The East Carolinian, February 5, 1981






�he lEaat Carolinian

Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 N
oo
10 Pages
Thursday, February 5, 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Kappa Delta Undergo
Real Estate Difficulties
By PAl'I COU INS
The Greenville City Council has
decided to grant a public hearing on
Feb. 12 to decide the future of Kap-
pa Delia Sorority's attempt to buy a
house on Fifth Street.
What started as the simple act o'
buying a house has become a legal
battle between Kappa Delta and the
residents of the neighborhood where
the house is located.
Ihe hearing will decide whether
or not the neighborhood should be
reoned to exclude all but single-
family dwellings. Residences and
businesses already in the area would
not be affected.
1 he house Kappa Delta has been
trying to buv since last September is
located at 1801 E. Fifth St. The
sorority is currently housed at 2101
E Fifth St.
Rezoning the neighborhood from
R-6 to R-9 would effectively
end
Kappa Delta's chances o buying the
house, but even a denial of rezoning
would not guarantee that the sorori-
ty could purchase the house.
At this point the situation
becomes complicated.
ro buy the house the sorority
must obtain a special use permit
from the Board oi Adjustments,
which has already denied one per-
mit.
The board, however, was ordered
by a Superior Court judge to rehear
the matter at its January meeting.
Lacking a quorum, the board was
forced to put the matter off until its
February meeting.
Kappa Delta has been looking for
a house closer to campus for a
number ol years, according to the
sorority's house corporation presi-
dent. Flo Gammon.
"We want to nune because all
members do not have cars, and we
are concerned for their safety walk-
ing to and from campus she said.
�'Also, our house is entirely too
small; we do not have adequate
storage or living space. And finally
we cannot be competitive in rush
due to the distance from campus
The sorority had planned to bu
what is now ECU's alumni centei at
901 E. Fifth St. but found that ade-
quate parking could not be obtain-
ed.
So last September the group
entered into an agreement with the
owners to purchase the house at
1801 1 . Fifth St Kappa Delta paid
the city, to advertise its request foi a
special use permit and anticipated
no trouble in obtaining it at the
board's Oct. 23 meeting, uammon
said.
"1 had planned to go and talk to
the people in the neighborhood, but
I had to be out of town early in Oc-
tober. By the time I got back my
phone was ringing off the hook, and
everybody was in an uproar Gam-
mon said.
The residents o the
neighborhood started a petition and
turned out in full force at the
board's meeting. The board turned
down the special use permit when it
decided that Kappa Delta could not
meet one of the six requirements
necessary.
On the sixth requirement the vote
was spin 2-2, with a majority needed
for approval. Two members, Mat-
thew lewis and J.B. Surles 111,
voted that Kappa Delta would
create a "vehicular haard" if it
moved into the neighborhood.
Only four board members voted
since two had been disqualified
because o' a possible conflict of in-
terest. Billie lean Trevathan is the
realtor for the house in question.
and Patricia Marshall is an
employee ot the I afts, who live next
door to the house. Surles is also an
See KAPPA. Page 3
Photo By JON iOt: ��
The Kappa Deltas have been trying to buy this house at 1801 E. Fifth St. since September.
Students Denied Liquor Vote
Iranian Student Harassment
Continues On U.S. Campuses
(CPS)-ln the wake ot ihe release
of ihe Iranian hostages two weeks
ago, Iranian students in the United
States have reported renewed har-
ras-ment on campus. The govern-
ment, meanwhile, has resolved to
continue us deportation proceedings
tins; the foreigners while school
administrators wonder if this will be
the i.i generation ot Iranian
students to study in America.
Reports from around the country
indicate that the harrassment usual-
Is has consisted of threatening
phone calls and public ostracism,
the first such instances noted since
the hostages were first taken over a
year ago.
Iranian students at the univer-
sities of Honda and Central Florida
have lodged complaints with cam-
pus police in hopes o getting some
kind ot protection from the jeering
phone calls.
For example, a student named
Saeed at UF says he has received
repeated calls from someone who
identifies himself only as "an
American marine" who wants to
"cut the Iranians' throats
"Thev (the callers) think they are
Basketball
Shuttle
Announced
"We had a very good turnout,
especiallv for a first effort at such
short notice ECU Transit
Manager Danny O'Connor said
of the bus service from the
women's dorms to Friday's ECU-
Southern Cal basketball contest.
"We had over 200 riders, so it
took a little while to get them all
over to the coliseum with only
one bus running. With such good
results, we've decided to continue
only with two buses running from
White Dorm to Minges
The buses will run on the
following schedule:
Thursday Feb. 5: ECU women
vs UNC
Thursday Feb. 12: Men vs
Deleware State
Monday Feb. 16: Men vs
UNC-Wilmington
Monday Feb. 23: Women vs
Wake Forest
The buses will begin carrying
students from White Dorm to
Minges Coliseum at 6:30 p.m. on
these nights and continue until
the 7:30 tip-off according to
O'Connor.
doing then country a favoi by
fighting with me sas Saeed.
"They are blaming me and the
situation only gets worse
UF administrators are advising
the Iranian students to "keep a low
profile
In California, an Iranian student
who identifies himself only as
Hooshvar reports similar incidents
at his Berkelev campus.
"There is not much trouble here
compared to the trouble my friends
have had in Texa- and the
Midwest he explains. "Here, it is
mostlv angry phone calls, but my
friends in Texas have been beaten
up in the last week. A friend in
Chicago was made to drop a course
b a professor, who said he didn't
want any Iranians in his class "
A spokesman for the administra-
tion at MIT also indicated that there
have been numerous problems there
recently, but university officials
were told not to discuss the in-
cidents.
Hooshvar attributes the renewed
antagonisms to press reports of
abuse of hostages while in Iran. He
says that whenever the hostage
situation receives extra coverage by
the news, the pressure invariably
I ecomes worse for the students.
! 'hough; that after the release,
this jingoism would diminish he
says, "but what 1 have seen of the
mediastirring up the people again
and making all Iranians out to be
horrible, makes me know the
pressure will get worse
American citizens get tougher
with the visiting Iranians, the U.S.
shows no signs of letting up on the
stric, enforcement of the immigra-
tion policies instituted during the
last vear by President Carter.
The new policy procedures began
immediately after the capture of the
hostages in November of 1979,
when the U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS) was in-
structed to review the visa status of
each of the 60,000 Iranian students
here.
Deportation proceedings began
last May against those students
whose visas were allegedly outdated,
forged, or invalid because of a
change in a student's status. Addi-
tionallv, the INS declared that no
new entry visas would be granted to
Iranians to study or visit.
Bv October, 478 Iranians had
been "escorted" out of the country
bv the INS, according to INS
spokesman Vern Jervis.
Bv PVl LCOLLINS
,�,i in
last Carolina students ate
generally not eligible to vote in Pitt
County but mav be liable to list
taxes here
ihe issue ot student voting
eligibility was raised when students
attempted to registei lot the Feb. P
liquor bv the dunk vote but found
thev could not.
According to Board ol Elections
Superv isor Mai � aret Register,
"Only those people who are perma-
nent residents ol Greenville ate
ble to vote on ihe hyuoi bv the drink
question
North Carolina law requires
citizens to register in their place ot
permanent domicile. Registei said.
She added that students ate. tor the
most part, considered to be tem-
porary residents.
"Most students ate registered in
their home counties oi states
KcL'ister remarked. "A very tew are
eligible to vole here. We handle it on
a case bv case basis
Registei defined permanent
domicile as the place "you can
return to no mattei what.
"Youi permanent domicile would
be the address vou gave it you went
ott in the service she explained.
"Many students don't understand
that they're not eligible to registei
here Registei continued. "1 tried
to get word out before the genet a!
election in November, but a lot ot
students still don't seem to know.
"You can't registei just becauase
vou want to vote on one issue. I hese
votes affect Greenville long after the
temporary residents are gone
One ECU student who had a pro-
blem registering to vote was Joni
Ciuthne. "My roommate and 1 wen!
in and said we wanted to register. It
seemed like they had a bad attitude
from the start, like they could tell
we were students.
"My roomate was having trouble
because she told them her parents
were residents oi Maryland.
Then I lold them I worked at the
Casablanca (Restaurant) and that 1
was a student. That's when thev
started to give me a hard lime
Both women were eventually
allowed to register. "We pi" up a
lough fight and they finally let us
Guthrie said.
Outline telt that students should
be allowed to register. "Aftei all,
what goes on here does at tec' us.
Who are thev to say thai I won
siav here aftei 1 graduate and gt
job?"
Registei indicated thai voters
could be challenged at the polls a to
the legitimacy ot then registrant
"It someone suspects thai a pei
son is not a permanent resident th
can challenge that person's right to
vole she said.
On ihe oihei hand. ECU students
hvmg oft campus ate required to hsi
taxes on belongings ihev mav hoe
in Greenville, according to Glenn
Culrell, assistant tax supervisor foi
Pill County.
Culrell said that student ; living in
apartments or houses ate required
to list personal and household items
in Pitt County.
He added that students are re-
quired to list cars if thev are kept in
Pitt County at least 51 percent ot
the time.
Selective Service Conducts Dry Run
WASHINGTON, DC.
(CPS)�Last November, while you
were studying, sleeping and worry-
ing that military legistration might
be a prelude to a real draft, the
Selective Service System was indeed
preparing draft notices for 35,000
unsuspecting young men chosen by-
lottery.
The lottery was only practice,
Selective Service spokesmen say.
The draft notices were never sent,
and the list of men was subsequently
discarded.
The practice was part of the
Department of Defense's "Proud
Spirit" mobilization exercise, car-
ried out by 80 government and
military organizations, one of which
was the Selective Service.
Within 24 hours of the starting
time on Nov. 6, the service had
reviewed its computerized list of
registrants, held a lottery, and fed
the names of 35,000 "inductees" in-
to a Western Union computer.
The computer, in turn, would
have sent Mailgrams to the 35,000,
if the exercise hadn't been stopped
at that point.
The next two weeks of the exer-
cise period were spent setting up
mock state headquarters and area
offices to carry out the draft, and
serve as induction centers in the
event of a real emergency.
"We were rather proud of our
results recalls Dr. Herb Puscheck,
the agency's associate director for
Plans and Operations. The
revitalized, and has the capability to
do it Lamb notes.
Asked if the mock draft was held
with any special precautions or sen-
sitivity to public worry that military
registration �begun last summer
and resumed in January�might
lead to a real draft, Lamb said, "Oh
no. This was just a regular Depart-
ment of Defense exercise
System Director Bernard Rostker
brought in judges from the I S
Bureau of Standards to "insure the
fairness of selection and to criti-
que the procedure in general.
The observers liked what they
saw, Puscheck says.
"The Defense people were in-
terested to see that our system is
fair, open, and statistically sound
he commented. "They recognized
our pains to protect the rights of the
young men involved
Rostker was quick to point out
that the computer tape holding the
names and addresses of the 35,000
mock inductees was removed from
the Western Union system before
the draft notices were actually
Defense Department was assured printed.
Photo By JON JORDAN
The student shown here are giving blood at the AFROTC bloodmobile. It continues in Wright Auditorium
through Thursday.
that our system works, and that we
can induct efficiently in case of
emergency
The Defense Department holds a
mobilization exercise every two
years "to check procedures and
make sure they are workable in a na-
tional military emergency
Puscheck explains.
The November mobilization,
however, was the first one in which
the Selective Service has fully par-
ticipated. "We've been required to
be a part of it in the past adds
Selective Service spokesman Joan
Lamb, "but this is the first time
we've physically held a lottery and
drawn names
The reason is that "this is the first
year the Selective Service has been
A tape with names of 715 military
reservists was substituted in the
computer. The reservists, previously
alerted of the forthcoming notices,
received the Mailgrams on the third
dav of the exercise.
The
Announcements2
Editorials4,
Classifieds9
Featuress
Letters4
Sports8
?
s�.
wuMmwi'MW1 iihi





