.50 and tickets will be on sale at
the door.
Yolanda King, daughter of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr
will appear in Hendriv rheatre on Thursday at 8:00 P.M. Her presen-
tation will be a dramatic lecture on "Black Theatre: Moving Us
Higher
She will cover the history ot black theatre to the present, with the
focus being black theatre's attempt to enlighten as well as to entertain.
Admission will be bv ID and Activity C Ards for ECU students and by
MSC membership tor ECU faculty and staff. Public tickets are priced
at $1.50.
A musical production, "A History of Music in the Black Church
is slated for Friday night at 8:00 P.M. in Auditorium 244 of the Stu-
dent Center. This production is being written and narrated by Ronald
Maxwell, President-elect of the STudent Union and a student in the
School of Music.
The production will trace the development of music in the Black
church from the advent of the slave spiritual to the contemporary
gospel sound. The ECU Gospel Ensemble will be featured in the pro-
duction. There is no admission charge for the program.
The festival concludes on Saturday evening with a dance in W'Right
Auditorium featuring "THE THIRD GENERATION BAND This
enthusiastic and exciting young group has been inspired by such artists
as Earth, Wind, and Fire, and Pockets.
Bryant. Kubrick originally intended
to make the film serious, but the
more he thought about the entire
world situation; that the two most
powerful countries in the world do
not attempt to reconcile their dif-
ferences and unite for the common
good but engage in an arms race to
see who will be first to push the but-
ton to destroy humanity, the more
he realized how ridiculous the whole
thing is.
"After all Kubrick has stated
(quoted in "The Cinema oi Stanley
Kubrick"), "What could be more
absurd than the very idea oi two
megapowefs willing to wipe out all
human life because oi an accident,
spiced up by political differences
that will seem as meaningless to peo-
ple a hundred years from now as the
theological conflicts oi the Middle
Ages appear to us today?"
So Kubrick decided to make the
film a comedy, albeit a dark, and
underneath a verv significant, one.
Appropriately, the film's characters
are outrageous burlesques oi our
nation's political and military of-
ficials, and would be even funnier if
they weren't so real.
The cast i n c 1 u d e s: Dr.
Strangelove, a partially artificial,
demented German scientist, a com-
bination oi Dr. Henry Kissinger and
Frankenstein; US President Merkin
Muffley, who gives the impression
of a cop trying to direct traffic in a
demolition derby; Captain Lionel
Mandrake, a perfect British officer
who keeps a stiff upper lip even
while losing his head, (all played bv
Peter Sellers); General Buck 1 urgid-
son (Geoige C . Scott), a devastating
and accurate pom aval of the ivpe
oi military man to whom world war
is a football game; General Jack D.
Ripper (Sterling Havden), the
lunatic who orders the attack on
Russia because the international
Communist conspiracy is using
fluoridated water to drain all oui
precious bodv fluids; Colonel
"Bat" Guano (Keenan Wynn), who
is obsessed with "Preverts I
think you're some kind of deviated
pi evert . . . you were organizing a
mutiny of preverts Mann "King"
Kong (Slim Pickens), a true
American hero, a man who will
unflinchingly commit mass murder
for the sake oi duty, country, and
God.
1 his Friday and Saturday niht, in addition Jo the regular weekend film, Led Zeppelin's immortal concert film
"The Sony Remains the Same" will be presented as a special late show on both evenings at 11:00 p.m. I he film is
based on Zeppelin's amazing 1973 Madison Square Garden appearances
Ad Gets 'Mean Joe'
Chance At TV Show
B KENNETH R.CLARK
I H I Rrp.irtrr
NI -W YORK. UP1 � Until
"Mean Joe Greene" of the Pitt-
sburgh Steelers did his novs famous
television commercial foi the C oca
Cdla people, about the only role he
could have commanded in show hi
would have been that of Goliath.
Now Greene is looking at a part
that might bill him as "Gentle Joe"
� the protagonist oi a movie for
television in which he would serve as
a father figure to the same kid
whose heart lie warmed m the soft
drink spot.
Greene shed the adjective with
which blood thirsty football tans
modify his name, when in a simple
acting job he guzzled a Coke ottered
by an adoring kid, then tossed the
kid his game jersey by way oi
wordless thanks.
