The East Carolinian, February 3, 1981






She iEaat (EaroHntan
$
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol. 55 No. Al
10 Pages
Tuesda, February 3, 1981
(�reenville, Northarolina
Circulation 10,(00
Local Attorney Relates
Memories Of Watergate
Bv Oils ROBINSON
si�H Wnlrr
mei Deputy Secretary of
Christopher said,
ol the people in the
es is the greatest resource
ave1 he was making an
�; about eastern
ans. One Greenville
vei stands out in the
4 Malcolm J. Howard, who
Howard, Vin-
�uoi ne s at I aw
vcn himself as a man of
d will. He credits deter-
rte kc to success.
forget the first tour
hal 1 was m practice said
"For four months I
- 25 I had two children and a
d to myself then. 'It is go-
long, tough road but 1
i k e it
did. Since he
September 1974, Howard's
as grown to five attorneys
� legal assistants. He
andles about 500
and estimated the
� �. to be between
freedom has not
foi Howard.
man ol will, he ex-
maji i desires is to
- "I cat a living
. - and mvsell he said.
"But Christianity comes first. M
work is second
Howard is active in many civic
and community affairs. He serves
on several boards in Greenville.
Amongh them are the Area
Chamber of Commerce, the East
Carolina Vocational Center, and the
Kennedy Home Baptist Orphanage
He is also on the board of deacons
at The Memorial Baptist Church.
The Kinston native attended The
Citadel in Charleston, S.C. for one
year and then was appointed to the
United States Mihltary Academy at
West Point where he graduated and
then spent 10 years as an army of-
ficer.
"1 thoroughly enjoyed my days at
West Point he commented. But I
do love my work here. I know how
the law is made and how it is inter-
preted. I will work on the average of
12 to 14 hours a day, six days a
week
Howard graduated from Wake
Forest University School of Law in
1970. He served as legislative
Counsel to the U.S. Congress for
the Secretary of Armv during the
period 197 1-1972 He was
nominated for Secretary of the Ar-
my in 1980 by the Reagan Ad-
ministration.
Howard spent eight months with
the Nixon Administration as Chief
Assistant to Special Counsel in the
W atereate Dcfeuse. "T he
Watergate case was a very eye-
opening experience he explained.
"It was a very intriguing process
He added that he was able to meet
President Nixon personally and
found him to be "a pleasant
gentleman
The attorney offered advice for
students planning to enter the legal
field. "I suggest that anyone in-
terested in pursuing a career in law
to develop a good English
background. Whether written or
spoken, you are constantly using
words. Being able to communicate
is essential
Though Howard has been practic-
ing law for only six years, he says he
is content with his practice and is
not looking forward to retirement.
"In my judgement, the lawyer really
doesn't top out until he is 65 he
stated. "Remember this is a
business that experience really, real-
ly counts.
Howard is married to the former
Eloise McGinty, daughter of
Retired Air Force Colonel Robert P.
McGinty, and they have two
children, Shannon Fee, 11, and
Joshua, 6.
"Mr. Howard is a fine man. He is
very devoted to his wife and family
and he is a very determined young
man says Chief Assistant U.S. At-
torney Weldon Hollowell o Eden-
ton.
� � By JON JORDAN
Malcolm Howard practices law in this building on the corner of Third and Cotanche Streets.
Defense Claims Garwood Not
Responsible For His Actions
! alwell Versus Penthouse
Judge Refuses Reverend's Suit
I v's.v HBl RG, Va. tUPl) A
federal judge today refused to ex-
� banning the distribu-
te Magazine, ruling
� : al right to free
lar � ige to
lerry 1 ell t fial may
erview in the
asl evangel;
Majority, ob-
rdei Friday
! 5 million
e that contain-
! � well -aid was ob-
etenses.
I lames C.
to grant a
junction extending
I the public interest
vimatelv K) million
� Penthouse each month is
pei relief is to seek com-
. es after the fact
restraint Turk
use ol a 90-minute hear-
irtroom filled with spec-
: � t porters.
� irst Amendment case
i ei.
� Penthouse said the
lid lose up to S14
were forced to stop
law yet - argued the case
did not involve free speech, but in-
stead was a case of "commercial ex-
ploitation" in which the magazine
used I alwell's picture and opinions
to increa -e its circulation
I alwell testified that he was upset
because free-lance writers Andrew
Duncan and Sashti Brata promised
when they interviewed him last year
the taped conversations would be
used for a book and a London
newspaper and would not be sold to
"pornographic" magazines.
"There'd be no problem here if
they had said 'we stole this in-
terview Rev. I alwell knew nothing
about it I alwell said.
I alwell said it his followers "are
left believing that we gave such an
interview, it will damage irreparably
our financial support
1 alwell conferred with his lawyers
after Turk's ruling and said he
would not appeal.
"We won Penthouse lawyer
Rov Grutman of New York said.
"Another blow for freedom has
been struck. The republic is safe for
a while
Falwell, however, said he intend-
ed to pursue a S10 million damage
suit filed in U.S. District Court in
Roanoke against Penthouse, Brata
and Duncan.
After Turk issued the temporary
restraining order Fridav, Penthouse
publisher Bob Guccione said copies
of the March issue already had been
distributed to wholesalers and news
agents and were to be available to
"he public beginning today in most
areas ol the country and foreign
countries.
At the outset of today's hearing,
lalwell's lawyer, lorn Phillips Jr
said the whole question may be
moot because distribution already
apparently was out of Penthouse's
hands.
CAMP I FlIT NE (UPI) A
Marine Corps prosecutor told a jury
of Vietnam veterans Monday Pfc.
Robert R. Garwood chose tit help
his Viet Cong captors rather than
other Americans who were dying in
the "muck and the mire" ol a com-
munist prison camp.
Garwood, his starched dress
uniform decorated with good con-
duct and Vietnam service medals,
showed no emotion as Maj. Werner
Flelltner, the duet prosecutor, told
the five-member jury the defense'
claim Garwood was driven insane
bv torture is a "smoke-screen" that
should be quickly rejected.
Garwood is charged with col-
laboration with the enemy during
almost 14 years in Vietnam. He is
also accused of striking an
American prisonet in a jungle POW
camp.
Garwood, the only Vietnam-era
serviceman ever to stand trial for his
actions in a prison camp, could
it ��'
New Amendment Moves
Up Fall Election Date
Bv PAUL COLLINS
s.e�s Kdllor
SGA legislature ratified an
� nent Monday, reducing the
number of hours needed to run for
president, vice president or
tsurer.
1 he amendment lowers the
number ol hours from 48 to 45. Ac-
cording to Rules and Judiciary
Chairman Russell Overman the
amendment will allow more
students to participate in student
government.
The new provision will allow par-
ticipation by students whose majors
allow them to average fewer than 16
hours per semester.
According to SGA Secretary
Marianne Edwards half the students
on campus fall into this category.
The legislature also ratified a
number of other amendments to the
election rules including one that will
make polling hours uniform across
campus.The new hours are 9 a.m.
until 6 p.m. and were extended to
allow students who do not return to
their dorms until after 5 p.m. to
vote.
The date for fall elections was
also moved up to the third Wednes-
day after fall classes begin.
These amendments will take af-
fect after spring semester.
In other business, the legislature
passed by acclamation a commenda-
tion to the lady Pirates for their
performances against three na-
tionally ranked opponents last
week.
President Charlie Sherrod also
noted that the SGA will be running
shuttle buses at four more basket-
ball games this semester.
Buses will run from in front of
W hite And Clement Dorms for the
women's games against North
Carolina and Wake Forest and for
the men's games against UNC-W
and Deleware State.
Sherrod said that running buses
to and from the USC game Friday
night was a success. "The buses
were packed he said.
The SGA also voted to accept two
new members, one day student
legislator and a Greene dorm
representative.
receive a life prison sentence if con-
victed by the jury of Marine Corps
officers.
Hellmer urged the jury to accept
the testimony of eight former POWs
who said they encountered Gar-
wood in the jungle POW .amps of
South Vietnam, carrying a weapon,
wearing the uniform of the com-
munists and acting as a guard and
interrogator
"They were there, gentlemen.
they were there Hellmer said.
Defense attorneys did not dispute
the allegations made by the former
POWs. Instead they presented four
medical experts who testified Gar-
wood suffers from a severe mental
disorder caused by torture, isolation
and childhood poverty.
The defense claims Garwood was
not responsible for his actions
because of that mental illness.
But Hellmer said Garwood was
responsible enough to follow certain
rules.
"He could abide by the rules of
the Vietnamese but he could not
abide by the rules that were the laws
of the United States government
Hellmer said.
He said it was the other POWs.
and not Garwood, who were sub-
letted to the deprivation and tor-
ture.
"They were down in the com-
pounds dying, gentlemen, in the
muck and the mire Hellmer said
Hellmer said Garwood was sane
enough to do what he believed was
needed for him to survive.
'it all boiled down to survival ol
the fittest in that compound he
said.
Hellmer also said the other POWs
have described Garwood a
"rational
"He was aware of who he was, he
was aware of where he was
Hellmer said.
"He was able to make a choice
Hellmer also questioned the
motives of defense psychiatrists.
"The government (psychiatrists)
don't intend to write any books or
articles Hellmer said. "What kind
of psychial 1st would do that.
gentlemen self-serving, self-
serving
Garwood disappeared near Da
Nang in 1965. He surfaced in Hanoi
in 1979 when he passed a note to a
foreign visitor, saying he wanted to
return to the U.S
ECU Placement Office
Effectiveness Questioned
Firing Over The Force
ECU women's basketball stalwart Kathy Riley (right)
shoots over Southern Cal center Paula McGee. McGee, a
6-3 freshman sensation, led the eighth-ranked Trojans to a
77-73 win over the then-19ih-ranked Lady Pirates. A
record 4,500 fans witnessed the contest. For more infor-
mation, see page 8. (Photo by Gary Patterson)
ByCHADBLFFKIN
Auultnl N�� l-dilor
"1 don't know any students who
have got a job as a direct result of
working with the campus placement
office, however 1 am working with
them now and 1 sure hope that I will
be an exception. They gave me a
packet of information that was
useful in helping me to write a
resume and get some interviews
Statements similar to the one
above are heard frequently on cam-
pus every year about this time as
prospective graduates begin their
frantic searches for jobs. Many
seniors don't exactly know what to
expect from the Career Planning
and Placement Service on campus.
"Will they get me some inter-
views? What do I have to do The
answer is yes. They will get you
some interviews if you go over and
sign up.
"But I thought they were suppos-
ed to find me a job Well, they are
capable of doing that too but there
is a 99 percent chance that it won't
be the kind of job you're looking
for. W;hat they can do is show you
how to go about getting the job you
want.
The philosophy and purpose of
the Career Planning and Placement
Service is to prepare students to
make the transition from the world
of education to the world of work.
"Most students have a misconcep-
tion of our office said Furney
James, Director of Career Planning
and Placement. "Our function is
not to get people jobs. We teach
people how to get jobs
Each year the service arranges for
approximately 80 different com-
panies, agencies and school systems
to come to campus for the purpose
of interviewing and recruiting
students. During the month of
February, 32 firms and seven school
svstems will have representatives on
campus.
In addition to arranging and
scheduling students for interviews,
the service teaches students how to
prepare for interviews, how to con-
struct a proper resume and also how
to build self-confidence.
According to James, about 75
percent of the students who use the
service and properly follow the ad-
vice call back to say they have found
the kind of job they want.
Student resumes are kept on file
in the Career Planning and Place-
ment office for 10 years. Currently
about one half of all ECU seniors
and about 400 alumni use the service
each year.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds6
Features5
Letters4 je
Sports8t
Entertainment j
� - , - � . v.
mm