THE EAST CAROL 1NIAN
FEBRUARY 5, 1981
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The deadline tor submitting an
nouncements is Friday al 5 p m
tor the Tuesday issue and Tuesday
at noon tor the Thursday issue An
nouncements submitted after
these deadlines will not be printed
All announcements should be dou
ble spaced and typewritten or
neatly printed on 8 by 11 inch
paper Messages should be kept as
short as possible and contain only
essential information The person
submitting the announcement
should include his name and
telephone number at the bottom of
the page
AED
Alpha Epsilon Delta, preprotes
sional society will hold a special
meeting on Thursday, Jan 30 at
7 30 p m in Flanagan 307 Tillet
Mills, a representative of the
UNC CH Schools of Medicine and
Dentistry Medical Education
Development Program (MED)
will speak The MED is a program
specifically designed to prepare
undergraduate students for a
medical education All interested
persons are invited to attend
SCHOLARSHIPS
ADVISOR
Any faculty member interested
in advising a newly forming cam
pus organization wnose purpose is
to promote the consciousness of
world citizenship please phone
752 4483 or 758 9530 as soon as
possible
DELTAZETA
There is a mandatory meet ng ot
all Delta Zeta big brothers on Sun
day. Feb 8, 7 p m . at the house
Please try to bring your spring ac
tivify fee
CONDITIONING
Class to meet from 3 00 4 00
p m The basic movements ot
athletics and physical condition
ing will be the basis of the class
mstiuctors for the class will be
ECU football coaches This is a
non credit course If interested,
meet at Scales F ield House at 3 00
p.m. in Tuesday Feb 3, 198)
cso
if you are pursuing a major in
allied health, nursing, pre
medicine, pre dentistry or
medicine you may qualify for
COST FREE services made
available through the Center for
Student Opportunities (CSO),
School of Medicine
Current openings exist for
students interested in utilizing
tutorial services Eligible students
can also participate in in
dividualized or group learning
Skills sessions (organizing lecture
notes, effective reading, mernoriz
mg and test taking techniques!
Professional counseling services
include career planning
assistance, personal, academic,
stress management, test anxiety
and or group counseling
If you would like to be con
sidered for participation in any of
the COST FREE services contact
Dr Frye, Center for Student Op
portunities. 217 Whichard Annex
or call tor an appointment at
757 6122, 6075 or 6081
The Latney W Pittard, Jr
Memorial Scholarship and the E.
A Thomas, Jr. Accounting
Scholarship will be awarded dur
ing spring semester The scholar
ships will be for approximately the
amount of tuition for resident
students
Students interested in making
application should secure forms
from the Accounting Departmen
tal Office (Rawl 325) or the Fman
cial Aid Office All applications
must be submitted to Ruth Jones
(Rawl 334), chairman of scholar
ship committee in the Accounting
Department, by March 1
Recipients will be selected on
the basis ot scholarship, citizen
ship, and need, in that order In
addition, the permanent residence
of a candidate tor the Latney W
Pittard. Jr Memorial Scholar
ship should be in Eastern North
Carolina (East of Highway I 95) or
any county west of Highway I 95 m
which Pittard and Perry, Inc ,
maintains an office
Final selection will be made by
April 1 by the ECU Student
Scholarships, Fellowships, and
Financial Aid Committee from
candidates submitted to the Com
mittee by the Dean of the School of
Business
TUTORS
The Accounting Society will
tutor accounting 2401 and accoun
'mg 2521 every Tuesday and
Wednesday in Rawl 339 from 4 00
5 00
RUSH
A O TT Sorority Rush Won
Feb 9 Tues Feb 10 and Wed
Feb 11 805 Johnston Street star
, at 700 p m Please call to let
.row .( you are coming, it you
need a ride or if you need d
T:0ns Call 758 4290
SPEEDREADING
"Speed Reading ' a class for
students and other persons in
terested in reading more rapidly
with increased comprehension,
will be offered on Thursday even
ings at East KCarodna university
Feb 12 April 16
The class wiil meet from 7 to 9
p m Continuing Education units
tor participating professionals are
available
Further information and
registration forms are available
from the Office of Non Credit Pro
grams. Division of Continuing
Education. ECU Grei � e, N.C
telephone 757 6143
BUSINESSMAJORS
The Max R Joyner Alumni
Scholarship will be awarded dur
mg the spring semester to a full
time student who is pursuing a
degree in the School of Business
The scholarship will be for the
amount of tuition and tees for a
resident student
Students interested in making
application may secure forms
from the Financial Aid Office or
from the following department of
fices in the School of Business
Accounting Department, R325
Economics Department, R238
Finance Department, R343
Marketing and Management
Department, R 137
All applications must be submit
ted to Ruth Jones (Rawl 334),
Chairman of the School of
Business Scholarship Committee,
by March 1
Recipients will be selected on
the basis of scholarship and
citizenship Final selection will be
made by April 1 by the ECU Stu
dent Scholarships. Fellowships,
and Financial Aid Committee
from candidates submitted to the
Committee by the Dean of the
School of Business
ACADEMIC SKILLS
Is surviving academically and
enjoying college life a reasonable
goal for college students? The
University Counseling Center
Staff believes so and are ottering a
two part mini series on Time
Management and How to Avoid
Test Anxiety
Students n ay participate in any
or all sessions The first sessions
on Time Management will be con
ducted Monday and Tuesday.
February 9 and March 24 from
3:00 p m 4 00 p m in Room 305
Wright Annex The sessions on
How to Avoid Test Anxiety will oe
conducted Tuesday and Wednes
day, February 10 and March 25
from 3 00 pm 400 pm in Room
305 Wright Annex.
Sessions are available to all
students free of charge interested
students may call the University
Counseling Center, 757 6661, for
further information Registration
is not required
FIELDHOCKEY
All women interested in playing
Club Field Hockey please attend
an organizational meeting on Feb
11, at 7 00 pm in room 221
Mendenhall if you are unable to
attend please contact Debbie Har
rison at 756 5181
ARTHRITIS
Send a carnation gram for ar
thritis On Feb 9-12, 8 a.m. � 3p m.
in front ot the student store Send a
message and flower to your
sweetheartfriend on Valentine's
Day for 12 00 We deliver!
REVENGE
Chemistry class frustrating?
Come and release that pent up
anger and throw a pie at the
chemistry faculty of your choice
The American Chemical Society
Student Affiliates is sponsoring a
Chemistry Faculty Pie in the
Face, Thursday, Feb 5. 730 9 30
p m at the Elbo Room Admis
sion is 50c along with reduced
prices on party beverages. So
come and seek your revenge! I
The East Carolinian
Serunn thecampm community
since v:
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ficial newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rates
Business �35 yearly
All others 25 yearly
Second class postage paid at
Greenville. N C
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville, N C
Telephone. 757 6366, 6367, 6309
AFTERNOON DELIGHT
Featuring $$ &
FRIDAY
FEB. 6th
easy to swallow
prices
330-7:00p.m.
Admission 25$
ATTIC
Presented by Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity
MIXED
DRINKS
(AHPAT)
The Allied Health Professions
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat , March 7, 1981 Ap
plicatcn blanks art to be com
pleted and mailed to the
Psychological Corp , 304 E 45th
St New York, NY 10017 to arrive
by Feb 7, 1981 Application blanks
are also available at the Testing
Center, Speight Bidg . Room 105,
ECU
VOLLEYBALL
An organizational meeting ot the
ECU volleyball club will be held in
room 104 ot Memorial Gym on
Tuesday, Feb 10 at 7 p m Anyone
interested in playing volleyball is
urged to attend
NURSING
Will you have an extra room in
your home May 15 July 30, 1981?
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
is looking for rooms and apart
ments for nursing students study
ing in Greenville this summer
The students are senior level
nursing students from throughout
the United States who will receive
some of their clinical experience
at Pitt Memorial If you would like
to share your home with one or
several exferns this summer, call
the nurse recruiting office from
8 00 5 00 Monday through Friday
at 757 4470
FOUND
A set ot keys was found Satur
day near Memorial Gym Contact
Ann Law at 757 6434
PHOTOGRAPHY
Two photography courses will
be offered on Tuesday evenings at
East Carolina university this
semester
"Camera I the basic course,
will meet Feb 10 March 17, and
"Camero II meets March 31
April 28 Class sessions in each
course are set for 7 9 p m on
campus
Participants m eacn course
should nave their own cameras,
preferably 35 millimeter or larger
information and registration
materials for these and other
evening course offerings are
available from the Office of Non
Credit Programs. Division of Con
tmuing Education, ECU, Green
ville, N C . telephone 757 6143
CO-OP JOBS
The Co op Office has current In
formation concerning career
related work experiences tor bo"
undergraduate and graduate
students during summer fall, and
spnng semesters with both public
and private agencies including the
Pentagon, Dept of the rnte' M
Fish and Wildlife Service Dept of
Energy, Federal Pron System
and Social Security Admin.stra
fion Private organizations include
IBM Duke Power Co Burroughs
Wellcome and others
Students are urged to com,
the Coop Office to rev.ew iob
descriptions and to talk to a Co op
coordinator concerning ,ob
possibilities Many positions have
approaching deadlines therefore
interested students shouic
delay!
Kg
( onttnuiH
BISCUIT TOWNE
INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIALS
1011 Charles Street Phone 752-1373
s