The youngster in the spot was
Tommy Okon a 10-year-old who is
just as much a pro in front oi the
cameras as Greene is behind the line
ot scrimmage. Together in 60
seconds they made heavy chemistry
and Beverlv Hills, Calif producer
Georj Wallach was quick to pick
up on tiic formula.
He said in a telephone interview
that a storv line featuring Greene
and Okon is m the works and that
NBC lias picked up the option as
part ot the new programming thrust
which the network has christened
"Project Peacock
"The basic premise said
Wallach, "is thai Joe � who will
play himself � helps the kid become
a man and the kid helps Joe regain
his youth. I he bov has a point of
view about his own family that
makes him feel he's being
mistreated, but he gets to spend a
few davs with the Steelers and learns
that his own family really is okav
Wallach who acts as agent for a
host oi sports figures other than
Greene, said lie isn't worried that
the big defensive tackle's ahUitv as
an actor might not match his skill on
the gridiron.
"1 think Joe Greene can be Joe
Greene well enough to do a job like
this he said. "He has a certain
presence in front oi the
camerahe's prettv sure ot himself.
He's very bright and verv soft
spoken and people will be very
pleasantlv surprised when they see
him If this is going to go it will be
on the air no later than tall or spring
next yeai at the laiesi
And he added, "I think he's got a
lot oi potential as an actor and if he
didn't. I wouldn't say it to his
face
If Greene finally makes the pic-
ture, with the hope as it alwavs
hovers m television, that it might
prove popular enough to percolate
into a regular series, he'll be the se-
cond Steeler mainstay to defect to
show business.
Jimmy Buffett Corner
Buffett T-Shirts
Being Given Away

m

MCA Recording Artist Jimmy Buffett will appear in
concert in Minges Coliseum on Feb. 21 at 8 p.m.
The Major Attractions Committee is
planning a Jimmy Buffett T-shirt
giveaway. Fifteen limited edition T-shirts
will be given away to students who pur-
chase their tickets before Wednesday.
Feb. 18. The winning ticket stub numbers
will be selected at random by a computer.
Winning ticket numbers will be announc-
ed in the Thursday, Feb. 19, issue oi The
Fast Carolinian.
Tickets for the concert are available at
all outlets city-wide. Tickets will also be
on sale at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall this weekend during the free
tlick and the late show. Over 2,(00 tickets
have been sold already.
Major Attractions Chairman Charles
Sune emphasized that, "a great deal oi
public tickets have been sold thus far. We
want as many students to see the show as
possible, which is the reason that the Cen-
tral Ticket Office will be open during this
weekend's free films
Jimmy Buffett On Tour
Jimmy Buffett is proclaiming 1981 with
a new MCA album. It is pure Buffett �
nine songs of great music and good fun
with perhaps a touch of maturity not
found in his previous albums. The months
since the release of Volcano (his last FP)
have been productive and rewarding for
Jimmy.
Four successful road lours (in the midst
of the widely discussed concert attendance
slump), and a dozen new songs have given
Buffett the confidence which sparks this
new album.
One new tune, "I'm Growing Older,
But Not Up may perfectly describe the
off-hours lifestyle, but the title skimps
justice on Jimmy's continual improve-
ment as a lyricist, vocalist and onstage
performer.
With tongue in cheek, Jimmy has
always referred to his sailing voyages as
"hydrotherapy Phone calls, freewavs,
decisions and checkbooks need a vaca-
tion, too.
For the larger audience � that is. those
who had not become devoted fans of the
preMargantaville" "unknown" Jimmy
Buffett � it has been a combination of
generous radio airplay, and word-of-
mouth concerning his live concerts, and
the quality compilations of the late '70s
albums which have put the man in the
comfortable realm of stardom.
The ease with which Jimmv handles the
attention and appreciation seems to fit the
characteristic Buffet lifestyle.
Not that hard work has not played a
part. Behind the scenes Jimmy and his
tour manager. Bob Fiberman, work close-
ly to coordinate the logistics oi touring
and recording.