t





THE LAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY J, 181
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The deadline tor submitting an
nouncements is Friday at 5 p m
tor the Tuesday issue and Tuesday
at noon tor the Thursday issue An
nouncements submitted after
these deadlines will not be printed
All announcements should be dou
ble spaced and typewritten or
neatly printed on 8 by 1! men
paper Messages should oe Kept as
short as possible and contain only
essential information The person
submitting the announcement
should include his name and
telephone number at the bottom ot
the page
PES
E ta Sign
LDS
The LDS Student Association m
vii-s you to join them at an in
stitute class on Wednesday nights
at 6 15 p m in Brewster B 102
This class is taught by Bro Bill
EvenhuiS, Seminary Institute
Director tor the Kinston. N C
Stake of The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter day Saints In this
class discussion centers on maior
Christian Religions in America as
well as their doctrine and how they
relate to Mormon doctrine On oc
iasion guest speakers will discuss
their own religious affiliation and
answer any questions concerning
their retig � "� l y0ne
welcome This class will be held
(; th� remainder of
M
JOBS
The Office of Handicapped Stu
dent Services has employment op
portvnltie tor students interested
m becoming attendants to
wheelchair students For details
come to Whicnara Building, room
311 or rail 757 6799
221
HOW DO YOU
SPELL RELIEF?
not so re � i
. ulptures
student Ce
READING
NURSING
ii extra room in
vour home Ma '5 July 30. 1981'
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
ooking for rooms and apart
ments for nursing students study
n Greenville this summer
� � , students are senior level
ting students from throughout
tie united States who will receive
r of their clinical experience
. rt Memorial it you would like
'are your home with one or
several � �'� rns IhtS summer ail
�� . nurse recruiting office from
� M Monday through Friday
CHEERLEADING
The tape that served as East
Carolina University's entry into
me national cheerleadmg contest
sponsored by the Inter national
Che, ounoatjpn. will be
shown in Mendenhall Student
Center on Friday, Feb 6, 1981 The
tape is SCl W 0e viewed in
newspaper reading section
trom 6 30 to 7 30 and from 8 30 to
9 00 Ev n �i ted T he
I bv Dave Balch and
Jfli . t the Audio Visual
. Center of the School of
Mec
MYRTLE BEACH
Take a break through us the
Student union Travel Committee
Be on your way to wild, wonderful
and beautiful Myrtle Beach on
April 17, 1981 You will arrive at 10
p m on the 17th for an indulging,
exciting evening Just think of lav
ing out catching rays of sun and
whatever shall come your way for
three illustrious sun filled days
Myrtle Beach is the place to be
during Easter Break, especially at
the Holiday Inn Downtown So
much to do. so many to meet1 It's
all yours for $79 (subiect to price
increase) You may sign up at the
Central Ticket Office by March 2
The surt and the sun are calling
you Make your deposit today
iuse of limited space
PHI SIGMA PI
Tau Chapter of Phi Sigma Pi Na
tional Honor Fraternity will meet
at 6.00 pm Wednesday Feb 4
The dinner meeting will be held at
the Western Steer restaurant at
3O05 E 10th St
BOWLING
CORSO
There will be a Cor so meeting on
Monday, Feb 9 at 5 00 in
Mendenhall Student Center room
247 All corrections and social
work majors and intended maiors
are urged to attend New
members are welcome1
PHOTOGRAPHY
Two photography courses will
be offered on Tuesday evenings at
East Carolina University this
semester
Camera I ' the basic COUTM
will meet Feb 10 March 17 and
"Camera II meets March 31
April 28 Class sessions in each
course are set for 7 9pm on
campus
Participants in each course
should have their own cameras
preferably 35 millimeter or large)
information and registration
materials for these and other
evening course offerings are
available from the Office of Non
Credit Programs Division ot Con
tinuing Education ECU Green
ville N C , telephone TS1 4143
CSO
It
INVESTING
ADVERTISING
� � �. rnship program
A , . , . � f summer by
edmont Ti �
Purpose of the
prouram ,s ' winningstg
ence in the
ig marketing or
�uoent from
. . ����.
compel � �'�' severa " �
ersitii
' �v
MCAT
Mr john s Childers, Dif
ECU Testing Center announced
that the new Medical College Ad
mission Tes' (MCAT) application
packets have arrived in the
Testing Center, Speight 105 The
test dates for 1981 are April l 1981
and September 12. 1981
deadline date for the ApriU test is
March 6, 1981 and the deadline
date for submitting application tor
September 12. 198' test is
Auciu' U. '98!
Co rec bowling entry dates open
Jan 26 and continue through Feb
10 Play begins on Feb 16 A team
captain's meeting will be held on
Feb 12, at 7 00 p m m the
Mendenhall Bowling Center For
further information please contact
the intramural Office, Ext 6387 or
Gregg Melton, Ext 6443
POETRY
ECU Poetry Forum will meet
Thursdsay. Feb 5th in Mendenhall
248 Anyone interested m reading
poetry and getting feedback on
hisher work is invited to attend
Bring six or eight copies of the
poems for other members of the
workshop
IVCF
I nter varsity Christian
Fellowship will meet Thursday
night at 7 30 m the Methodist Stu
dent Center This week's topic is
the fulfillment of end time pro
phecv Everyone is welcome
FELLOWSHIP
Each Tuesday at 5 30 P m
there is a Fellowship Supper at Ac
Baptist Studenl Union mext to
Wendy s on 10th Street) Cost tor
the meal is 1 75 Tonight, follow
ing supper, is game night bring
your favorite! So come on out and
indulge in good good, fellowship
and fun1
SKI SNOWSHOE
Additional space has been made
available for the Spring Break tr.p
to Snowshoe, West Virginia For
information contact Mrs Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 in Memorial
fW 205 The deadline has been
. .�. �� ' I eb 12 Final tees will
be collected on this date at 4 00
p m in Memorial Gym room 108
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Women's rugby team meets
Tues, Wed, 8. Thurs, 46 pm on
the rugby fields behind the Allied
Health Building No experience
needed, anyone is welcome For
more info Nancy 758 1160 or
Kim 752 6388
PAUSE
Thursday night at Baptist Stu
dent Union Inexl to Wendy s on
10th Street' is a time ot eel-
tion and n Met I on Th.s w �
topic is "Simplicity Beg.ns at
7 00 We hope to see you there
If you are pursuing a maior in
allied health, nursing, pre
medicine, pre dentistry or
medicine you may quality for
COST FREE services made
available through the Center for
Student Opportunities (CSO).
School ot Medii ine
Current openings exist tor
studei ' ' in v i
tutorial services Eligible students
can also participate in in
dividual, ion Of group learning
skills sessions (organizing l hire
notes effective reading, memoriz
ing and test taking techniques)
Professional counseling services
include career planning
Stance personal, academic,
� ,i anx.efy
. ling
it you would like to be con
sidered for participation m an, of
�' � COST FRET services contact
Or Fr, 'or Student Op
port, i ' � ' I B I
ca'l for an appomtmc
� . . 6075 or 6081
SPEED READING
tor
persons in

� ����� si on.
� on Thursd � -
�ngs at Fast KCarolma University
Pel 1J April '6
The class will meet from 7 to 9
pm Continuing Education units
� g proles
ible
Further information and
registration forms are
Office of Non Credit '
grams Division of '
� n ECU. Grei e, N.C
� 757 6143
REVENGE
Chemistry class frustrating?
Come and release that pent up
anger and throw a pie at the
chemistry faculty of our cho.ee
The America- Chemical Society
Student Affiliates is sponsoring a
Cnerrstr, Faculty P.emthe
Thursda Feb 5 730 9 30
pm at the fc mo Room Adm,s
s,on IS 50c along with reduced
pnees on party beverages So
come and seel- � nge"
AED
Alpha EPS.ion Delta preprotes
s.onai societ, will hold a special
meeting on Thursday, Jan 30 at
7 30 p m in Flanagan 307 Tillet
Mills a repn i rt'vi ' ,nt
UNC CH Schools of Med ine anci
Dentstr , Wedi al f du� ation
,� ,e, pn � I I Program iMED
, ii spt all �'� Wl D.sai
Hcally designed to prei
lergraduate students fof
medical education AH � '
� '� '
FILM
Cor�� '
doc. �'
lory of f ram laegerst "�
� �, �. peasant beheaded in
������
Htary forces of Han Ger-
. , rerested
poss.oility ot conscientious obiec
tion to war and military set
and or alter- itivi
. , tl film and
,om the discussion follow
ninety mil ' n G�
won
. . � � �. t directot
p�� ' a Venn. I
film i
3S from 1 to 9 pm a- �� �
?er locate �' -
� . . �� �
SOCIAL WORK
TneNC Coastal D-str . o H .
AtinrifltiOn Of SO
Na0nd meet Jan 79 a-
m n the Caroi Be.k Audito.
Sn the East Carolina Unlver. ty
campus
Addressing 'he
�, t.rvial workers
u,censmg of So-
jTll be Or Tom ScutHun of UNC
n.poro and Dr Constantme
Tot me ECU Oepartmen
o, Social work and Cor-
Services
A.l soca. workers and
terested persons are mv.ted to at
tend
PI KAPPA PHI
Pi kapps '�
. wone to then
do �
Thui " :
, �� reduci
beverages Cor-
favor '
a �vav� � ' " v
CO OP JOBS
COUPON
I
WORSHIP

:
TWIG FELLOWSHIP IS:
ESSAY
� � �
I i � � to announc. " �
nuai Paul Farr Memoria
Con ' infest iS Opt
undergradu
Enii The entru

no research papers
and should havi been ' "en in
� � menl of an En .
' �
�� . . ' ' -
� ��. � '
.
HOTLINE
The East Carolina Proiect on
Sexual Harassment Dept of
Soc iOl � � and Anfhr open 05 .
Mants 1 talk Witt students who
haa problems with an East
Carolina teacher. If you have ever
by sexual looks
igestions. or
.�.ant to hear about
,ou. es Your contiden
ity is guaranteed Your
� - nts vi not b use I to (e
� .
Thurs 2 p.m. 10
-� :
JEWISH STUDENTS
Come see Rabbi Groner of the
Lubav.tch Rabbin.cal Society ot
N C He w.ll speak on too
Jewsh society Thursday. Feb 5 at
7 00 at the synagogue 1420 East
U'h Street For more mfo or rides
caH Jerry 752 5942 or Dr Resn.ck
?S6 5640
btiNfNIL 3
CITCO
WRECKER
SERVICE
Front End
Alignment
All Types of
Auto Repair
Foreign & Domestic
Reasonable Rates
2900 E. 10th Street
Phone 758 4224
111 Happy Q) Situ
r)Bia ii mAiici
OPIM 14 HOUlt
Wholesale & Retail
Ice Sales
SPECIAL REG OQc
8-LB BAG 89- �3
with this coupon
Expires April 1. 1981
f eg Ice Delive'y
r� n I'l'lllll
ARMY NAVY STORE
. Backpacks. � U. Bomber.
it F.eW. Oeck. Fi.etit. Snorkel
m
jackets. Peaceats, Parkas.
� Shoes, Combat Roofs. Plus.
t tstt sevens Streat r
�tt�HttfH���
I
tormat.on concert-
related wor exper.e-
undergraduate a'
students dui
sprmu �
and ;
Pentagon D
Wildlife Set
Energy Federa' Pi
and Socai Security Ad
tion private organuatioi
f Duke Power (
nfelli �" � "
Stu �
o op Ot to rev �'�
nptionsand totalk to a '
coordinator coi i i
pos-
approach.ng deadlines I
mteres �� shoui
de(a�
SAAD'SSHO !
REPAIR
I 1 J Gr.imlf Ave.
758 12:
Qua I If. Kp
CAREER CHOICE
BLOOD DRIVE
Itte Word of
"
hot
.
: � ' ' '
on .
ion E -

SIGN LANGUAGE

keep .