RIB SPECIAL
Two Jumbo BBQ Beef Ribi,
Homemade BiKuit, French Friet end Coleelew
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
JvVl
,SK
N�-

99
N

$179
CHICKEN SPECIAL $129
Two Piece of Southern Fried J ,
Chicken, Homemade Biscuit, French Frie, Coleslaw DARfc yj-
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
M
.?

t
SAVfc
up
to
tf
BISCUIT SPECIAL
YOUR CHOICE OF THREE
Steak BiscuitCountry Style Gravy and French Fries or
Chicken Biscuit with French Fries or
tiscuit Burger and French Fries
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
MEET AT
BISCUIT TOWNE
And Enjoy iXlicious Home Looked Meals
At Inflation Fighting FricesH!
90
29
ve
Dri
Thru
Wind,
ow
VOTE FEB. 17
JIMMY
BUFFETT
Sat Feb. 21,1981
8 P.M.
Minges Coliseum
GREENVILLE RESTAURANT
ASSOC.
TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE:
Students $6.50 (in advance)
Public $8.50
GET YOURS WHILE YOU CAN!
��efcfc
Note: The Central Ticket Office will be open this weekend
during the FREE FLICKS to give students a choncc to get tickets.
l





I HI si (. k I INIAN
1 1 Hkl k
ns
Kappa Delta Faces Battle
( ontinued I rom Page l

ded
nsure
�-
t'al

sorority would ada to
the problem. She also
said. "1 understand
and note that sororities
and fraternities have to
have dumpsters to pul
� to park their trash and garbage
et
"We
- and e en
ds come to out
e and the have
lift'iculh p ti king she
board
ts o
blocks
m
an
es, bui
���

in rhey
g aibage
residential
cannot
c a n s
places
use
ike
do.
I hey have to be the big
dumpsters and they
would have to have one
ese dumpstei -
uild be neiil at I
im backdopi almost,
and you know how un-
sightly a dumpster is
and how smell) they
can get
I he I atts nave since
i efused to comment on
the tnattei. William
1 afl Sr. said. "1 think
it would be inap-
propriate to say
anything at this time
since the mattei is in
itieation
Student Benefits Face Cut
UII
�XI) HI

I I KIN
on
payments to
d
who are
ol dead.
d i s a b 1 e d
Pay ments
p when the
it is. but if
- still in col
payment can
the
monthly
S229. in
198
Aer
the fiscal year ol
1982, the estimated cosl
to Social Security will
$2 1 billion.
No test is ad-
ministered to determine
it the recipient has a
financial need. General
ccounting Office fin-
dings two years ago
revealed thai about 70
percent of the reci-
pients had family in
comes ol undei $15,000
a yeai. 1 oss of the
benefil would force
many families into a
low income range.
1 he C'attei
ministration made the
argument two years ago
that with other forms
of federal financial aid
available to students ol
low and model ate in-
comes, the need to con-
tinue with the Social
Security student benefit
might stand to be
ieduced.
According to the
GAO the benefits are
overlapping, some in-
dividual- continue to
collect the benefil aftei
dropping OUl ol school.
Med School Places Interns
Bv Mike Davis
Hospitals in such Second yeai students
ville, have started the
. Goldsboro, physical diagnosis por
Mounl Olive, tion of then training.
n and Beginning this summer
M
Banks have
by
net
practice, pdiatfies,
surgery, obstetrics and
these students will be
spending two months
oi clinical
disciplines. cse
disciplines include
ne, pediatrics,
r y, obstetrics,
. v and family
practice.
i ourth s ear
have uist finished then
January term
I he resid i
ching program has now
begun and is designed
to pair students with
hospitals where they
can complete then
residencies.
Aboul 50 pei cent ol
the class will be taking
residencies in family
practice, Monroe said.
"I feel the majority
ol the students will
return to North
( aroiina aftei finishing
up then residencies
he sa
Mom �
the
school's Brody
Building is righl on
schedule, as is the new
bed towei. rhe tov
will hold 160 beds once
completed.
A Cup
Cake
Order At
Cotten
Hall
4:00-
6:00pm.
(Feb. 9-10)
C.25 C.25
BENNIES
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Alignment
Types of
AutQ -
Fci'iqn & Dorr'
Reasonable w.
K) F. 10th st
Phom 7Sb "�
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday PluS &X
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
uesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
Drink
Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
Thursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
Friday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
.Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
WE WANT TO SHOOT YOU!
The 1981 BUCCANEER portraits
will be taken through the month of
February. All students, faculty, and ad-
ministration are invited to have their
portraits made. Tradition bust poses
will be made free of sitting fee charge.
A contemporary package offer (34
length, close-ups, profile shots, etc.)
will be available for a $3.00 sitting fee
charge. Portraits will be made from 10
a.m5 p.m. No appointment is
necessary. All seniors having their por-
traits made will have their 1981 BUC-
CANEER delivered free of charge in
the fall.
I hi Kappa Deltas present house, shown here, is too small the sorority says.
DAYTONA BEACH
Oaytooa Ocean
Eleven Resort;
offers a perfect
Spring BeHr
Vacation at seven of the finest
oceanfront hotels in tHe
Daytona Beach Area.
Chocse from 1163 sparkling
rooms, suites, and effi-
ciencies. All Oceans Eleven
hotels feature restaurants,
lounges, swimming pools
and spacious sundecks.
DAYTONA OCEANS ELEVEN
for SPRING BREAK 81
GO FOR IT!
2025 S ATLANTIC AVE DAYTONA BEACH SHORES. FL 32018
(904) 257-1950
CALL TOLL FREE
800-874-7420
ASK ABOUT COLLEGE
DISCOUNT DAZE
� � "Treasure Island Inn
MskAcaputco Inn
w�.Beachcomer ffin
BBjrMayan Inn
A J�Sheraton Inn-Daytona Beach Shores
Best Western-Islander Beach Lodge
Whitehall Inn
oceans eleven resorts'
MON. TUES AVAILABLE FOR
PRIVATE PARTIES - PAPA KATZ WILL
CATER ANY PARTY OR FUNCTION.
WED ORIGINAL LADIES' LOCKOUT"
- 8:30-10:00. LADIES ONLY - GENTS IN
AFTER 10:00
THURS. SUPER COLLEGE NiGHT -
SPONSORED BY THE SIG EPS AND BETA
LIL' SISTERS - DOORS OPEN FROM 3:00
UNTIL 1:00
FRI - "PIZZA PICKIN " - SPON-
SORED BY THE ALPHA PHIS AND GOD
FATHERS PIZZA - DOORS OPEN AT
300 FREE BEVERAGE - $3 50 AT THE
DOOR FOR MEMBERS AND THEIR
GUESTS ' �' -J
SAT LADIES LOCKOUT II" -LADIES
ONLY FROM 8:00 to 9:30.GENTS
ALLOWED IN AT 9:30
SUN. - ROCK AND ROLL WITH ECU'S
PARKS AND RECREATION DEPT. -
LADIES FREE 50c FOR MEMBERS -
$1.00 FOR GUESTS.
FEB. 2-6 FLETCHER DORM
MEMBERSHIP
APPLICATION
1980-81
fou have a unique opportunity to become one of
the members of an exciting new nightclub for those
of us 19 and over.
All members will be entitled to 3 guests per even-
ing Neat dress and proper identification will be re
quired of all members and guests
This special INTRODUCTORY MEMBERSHIP is
only $1.00 All applications and dues must be return
ed to this address: P.O. Box 1943, Greenville, N.C.
27834 NC State Law requires a thirty day member
ship waiting period from date of application for
clubs with brown bagging permits.
MEMBERSHIP CARDS AVAILABLE AT DOOR
MtMBLKSHlP �1
Nome
Address
Telephone No. I
Birthdote
Occupation �
Hobbies
Music preference:
DATE
SIGNATURE