And the momentum which has carried
BuffettN music to the broader audience
has been built upon the charm, the excite-
ment and exuberance which Jimmv
himself conveys. More simply, he likes to
work hard, entertain every audience and
leave them smiling, and then relax like a
man who has perfected the art.
With Coconut Telegraph, Jimmy Buf-
fet t's island cruises have become an ex-
tended voyage across the short stories,
wiv parables, transient characters, and
pleasant humor which typify the Buffet
lyric.
While we wonder where he comes up
with all those ideas, we can all sit back
with the new album, and somehow feel
belter for the ways we exist
The Coral Reefer Band will tour again
in 1981; and after being able to kick off
his shoes, sit on a midstage barstool and
make 'em cheer, Jimmy already plans
another solo tour for late in the vear.
i
I
wmm
� �





I HI I ST Kt) l
I HKl K 10 1981
Texas Professor Is World Authority On Kissing
C on tinned from pane 5
Sutra In it Vatsyayana sas the
kissing customs he describes are
already centui ies old.
Mi ant said kama me u ov md
sutra is "a poem much like the
'Odyssey an abbreviated type ol
u! iting 1 he (the Indians) had
is foi all kinds ol things
More are "Kama Sutra" direc
tions tot the three mam kinds ol
kisses tot loeis
1 he nominal: the gh i is k issed
sed lips and shows no reac
1 he throbbing: the girl is again
' on iloved lips bul moves hei
k and fortl
i U out. hes
-�
Bryan � passa .
K i i Sutra" tell hou to kiss ,t
n tells I

kiNv thai awakens
� .
al c hei up w .
ii � - late a SI �
however, should onl pretend o be
sleeping, the book sas.
In "the kiss thai kindles loves"
the woman kisses hei lover's face
while he is sleeping. Whet hei he
ild awaken oi not, Vatsyayana
doesn'l sa
"It was a male chaumist socie
ly Hi yant said
"I've also studied the Fai 1 ast,
bul find really no references to
anything that might even approx-
imate kissing. 1 he I at Easterners
were mote concerned v 11 h
economics and trade: hovs to grovt
mote wheat, and where wheat was
shipped to. Sumerian literature
devoted a greal deal ol time to how
lo make the best beer.
"It ihey were into kissing, they
I Jn'l waste time vvriting about
.
Kissing became a national craze in
Roii nes, lie said "1 iterally.
they kissed everybody the hut
akei Kissing was as com-
monplace as shaking hands, at all
age levels and both sexes
ins also classified kisses, he
I he osculum was an affectionate
kiss, ihe beginning, apparently, ol
cheek kissing still widespread today.
Women kiss each other's cheeks
in greeting So do politicians and
military leaders in France, Spam
and 1 aim Amei ica,
Bryani said the Romans also
practiced the basium, a male female
tv pe lip kiss more passionate than
the osculum. Undei ancieni Reman
law
had
a virgin who could prove she
been kissed in ihis manner
could ptess foi legal marriage to the
kissei
Bryant thinks basium led to
"buss" as a synonym for kiss.
"( I he wotd) kiss is vetv recent.
won't find kissing in
Shakespeare oi Chaucer Both
wrote buss instead.
He thinks kiss developed from the
old Gei man word, kussen
Ihe Romans' third type ol kiss
was the savium, which the profe
translates as "hps puckered U
kiss In Amores, the Roman ;
Ovid describes saviolum as the girl
who "eagerly kissed me with her
tongue . . in my lips her whole
tongue hid . .
Among medieval knights, kissing
apparently was a status symbol
k n igl
is refinement I
i
K;
coverned I k, Bi
� opli
female, .?
k
thos p eatei rant
knee, foot
ee.
Some Recipes For Valentine Sweets
Continued from page 5
cookies.
It you have only one baking
sheet, be sure to clean n between
batches!
I oi those ol you w itnoul .in oven,
the following cream pie recipe may
be just the sweet logiveyoui honey
I his is a variation ol the Dream Pie
recipe you'll find on boxes ol lell ()
Pudding.
M1N I DRI Wl I'll Prepare one
envelope ol Dream Whip topping
mix according to package direc-
tions. You'll need only milk and
vanilla foi this. dd one package ol
vanilla pudding mix (tour and one-
eighth ounce sie). five-eighths cup
ol milk and a teeny hit less than one
fourth cup green creme de menthe.