ORIENTATION

'
school
nay part
� . I rvt i � the first g
Feb. : these
10 and 26
groups �'� meet from 3 00
pm 5 00 0 m .n 201 VVr.ght An
ROTC A roriuri
� rtg Campbell Vocational In
- ��- a ' ��
participant

trong Can

-
.
ind epiored
. . - �

� tents mat "
' i
�� on Nop'
. � � ��� patel
��. first Jroup meeting of
.
(ACT)
ACT) � � " CU or
.� � ,i � 1981 App
. are to be completed and
to ACT Reg.strat.on P O
Bon 414, Iowa City. Iowa 52240
Regfstrartlon deadttfw �
198) Appl '� be obta.n
� '
oom 105
(AHPAT)
sions
� .
ECi' �' "�' � " ' ;yt"
'
. �. � mailed '�
it 45th
� � � � �. � 10017 to art ��
� on blanks
,t,ng
foom 105.
ECU
SOULS
( o! united Liberal
Stu ' ponsoring an i'ssa,
� it.on ot I-
.
I - kWERICA
It lea '
double spaced typed page;
deadline for entry is Feb 10, 198'
1st Pn?e SS0 00 2nd Pr.re
S2S00 3rd Prize S15 0C it you
riavv an, quest.ons please call
Grace Wells at 752 9802 or Eula
Voore at 752 S9R 1
TheEast Carolinian

1923
Pubishea every Tuesday and
ThursC. " . academic
� �. dur
. " �
East Caroi.n.an is the of
�newspaper of East
Carol.na Un.versity. owned.
published tor and
students ot East Carolina
FOOD IS
BACK
at the
Rathskeller
GOOD FOOD -
GOOD PRiChS
FRENDLY ATMOSPHERE
12 p m. � 1 a
109 L 5th Street
752-1361
r
Summer Job Oppertunities
In Camping For
rfa
Counselors
� Guards
CraHs
Sailing
Nurses
Salary
Roorr. 8. Be
Benc � '
N.C United Methodist Camps
interviews and information February 9, 1981
2 30 5 00pm at Wesley Foundation
Test Influence Exaggerated
Subscription Rates
Business 5 �� �' �
All others 25 yearly
rtd class postage paid at
N C
Tr,t East Carolinian off � s
ti .n the Old South
Blcl.ng on the campus ot ECU
N C
Telephone 757 6366. 6367 6309
OPTICIANS on
Contact Lenses
ch
$79.95
Money Back It Not Satisfied
OIHO. MRS.
clam 5:30pm.
Mon I ues 1 hurvlri
9am � 1pm.
W ednesdai
Ph. 732-1446
Physicians Quadrangle
Buildinii A
Greenville
(C PS) � Standardiz-
ed test scores are not as
important for getting
into college as test
critics claims, a new
stud of admissions
procedures suggests.
A report by the Col-
lege Entrance Examina-
tion Board, which
sponsors the Scholastic
Aptitude Test, and the
rVmerican Association
of Collegiate Registrars
and Admissions Of-
ficers says admissions
procedures are diverse
enough to allow
minority students to get
into college even if
"grade averages, class
ranks, or admission test
scores were significant-
ly lower than those of
other applicanis
In recent years
stnadardied test critics
have claimed the tests
plav too large a role in
deciding college ap-
plicants1 tales. 1 hose
criticisms have led to
truth-in-testing laws in
several states.
T h e laws give
students access to test
answers, and have been
opposed bv test-makers
like the College Board
as inefficient, un-
necessary and expen-
sive. College Board
President George Han-
ford, among others,
has argued that the
laws assume that ad-
missions officers weigh
standardized tests in
determing who gets in-
to school more than
other factors.
One reason the Col-
lege Board undertook
the just-released studv
ol admissions pro-
cedures, Han ford says,
was to help support its
anti-truth-in-testing
law arguments.
"Sure we wanted to
prove what we were
saving Hanford says.
"And 1 think we've
done so in a dispas-
sionate, scientific
way
The two-year survey
was of nearly 1500 col-
lege admissions offices.
More than half the
admissions operations
"actively recruit
students with
characteristics other
than academic talent
Hanford pointed out in
a written introduction
to the report results.
Mitchell's
Hairstyling
and Beauty Salon
Pitt Plaza
STUDENT SPECIAL
Cut-Blow Drv and
Condition
Keg. $13.00 Now $9.95
Good 1 hru Jan. M K-b.7
756-2950 7-4042
BISCUIT TOWNE
INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIALS
1011 Charles Street Phone 752-1373
AftORTIONtVPTO
IWMIItO
PKtONANCY
ii h oo ���! tttrntmr
prvfAancy Mt, Wr c�n
trw, and puMw tw�W
c� ��WI Pw �����
lft�ors�tton call Ml MIS
t�n ' �rt� numtar
�no �t mt b�tw��o
A.W.f.M WMMy
NMMtOrtMlUHM �
tUWMlMMMtt.
I
fi&
s
WE WANT TO SHOOT YOU!
N
1&
The 1981 BUCCANEER portroits
will be taken through the month of
February. All students, faculty, and ad-
ministration are invited to have their
portraits made. Tradition bust poses
will be made free of sitting fee charge.
A contemporary package offer (34
length, close-ups, profile shots, etc.)
will be available for a $3.00 sitting fee
charge. Portraits will be made from 10
a.m5 p.m. No appointment is
necessary. All seniors having their por-
traits mode will have their 1981 BUC-
CANEER delivered tree of charge in
the fall.

M
O
N
D
A
Y
T
U
E
S
D
A
Y
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
RIB SPECIAL
Two Jumbo BBQ Beef Ribs.
Homemade Biscuit, French Fries and Coleslaw
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
,vVi
99
SI 29
1
FEB. 2-6 FLETCHER DORM
CHICKEN SPECIAL
Two Pieces of Southern Fried
Chicken, Homemade Biscuit, French Fries. Coleslaw rAARK
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
��������� M1r
BISCUIT SPECIAL SVE

??
up
YOUR CHOICE OF THREE J3�
Steak BiscuitCountry Style Gravy and French Fries or
Chicken Biscuit with French Fries or
Biscuit Burger and French Fries
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
MEET AT
BISCUIT TOWNE
Arid Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals
At Inflation Hghting Fricesll!
90�
29
Drive
Thru
Window
Rep
(CPS) � 1
I
enten
uall
at t

Bu
J
rape
i
Tk� Haft.
' I :� m ' r� �-�
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I Ml I AS I I AROl IMAN FEBRUARY 3, 1981