Sire lEaat (Karnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
v. HRIS Lit HOK, (ieneral Manager
Jimmy DuPREE.t
Paul Lincke, m Wwn, Paul Collins. ,����
Dave Severin, m� mh, Charles Chandler � em�
Anita Lanc aster. n�M mmut David Norris. ,�,���
K-hruarv 5, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Zoning Laws
A ttempt To Restrict Greeks
There are some individuals here
in Greenville who are trying to have
the city limits rezoned to prevent
any sororities or fraternities from
purchasing housing within this area,
which includes the area directly sur-
rounding the campus. This rezoning
law would deny any of the existing
chapters that are located a long
distance from campus the oppor-
tunity of moving within a more con-
venient range, it would also stifle
the growth of the Greek system in
the future.
This action is being spurred by
some well known families in the
Greenville area. At this time, it is
directly aimed at the Kappa Delta
Sorority here at ECU. The KDs,
located now about a mile off cam-
pus were in the process of relocating
to a house that would be safer and
more convenient for their members
in relation to the campus when this
action was started.
It appears that some powerful
forces are at work to make this
rezoning a reality. It is interesting to
notice that, the day before the KD's
had their first hearing in October, a
local paper printed an incriminating
picture of one of a fraternity's yard,
covered with debris from their
Homecoming float, soggy because
of all the rain that day. Also, the
most recent hearing date, January
22, 1981, was cancelled because the
city couldn't get enough board
members together.
The next hearing in this matter is
set for February 5, 1981, at 7:30
p.m. at the City Hall in downtown
Greenville. A show of support on
the part of the entire ECU com-
munity will be helpful in fighting
this damaging and unfair legisla-
tion.
we got Your cute dog &ook& and your
bad dog book&, your fat cat, your droll
Cat, your vjry Cat and your Surreal cat
Books, your gnomes, R?oll, witches,
UNICORN&, WARLOCKS AND MYTHICAL
BEASTS BOOKS. I PONT KNOW WHERE
YOU'D FIND Book& ABOUT PECpLE.
SOuPvU FfcWfcRHYTf 0 oOQAL t5E:&5k
Military Preparation Essential
"The history of Failure in War can be
summed up in two words: Too Late. Too
late in comprehending the deadly purpose
of a potential enemy; too late in realizing
the mortal danger; too late in
preparedness; too late in uniting all possi-
ble forces for resistance; too late in stan-
ding with one's friends. "
�General Douglas VfacArthur
It wii! greatly behoove the United States,
not only the government, but the citizenry
as well, to heed the words of thai great
soldier.
Those words, uttered decades ago, are
more appropriate than ever with regards to
our nation's foreign policy and military
preparedness.
We cannot be too late in comprehending
the deadly purpose of our enemy. Our
greatest enemy, make no mistake about it.
is the threat of the onslaught of com-
munism, not only abroad but at home as
well.
The Soviets have never made an bones
about their intentions, "hey are firmly
committed to world domination and the
enslavement of tree people throughout the
world. Our nation is a primary target and
the apple of the Russian eye. Tor they
know that to conquer the rest of the free
world they must first defeat us. the most
powerful bastion of freedom the world has
ever seen. We must be aware of the danger
that the Russians pose to our society and
realize that it is not an idle threat but a very
real one. Liberals condemn those who
warn of the communist threat as "war
mongers" and call the warnings
"rhetoric" or "McCarihyism" in an at-
tempt to discredit prophets like Alexander
Solzhenitsyn.
If we are too late in preparedness then
there is no hope. The only thing that com-
munists fear is brute force and militarv
Robert M.
Swaim
might. In the Cold War. onl the strong
survive.
Whenever I here the liberals rave and
plead for arms limitations, particularly
their beloved Salt treaties, I am reminded
of a bit of historic folly.
In 1939 Europe became fearful of
Hitler's military buildup which was done
in violation of the Treaty of Versailles.
Those European leaders who possessed no
foresight instituted "peace treaty negotia-
tions" with Hitler rather than forcing him
to halt his military buildup. So the leaders
of Europe sent the British Prime Minister
as their representative to negotiate with a
mad German dictator.
So they worked out what amounts to a
1939 version of SALT. Chamberlin pro-
claimed, as he stepped off the plane in
England after returning from Germany,
that we would have peace in our time
as he waved a worthless piece of paper with
Hitler's worthless promise that he would
not promote military aggression against his
neighbors in Europe.
The Communists cannot be trusted. As
President Reagan recently said, they will
lie, cheat and commit all manner of evil in
pursuit of their world domination goal.
For those who would dismiss the warn-
ings of our conservative leadership as cold
war rhetoric, I ask them to consider a few
sobering facts. Angola, Ethiopia,
Afghanistan, South Yemen, Mozambique,
Laos, Cambodia, and South Vietnam;
over 1(X) million people in all, have taller.
under the cruel voke of Communist
1974.
"Iran has been plunged into bloody
chaos and turned overnight from a bastion
of Western strength into a cauldron ot
virulent anti-Westernism, its oil treasure
lying provocatively exposed to kisttu! Rus
Man eyes. Cuba acts increasingly as an
agent of wide-ranging S bitions.
' These are examples of how the pieces will
continue to tall if we take a piecemeal ap-
proach aid President Nixon in his re-
cent book The Real War.
America is still suffering from
radical liberalism ot the I960's when fan-
tasy and idealism, which, is usually the op-
posite ot realism, swept the campuses. At-
tacks on anything that represe:
America and the established order were the
fad of the da .
I tie notion that beyond a certain
minimum level, the less militarv strei
you have, the better, is a fallacy The hope
arose among liberals that if the United
States limited its own arms, others�par
ticularlv the Russians�would follow. It's
a beautiful theory but that's not the wav it
works in the real world. The Russians,
masters ol pragmatic action, performed
admirablv according to their theory. In
fact, during the same period when arms
control was becoming fashionable, the
Soviet five year plan charted heavy in-
creases in their militarv spending.
It is time we realized that might does
mate right and there is strength in
numbers.
We must begin rebuilding so that never
will our people have to face the threat of
Communist takeover with uncertainty as
to whether our government and armies can
protect us.
i-Campus Forum
Sudden Attendance Boost At Women's Games Questioned
1 wish to comment on the recent suc-
cess of the women's basketball team and
the attendant hoopla which has suddenly
arisen around them.
The ladies have been playing before
obscenely small crowds over the years,
but their recent successes and their rise
into the national rankings has
precipitated a mad rush by certain cam-
pus organizations and area people to get
on the bandwagon.
On Wednesday past, 1 observed a
crowd of over 4,000 which, while con-
sisting mainly of students, doubtlessly
had a number of people who have not
regularly attended the women's games.
Also, I noticed that the varsity
cheerleaders and the gymnastics team
deemed it necessary to honor us with
their presence to arouse the crowd and
exhibit their skills during half-time,
respectively.
It strikes me as odd that these
organizations would not have chosen to
show themselves in earlier contests in
which the ladies have been involved.
Why have the cheerleaders suddenly
begun attending women's games to put
forth their foolishness and imbecilic
behavior before the also suddenly-arisen
crowds? For those who may be
freshmen, the cheerleaders pulled this
same stunt last year when the ladies
played State and U.N.C.
Those of us who have been regular in
attendance in the ladies' games are upset
over this sudden increase in organiza-
tional and individual attendance at these
games. Where were you last year and
earlier in the season? The ladies have I wonder how many of you would
been winning without you and the continue to come to the ladies' games if
faithful do not want you! they were to go into a decline and be left
IT Wn 9 9mrm 9 mn
. � ����� ofi1 YjJ?'??'?-V'Vf'fi'
out of post-season play? Certainly verv
few of you would stick with them.
It is really unfortunate that such an
excellent basketball team as the Lady
Pirates are saddled with such a large
contingent of fair-weather fans.
D.W. HOWELL
English
EDITOR'S SOTE: White the author
of this tetter feels "the faithful" are
upset over the sudden popularity of
Lady Pirate Basketball, we fee i that it is
in the best interest of the program and
the University to urge these organiza-
tions and individuals to continue their
support and attendence.
Valentine
Alternatives
Valentine's Day is a special day set
aside for expressions of affection, letting
those significant others know you ap-
preciate their friendship. The celebra-
tion is important, and how we celebrate
is important too. Often, the only way we
know how to reach out is through com-
mercial cards and candy valentines. Giv-
ing other peoples' words, other peoples'
feelings, other peoples' creations, can be
the same as giving nothing. A small risk
is involved in the alternatives, for we
share a part of ourselves. Receiving, the
other hand of giving, is a response that
focuses on the good will of the giver
than on the quality of his gift. An alter-
native celebration checklist:
Stop buying candy and commercial
cards
Make homemade "alternatives"
Give yourself
Contribute to person's favorite
cause
Contribute to prison reform pro-
ject
Considering alternatives is a step in
the direction of living a way of life that
is outwardly simple and inwardly rich,
the essence of voluntary simplicity. Let's
make this aay responsive and life affirm-
ing, not mechanical and materialistic.
Kent McCullough
Alumnus
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyntr Library.
For purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks wilt be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
da vs.
4
A
in � ii'i�i?ii i m��" it "�"i"
I