Blend and then beat at high speed
foi two minutes. Spoon into a
chocolate pie shell (can be found
somewhere neat the cake mixes in
youi grocery store). Chill at least
foui hours before serving. Do not
freeze.
A Day
You san buy creme de menthe
flavoring, bur you would use le
this, thereby changing the propoi
tion ol milk to creme de menthe.
Math and oi kitchen wiards n
be able to figure this out and be
to use flavoring instead ol the real
thing.
( Win BAR FUDGE. In a lai
dutch-oven cooker, combine tour
and one-halt cups ol sugai and one
tail can olarnation steam Bi
this to a boil foi foui and one-hall
minutes. Nova you're going to have
Hei : � ' � '
bits. Stu ui

ir and
grea '
broiler pan
Mai
Ma
tine's Da
Western SteerQ
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k





HI ! si . Koi
Sports
1 1 Hkl ARV 10, I'l Pai
Lady Pirates
Fall From Poll
Hn JIMNH DiiPKI I
-
o, the 1 ad) Pirates
m tved into the
on m the Associated
the nation's "op 20
ams. One loss
the 1 ad Pirates
from the ranking.
ess than full strength
la) . l N Chapel
e urn, the 1 ad)
I 1 eels 7 74 in a
e ECl shot an embarass
� . from the flo
Mai cia Girven had
an injurv while in
bul Ills! pi
as i onfii med that
d a stress fracture ol
V hile the injui v was not
keep the heads
the com I, it did hamper
v and provide earl access to
for tl lar Heels.
. she posted 12 points
aid the
d Kath) Rile led the waj
� olina w ith 22 points and
d down nine rebound
M u . Denklei tallied 16
nine rebounds while still
h the flu.
more than anything cost
inking, as
H tve collected
i the 1980-81 cam
: i I
( ai
. i
l played
said E( I
i Sam
d game ivel)
Shaffei the ball
1 he Lad) Pirates slid past East
rennessee State 83 "4 aftei trailing
b five at halftime. Denklei shook
of! the t'iu symptoms long enough to
boost hei average with a 29 point.
11 rebound effort to lead the com-
eback. Girven notched 21 points
and claimed eight rebounds, with
Rile adding 12 points.
Senioi point guard Laurie Sikes
dished out eight assists and provided
nine points.
"1 as; 1 ennessee was a tough
game to the end said Andtui.
"last 1 ennessee had an excellent
record, so that gives us a good deal
ol credibility in out region. Out
comeback was good in the second
hall "
1 he 1 ad) Pirates returned to
Boone Sundas to face the 1 i
Mountaineers ol Appalachian State,
and claimed a difficult 87-75 vic-
tory. As Andrui admits, this was
not the best set ol games the I ad)
Pirates have played thus tai in then
19 5 campaign.
"Appalachian reall) played a
good game she said. "Much bet-
ter than the one here a couple ol
weeks ago.
"M) disappointment is not in the
kids; the) reall) want to do well.
1 he) wan; to be the best. We're get-
ting read) tor I C Wilmington
(tonight) and aftet that we have
about a week of
"We've had o main games lately
that we just haven't had time in
to do anything bul get
ndividu XK
da
tin; get back to the ba
teaching the system we have
I he 1 ad Pirates managed onl) a
Pirate Football
Slate Released
Kath) Rile) Squares To The Hoop
4 38 lead o
intermission,
24 poinl pei
20 b Denkle
ded 16 poii
w h i 11 I
.
nine as
Muriel H
pala hia
ei the Mo
but they
formance
I io v ictO!
Pll
botl
ntaineei s at
followed the
ol Rile) and
v. C11 r v e I
1 rebounds,
II Sil
lei
ates.
am led Ap-
26 and seven
rebounds.
"1 think the thing that we are
missing more than anything else is
overall intensity said Andruz-
zi "We're jus! ,i step slow . When
we're ' � "
t's 1
be al then best at all tn.ie.
"We haven't peaked vet and
that's a good sign for us
I ast Carolina University Directoi
ol Athletics, Dr. Ken Kan, has an
nounced an 11-game football
schedule todav tor the Pirates.