Reports Of Campus Rape Increase
(C PS) - rwo years
ago t h i v m0nth,
1 h e o d o r e B u n d �
entered the Chi Omega
sororit) house on the
campus ot Florida
State I lni jrsitj, se
ualk assaulted and
then killed two women,
and beat two othti
who ultimate!) Mitn
ed
Since then Bund has
been caught and COP
victed of the crimes,
and lite ai the Chi
Omega house ha
assumed a vi i:l! ied
calm.
But the women at
Florida State have .
parent!) become one ol
the tew groups ot
its this yeai who
not talking about
violence aeauM women
on campus ollege
security ; s say
; hat. nationally,
rumors and reports ot
rapes have seemingly
.leased at a mu
than campus
crime itself ovei the
first halt ot the sch
year.
"lt- been highly
unusu.il say
police chief
uls: coast unrv
His department got
"six or se en" ieports
a week oi tap sex-
ual assauli during Oc
�er. although "the
been as
auiel a- a h as far
as actual committed
crimes of that nature
go
"Rape says lames
McGovern ot the Inter-
national Asssociation
of C ampus I aw En-
forcement d
ministrators m Atlanta,
�'is a relatively infre-
quent crime on college
campuses. The in-
cidence of rape and
homicides is very low
compared to assault,
robbery, a nd
burglary
Still, rape is also a
"highly emotional"
crime, and one "that
receives a great deal ot
publicity he notes.
Consequently one
repotted incident �
true or not � can lead
to something like
par
I ot example. a
reported sexual assault
a University ot
Maryland dorm in k-
lober (the report was
later withdrawn) lead
nol onlv to a campus-
wide Rape Awareness
Day but to "a spurt"
of subsequent rape
allegations "through
November according
to Captain Robert
Anderson of the cam
pus police.
Anderson said the
major problem has
been in denying that a
rape epidemic was
under way.
George Huntington,
police chief at Indiana
University, agrees that
his hardest job of the
school year has been
dispelling "rampant
rumors" of a
tranvestite knifing and
raping women in one
campus area, and so-
meone else lurking in
the woods behind the
Student Union.
Though "we've had
just three formal
reports, down from last
year Huntington says
he's gotten calls from
worried parents "from
half the states in the
union
At the University of
Idaho and the Universi-
ty of Vermont, the ac-
tivities of peeping
Toms during the fall
semster led to pained
denials by campus
police who, when con-
tacted by College Press
Service, still weren't
sure anyone believed
them.
Clemson University
police called for and
got a special session of
the Student Senate in
order to deny rumors
that "several" rapes
had occurred on the
campus within a two-
week period in early
November.
Earlier in the fall, a
police denial o' sexual
assaults at the Universi-
ty of Oklahoma ap-
parently left one cam-
pus women's group un-
convinced. It staged a
"Take Back the Night"
rally which ended when
eight demonstrators
were physically sluwed
around b v so m e
unidentified men, who
also shouted sexual
epithets at them.
The cycle of rumor-
denial-disbelief-more
rumors has begun again
with the re-opening of
schools after break. An
Ann Arbor women's
group has spray-
painted 150 sites
around the city with the
claim that "A woman
was raped her
University of Michigan
police say that, while
they encourage rape
awareness programs,
they fear this one may
cause unnecessary
alarm.
Part of the reason
police denials don't
always calm the nerves
of campus women is
the ambiguity of most
campus crime statistics.
The "only compila-
tion" of college crime
statistics. says
McGovern, is done by
the FBI, and campus
law enforcement of-
ficials themselves
A
Western Steer.
Fomily
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Chicken Filet
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99
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4 oi Chop Sirloin
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Child's Plate
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Steerburger &
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5 99
Potato & Salad
99
No Potato
Steak Sandwich
229
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89
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1
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$1.00
off!
Any 16" pizza.
One coupon per pizza
Expires:
Fast, free delivery
1201 Charles Blvd
Telephone 758-6660
EXPIRES 21781
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ham
On any 16" pizza
One coupon per pizza
Expires:
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1201 Chahes Blvd.
Telephone. 758-6660
I I-
EXPIRES 21781
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Free j
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One coupon per pizza.
Expires:
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1201 Charles Blvd.
Telephone. 758-6660
EXPIRES 21781
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ADVERTISED
ITEM POtlCV
Each of thaaa advertiaed items is required to be readily available
below the advertiaed price in each kkP Store, except as specific
in this ad
i for sale at o A
ally noted J
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT FEB. 7, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C.
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE
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Highway 264 By Pass
Greenville Square Shopping Center Greenville, N.C.
I
Great Steak Giveaway
Register to Win $1 OO00 Worth of l
Steaks or Meat Of Your Choice!
Drawing Will Be Held Saturday Night At 6:00 P.M. To
Determine MOO00 WINNER In Each A&P Store In North
And South Carolina (Except Aiken & Beaufort). Winning
Ticket From Each Store Will Be Forwarded To A&P
Charlotte Office. Winner Will Receive By Mail A MOO00 Gift
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No Purchase �S3m�entry blank-great steak giveaway
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Must Be 16 Years NAME
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A&P Employees And I STATE
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Hostess Ham
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88
BONELESS 18 TO 22
Chuck Steaks lb avg
2
A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
N.Y.Strip Steak
379
Boneless
lb.
US O A INSPECTED FRESH WHOLE
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5 lbs. or 7Q0
more ; f J
A&P QUALITY CORN FED FRESH
1
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59
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LIMIT TWO WITH THIS COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT , FEB 7 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE N C
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Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Chris Lichok, GMMiMMfi
Jimmy DuPREE. �,
Pv 1 I im ki. ),rll.��f Paul Coi i ins. �,&�
Davi St vfrin. �,� m. Chari i s Chandi eh v ��
Ami I m si i r.
'lutl'�
David Norris.
itllOl
February J, iwi
Opinion
Page 4
Liquor Debate
Faction Distorts Real Issues
There is an anonymous group in
the Greenville area circulating
leaflets that indicate there will be
more teen drinking, crime, child
abuse, prostitution, and various
other signs of moral decay if the bill
on Liquor-by-the-Drink is passed
on February 17th. These drastic
predictions are far-fetched and
ridiculous.
Statistics do indicate a rise in li-
quor consumption and alcohol
related incidents in areas where this
bill has become effective. However,
to insinuate that a thing like pro-
stitution, for example, is directly
related to the legality of purchasing
liquor by the drink instead of
brown-bagging is outrageous.
Another example of the kind of
logic that clouds the true issue was
in the letter to the editor that ap-
peared in this paper on Thursday,
January 29, from the Concerned
Citizens Committee. It stated that
"New York City has more bars per
capita than any other city in the
world, but New York City is in
bankruptcy The letter goes on to
conclude that, "Liquor does not
help develop a community, but in
fact destroys it This kind of
reasoning is not only faulty, but
confuses the issue.
The pamphlets that were
distributed conclude with the mot-
to, "More drinks equal more
drunks However, an individual
classified as a "drunk" will pro-
bably be a drunk whether the liquor
is sold by the bottle or by the drink.
Restaurants wishing to par-
ticipate in Liquor-by-the-Drink
sales must pay an additional $10 per
gallon tax on any bottle of liquor
they purchase. This will help the
state of North Carolina to fulfill its
legal requirement of a balanced
budget.
Liquor-by-the-Drink will put
social, public drinking in a more
controlled atmosphere. It is not a
major factor in the overall moral
decline o the community, as the
anonymous group circulating this
kind of propaganda is trying to in-
dicate.
ANNOYED BY THE ENERGY CRUNCH?
FURIOUS ABOUT SUBSIDIES 7e FAILING
AUTOMAKERS? ENRAGED W WE CANT
SEEM TO BUILD AN EFFICIENT CAR?
YOU'LL LOVE THE NEVldTOCAR! IT
RUNS CN AMERICA'S MOST PLENTIFUL
ENERGY SOURCE�ANGER
!5
�JN'8�
RQCK� MTN
NfcWg) �
wmm
Mub-B-7HE-DRINK MLL LEAP TOPROSTIlWOMNf
CHILDaSuSE. TOBACCO ON& CAUSBS LUNG CANCER
rCampus Forum
Student Defends Cheerleaders
In regard to the recent editorial which
maliciously criticized a lot of peoples'
hard work, I must say there were a few
ideas which were obviously not reflected
upon long enough.
Before the ECU cheerleading squad
can fit the description as defined by your
American Heritage Dictionary as "one
who leads group cheering there must
first be a group present for the
cheerleaders to lead. Surely you do not
expect the cheerleaders to magically fill
Minges Coliseum.
Now, moving along to your concern
of the cheerleaders not having any
supervision. Our varsity cheerleaders,
which are made up of mostly up-
perclassmen, are both old enough and
mature enough to function effectively
without supervision. By the way, how
many supervisors hang around The East
Carolinian?
According to you, and 1 quote. "The
supervisor should make sure that the
squad does its job, that being to cheer
I can't for the life of me figure out what
you think the cheerleaders are doing at
each game. Every game that I have been
to, 1 have found the cheerleaders to be
cheering.
Your remark concerning professional
help for the ECU cheerleading squad
may be a good idea, but with a budget of
SI,000, who can afford it.
Now finally as to your "cubby hole"
analogy: The only sensible area for the
cheerleaders to situate themselves in
Minges Coliseum is behind one o' the
baskets. If you think about it long
enough, where do most of the collegiate
and professional basketball cheerleaders
position themselves?
Thanks for your time, and next time
use your head!
Bob Benson
Senior, Psychology
King Remembered
On January 15, 1981 Martin Luther
King Jrs birthday was celebrated on
campus. A full program was planned in
recognition of this great civil rights
leader. The program started at twelve
noon. The Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity
did a step in his honor. The step was
followed by a moment of silence. Martin
Luther King's famous speech "1 Have A
Dream" was played in remembrance of
this magnetic speaker. Five hundred
students marched to the Ledonia Wright
Afro-American Cultural Center singing
"We Shall Overcome rhese students
were holding hands as they marched to
promote the feeling o' unity. The Negro
National Anthem was sung proudly. The
Fountain ol 1 ife Christian Fellowship
Choir sung two selections. A brief
biography was done b Micheal
1 ockamy o Dr. King. Mar Williams,
acquisition librarian, gave the crowd a
tew remarks about the ceremony.
This program was covered by Channel
9 here in Greenville. 1 was disappointed,
to say the least, by the coverage provid-
ed bv our student paper THE FAS 1
CAROl INI AN. On Tuesday, January
20, 1981 a photograph appeared at the
bottom o' the 1st page with twenty-one
little words about the program provided
by the students remembering Martin
1 uther King.
It is sad thai this great man is gone. It
will be even sadder if he is ever forgot-
ten.
Grade A. Wells
President of S.O.U.I .S.
Senior, Political Science
Intelligence Insulted
Normally my critical urges stay buried
Jeep within my bosom by the realization
that their manifestations fall only upon
already decided, monotonic ears;
however, the article in the East Caroli-
nian's Jan. 27th issue entitled
"Preparing Steak Can Be Easy" urges,
invites, instigates, simply pleads and
begs ridicule. Statements such as "When
you plan to cook steaks, the first thing
you must do is buy them "Be very
observant of the meat department in
your supermarket thick steaks
take longer to cookDoneness' is a
matter of personal preference these in-
sult the intelligence of a college student.
Surely better filler material can be
found; if not, this paper is in dire trou-
ble.
KEITH DAN1E1
Senior, Chemistry
Library Unbearable
What's this 1 hear about an energy
crisis? That can't be true judging from
Joyner Library's all-out efforts to turn
East Carolina campus into a tropical
paradise. Sure, we all like warm
weather, but 85 degrees in midwinter is
slightly overdoing it.
After passing through the entrance to
the library, the heat becomes almost
unbearable to the average human being,
who has just emerged from a very c
fortable environment on the outside
I he sudden adjustment that the body is
forced to make is a shock to the human
anatomy.
But aside from the fact that this ex-
treme contrast in environments could
cause the students bodily harm, such as
colds, flu, pneumonia, etc it is a se ?re
waste of an expensive, nor to mention
scarce, supply of energy. If the last
C arolina University budget cannot sup-
port two worthwhile sports like wrestl-
ing and women's field hockey, it is
amaing to me that there is enough
money available to overheat such a huge
building as Joyner Library.
The atmosphere is not very com-
plementary to studying, but it does have
a great deal to offer those interested in
catching up on lost sleep. Don't despair,
though, something has been done to
remedy the situation. The library doors
are spread open wide to generously
disperse the excess heat to other needy
parts o campus, namelv the outdoors.
It may seem too complicated, but what
would be wrong with an alternate solu-
tion of turning the thermostat down a
few degrees? Forgive me if thai is too
much to ask o' university officials.
1 am sorry to see an upstanding
university, such as ours, totally ignore
the need to conserve the world's ex-
haustible energy supply. Waste, o
anything, but especially of something as
essential to survival as energy, is a sad
practice. Until the library can be cooled
down a bit, the students and the environ-
ment will continue to suffer.
How much more effort would a few
steps to lower the temperature o Joyner
take, compared to the amount of monev
that could be saved? Maybe ECU
students would like to go to a library to
study instead of a sauna. If America can
put a man on the moon, why can't East
Carolina University keep its library at a
sensible temperature?
Lana Ginn
Junior, Business
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
Foreign Relations Committee Carefully Studied Nomination
WASHINGTON - 1 learned long ago
that it's risky business to proclaim any
event as the longest or oldest or shortest in
history. Still, it's a fairly safe conclusion
that the hearings by the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, in connection with
the nomination of General Alexander M.
Haig as Secretary of State, probably broke
all records in terms of time consumed.
We began on Friday, January 9, and met
alt day, and into the night. We met all day
Saturday. The sessions on Monday, Tues-
day and Wednesday of the following week
began at 9 a.m and sometimes ran until
after 9 p.m. Finally, on Thursday morn-
ing, January 15, the Foreign Relations
Committee voted, 15-2, to approve the
Haig nomination and to report it to the full
Senate.
HAIG � I have known General Haig
since I arrived in Washington as a new
Jesse
Helms
Senator in January 1973. He impressed me
from the outset as an able man. When
President-Elect Reagan announced that he
had decided to nominate Al Haig to be
Secretary of State, I immediately met at
length with General Haig in my office.
We discussed every aspect of foreign
policy, and I was totally satisfied with the
assurances that he gave me. He will be his
own man as Secretary of State; he will not
permit the Department to be taken over by
any second-level advisors, or anyone on
the outside. 1 may as well put it frankly: I
was concerned, and told General Haig so,
that Henry Kissinger might be "lurking in
the wings 1 was given every assurance
that this would not happen.
I have nothing against Mr. Kissinger
personally, but this so-called "detente"
with the Soviet Union bothered me when
he was Secretary of State. There were
many other things that bothered me, as
well
FRIENDS � As U.S. Secretary of
State, Al Haig will immediately seek to
strengthen U.S. alliances with non-
communist nations around the world. In
recent years, the tendency has been for the
U.S. to ignore our potential friends. In
fact, we have too often disavowed our
friends in an attempt to pacify communist
nations.
My feeling is that the United States
should move to regain our position as a
beacon of hope for the millions of people
around the world who are today oppressed