I Ml 1 S1 AROl INIAN
Features
g
.���
rn on
tttes
wed
Women s Basketball Appalachian
State Minges
The Fabulous Knobs Attic
8
GROUND HOG DAY A shadow
means six more weeks of winter -
who knows what cold lurks in the
heart ot winter
Men s Basketball Santord -
Mmqes
Black Arts Festival begins at UNC
thu
rs
Feb 35 � Intramural Arm
Wrestling Tournament Memorial
Gvm
Women s Basi-
State Boom nc
Appalachian
Ooro Coliseum
" to 6 p m

Faculty Duo Rectal,8 15 p m
Paul Tardiff,piano and Selma
Goken cellist Hendnx Theatre
Men s Basketball Pan
American Edmburg TX
Phylis Schlafy and Betty Fnedan
debate the Equal Rights
Amendment,8 p m Memorial
Hall Chapel Hill
TUNISIAN DUCK DAY
NC S.rnphon, Memorial
Auditorium,Greensboro 3 30 p m
� aie Attic
22
mm BIRTHDAV
GEORGE!
GEORGE WASHINGTON S REAL
BIRTH DATE
ECU Symphonic Band
Concert Wight Auditorium 8 15
p m
Sugar Attic
Noe! Pointer,Webb Center,Old
Dominion University .Norfolk
Jimmy Butlett.Camden Indoor
Stadium,Duke University
Bruce Springsteen concert,8
p m Columbia SC Coliseum
Ice Cream Bingo.MSC.7
p m Student Center Multi Purpose
Room
Women s Basketball UNC
Wilmington NC
Buster Brown,Attic
Madame Butterfly,Duke Artists
Series.performed by Goldovsky
Opera of New York Page
Auditorium Duke University
Men's basketball Campbell
University Raleigh. N C
Minority Arts Film Series,Black
History Double Feature,8
p m Hendnx Theatre,ECU
The Young Invaders,Attic
OFFICIAL HOLIDAY FOR
GEORGE WASHINGTON S
BIRTHDAY
Intramural College Bowling Feb
14 March 5 MSC Bowling Center
Men's Basketball UNC Wilmington
Minges.7 30 p m
17
Buford T Attic
Edgar Winter Group Rogue s.Va
Beach
Ringlmg Bros Barnum and Bailey
Circus opens at 1 30
pm Greensboro Cohsum
Greensboro Symphony Chamber
Orchestra,8 15 p m Carolina
Theatre Greensboro
CHANGE OF MAJOR - Feb 23 27
6. Mar. 2 t
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production Student Center
Auditorium .Rm 244
Women s Basketball Wake Forest
University Mmges,7 30 p m
Bruce
Springsteen.Omm, Atlanta. Georgia
Frani Lisjt Orchestra of
Budapest,8 15 p m .War Memorial
Auditorium, Greensboro
24
NATIONAL INVENTORS DAY
MovieDr Strangelove. 8
p m Hendnx Theatre
Suffers Gold,Attic
Madame Butterfly, Goldovsky
Opera of New York,Memorial
Coliseum.Greensboro.8 15 pm
Ry Cooder Bayou.Washington.DC
Nantucket Lighthouse.Elizabeth
City.NC
Women's Basketball UNC Chapel
Hill � Mmges
Feb. S-7: Sorority Recognition
Feb. 5 8 Intramural Racquetbaii
Doubles Tournament,Mmges
North Carolina Symphony IS
p.mWar Memorial
Auditorium,Greensboro Coliseum
Complex
Kaleidoscope Mime Troupe,8: IS
p.mTaylor Building,UNC G
The Young Invaders,Attic
12
18
Movie, "Breathl��si pm. Hendnx
Theatre
Children's Orchestra
Concert,Wright Auditorium,1 p.m.
Women s Basketball: NC State
University Raleigh,NC,7 30 p m
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production ECU Student Center
Auditorium Rm 244
Super Grit Cowboy Band,Attic
Ringlmg Bros . Barnum and Bailey
Circus.4 and 8 p m Greensboro
Coliseum
ABE LINCOLN S 172nd
BIRTHDAY
Men's Basketball: Delaware State
� Minges,7:30 p.m.
Movie Travel Adventure
FilmChina After Mao Hendnx
Theatre
Choice,Attic
19
ECU Cabaret Production,Student
Center Auditorium,Rm. 244
Super Grit Cowboy Band,Attic
North Carolina Dance Theatre IS
o ,m Carolina Theatre,Greensboro
Ringlmg Bros Barnum and Bailey
Circus.11 a.m. and I
p.m .Greensboro Coliseum
25
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production,Student Center
Auditorium,Rm 244
Faculty Recital Henry
Doskey piano.Hendnx Theatre,8:15
p.m
Breckenndge Attic
Best Little Whorehouse in
Texas, road company of hit
Broadway play opens at 8 15
p m War Memorial
Auditorium,Greensboro Coliseum
Complex
Beverley Wolff meuo soprano 8
p.mat Cummings High
School.Burlington,for Alamance
Community Concert Association
pre-
or
pal at-
M 30
flip
my
wig!
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production,Student Center
Auditorium.Rm 244
Intramural Swim Meet.Mmges
Pool.ECU
Intramural Co Rec Racquetball
Doubles,Mmges Courts.ECU
Suzanne Sexless and the
Stimulators,Attic
"Best Little Whorehouse in
Texas, "8 15 p m ,War Memorial
Auditorium,Greensboro Coliseum
Complex
ECU PLayhouse Cabaret
Production,Student Center
Auditorium,Rm. 244
Opera Theatre Production
p m.A.J Fletcher Recital,
Hall.ECU
Doc Holiday with Driver,AIM
Record Release Party.Attic
Feld Ballet p m High Point
Theatre,High Point,NC
FEBRUARY 5, 1981
Page 5
o
3
fri
sat
All Day High School Band
Clinic,A.J. Fletcher Music Center
MovieNorma Rae, "5,7,�
p m Hendnx Theatre
ECU Wind Ensemble
Concert,Wright Auditorium
Snow.Attic.JM 7:00 p m
Laserdrive sound and light show
featuring music of Pink
Floyd. Emerson, Lake,and
Palmer,opens at Morehead
Planetarium,Chapel Hill Shows at
�: IS p.m10 30 p.m and midnight
Johnny Paycheck,Carolina Opry
House
Lubovitch Dance Company of New
York 15 p.m.Aycock
Auditorium,UNC G
Kaleidoscope Mime Troupe 15
p.m ,Taylor Building,UNC G
13
NeYeRmore
FRIDAY THE 13th avoid ladders
� cut class
MovieWhen A Stranger
Calls. "5.7,� p.m Hendnx Theatre
Late ShowThe Song Remains The
Samell pm,Hendnx Theatre
Women's Basketball Lenoir Rhyne
College.Lenoir Rhyne.NC
BB
King, Mosque, Richmond. Virginia
Robbin Thompson Band.McGuffy
Lane Peobody s.Va Beach
Choice,Attic
Preservation Hall Jan
Band,Stewart Theatre,Raleigh
All Day High School Band
Clime.A J. Fletcher Music Center
MovieNorma Rae 5,7,9
pm Hendnx Theatre
High School Band Clinic
Concert,Wright Auditorium.7 30
p.m.
Men's Basketball Athletes in
Action � Minges
Snow.Attic
Chris Cross,Premier
Theatre,Norfolk
Doc Watson,Spirit Square Charlotte
George Jones.Tammy
Wynette Jerry Lee Lewis.Charlotte
Coliseum
14
???
20
JOHN GLENN DAY
LAST DAY TO DROP A COURSE
OR WITHDRAW FROM SCHOOL
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production.Student Center
Auditorium,Rm 244
MovieAmerican
OlfjjQloS.7:lS.�: 10 p m Hendnx
Theatre
Bnce Street.Affic
Jimmy Bulfett Charlotte Coliseum
Richie Biackmore's
Rainbow,Peppermint Beach
Club,Norfolk
Roger Whittaker p m.War
Memorial Auditorium,Greensboro
Coliseum Complex
Ringlmg Bros Barnum and Bailey
Circus,4 and I p.m .Greensboro
Coliseum
VALENTINE S DAY
MovieWhen A Stranger
Calls 5,7,9 p m ,Hendnx Theatre
Late Show, "The Song Remains The
Same, "11 pm .Hendnx Theatre
Conway Twitty and Helen
Cornelius.8 pm .Greensboro
Coliseum
Robbin Thompson Band McGuffy
Peobody s.Va Beach
BB King,Premier Theatre Norfolk
David Bromberg Dana
Auditonum.Guilford
College. Greensboro
Savoy Brown,Peppermint Beach
Club.Norfolk
NC Symphony,Memorial
Auditorium Greensboro,8 p m
The Eaie,Attic
21
27
HAVEA
HEART!
JIMMY BUFFETT DAY - Jimmy
Buffet,Minges Coliseum.�
p m .ecu
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production,Student Center
Auditorium.Rm. 244
Movie, "American
Gigolo, "5.7: 15.9:30 p m Hendnx
Theatre
Men's Basketball
Richmond.Richmond VA
Bnce Street,Attic,also the Coonev
vs. Norton fight on 7' TV screen
Ringlmg Bros .Barnum and Bailey
Circus,11 a m ,3 pm and 8
pm .Greensboro Coliseum
28
FV
MovieCoalminer's
DaughterS,7, IS,9:30
p.m .Hendnx Theatre
Deadlne: Intramural
Wrestling � S p.m
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production.Student Center
Auditorium,Rm. 244
Opera Theatre Production
p.m.A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall
Wheels.Attic
Melba Moore,Spirit
Square.Charlotte
Movie. Coalmmer s
Daughter. S.7-15,9.30
p m .Hendnx Theatre
ECU Playhouse Cabaret
Production,Student Center
Auditorium,Rm 244
Opera Theatre Production,8
p.m.A.J Fletcher Recital
Hall
Men's Basketball: Illinois
State,Normal,IL,2 p.m
Firekat.Attic
Bruce Springsteen concert,8
p.mGreensboro Coliseum
Southern Living Show opens
at Merchandise Mart in
Charlotte (through March 8i
"The Philadelphia
Story, I 15 p m Aycock
Auditorium,UNC G
The Boss: Jersey Success Story
Bruce Springsteen, one of the greatest rock performers of today, will be in
concert in the Greensboro Coliseum on Saturday, Feb. 28 at 8 p.m.
B FREDSCHRUERS
Rf pnnlrd r rum Hulling siunr
Bruce Springsteen, in the
abstract, is just the kind of guy my
linle New Jersey hometown school-
ed me to despise. Born seventy-
seven days apart, raised maybe fifty
miles apart, this beatified greaser
and I grew up sharing little more
than what came over AM radio. In
Mountain Lakes, a community of
4000, we had a word for people like
Bruce: Newarkyianders. The urban
canker of Newark-Elizabeth was
their state capital, but they lived and
played along the boardwalked
Jersey shore. They wore those
shoulder-strap undershirts some
people called "guinea-T's we call-
ed them "Newarkys They drove
muscle cars and worked in garages
and metal shops. They ate meatball
subs made of cat parts for lunch,
and after work they shouted at their
moms, cruised the drive-ins, punch-
ed each other out and balled their
girlfriends in backseats.
Our contempt for
Newarkyianders cut almost as deep
as our fear of them. We looked on
them as prisoners, a subclass that
would not get the college degrees
and Country Squires we were mark-
ed for. But we realized that
prisoners sometimes bust out of
their cages with a special
vengefulness. The fear was as real as
a black Chevy rumbling down your
tree-lined block, and inside are six
guys with baseball bats and tire
irons.
Bruce Springsteen has seen all this
from the inside, he's seen the gates
swing shut, he's watched people tur-
ning the locks on their own cages.
You can hear it in his music, a music
with shack-town roots; paradoxical-
ly, it saved him from that life. 1
could not have heard his songs,
especially the early, wordier ones,
and expect our meeting to boil down
to the wracking Jersey nightmare of
Joe College vs. Joe Greaser.
While even among his ardent fans
there are people who say Springs-
teen has gone to the well too many
times for his favorite themes of cars,
girls and the night, watching him
perform the new songs, I came to
believe he really was battering at
new riddles: marriage, work and
how people in America turn
themselves into ghosts.
I would come to understand that
this jubilant rock & roll cock of the
walk never had cut it as Joe Greaser,
that what had fathered his
obsessiveness was doing time as a
runty, bad-complexioned kid whom
the nuns, girls and greasers had
taken turns having no use for. There
is finally something irrevocably
lonely and restless about him. He's
never claimed any different. Spr-
ingsteen wants to inspire by example
� the example of a trashed and
resurrected American spirit. "You
ask me if there's any one thing in
particular said E Street Band
pianist Roy Bittan when we talked
about Springsteen's commitment.
"There's too many things in par-
ticular. He's older and wiser, but he
never strays from his basic values.
He cares as much, more, about the
losers than the winners. He's so
unlike everything you think a real
successful rock star would be
Springsteen comes down the ramp
at the Minneapolis-St. Paul airport
and looks down the empty corridor:
"No autographs he says in his
characteristic parched cackle. "No
autographs, please
This is exactly what he never says,
of course, and when the tour party
breaches the corridor's double
doors, he greets a pack of young,
denim-jacketed guys familiarly.
Some are holding copies of The
River, released just this day and
headed very quickly for Number
One. As the entourage loads itseli
into a string of station wagons, a kid
who has been hanging at the edge of
the pack tells Bruce about a friend
who's critically ill in a local
hospital. Bruce tells the kid to get
his friend's name to him through the
record company. Doors are slamm-
ing and engines gunning. It's bitter
cold. Just another stranger, I think.
Thirty-eight hours later, after per-
forming "Out in the Street" onstage
at the St. Paul Civic Center, Spr-
ingsteen halts the show. "I met a
bunch of guys at the airport yester-
day coming in. One told me he had a
friend who was sick. If that fella
who told me his friend was sick will
come to the side of the stage during
the break, I got something for your
friend backstage
After the kid appeared, and was
duly loaded up with autographed
mementos, I pondered the gesture.
Springsteen could have scribbled his
good wishes on an album at the air-
port and been done with it. But he
had left the benediction to be ar-
ranged in public. There's a lot of
showman in Springsteen, and not a
little preacher. Why had he let the
anonymous kid slip so close to being
See BOSS, page 6, col. 1
T
i
i �
����





! Hi I M knl IS! N
t 1 HKl ARY 5, 1981
Le.fojirj( A5QVJ7 CouLc&r th Mkd Iajj
OS dfsvQ Ata
TOHV)07, VOU SH0ULDs)T
flT ILL THTTUaJIc foop
You AH?aJHAT yuEAT
The Boss: Jersey Success
Continued from page 5
probably why ve conic out and play
every night, there's thai fear, 'cause
(hen nothin' works, nothin' make-
sense. As long as one thing docs, it
there can be just one thing thai
against what you sec all around
then you know that things can be
different. Mainly, it's importani
have that passion foi living, to
somehow get il fi
forgotten, then givei
I roll ril
I
� i erythii
and peoph
disrespec t. N i u �-�
don .�
S A AD'S SHObl
RtPAIR
11 J Grande Ave.
7S8-1228
Qualitv
Repair
irnillllUll
ARMY NAVY STORE
? Backpacks. � IS. Bomber.
0 Field, Otck. Fliqht Snorkel .y
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FOOD IS
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at the
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(la" 'aa n�Mt I
in. �i mi ow � i
AMI ateuiri
Hear OrpaMu'ipe
��� �f� Mara It
.
Subscriptions to the Greenville Ciiiema Society's series of films for the spring semester are still
available. All 1 ilms (including next Sunday's selection, Truffaut's Jules and Jim) are shown Sundays
at 2:00 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre. I he cost of seeing the remaining five films is S9; subscriptions
may he purchased from Karen Mansfield or Glen Brewster in the English Department, or at the door
before the movie showings.
Music Faculty Duo
To Give Recital
rano Ai
Da la pas and bass-
baritone Edward
Glenn, members of the
Easi t a a I nivei si-
ty School ol Music
voice faeul II pei
form a recital ol arias
and duets from operas
and songs from modern
musical comedies Sun-
day, Feb B
1 he pi og i am.
scheduled foi 8: Ic p
in the -V J. 1 letcher
Music (en let Recital
Hall here, is tree and
open to the public.
The program will in-
clude the Figaro and
Rosin a duet from
Rossini's "Barber ol
Seville "non piu an-
drai" from Moart's
"Marriage ol Figaro
"Tu, che di gel" from
Puccini's �' I urandot
the duel Iron
Mascagni's "C avalleria
Rusticana the Nile
scene from Verdi's
"Aida" and selections
from musical comedies
b Noel Coward.
Rodger- and Hammers-
tein, Jerome Kern, Vic-
tor Herbert and
Rodgers and Hart.
Antonia Dalapas,
who has degrees from
the New Englandon-
sei v av i ol Music, has
performed in Oregon,
N e w Y 0 r k and
ashington, D.C. as
well as extensively in
the New 1 I area.
Edward Glenn has
performed throughout
W ashington, D.C. and
the southeastern U.S.
and has been featured
baritone soloist with
the U.S Navy, Band.
I he two singers have
performed together
within the past year for
several local civic
groups and presented a
program of show tunes
tor the annual Cireen-
ville Chamber ol Com-
merce banquet, which
featured as guest
speaker James Rosen-
tield. president of CBS-
IV.
Happy
Birthday
Robert
Boyette
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Tues. Fish Fry- All I he rah You Can bat With A Mug
Of Your Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shrimp With French
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lues,Wed,Thur(Oyster Bar Only) I Doz. Halfsheil
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PI KAPPA PHI
Come Pit
The Phi iv � ll
Night Prom 7:00
1 ill C. l t
1 he Chapter X
'rices I
p-
Ensemble Concerts
Presented Friday
rraditional and contemporary band and jazz
music will be presented by the East Carolina
University Symphonic Wind Ensemble and the
ECU Ja Ensemble in a joint concert Friday,
Feb. 6, a! 8:15 p.m. in Wright Auditorium here.
The program, tree and open to the public, is a
featured performance for participants in the All-
Stale High School Band Clinic hosted by ECU
Feb. 6 7
The Wind Ensemble, conducted by Herbert
Carter and Harold Jones of the ECU School of
Music instrumental faculty, will present Gordon
Jacob's version of "The Earle of Oxford's
March "Blue Lake Overture" by John Barnes
Chance, Fisher Tull's "Jargon" (For Percussion
Ensemble and Band) and "Variations on
"America" by Charles Ives and William
Schuman.
The Jazz Ensemble, conducted by ECU music
faculty member George Broussard, will play con-
temporary ja selections.
1
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H a ppenings
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Thursday 5
� 7 p.m. Gamma Beta Phi, Biolog) 103
� 7:30 p.m. Women's Basketball: UNC-Chapel
Hi Minges Coliseum
� 5 p.m. Sororit Recognition
� 5-8 p m intramural Racquetball Doubles
1 viiuament, Minges Court
Friday o
� Ml Da High School Band Clinic, AI. Flet-
chei Musicentei
� 5, 7, and :(K) p.m. Movie: Norma Rae, Hen-
drix 1 heati e
� 8:15 p.m I . I Wind Ensemble Concert,
W i ighl uditoi mm
Saturday
� All Da High School Band Clinic, I Fl et-
chei M isic C entei
� 5, 7, and 9 00 p m. Movie: Norma Rae, Hen-
drix 1 heat re
� b p.m. Women's Basketball: Easl rennessee,
waj
� 30 p m. High School Band Clinic Concert,
Wrig uditoi rum
Suruiiix V
� 3 p.m. Women's Basketball: Appalachian
State I ni ersitj. Boone, N.C.
Monday V
� 8:15 p m. Faculty Duo Recital: Paul Tardif,
& Selma Gokcen, cellist. Hendrix Theatre
Monday 9- Tuesday 24
� Inti Su M . Entries Due
� Intramura I -Rec Racquetball Doubles, En
v - due Mei i !i u
Tuesday 10
� 5 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Co-Rec Bowling
� 7 p.m. Phi Upsilon Omicron Meeting, Home
Economics Social Room
� 7 p.m. Mendenhall Student Center BingoIce
Cream Party, MSC Multi-Purpose Room
� 7 p.m. Women's Basketball: UNCW, Wilm-
ington, N.C.
SCHOOl OF ART
Jan. 15-Feb. 8
� Annual Faculty Show-Works by the E.C.U.
School of Art Faculty
SCHOOl OFMUSiC
� Feb. 5 Ban Webster, clarinet Senior Recital,
7:30 p.m.
� Feb. 6 Betsy Floyd, piano Senior Recital, 7:30
p.m.
� 1 eb. 6-7 All-State High School Band Clinic
(Eastern Division), All Day
� Feb. 6 Wind Ensemble, Ja Ensemble Con-
cert, 8:15 p.m Wright Auditorium
� Feb. 7 High School Band Clinic Concert, 7:30
p.m Wright Auditorium
� Feb. 8 Antonia Dalapas, voice; Edward
Glenn, voice; Duo Faculty Recital, 8:15 p.m.
� Feb. y Paul Tardif, piano; Faculty Recital,
8:15 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
� Feb. 11 Phi Mu Alpha Musicale, 7:30 p.m.
MliHl'LIFE
Attic
� rhursday, rHE YOUNG INVADERS
� Friday, SNOW' w Sigma Phi Epsilon Happy
Horn 3:30-7:10 p.m.
� Saturday, SNOW
� Sunday, THE X-RAVES
� Tuesday, BUSTER BROWN
� Wednesday, SUTTERS GOLD
( arolma Oprv House
� Thursday, NORTH STAR BAND
� Friday, JOHNNY PAYCHECK & NORTH
STAR BAND
� Saturday, NORTH STAR BAND
� Wednesday, FOOTLOOSE
C hapter X
� Thursday, Pi Kappa Phi, "Evening Delight"
7-10 p.m.
� Friday, A Nu Pi "End of Week Party" 4-8
p.m.
� Saturday, Kappa Alpha "Nickel Nite"
� Tuesday, Sigma Phi Epsilon "Ladies Night"
� Wednesday, Sigma Nu "50,50 Night
Elbow Room
� Wednesday, Feb. 11 1st Annual Mens All
Campus Arm Wrestling
JJs Music Hall
� Thursday, ALLEY CATS
� Friday, BILLY PRICE
� Saturday, ALAN HANDLEMAN'S NEW-
WAVE PARTY
� Sunday, TOYS
� Wednesday, ALAN HANDLEMAN'S ROCK
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I