Highlighting the five-game home
schedule will be the appearance ol
Peach Bowl champion, Miami ol
Florida. Top road games will in-
clude rivals Universit) ol North
Carolina, North Carolina State and
Duke University. Also, the Pirates
will visit the Universit) ol We I
Virginia, the first tune the two have
met since 1971 .
In conjunction with the 1981
schedule announcement, Karr
revealed future home dates with
West Virginia and Florida State
University. A four-game series
been established with West Virginia,
playing in Morganton in 19K1 and
1982, and playing in 1I - Ficklen
Stadium in 1987 and 1988
The three-game series w
Florida State has the Pirates visiting
Iailahassee in 1982 and 1988, while
the top-rated Seminoles will some to
Greenville in 1987.
"We are obviously verv excited
about having the Universit) ol
Miami coming to Greenville this
year said Karr. "Also, the add:
tion of West Virginia is a real plus to
our schedule.
"I he lour game slate with W
Virginia and the three game slate
with Florida State is a start towards
the type scheduling we want to have
for our football program, i noted
when I first came to Greenville that
it might take five to six years bel
the home schedule could reflect this
tyr -ame I Ao believe we !
a. e nope to expand u.
West Virginia and Florida State
series tor more exciting schedules al
home and I iad
I he t i e home c hedule tor
1981 include Western Carolina
Universit) to open the schedule on
Sept. 5, the I niversit) ol Miami,
I i I enne .see Sta versity and
theollege ol William and Mary.
Homecoming ha been set tor
Nov tins! 1 asl I ennessee State.
1 h( . ile is as
follow s:
s.pi 5 MsK k()l IN V 7:00
st-pl 12 al Northan.lma I 00; s�pl IY al
N stait. 7 (Mi Sepl It I'll IIMI 7 (Mi
Ocl 3 ai Duke. 1:30; oo 10 at Richmond,
1 M) t )i I 1" at Southwestern I utsiaina.
7 Ml ll l: Ocl. 24 Ml W1I. 1:30; Oct. Jl at
VV.st Virginia. 1:30; Nov. 7 t rN-
N M s . 1 Ml N 14 VMI I I 1
N) M H 1:30
Pirates
Defeated
t DIN
Pirate Grapplers
Close Home Slate
Win One Of Three Matches
H WILLIAM H FKION
sutt V nit-r
:urtain closed on
1I 's Minges
c ol - irdav, and while
itsell was a hit, the
earn proved to be a little
disappointing bv winning only
one ol three matches.
I he East Carolina wrestling
a ill be discontinued
end ol the present
i ise ol its reported
un -
gel
. ram
w eekend
e the last
( oliseum
be put to
Hi
Hun
Revils
at all,
,er, as he polished ofl
tents to up Ins
seasona rd to 20-0. I he
anlted wrestler
177 pounds pinned one ip
poneni and scored superioi
deci ioi �er the other two.
rhe . ' amen! was a
round-robin affair and includ-
ed rivalsentral Florida, Ap-
palachian State. Virginia leJi
I the homestanding Pirates.
"This was an excellent
meet said Pirate head coach
Hachiro Oishi. " 1 here was
good competition, plus no one
was injured. It was just a good
experience lot our team
Super sophomore James
Ellison continued his winning
ways for East C arolina as he
defeated two opponents to
hike his record to 20 4. 1 llison
did not wrestle against VP1
because the Pirates were far
behind at the time, and Oishi
did not want his wrestler to
suffer an unnecessar) injury.
Both the 190-pound Ellison
and Revils are strong can
didates to participate in this
v ear's national champion-
ships, which are being held in
Princeton, N.J. in mid-March,
i he Pirates' lone victory
.ame against Central Florida,
as thev won a squeaker. 18-16.
The Hues' then dropped a
close one, 21-20, to the Moun-
taineers ol Appalachian State
and wete beaten soundl) bv
VP1 in the finale, 33-7.
In other competition in the
quad-meet. AM and VP1
tied, 21-21. but the Gobblei 5
bounced back to nip Central
1 lorida, 21-1 while ASl lost
to the same team. 23-21.