by communism. That does not mean that
we should pick fights with anyone, but
surely we should be standing up for
freedom.
FOLLY � Our foreign policy for the
past two decades has been largely a bipar-
tisan folly. I believe that Secretary of State
Haig will be attentive to people like
Solzhenitsyn who have repeatedly sounded
warnings about the takeover of the world
by communism.
America must once again become a
strong nation � morally and spiritually;
we must have a superior defense capability
to deter the threat of war; we must have an
economy strong enough to encourage full
productivity by our people.
We have been cutting corners for too
long. We have compromised our principles
and our priorities. It won't be easy to
regain our position in world leadership,
but we have no alternative to making the
sacrifices to do it.
Alexander Haig convinced me that this
will be his goal. That is why 1 supported his
nomination vigorously. I was pleased, of
course, when the lengthy hearings failed to
produce anything other than an assessment
that General Haig is an honorable,
dedicated American. Not everyone will
agree with him as he goes about his duties
as Secretary of State. But if he lives up to
the principles he and I discussed � and I
am convinced he will � America will be a
stronger and more highly respected nation.
A
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lilt 1 M c Akol IN1AN
Features
i 1 BKl KY i. IWI
Page 5
A Decade Of Underground Comics
San Francisco - Ten years ago the Rip Off Press was
just a wild-eyed scheme, involving Texans, printing
pi esses and comic books. 1 oday, with a little help from
the 1 -icak Brothers, it's one of the nation's greatest
underground comic book publishing houses. Fred
Todd, President of Rip Off Press, Inc talks about the
early days and the days ahead.
Q: It all started ten years ago. How did it begin?
V Well, there was a batch o' Texans who had come
to San Francisco from Austin. It was the 60s and
everything was happening. More of it was happening in
San 1 ranciso so the tour Texans who were to become
the Rip Ofl Press ended up here.
Jack lack son was thinking about how to get his
pioneer underground comic Cod Nose reprinted.
Gilbert Shelton made a trip out from Austin with a
spring breaking load of beds & Heds, his comic.
Dave Moriaty kinda stood in the middle and said,
"vice, let's get all this together . . . let's buy a printing
press Moriat) was living in my Oat in the space where
a washing machine would have been if 1 could have af-
forded a washing machine. He had decided that the key
to the universe was a printing press
Q: So you decided to become a publisher, distributor
and printer ot comic books?
Right. 1 threw in some money because 1 was the
one with the downtown job as a computer programmer,
and. consequently, the money. These other guys were
just crazy hippies. We bought a little Davidson press for
nething like a hundred bucks apiece down. It was
rea!l just a glorified mimeo machine.
Our first job was a tour-color poster on coated paper.
We threw away two-thirds of the press run we had
to pull the sheets off the press . . . they made this terrible
ripping noise. (Sigh!) 1 didn't really like that phase of
the Rip Off Pi ess . . when we were all being gentleman
printers. (1 aughtei.)
Q: Where was Rip Off Press' first home?
fOtmm �, 5 i
Pfflk
A: It started o at Mowry's Opera House at Laguna
and Grove in San Francisco. It was an incredible place'
Don Donahue, the mad printer of Apex Novelties was
up there printing Snatch Comics on this old Multilith
and heating up his brandy and sake on a little electric
stove. It was a big old place with a porno movie maker
in one part, and a couple of rock bands practising.
It ended when a building down the street burned and
our attic caught fire, too. Fortunately the firemen were
just down the street and they came and put it out real
quick. But, the ceiling came down. It ruined the first
press run of our first publication, R. Crumb's Comics &.
Stories. So, we took the printing press apart and carried
it down three flights o stairs and threw it in the back of
my Falcon.
Q: Where next
A: Jaxon was the art director and accountant for the
Family Dog, which had just folded, so we moved into
their old office, right past the eviction notice on the
door. The building was owned by the urban renewal
agency, which took on the responsibility oi resettling us
. into a soon-to-be-demolished building a corner
store on the filth busiest intersection o town! I consider
this one the golden periods. The sun shine in the win-
dows . . .we paid S60 a month rent for the place, in-
cluding an apartment in which six people lived.
Bv this time we were doing about one third publishing
and two thirds job printing. Our first year we published
Crumb's little comic, and his first Motor City Comics.
Gilbert's Hydrogen Bomb was one of the early ones . . .
perhaps the first dollar comic. But pretty much it was
living on ten dollars a week and if somebody came in
and bought some comix we'd eat lunch.
The urban renewal folks finally decided to tear down
our building and make it into a parking lot, so we mov-
ed to our present home at the foot ot San Francisco's
scenic Potrero Hill. Things started happening. We got
this monster press, the Ebco, made bv the Electric Boat
Company after they gave up making submarines. It was
a terrible machine ill maintained and not wonderful
to begin with . . . the printers cursed it regularly. We got
a two-color Solna press. Then we bought a web press.
There's two parts to a comic book. There's the cover,
which we were already printing on our Solna. Then
there's the insides which are printed on newsprint by a
web press. These presses are huge capital investments
. they're 6() to 70 feet long, ten feet high, five feet wide,
taking five or six people to operate, working real hard in
unison after great training. A press capable of eating
trainloads of paper.
Well, our gang of clowns would go out there and
fumble around and try to remember what it was they did
last time we made comic books, ruin a couple three
plates and chew up half a forest of paper.
Then along came the great newsprint shortage ot 19"3
at about the same time we started a magazine, the Rip
Off Review of Western Culture. Between the web and
the magazine we soon owed a potful of money to all the
paper companies in town. The sheriff came and
repossessed the web and it took two days to get it out of
the building.
The only thing selling for us then was the first two
issues of the Freak Brothers comix. We'd print ten or
twenty thousand at a time as many as we could con-
vince some printer we could pay for. We'd truck 'em to
our warehouse and sell 'em and wait for the money.
Then we'd do it again. We very carefully did nothing
but that for two years.
Sometime along in the darkest part of all that, Gilbert
came in one morning, pulled a stool up to a light table
and began drawing a Freak Brothers strip. There had
been some talk about him being tired of drawing the
brothers and we all thought maybe the world had seen
the last of those hairy dudes. But what he started that
morning became Freak Brothers Comix .
Q: Two quick last questions: Are you rich?
A: Hah! Sears hasn't given me a credit card yet!
0 Are you happy?
A: Am I happy0 Well, some days.
Spice Up Your Canned Foods
With Some Tasty Recipes
� HA I :l KiUV
I ast Friday
removed all
A Friday Morning Surprise
s snowstorm took many ECU students by surprise. The weather over the next couple of days quickly
traces of this blizzard. Oh, welleasy come, easy snow.
By KVlin WEYLER
sufl W nier
If you live in a dorm room or
small apartment, you know how lit-
tle storage space you have. Phis.
you probably have an almost
miniature refrigerator, l! this is the
case, keeping fresh food in your
room is a problem, fter all. a tiny
'elrigerator fills up awfully fast.
Do not despair. Canned food is a
handy invention for people in such
circumstances. At the mention ot
canned food, visions of tuna fish
and ravioli probably dance through
your head, right? Wrong! Almost
anything you can buy fresh, you can
buy in a can. Next time you have an
hour or so to kill, go browse in your
local supermarket if you don't
believe me. You'll find an amazing
variety of foods in cans, and a wide
variety o prices as well.
When buying canned food � or
anything for that matter keep in
mind that the costliest isn't
necessarily the best. All grocery
stores carry nationally and or local-
Friends Of Felines
'Cat People' Are An Interesting Breed
Iv known brands, the kind you see
advertised on TV. Many, however,
carry their own brands. This means
the name of the store will appear
somewhere on the label. This also
means that vou will pay less for a
product that's just as good as well-
known ones hut isn't advertised on
IV.
Some stores also carry lower
quality brands. You needn't be
at raid oi anything being wrong with
such canned products. Their main
fault is that they don't look quite as
pretty as higher quality brands. The
pi ice tags, however, are much pret-
tiei.
Don't confuse low quality brands
with the generic brands some stores
carry. Generic products are usually
of good quality but are merely miss-
ing fancy packaging. The label on a
generic can oi beans, for instance,
will most likely be white and sport
the word "BEANS" in big black let-
ters. Generic brands are often very
good buys.
But perhaps you are hesitant
about canned food because of its
reputation tor tastelessness. If
you're willing to go to a little extra
trouble, canned food doesn't have
to be predictable and tasteless. With
a little help from a few extra ingre-
dients even the most ordinary cann-
ed food � yes, even canned
spaghetti! � can become tasty.
Bv TIM HARPER
I lie Iowa legislature was
debating a bill imposing penalties o
up to a year in jail and a $1,000 tine
tor motorists who don't stop after
running over a dog or cat.
Sen. lames Gallagher, a Jessup.
Iowa, farmer, rose in opposition.
"I can see stopping a car for a
Jog he argued. "But a cat? You
squish a cat and go on
Gallaghei said later he only meant
that some drivers might not be
aware o hitting a cat on a dark
highway, but his explanation mat-
tered little to the hundreds of feline
lovers who sent him angry letters
aftei the bill was defeated.
Gallagher, himself the owner of
four dogs and two cats, said the
iuror taught him something about
the difference between people who
have iust dogs and just cats: "I
don't think dog owners are quite as
possessive
The senator's musing was one of
the latest observations on "cat peo-
ple a breed that has been growing
ever since Felis catus crept out of the
desert to become the exalted mouser
in better Egyptian homes and
granaries 5,000 years ago.
While the nation's 23 million cats
and their owners � cats live in one
of everv five U.S. households � are
outnumbered nearly 2-1 by dogs and
dog owners, most cat people prefer
to think of themselves differently
than those who prefer dogs, or, God
forbid, no pet at all.
"Usually, cat people are nicer
From "Cat" by B Kliban (Workman Publishing)
says Calla Fricke, who makes a liv-
ing cat-sitting for wealthy New
Yorkers on vacation. "And their
houses are cleaner
Actually, even cat haters general-
ly admit felines are better suited to
city apartments because they are
usually smaller, cheaper, quieter,
cleaner and less troublesome than
dogs.
"But dogs are much more respon-
sive than cats says Cynthis Kohl,
who grooms both. "You can't pet
them the way you can a dog
"I hate cats Manhattan fashion
designer Susan Obercion says with
no apparent remorse. "They're too
sly. They jump up on the kitchen
table and lick the butter. They sneak
up in the middle of the night and
jump on your bed. They give me the
creeps
Those are fighting words to
the one about cats sucking away
babies' breath. But cat people have
a few counter-offensive jabs, too.
"People get dogs for protection
Vera Meehan, a 76-year-old widow
who lives in a Manhattan apartment
with two cats, says. "But I get just
as much protection from my
Siamese without all that barking
and uproar
While dogs are traditionally seen
as more "masculine" in terms of pet
preference, there are apparently few
bona fide "cat ladies" � the
stereotypical spinster whose home is
overrun with kitty fur and litter.
"But I've heard there's some lady
in New Jersey who's supposed to
have 1,700 cats White Plains,
N.Y animal behavioralist Daniel
Tortora says.
This mystique has been around
ever since the early Egyptians began
felinophiles who spend their lives mummifying favored cats whose
shooting down old wives' tales like mousing days were over. The Egyp-
tians eventually deified the beast as
Bast, goddess o moonlight, fertili-
ty, wisdom a"d hunting.
In some ways, this mystique is
still going strong for cat fanciers like
Li Sumski, who has four felines.
"Cats can teach you a lot she
savs. "It's something that's hard to
put into words. I look into one of
mv cats' eves and it's like seeing the
past, all of history. It's as if she's a
throwback to 100 million years
ago
"God made the cat 19th cen-
tury French satirist Joseph Mery
wrote, "to give man the pleasure of
caressing the tiger
Mysticism aside, there is scant
scientific evidence to show just how
and why, or even if cat people are
really fundamentally different from
the rest of the human race.
Dr. Peter Borchelt of New York
City's Animal Behavior Therapy
Clinic says the few studies done on
the subject recently are largely in-
conclusive.
One study, he says, shows dog
owners get more emotional satisfac-
tion from their pets, and have better
relationships with other people.
"Cat owners are generally a little
more aloof or asocial he says,
"while dog owners are more in-
terested in controlling the things
around them
Carol Wilbourn, a "cat shrink"
who treats tabbies for aberrant
behavior, agrees: "You can't own a
cat. Dogs like to take orders, but a
cat lives to please himself.
SPAGHETTI A LA STOCKTON
Empty the contents of one can of
spaghetti into a pan. Add one stalk
ot chopped celery (remove the leafy
�nds) and about one-half of a chop-
ped, medium-sized onion. Stir in
well. Add one teaspoon of chili
powder (more if you like very spicy
foods), a pinch of salt and pepper,
tir again, and heat until hot
throughout.
TUNA CRUNCH
In a Corningware or metal (not
glass!) one-quart casseiole dish:
melt two one-fourth inch pats of
butter over low heat. Add two large
(or three small) chopped stalks o
celery, one medium-sized chopped
onion and cook over low heat in the
butter, stirring occasionally. When
tender, remove from heat and add
one can of tuna (drained), one can
of cream of mushroom soup, and
one-half can of chow mein noodles.
Mix well. Bake in toaster oven or
regular oven at 325 for about
twenty-five to thirty minutes. Then
stir, top with remaining noodles,
and bake five more minutes before
serving.
QUICK STEW
Cook rice according to package
direction (you'll want to use only
half all the ingredients if you're
cooking for only one or two peo-
ple). After the rice is cooked, set
aside. Heat one can of chunky soup,
whichever kind you prefer, until
piping hot. If you wish to thicken it
add about two tablespoons of flour
while cooking and stir in well. Serve
over rice.
Interesting Events
At Other Colleges
To curb cheating, the U. of
Maryland hired a second-year law
student to act as a prosecutor and
investigator in cheating cases.
Previously, a student who witnessed
a cheating incident had to confront
the offender directly, but under the
new program a complainant can call
a special hotline to report the infrac-
tion. In addition to following up
such complaints, the law student is
compiling catalogs from term paper
firms in an attempt to give pro-
fessors information about purchas-
ed term papers so that they can be
more easily spotted.
Minimum wage laws now cover
work-study students. Although
passed in September, regulations ex-
tending minimum-wage coverage to
work-study students didn't make
clear when the new provision took
effect. In a recent letter, the Depart-
ment of Education surprised some
colleges by making the provision ef-
fective Oct. 1 � and requiring back
pav for students who received less
than the $3.10 minimum wage since
that date. College administrators
complain that the new requirement
will play havoc with budgets and
create dissension, since some other
unclassified employees continue to
receive less than minimum pay
under a different federal exemption.
Fast food restaurants are visited
by the average student 13.7 times in
a month, says Expo America, a firm
promoting consumer goods to the
college market. The firm's survey
revealed that Pepsi is more popular
than Coke among students, that
62 own a 10-speed bike and that
popcorn poppers are the most com-
mon household item owned by
students.
Potential presidents abound at
Princeton and Harvard, if the
students' self-estimates are to be
believed. More than 55 of the
undergraduates at the schools said
they were smarter than both Carter
and Reagan, according to the 1980
Ivy League Presidential Opinion
Poll. Cornell and Brown undergrads
were slightly more modest, with
42 rating themselves smarter than
the presidential candidates.
"Assassination Games" continue
to spread to campuses throughout
See INTERESTING, page 6, col. 1
?
I