"
LAS! XKt 1 1M
Sports
! I Bl
Branning, Delph Lead AIA Barrage Of Stars
UiMhui it. it tiu i n V- r
Bj11 KI Istll M) IK
no
East
-
v toi � nevei
i.
nng, some ol the top collegiette the perfect opporti I know
teams. hav
Ovei the past five years, MA has
posted an incredible 195 37 record,
AI
a.ee.
.i before losing 66 s
ie 'VI � I SO-81 lean
e al .cast roui guys who have young man thai na ited in lasi
inalFouroftheN AA year's �
tonne; II
� winning rwo members of the current l Anothe. formei Final Koi
squad combined with NBA stars former on the Rich Bi
Sidney Moncrief (Milwaukee Bucks) ing, out of
Mready this yeai the club has and Ron Brewei (Portland tutelage at Notre Da.
aeteated Marquette and taken the rrailblazers) in leading Arkansas to
top learn in the UP1 lop Iwentv two Southwestern Conferei a
"� Oregan State, down to the wire 'h
l

upst
I he team has won II ol 12 games
the lost to Oregan State and I tie twosome forwai
ently stands 22-8. Delph and centei Steve Set
People around here always say current!) AIA's two leadi
� wanl to see some name people averaging 11.5 and II 7
in Greenville Odom said. " l his is game, respectively.
en unpumslnps and alvM�ir� , ,�. four vears runnim,
heN V "ist a tew years back.
and now c
Kthlei .
Marv in team w ith ! 10 a isists.
Anot 1
ig scorers,
joints per formei ! It