1 lie Pirates traveled to Not
folk Mondav mght, to face the
Monarchs of (!d Dominion, a
team that Oishi says is much
like his own. "They are verv
similar to us, but in a different
combination ol their weight
classes he pointed out. "It
will be a good match. Thev
would win big. or we could
win big
Aftet thai match, the
Pirates onl) have three more
regulai season meets before
their history is concluded.
There wete man) fine
moments, from the first
Minges Coliseum match in
16 up to the final action last
weekend.
Minges
Finale
Left: Butch Revils strains for
pi ul all
Top: Tony Mitchell reaches
for a leg
Middle Left: Mindell Tyson
(R) controls opponant
Middle Right: Coach Hachiro
Oishi studies action
Bottom: Tyson twists arm for
leverage
(Photos by Gary Patterson
and Jon Jordan)
I





10
I HI- 1 AM i R() INIAN
I t HKl XKN 10. 14S1
Student, Faculty Cage
A ction Dominates Slate
Basketball highlighted the past week ol
ECU's intramural schedule. Both the stw-
deni intramural and faculty leagues were
in full swing. Here's how the teams fared.
Alpha Phi Alpha continued to remain
atop the men's student division while
"The Dribblers" tank as the number one
women's team. Alpha Phi Alpha was able
to remain the league leader b virtue of
then 93-18 win over Delta Sigma and a
thrilling 42-40 win ovei Kappa Alpha in
pet haps the week's most exciting game.
Danny Scott continues his torrid shooting
to: Alpha Phi Alpha scoring 22 pis. in the
Delta Sig game and 34 pts. m the victory
over the KVs Congratulations go to
Damn and both teams (or then perfoi
mances thus tat.
In the women's division an upset mark-
ed the action as the "Wormburners last
week's 5th ranked team triumphed over
the 2nd tanked "IBA( " git is b a score
of 40-21. Sharon Perry was outstanding
as she si the nets for 20 pts.
Other scores from the women's division
included the following: "Tylei We Bad"
4b and Fleming lechmcal Foulers S. Also,
the I 1 cr Rountree women were winners
by a 54 to t? score over the "Greene
Gremlins He:e are this week's rankings:
Men
1. Alpha Phi Alpha
2. Jones Enforcers
; Streak of I ightening
4. Dough Boys
5. Henderson's finest
v omen
1. Dribblers
IM Sports 'IM' Shorts
By Dimyne Grooms
�and�
(j're Melton
2. I lor "We Bad"
3. Tyler Rountree Chris
4. Wormburners
5. IB AC
finally, in the faculty staff league,
" I he Klunkers" from Intramural-PE are
tanked number 1 and posted wins over the
Hospital and Security teams. Dr. Wayne
"Truck" Edwards led the way in both
games scoring 20 and 16 pts.
Other top players tor the week includ-
ed, Al By rum who scored 20 pts. for the
Weary Warriors, led Whit ley who scored
16 pts. in Psychology's loss to "The
Steelers and Rod Seymour who threw in
13 pts. in his team's loss to the "Weary
Warriors
lor a good time please go out and
watch some ot the action. Information
about game times can be obtained from
the IM Office. Ext. 6387.
NOTE: The finals of the ECUBudweiser
arm wrestling championships will be held
this Thursday night during half time of the
ECU Pirates-Delaware State basketball
game. This should be an exciting event.
Pirate Swimmers Drop Two
By I1M UN I I1s
si�ft w riln
I en t hough the
ial scores were a let-
I h e m e n
women's swir
and down, there were some
. in " j t spots along the
both put up g
OOd ih
against two touj Lady Pirates Dordi
teams from Duke Henriksen broke two
University, Saturday, varsity records in winn-
the Minges 1g' the 100 ard but-
: fly (1:00 60) and
finisl :ond in the
.led by
gin.
i tie pre ious
were I,eld by
SI tffer, 1978
(1:00.72), and I auren
Cirimes. 1980. (2.87).
Henriksen, a native
ot Norway, also won
the 50 treestvie. She
qualified for I he A1AW
National Champion-
ships at Marquette,
Michigan, m each of
these races.
Jennifer Jayes finish-
ed first in the 50 and
the 100 backstroke.