1 HI M-XKOl 1N1AN
FEBRUARY3, 1981
Classifieds
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FOR SALE
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FOR SALE Mivata Americana 10
speed, perfect condition, one year
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FOR SALE Hide a bed sola
table, lamp, lounge chair Good
condition 1375 00 Call 7 5 6231
alter 5 00
PERSONAL
COUNSELORS For western
North Carolina co ed summer
camp Room, meals, laundry
salary and travel allowance E�
penence not necessary, but must
enioy living and wormng with
children Only clean cut non
smoking college students need ap
ply For application and brochure
write Camp Pinewood U01
Cleveland Rd . Miami Beach, Fl
33141
OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
round Europe.S America.
LOST Be'�ee. Brewsttr and
White silver tigei i eye I I -
It touno please call '57 8572
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share two bedroom King � Bo
Apartment Hill rent and
utilities Call 752 0865 or l�av
message at 758 970'
FEMALE ROOMATE Wanted
share a two bedroom Eai'brook
apt Halt rent and utilities Anon
smoker please Call '52 4443
LIBERAL MINDF D MALF to
share one bedroom apt 575 00 mo
plus halt utilities Mike 752 3501
ROOMMATE WANTED Tostiai-
new two bedroom house ill Stoke;
5100 00 mo and halt utilities Call
Tom at 758 .717
FEMALE HOUSEMATE NEED
ED Own bedroom plus stud
studio room t8' 50 plus half
utilities Two bi � Art
Building Call '58 ISM
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Great location to
ECU and downtown area
58' 00 share utilities Can
7� A1�3
FOR RENT
WANTED Female roommate to
lhar� th Drdroum house Big
and back �ard Garage
Electric heat and only halt mie
torm the m�ll and one mile form
Pit; Community College Onl.
Mo plus jt-hturS Call Anita or
Ann al 75 Mil or leave message
at 7SJ �36
APARTMtNT Foi rent r�
rooms modem bath and kitr.r
Sludr Call 752 iOJOatter � OOp.m
FFMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
two bedroom Ta' f-
Apartment Call Lisa 752 0453 or
758 542�
A. S ROOMMATf Hi �
ED To shate large houst- Watt
,ng i campus �7C rent
or u1iiit.es
544
ROOMS FOR REH1
� included l�
MM
ECU Historians Publish
Judge Larkins' Memoirs
Australia, Asia
All fields
A book detailing the
personal memoirs of
Judge John D. I arkins
Jr. of Trenton,
"Politics, Bar and
Bench: A Memoir of
U.S. District Judge
John Davis Larkins
Jr has been publish-
ed by the Historical
Society of Eastern
North Carolina.
The editors are Dr.
Fred Ragan, chairman
of the Department of
History, Last Carolina
University, and Don
Lennon, director of the
East Carolina
Manuscript Collection,
ECU.
John D. Larkins, at
age 26, became the
youngest
to serve
Senate
Carolina
member ever
in the State
of N or t h
He served
nine terms as a state
senator, becoming
chairman of every ma-
jor committee, chair-
man of the Advisory
Budget Commission,
chairman of the state
Democratic Party and
Democratic national
committeeman. He ran
for governor in I960,
but lost in the primary.
Then President John F.
Kennedy appointed
him to the federal court
bench for the Eastern
District oi North
Carolina.
for 20 years Larkins
presided over many
major federal cases in-
cluding school integra-
tion and civil rights
suits, environmental
disputes and numerous
criminal trials.
The hardbound
volume of Larkins'
memoirs is 171 pages
plus appendices and in-
dex and contains 17 il-
lustrations.
5500 S1200 monthly Sightseeing
Free info Write IJC Box 53 NC4
Corona Del Mar, CA 9225
LOOK GOOD ON PAPER
Resumes, term papers protes
sionally typed WRITE RIGHT
75 M4�
PRES Sorry it took so long to rep
ly but I got myself that toy and I
like it a lot better Bags
Charles heard the Buffett
tickets were going fast
GeepSure are, faster than
medical drops at e�am time
NOTARY PUBLIC Convenient
cheap rates. Can Amy at 758 ��4
DEAR DOUG. You and me. us and
we, together forever Always'
Love, Your valentine Debbie
TO F M " No static at all Lets
go skiing C D
HAPPY BIRTHDAY ROBERT
Best wishes from the staff The
East Carolinian
E J Weekends were made for
wining and dining Still thinking
about you Chris
Art and Camera
526 S. Cotanche St.
IAju Town
Hht Ik AH HA i ll-HV
Ready to teach
home nursing, first aid,
parenting, child care,
water safety; C PR.
Red Cross: Reads for a new century,
Into The Teeth Of The Storm
The sudden cold and snow of last Kridav was almost enough to make one
sta in class rather than leave the warmth and shelter inside.
Interesting Events
At Other Colleges
No Foreign
Film
!$$s$$$$$$$$$$s$$$$ss$$$$$i
� KODACOLOR
� Developed and Printed
$5.53
8
A Put- Service o� This Nt � wig Council V
Continued from page 5
the country. But K.A.O.S. (Killing
as an Organized Sport) won't be
sanctioned b the Oregon State U.
Student Activities Committee. The
Experimental College had proposed
funding an organized campus-wide
game, in which students stalk one
another with rubber-dart guns, but
the committee decided that possible
problems, such as the harassment of
unwilling plaers, were too great
and nixed the idea. The committee is
trying to come up with revised rules
emphasizing the "positive
elements" of the game, such as the
chance tor students to acquire new
friends, so that it can be recon-
sidered next term.
A security newsletter published at
the U. of Oklahoma is distributed in
campus bathrooms, because that's
where people have time to read, ac-
cording to a security committee
spokesman. The publication, which
discusses such subjects as a rumor
control service and false fire alarms,
is called "Tank Times A Syracuse
U. researcher used restroom walls
for a poster campaign teaching
Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. A
follow-up showed that students who
were merely exposed to the posters
did much better on a CPR test than
those who weren't and actually
knew CPR techniques as well as a
test group that had had formal in-
struction in it.
"Casper, the friendly ghost
writer, "as the ad listed him, was ar-
rested in New York on charges of
selling students term papers. Dennis
King, who had placed the ad in the
Village Voice, thus became the first
person to be charged under the
state's 1974 law banning the sale of
academic research papers.
GET WILD
OKT
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HH with
Phi Kappa Tau &
L'il Sisters
EVERYONE COME & PARTY
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Film
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li you want something to do on 1 hurs-
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do, We've got the time. We've got
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We've got the entertainment.
The Flamingo Disco proudly
presents Thursday Night Live
hjitertainment guaranteed to please.
Students get in tree until 1 1:0U. " I he
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Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
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Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
ANGEL FLIGHT RUSH
6th Annual TKE
Boxing Tournament
will be held
in Wright Auditorium
February 24, 25 and 26th, 1981
'Ring Girl" Competition February 18 at Papa Katz
TWO RUSHES MUST BE ATTENDED'
What It Is Angel Flight it an honoary.professional service
organization with the objective of becoming involved in the com-
munity. We help sponsor the Red Cross Blood Drive and we alto
sponsor families during holidays.
Fun Activitieswe have keg parties, dances, bake sales, cook
outs, and a military ball. Our biggest joy is being together. There is
no Military Obligation.
Dates To RememberFebruary
3 (Tuesday); ice cream party 7:00 Wright Annex
4 (Wednesday); Wine & Cheese party 7:00 205 F East Brook Apts.
5 (Thursday); popcorn party 6:30 Wright Annex
Become an Angel
Registration begins
January 19th-Feh.6th
at the TKE House-951 fc 10th St
Ring Girl Info Call 758-7699
Sponsored by Miller Beer o7-oli30
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I HI EAST K() INI AS
Entertainment
I I Bkl H 3, I9M
Page
Buffett Concert Soon;
Tickets Selling Fast
1 ickets for the Feb. 2 Jimmy Buf-
fet concert went on sale yesterday in
the Centra! I lcket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center. Over
6(X tickets were sold in the first da)
of sales.
1 ickets will be sold only on cam-
pus until rhursday, and alter that
the) will also be on sale at Apple
Records, the Record Bars at Pitt
Plaza and the Carolina East Mall,
the Wilmington Record Bar and
WQR in Jacksonville.
The Central Ticket Office will
now be open on weekends during
the Free Micks, so you can buv a
Buffet ticket and get a tree films
poster. I he ticket office is also open
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on
weekdays. The) accept Master
charge, Visa, cash or money order.
Jimmy Buffett is proclaiming
1981 with a new MCA album. It is
pure Bullet; nine songs of great
music and good tun with perhaps a
touch of maturity not found in his
previous albums. The months since
the release of Volcano (his last 1 P)
have been productive and rewarding
tor Jimmy. Pour successful road
tours (m the midst ol the widelv
discussed concert attendance
slump), and a doen new songs have
given Buffett the confidence which
sparks this new album.
One new tune. "I'm Growing
Older. But Not Pp ma) perfectly
describe the off-hours lifestyle, but
the title skimps justice on Jimmy's
continual improvement as a lyricist,
vocalist and onstage performer.
1 rue to form, the new material on
Coconut Telegraph emphasizes But
ten's light cynicism and refreshing
insights in our plight on this planet.
Drawing on his travels, his affairs
with the boats, the islands and the
tropical ocean, his marvelous sense
of humor, and his all-new respon-
sibilities as a father, Jimmv has
pieced together the annual puzzle
which m the end, becomes a
tight" album.
His fans may recall that earlier
albums seemed always to include a
couple songs written by Jimmy's ac
quaintances or band members.
Similarly, contributions by singer
songwriters J.D. Souther, Mas
Mc Anally and Dave I oggins round
out the album perfectly.
In the past five years, Buffett has
toured regularly with his h
spirited Coral Reefer Band.
Members oi the group have become
as well known to regular audiences
as Jimmv himself. Yet a highlight ol
Buffett's concerts was his mid-show
unaccompanied acoustic set ol hall
Joen songs
This past October and November
Jimmy carried the idea one step '
ther with his extremel) successful
"Hot Dog and a Road Map lour"
� his first set oi solo concerts since
"Marearitaville" shot him into the
1 op 1 en. In addition to the satisfac-
tion ot sell-out crowds (though in
smallei halls more suited to one
voice and two guitais), Jimmy had
the opportunity to perform more ot
the hod back Buffett favorites
which tended to get lost in the
upbeal variety of the full-blown
( oral Reefer shows.
On Coconut lclegiaph, the title
song oncei ns next-day gossip about
indiscretions ot the night before.
Other topics move from getting
awa) from it all ("The Weathei Is
Here, Wish You Were Beautiful"),
to home state nostalgia (the classic
"Stai s Fell on Alabama"), to a song
tor his daughtei entitled "Little
Miss P,LU
1 he Coral Reefer Band will tout
again in 1981; and alter being able
i- ick of! Ins shoes, sit on a
midstage bar stool and make 'em
cheer, Jimmv ahead) plans anothei
solo toui tor late in the year. Mean
while, keep youi ear to the C OCOnu!
relegraph and keep an eve out foi
shallow vvatei.
Popular recording star Jimmy Buffett will be in concert at Minges Coliseum on Saturday, Feb. 21 at 8 p.m.
I ickets are Sh.50 for ECU students and $8.50 for the public. (Her 600 tickets were sold in the first day of sales
yesterday.
Lily Tomlin Bouncing Back
Black History Films
Showing Wednesday
This Wednesda) night at 8 p.m. in MendenhalPs Hendrix rheatre, the
Student Union Minorit) Arts Committee will present a Black Histoiv
Double Feature as part oi its Spring Semester Films Series. I wo short
films are scheduled.
"Black Historv, 1 ost, Stolen, ot Strayed the first film ot the double
feature, is an outstanding film which focuses on "lost" black histor) and
the effect of its absence in the historv books upon black people, par
ticulark children.
"Black Shadows on a Silver Screen the last halt oi the twin bill.
documents the treatment ol Blacks m Hollywood films and Black ettorts
to combat these stereotypes and increase Black sell esteem b) creatii
their own companies to produce films tor Black audiences.
The first of these emerges after the outragious treatment ot Blacks
Griffith's B1R1H 1 A NATION. Footage from some o these earl)
works reveals committed artistry. in spite of adverse conditions.
Violence On TV
Still Increasing,
Says Coalition
B PATRICIA KOZA
WASHINGTON I 'PI�The National Coalition on Televi-
sion Violence says 16 persons have killed themselves imitating
the Russian roulette scene from the movie "Deer Hunter"
shown last year on television.
" 1 his is still further proof that television violence kills and
that on-the-air warnings are of little value said the coalition
formed last year to monitor TV violence
The coalition in its January newsletter listed the names o!
15 persons it said died imitating the "Deer Hunter" scene
dating back to March 20. it said the 16th was reported in Pen-
nsylvania this month but gave no name.
It also said two other persons were seriousl) wounded in-
cluding an "unidentified White House Secret Service agent"
on Nov. 21.
Pie coalition said stations in Atlanta, Denver, Phoenix,
1 ouisville, Oklahoma City, Pittle Rock, Fort Wayne, and St.
1 ours plan to show uncut versions oi the film this year.
On another subject the coalition said more X-rated films
were produced in 1980 than those for general audiences with
production oi Grated films falling from 12 percent of all
films made in 1968 to only 4 percent last year.
The coalition said it began monitoring theatre movies last
September because its own surveys show 45 percent of televi-
sion violence comes from movies shown on TV.
The Motion Picture Association of America uses the
following voluntary rating system: G for genera! audiences all
ages admitted; PG for parental guidance suggested some
material may not be suitable for children; R for restricted
under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian;
and X for no one under 18 admitted; the age limit may vary in
certain areas
The monitoring showed PG rated movies averaged 15.6
violent acts per hour while R rated movies averaged 15.1.
About 61 percent of PG movies and 39 percent of R movies
were in the high violence category defined by the coalition as
having more than 10 violent acts each hour.
One film "Shogun Assassin" produced by Tnstar averaged
123 violent acts per hour the coalition said. It was followed by
"Flash Gordon a Universal film, with 82 per hour and
"Anv Which Wav You Can a Warner film, with 29.
Coalition Chairman Dr. Thomas Radecki, associated with
the Southern Illonois University School of Medicine, at-
tributed the growth of movie violence to the rating system.
"The MPAA rating system has made it seem childish to
want to go to a movie without sex or violence he said.
"Producers are forced to add violence or an adult scene to
avoid the G rating
B) MRNON scon
I PI Hotha i Ri ittir
H 1 I YW( )(!) UP1 1 il)
romlin pei haps the country's most
versatile comedian appeared to have
crashed and burned two years ac-
he and John liavolta
revolted moviegoers in "Moment
B) Moment
Ii was a poorly conceived movie
about a middle aged woman involv-
ed mi a tawdr) love affaii with an
lescent pui �
ritics juslifiabl) bombed
'Moment B) Moment" unmerciful-
1) and box offices stagnated.
Hollywood wondered it 1 il) had
come to ih c nd ot the road.
B) Moment"
she tiad won an Oscai nomination
for lNashville" three Emm)
v foi i specials a special
loin Award tor her one woman
Broadwa) show and: a (iramm) foi
hei v omed) album.
;� 1 il wa ��: a career
ecli;
1 � bounced back
high '� ever Her "Nine to
1 ive" movie with. Dolly Parton and
Jane i onda is a i unaw a - her
notices superb. Next month "The
Incredible Shrinkin Woman" � a
tour de foi ' he
released b)
Monda) night she stars in her first
IV special in five vears "I ily: Sold
Out" a (. BS musical corned) with a
bunch or guest stars including Par-
ion and F inda, Paul Anka,
1 iberace and loan River
I ii contributed to the script and
is exes . iroducer ot the hour
long sh
Other phenomenal resurgence I i-
iv sard, "I take tride. Show
business ups and siown. 1
teel like I'm part oi the show
business tamilv, vou knowO It's a
nice fe. i be a member of the
up.
"You can't not be famous once
you've been famous if vou know
what 1 mean. It follows you around.
( m t � u g ' in the public eve vou
stav there. Did vou ever hear of
anybody in show business getting
unfamous?"
Lil) became a public tigure 15
years ago with "Rowan and Mar-
tin's laugh In She and Goldie
Hawn reaped the great career
rd? ft Mil the show err
superstars in their own rights.
Since then Lily has based much of
her one woman concert shows on
the characters she formulated on
"Laugh In" � Ernestine and
telephone operator Susie Sorority,
Mrs. Beasley and others.
She has added a new character �
Iommv Velour, male Los Vegas
headline! to Monday night's show
in addition to being seen as
Ernestine organist, Bobbie Jeanine,
Mrs. Beasley the housewife, Tess
the bag woman and Chrystai The
Terrible Tumble weed the
quadraplegic.
"1 was helping put together one
oi the sketches for the show and
thought it would be a great idea to
include Jane Fonda Lily said.
"When I called her she was really
enthusiastic about appearing with
me.
"A few davs later 1 got a call
from Dolly who said, 'How come
I'm not on the show and Jane is.?'
So we wrote in a part tor Doll) too.
"It the right opportunity present-
it self, i.e. a good script all three ot
us would like to make a sequel to
"Nine to Live
Like "Nine to Five Lily's show
is a light satire on the battle of the
sexes with oi course, the women
winning out in the end while gently
getting their feminist message
across.
In addition
eight writers
women.
Lily during lunch at Hollywood's
Brown Derby was dressed in gray
beige sweater, pmk beige blouse and
tan pants tucked into knee high
booths.
She said, "It isn't necessarv to
come down too hard with feminist
messages. In 'Nine to live' we kept
it light and funnv with satire
to I ilv five ol
on the show
the
are
Sally Field stars in her award-winning role as Norma Rae in this weekend's Free
Flick on Friday and Saturday. Showings will be at 5, 7 and 9 p.m. in the Hendrix
Theatre in Mendenhall. While waiting in line for the film, be sure to pick up your
free Spring Semester Student I'nion Films Poster.
Union Labor Corner
Sally Field Is
Norma Rae
This Friday and Saturday night at 5. 7, and 9 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theatre, the Student Union Films Commit-
tee will feature Sally Field's dynamic performance in the film "Norma
Rae
Admission is by ECU Student ID and Activitv Card or b)
Mendenhall Student Center Membership Card tor faculty and staff
members on campus.
The film for next weekend, February 13 and 14, is the shocker
"When A Stranger Calls The film will be shown in the Hendrix
Theatre at 5, 7, and 9 p.m.
Next Wednesday evening at 8 p.m. in the Hendrix Theatre, the tilms
committee will screen Kubrick's "Dr. Strangelove
Sallv Field performs without Burt Reynolds in 1979's "N rma
Rae Field took the Academy Award for Best Actress that year for
her amaing portrayal of the title character in the film.
Sally Field is an energetic and attractive performer; Martin Ritt
("Sounder "Conrack") is a nobly intentioned director; Irving
Havetch and Harriet Frank Jr. are old-pro screenwriters with a
healthy dose of social commitment, and all their hearts are clearly in
the right place.
Field is Norma Rae, a lovable, loose-living ball ot fire who is in-
spired by an equally lovable New York Jewish labor organizer,
Reuben Warshovsky (Ron Leibman), to organize a union among the
mistreated textile workers in a small Southern town. The conditions
are appalling enough to cause her mother (Barbara Baxlev) to go deat
and literallv kill her father (Pat Hingle). It's a town badlv in need ot a
knight in white armor, but not one who happens to be a Jewish
Yankee. The only one who sees things differently is, of course, Norma
Rae � and her tough tender friendship with Reuben makes for the
cutest mismatch since Beauty and the Beast.
He's a stranger to the South, she's never met a Jew. He's all in-
tellect, she's pure instinct. Being a city slicker, he naturally falls right
into cow dung and cuts his finger when he takes up whittling. He gives
her his copy of Dylan Thomas, she gives him the spark to carry on the
cause. They tell each other how wonderful they are. Norma Rae's new
husband (Beau Bridges), a lovable redneck saint, is understandably
upset by all the time she's spending with Reuben, but rest assured,
everything's platonic. And rest assured that the union gets voted in �
with surprising ease. Reuben packs his bags, though it would seem his
work has just begun.
A gung-ho salute to organized labor may seem a bit peculiar in
1979,hen there's so much evidence of union decline and corruption.
Even so, there is room for a stirring attack on the textile industry's in-
justices.
?
mtm