Rali
har
turn
v
ai
-

rule ou
'Thi
lid i �
I

Mi
I
Lady Bucs Hope
To Sweep Heels
Bj JIMM DuPKH
i ,i
"We I
( hai
v ea;
thej aoi here We've alr
bea
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11 w ill ,
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p
druvi
d we rea
a win to improve ou
lie toui nt. C onference
ake o
"Wei �
I re
B
Pt'
Jones looks for an outlet
opponent defends. Jones and the
gfi
other members of the 18th-ranked team host
arch-rival North Carolina tonight
� �
Us
I
la' ii, s
.
Cai ha;
impressn .
upsei
victories ovei N
and fennessee on .
; I i Walls will
ilis
Pirates Go Past .500,
Defeat Camels, 81-59
e tens e
u t ei
ilchrisl
Bill
hinlis
VlER-
McNair
ine duc recoi u
x in
d red-hoi 62
to aid in the
. who shot
fell to 7 12
A Stingv Pirate defense allowed
Campbell but six first hall held
goals as ECU led at halftime
41-24. I he Camels never led.
C ampbell was hampered
somewhat hv the absence ol
ol center ronv Britto, who
suffered a badlv spraigned ankle
in a I uesdav. practice.
Two ECU forwards, Gibson
and Morris Hargrove, put Brit-
to's absence to then advantage,
pulling down a combined total of
! 7 rebounds.
1 he big lead ECT held
throughout the game made it
possible for head coach Dave
Odom to clear his bench. Every
Pirate in the game scored with the
exception ol guard Greg Batson.
Onlv, freshman guard Mike
Fox tailed to play. The Raleigh
native ivas not able to piav in his
hometown due to an illness.
�vitt; 14
Watkins
Gibson
s
Pirate Barn Wright Scores As Rill McNair I ooks On
Gymnast Jackson Vet Amongst Youth
B M( f MM mi Ws
II V nlr
Amonj ol new, young
talent, veteran gymnasl Elizal
1 ! ksoi i own.
"Mice ad-
h, is
ECU'
womei ' During
has seen
hands
am men"
mm
a t
the
once, a
ship change several time
Despite all these changes. Jackson
is still one ol the top all-around
competitors foi the Pirate gym-
nasts. "Elizabeth has kept up very
well with all of the adjustments
said coach Jon Rose. "She is grow-
ing along with the program
I he gymnastics program is
definite!) growing. On this year's
team are 7 freshmen, five oi them
are from out of state. Most of the
all-around competitors lor the team
are freshmen, with the exception ol
Jackson.
" i he freshmen now compared to
when I was a freshman are like night
and day said Jackson. "They
have a lot of potential
The gymnastics program has also
changed considerably over the last
two years. According to Jackson,
the program is much more serious
and demanding on the gymnasts.
When asked about the Pirate
gymnastics team. Rose always
speaks highly o Jackson. Scoring
an average oi 29.(X) points per meet,
she is one o the team's most consis-
tent performers.
"Elizabeth always rises to the oc-
casion in meets said Rose. "You
can usually count on her to hit foui
out of four of her routines
During Jackson's years at ECU,
she has improved greatly. Her skill
level has increased, with more dif-
ficult tricks being added to her
routines every year, helping her to
keep up with the rising difficulty
standards.
Jackson's performances have also
matured while at ECU. rhrough ex-
perience, she has learned how to
maintain hei composure during
competition "High school competi
tion is much different than college
competition said Jackson.
"Experience definitely makes the
difference
According to Rose, "l lizabeth is
an excellent example of a college
athlete � dedicated, hard-working,
enthusiastic � a real leader
-
1 ven against
Appalachian Si Sunday,
ve-average
1,200.
"We're realh exc
tar Hippo)
a �
-tn.
"It's
p
I
"Hvei es
it when a
Carolina
again Thursdav
Curtain
Falls On
Wrestling
Inlet collegiate
Minges Colise i
ha
xvn . w ei ��� . Saturday
on.
vv ith the announcem the
term
wrestling progra
Pirates' final home mai
season becomes the Pira
itch.
1 out teams will be .
in a round-robin tournament
weekend: I CU, Virginia k
Appalachian Sta SC. C
tral
Action begins m the Colise
at noon and will continue until
approximately 5 p m . or until all
earns have played ea er.
I c l coach Hachiro; � .aid
Wednesda) i . planned to
wrestle Pirate Ail-American
Hutch Revils in all three matches,
Revils, 17-0 on the season, will
be shooting foi his 20th win
without a loss
following the home tourney,
the Pirates have several aw;
meets to compete in before the
wrestling program thai is so full
in tradition draws to a close
Dual meets with N.C. State
and Old Dominion are scheduled
tor later this month. The team
will also compete in two more
tournaments.
I he Pirates are currentK 2-5 in
dual meet competition.
Revils and teammate James
Ellison are strong candidates to
compete in the national cham-
pionships, to be held in
Princeton, N.J. March 12-14





IHI I AMAKOI IN! AN
H BKI MO c. 19X1
Wrestlers Seek
Team As ECU
Program Ends
BMI1IMMI KKION
M�t1 w ritei
s,walking through the ;ii! doors neat the ol Ku klen Stadium, the ees is a large - awards and l-Cl hletic past.
siids, to sa !he least, bi
� memories.
troph case is e ac
�I �. I wrest l-
awards are
1 w inns as the
MM I First Col
n in
V ilies the N. ampions. ore trophies to
il . � this year,
t i i I wi estling
n

1 c I wrestl-w pi omising i d into vs in-�. .
rs on
�vill the
men
k Wei th the
Ha. 0 � . about � l talent
"l thmk since Coach Oishi is
populai on the wrestling scene is a
er important factor. His populari-
ty is gome to help a whole lot of us
find a school to attend
last Carolina dominated the
Southern Conference in wrestling
foi five straight years, being con-
ference champions from !) 1976.
During these years the Pirates
manhandled Atlantic Coast Con-
ference teams while undei Coach
John Welborn. I hose teams compil-
ed a "4 S 3 record, which translates
to a winning percentage ol .870.
1 (. I wrestling was also ver suc-
cessful under Coach Ed Steers, who
followed Welborn and was responsi-
� � ebb and 1 eal bunging
ents to Greem ille.
"The reason I came to ECU
is 1 eat. "was because oi the way
Coach Steers recruited me. 1 really
thought 1 C I had a good wrestling
program, but when 1 got here he ac-
cepted a job at the U.S. Military
cademy. Coach Oishi is a real
good coach, though, but with the
situation the way it is. it nisi seems
the whole program is being
o erlooked
Both young men said they had op-
portunities to attend other schools
in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West
Virginia and Virginia, but were sold
on 1 c I s wrestling tradition.
"My brother was recruited by
Welborne says Webb, who
trestles at 142 pounds, "so I was
familiar with how strong this pro-
gram was. 1 aUo knew Coach Steers
. because he coached at a college
in my area
1 ven though both wrestlers were
ruited b Steei . they pointed out
,vere told he would be leav-
ing before thev enrolled at last
i. arolina.

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it you need money tor (all clothes or football tlckttt, now is a
time to sell your gold and silver valuables. And here s a
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I YOMK yOFlSSIONAL PIKMAMINT PIALI
Swimmers Seek Revenge
A dose defeat is no!
soon forgotten. Tins
seems to be the feeling
of many ol the ECU
swimmers as they ap-
proach this Saturday's
Natatorium. swimmei in Nancy
Both teams losi close Hogshead. She is cur-
meets to the Blue Devils rently fourth in the na
last year and now have tion (Division I) in the
revenge on their minds.
I o make t he
men's and women's challenge even greater,
sunn meet with Duke at least foi the Lady
University at 1 p.m. in Pirates, EC Li will be
the Minges facing a "world-class
2K) individual medley,
fifth national in the
100 bu and
eighth in the country in
the I0D individual
medlev.
Classifieds
ECU WRESTLING: Last action in Minges is set for
Saturda. With the termination the younger Pirate team
members are looking at possibility of transfer.
"Sice gave me the option ol
staving here or talking to some other
coaches Webb recalled. " I had
some other otters still available, but
I decided to stav here and slick il
out. 1 figured there was always a
chance thai the wrestling program
would be continued "
1 eat summed up mam ol the
team members" feelings. "1 really
like 1 Cl and especially the area. I
surely wish they would continue the
wrestling program here
1 hese voung men won't be able to
follow m the footsteps ol formei
greats Bill Hill and Phil Mueller al
ECU, but perhaps they will be suc-
cessful al othei sehooK.
As for the ECU wrestling pro-
gram, there will be no more matches
in Minges Coliseum alter Saturday's
encounter with VPI, Appalachian
Mate and CI . I here will be
memories, however; memories ol a
wrestling program thai once achiev-
ed greatness.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Hide a bed sola
table lamp lounge chair Good
condition 35 00 Call 754 623!
att. i 4 0C
FOR SALE Rossignol ST Compe
tion skis with LooK bindings 1310
�S6 ins days 7i2 9775 nights ash
tor Jim C
FOR SALE Ladies new golt baq
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radio AC aluminum alloy wheels.
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anytime.
FOR SALE Pioneer car stereo
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Cassette deck model KP707G
SI50 00 Mam amplifier model
GM40 550 00 Surface mount
speakers 2 way model TS X6
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model AD 30 595 00 756 5323 leave
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Marantz 2230 receiver 5'�0 00
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5280 00 Bose 90' series 4 with
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model DY 78. Grover machine
heads, herring bone inlay mlayed
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PERSONAL
COUNSELORS For western
North Carolina co eJ summer
camp Room meals laundry
salary and travel allowance f �
perience not necessary but mus'
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children Only clean cut non
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write Camp Pinewood '801
Cleveland Rd Miami Beach F!
OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
round Europe S America
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5500 51200 monthly Sightseeing
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cheap rates Can Am , at '58 M
CARPOOL Interested ill ,0'mng
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Rock f Mount � . -He
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RiDE vANTfD ro Charlotte foi
a- i � -f i �
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mmg pampUt cover Thanks lor
shopping
WE SPEAK TURABAIN Pi I
sionaiiy typed edited pi
ofreadmg WRITE ON '56 95 46
ELIZABETH Mope you are ban.
in the swmq of thuiqs soon I Pa'
don the pun GeT well soon'
TO THE GYMNASTICS TEAM
Best of luck in your etlor ts aqams'
Longwood 120 or b
CONGRATULATIONS PHI KAP
PA TAUS Here s to your 20th an
nivei sity, Wed Feb 4 1981
Special thanks to John Meyerhoft
ECUS MOST OUTSTANDING
FRATERNITY
CONGRATULATIONS HAM
MERHEADS Full steam ahead
and on to the playoffs Yeah
team
HERE S TO LOOKING AT rOU
BABE Ph, Kappa Tau I
Sister Champagne Breakfas'
commg soon Be there Aloha1
REEFERS AND BUFFETT' No
dummy not pot and munchies
Jimmy and his band' Fib 2'
Minges Coliseum DON T MISS
OUT'
ladies it arrived Tuesday
Lo.o sea' anci couch Drop on b,
and check .t out P S Com.nq
soon a new Set ta CPJ C �'�'
BROWNRIG Son . forgot your
ad GPj
WANTE D IN K INSTON Sorr-
to commute with Monda. through
Thursday Call 522 ' 141
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piti Communil, C i He�
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APARTMENT Foi
room s mode' I ' - I -
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1100 00 n
Tom a' � (
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it)
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48 of 200 loyal
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.
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t
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m
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states Schlitz Chief
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Mi '� Bt 11
TV !
tSedsdiilitonisers eer ans surP"se( a choice of Schlitz
preferred by 37
ej the Schlitz e
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 5, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 05, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.108
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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