As tor the Pirates,
both Jan Wiklund (first
in the 500 and 1.000
freestyle), and Doug
Neiman (first m the 200
individual medley and
the 200 backstroke),
had exceptional meets.
.lack Chowar finish-
ed first in the 50
freestyle and second in
the 100 freestyle
although he had a
throat infection foi
lour days before the
meet.
,9 A MESS,

TO YOUR
SPONSORED
BY
AOTT
FOR
ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION
FEB 9,10,11,12. 8T04
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
teSpK
- a7A
Coming Soon:
A Special
Pre-Registration Issue
Wed Feb. 18
2Ure iEaat (Earnlmian
Serving the campus community Jor 54 yean
ECU Gymnasts
Meet Ambition
ByC ANDICK
MATHEWS
Muft Wnlir
ECU's Women's
gymnastics team travel-
ed to Longwood Col-
lege Saturday night,
competing in a tri-meet
with Longwood and
Virginia Tech.
Longwood won the
meet with a score of
129.75. ECU claimed
second, beating Tech
120.4-78.00 but Tech
was not competing with
a complete team.
Despite the loss, the
Pirate gymnasts still
have something to
celebrate. In Saturday's
meet, they finally
reached seasonal goal
of their 120.00 points.
In fact, they slightly-
surpassed it.
"We finally got it
together said coach
Jon Rose. "There's no
where for us to go now
but up
Several of the ECU
gymnasts did well in the
individual scoring. On
the vault, five out of six
gymnasts scored in the
eight's. Louise Mat-
thews claimed fifth
place with a score of
8.25. Joanie Ford and
kathy McNerny each
received 8.1 for their
vaults.
On the uneven bars,
Claudia Hauck receiv-
ed fifth place with a
score of 7.5. Jennifer
Bell and Wendy Meyer
also pe formed nice
routines, receiving
scores of 7.05 and 6.95,
respectively.
Lisa Tamarru's
balance beam routine
took third place with a
score of 7.65. Bell
claimed fifth place with
a score of 7.45.
In the floor exercise,
Joanie Ford received an
8.2 and sixth place for
her routine. Lisa
Tamarru also perform-
ed well, receiving an
8.0.
Co-captain Elizabeth
Jackson was unable to
compete this week-end.
She dislocated her
elbow last week in prac
tice. Rose hopes to
have Jackson back in
lime for the regionals.
"You just can't replace
someone like
Elizabeth said Rose.
"We'll just have to do
our best until she's
back
ECU travels to
Chapel Hill tomorrow
night to meet with
UNC.
Susan Lawrence
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Brand new Maranti
compact stereo system still in
carton JS20 retail, sell for J400
7S6 7874
FOR SALE Parade drum
Premier, chrome in excellent con
dition Call 757 3210
PERSONAL
COUNSELORS For western
North Carolina Co ed summer
camp Room, meals laundry
salary and travel allowance Ex
perience not necessary but must
enioy hvmq and working with
children Only clean cut non
smokinq college students need ap
ply For application and brochure
write Camp Pmewood. ISOl
Cleveland Rd Miami Beach. Fl
3314)
OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
round Europe,S America,
Australia. Asia All heids
JS00 JU00 monthly Sightseeing
Free into Write I JC Box S2 NC4
Coronn Del Mar CA 9J625
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
cheap rates Call Amy at 75J 6994
CARPOOL Interested in toin.ng
existing carpool or forming one
from Rocky Mount to Greenville
Call 977 2S33
LOST A ladies gold Hamilton
watch Lost on Jan 30 Reward
If found call 7J8 8639
STAN Have a Happy Birthday
Love, Vicki
A P Coming to Minges soon
"Oscar and the Syndrome"
MM Swimming, soccer, swim
ming Make up your mind
J M The vulture has found a new
nest
WANTED New HB for E D, Old
one is worn out T.Y.F S
HOSEBURGER Nowhere else
but Pitt Dad said I could hit boys,
I M tough1
S.C Lay down Sally. AG is
ready'
L M What s it like to have a per
sonal trainer'
J J Had any Swedish meatballs
lately
TO F M Congratulations You
finally made it You're lucky I
didn t take you're money this
weekend
MARRRRTIN Chef Craig, I love
you re new recipeHard boiled
eggs a la microwave" Perhaps
you should try to cook them with a
stove, not a microwave Rupart
LOOK GOOD ON PAPER