1H1 I s (. K(1 INIAN
Sports
HKl 'KV J, 14
i � .
Lady Bucs Split,
Now Ranked 18th
1 ad Pirate Sam Jones scores here on an
incredible stretch shot from underneath
Frosh McNair Sparkles
the goal during
Sundav. (Photo
the team's win over ASl
b (iarv Patterson)
BHARI LS( HANDl LR
SporS Mllnr
The drama oi the East Carolina
women's basketball team continued
in full force last 1 ndav nighl as the
then-19th-ranked 1 ad) Pirates took
on power! ul eighth-ranked
Soul hem Cal in Minges Coliseum.
The game followed back-to-back
wins b ECU over two other ranked
teams. Virginia (15) and N.C . Slate
(13).
The State game set an all-time
Minges attendance record tor a
men's game of 4,000. Attendance at
the Southern Cal contest topped
that (4,500) despite over lour inches
of fresh snow thai tell on the ground
Saturday.
The trip into the winter weather
was well worth the trouble of the
fans, as the Lad) Pirates got 26
points from forward Mar) Denklei
and almost pulled off a major upset,
falling to the Trojans 7 3
1 he 1 ads Bucs, whose nine game
winning streak was snapped bv
I SC, got back into their winning
ways on Sunda) bv touting Ap-
palachian Stale, 96-54, improving
then record to 17-4.
Monda) morning's polls were not
as kind to ECU as some had ex-
pected, the I ad) Pirates moving up
to the 18th position following last
week's pla).
In Frida) 's game, ECl wen; into
the dressing room at halftime down
by five, 41-36, despite a fantastic
first-hali performance bv USC's
dynamic duo ol Paula and Pam
McGee.
I he identical twins, both 6-3,
tallied 2 points m the opening halt
alone.
I he 1 ad) I rojans came oul
strong to siait the second peliod and
built their lead to 11 points, 55-44,
following a Pam McGee layup.
E( I tailed tii buckle, though, as
the nois) Minges crowd urged their
support, i he Bui � downed I S
16-8 during the next eight minutes to
narrow the margin to three, 63 I
I he margin became one, 67-4
aftei back-to-back field goals b
Mar) Denkler ai tnd-
tree, the lattei coming with 5:54 re
maining
I lie Lad) Pii
tunnies aftei hold al
to take the lead. I m both
occasions.
The I rojans built their lead
up to six, 73 6 and appeared
have the game well in hand bel
ECl 's Kath) Rile) began mal
hei presence f
Rilev scored the next six 1 �
Pirate points as her team narrowed
Southernal's lead to 75-73 i
Rile) layup with 1 seconds rem
ing.
1 ollowing 1 illian
Barnes fouled f uled rrojan 1 I
Smith, sending
one and one opportunit) with 11
seconds left.
The ECU I
situation with wreckless al
crowding the .oca behind
Smith was to ,i and wa �
their hand- rth.
Smith missed oni end ol
one-and-one but th present
Paula Met lee � �
bound and dished ofl ammate
I cm Huff, a
1 aui ie Sikes.
Hufl also � iced
hei teamn
� ed the front end
one
Paula McG ain,
though, pulling d( -v n the ol
crucial rebound and I
the final m i
The McGee sisters finisl ed wit
combined total ol 4
canning 20 and Paula 27. !
added 2" rebounds, 1
and hei sister 12.
" rhey're the best
this yeai besides (ODI
Donovan M I
Cath) Andruzzi
test
Despite the presence
kGee's, EC!
b) tl ans b) onl) three, 42
"1 was very pleased
bounding against
claimed. "(Mai a) (
1 ydia (Roundtree) did a I
Us
(iirven finished the nigl
rebounds in addition ten
pomts while Roundtree added
pulls to her eight points.
In the Sundav win
palachian, the Lad) I
points from Mars Denkler ii
ing to a 53 30 halftime lead and
were never he
� 54 romp.
Sam lones led the I a
with 18 points while R
in billed 1 Denkler sav
second-hall playing time and finish-
ed with 14.
i illowinf game V di uzzi
praised hei team's el
have to avoid a letd
sspectin op-
lents. Our kid
1 he) respect all then O
ndruzzis SI
, h Jud) Clarke, a
Is foi
1 ad) Pirati
" 1 tst