Resumes term papers profes
sionally typed WRITE RIGHT
756 9944
DISAPPOINTED because the
sitiling ECU girls basketball
team schedule is coming to an end'
Sure, but we ve got another hot
night Feb 21 at Minges with the
world famous JIMMY BUFFETT
Don t miss out'
WENEE I'm going to have you
liking Rockford' See you at Papa
Kati GPJ
5TH FLOOR TYLER Good after
noon to the card sharks Part,
with Bacardi GPJ
BETH D I love getting m the
cups with you How bout Thurs
day at the Deli Moondoggie
FOR RENT
APARTMENT For rent Two
rooms, modern bath and kitchen
study Call 752 3020 after 6 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Tar Rivei
Apartment Can Lisa 752 0453 or
758 5429
ROOMS FOR RENT 17; pe-
month, utilities included for info
call 752 3480
ROOMMATE WANTED Female
Call 758 4493 or 752 9416
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share 2 bedroom Eastbrook Apt
Call 752 4443 after � 00 pm
FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED
ED House I block from campus
J'OO 00 mo everything included
Call 7e 33 '8 ask for An, la
HOUSEMATE WANTED Share
house with one other person Two
block from Art Building it? 50
plus half utilities Call 758 3308
Available immediately
FOR RENT Large house 13
rooms 2 baths Ideal for student
group 5500 plus utilities 752 5294
ROOMMATE WANTED 14)0
Dickinson A ve Can '58 '493
FOR PENT i and 2 bedroom
ap's Can 758 4015 Mon Fr.
'0 00 4 00 Sat Sun 1 00 4 00
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED Cypress Gardens hall
mile from campus Call 752 594'
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CH&SEDFROM2 00 4 00 M F AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
FICE
�IO�trOkUf to
PRCHANCY
W��4WKy mi MrJ tm
Mend a broken
heart � Feb. 14
through
Classifieds
MF 2:00-4:00
a
Sail To The
Bahamas
Spring Break
Round trip transportation from
Chapel Hill to Miami, Fla.
All Meals And Stocked Bar On
Each Boat.
ALL FOR ONLY
399.00
For Details:
John Mitchener 919 967 8117
300 Chase Ave.
Chapel Hill, NX. 27514
MLmerro chirt�R9
CHA?�l HILL, HC
!$$$$$$$$$$$�
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
The ECU Media Board is accepting ap-
plication for the following positions for
the 1981 82 school year:
Editor of the Buccaneer
Editor of the Rebel
Head Photographer of the Photo Lab
General Manager of WZMB
General Manager of the
East Carolinian
Editor of the Ebony Herald
Applications may be obtained from the
Media Board secretary n the Publica-
tions Center, M -F from 8-1 or 2-5.
Deadline is Feb. 27.
We Aim To Please
So, you didn't get your picture
taken last week . . . how about an in-
centive? A 35-mm camera will be
given away to 4 lucky students who
have their portraits made for the
1981 yearbook. What have you got to
lose? Traditional poses will be made
at no sitting fee charge. A contem-
porary (34 length, close-up, profile,
etc.) will be made for a $3.00 setting
fee charge. No appointment is
necessary. All seniors having their
portraits made will have their 1981
Buccaneer delivered free of charge.
FEB. 9-13 SCOTT BASEMENT
SOCIAL ROOM
12
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
No Foreign
Film
20
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
$3.23
$4.81
sssss$s$s$$$$$s
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
$5.53
24
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
No Fofeifln
Film
EXPOSURE 7 Q7
ROLL ONLYP e 7 f
FILM DEVELOPING
20 EXPOSURE C 1 Q?
KOOACMROME Vie J �
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
38 f XPOSUftf
KOOACMROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
$3.15
LOW, LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
KOOACMROME
AND EKTACHROME fcO 1
PROCESSING ONLY JZ. 1
SUPER � AND STANUaM , OVIES
LIMITED OFFER





Title
The East Carolinian, February 10, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 10, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.109
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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