.an see why the) I I would
rank them with Clen
shine State a:
Carolina"
I he 1
N XI XW
ting arch rival N
Minges C oliseum
matchup.
ECU Downs Samford, 75-50
B CHARLES CHANDLER
sprl Mttor
"1 don't think I'm getting too far
ofl the limb when 1 sav this is the
best game we've played all year
ECl head basketball coach Dave
Odom was obviousl) pleased with
his Piraies following iheir ?-() win
ove: Samford in Minges Coliseum
iast night.
Odom had feared the little-known
Birmingham, Alabama school after
seeing them in person.
"The people in Greenville didn't
see as good a Samford team as 1 saw
Saturda) night Odom said. "1
hope we're partly responsible for
that. They just looked super Satur-
da) - scared me to death
I he Pirates had trouble shaking
Samford early. After the game was
tied 16-16 on a bucket bv Samford's
Steve Barker at the 8:02 mark ol the
first half, the Bucs made their move.
Iwo long jumpers bv Mark
McLaurin highlighted an 11-0 run
during a four-minute span by E I
thai pushed the Buc lead to 27-16.
ECU went into the dressing at the
halt with that same 11-poinl
margin, 33 22.
I he Pirates blew the game open in
the second hall as freshman sw-
ingman Bill McNaii enjoyed the
best halt ol his short career, scoring
11 points and pulling down t:ve re-
bounds.
�X slam dunk over two Samford
defenders accounted tor two ot
McNair's points and brought the
sparce Minges Coliseum crowd o
1.200 to life.
Seven o' the Dunn native's points
came in the game's last 2:24 when
the Pirates built their lead to its
25-poinl final margin.
McNair finished the game with a
career-high 13 points, six rebounds
and four assists in onl) 18 minutes
o plav.
In playing the best game o Ins
career, McNair canned six ol seven
field goals.
"1 think Bill kind of found
himself tonight Odom said. "His
job is now to put several games
together back-to-back
Junior forward David Under-
wood paced the Pirates with 14
points, his third straight double-
figure offensive performance. The
guard tandem of Charles Watkins
and Barry Wright added 11 and 10
points, respeclivel).
The Pirates held Barker, who was
leading Samford with an 18-point-
plus per game average coming into
the contest, to but four points. For
this Odom was particularilv proud.
"1 thought Barrv Wright did on
outstanding defensive job on
Barker said the second-year ECU
mentor. "Barker's a fine basketball
player
Odom claimed that the Pirates
played well in every phase of the
game in evening their record at
10-10.
"I'm glad we were finall) able to
look like a real basketball team in
Greenville he said. "I think we
did all the things tonight that make
up a good team. About the onl)
thing I could complain about was
our shot selection at tunes
The Pirates now must travel to
Raleigh to take on Campbell Col-
lege in a 7:30 p.m. game Wednes-
day. Odom hopes to return to
Greenville with a winning record.
"That would be nice he said.
"If we plav well, we've go1 a chance
to go over .500 for the first time in
memor). I hat's a reliel
After the matchup with Campbell
the Pirates return home foi an ex
hibition game with Athletes in Ac-
tion, a group o' foi mer college stars
that tour the countrv.
Included among those coming to
Greenville are ex-Notre Dame star
Rich Branning, formei UCLA
center Gig Sims and ex-Arkansas
stats Marvin Delph and Steve
Schali.
Gametime for the Athletes in Ac-
tion game has been changed from a
7:30 p.m. start to a 7 p.m. tipoff.
ECU Guards (harks Watkins (left) and Barry Wright (right) displav
some of the tough defense that helped the team to a win over Samford
last night.
Andruzzi: Ranking Not Easy
B JIMMY DhPREE
Keillor
Suddenly Last Carolina Universi-
ty has a nationally ranked basket-
ball team.
Not only docs ECU have a na-
tionall) ranked team, but that team
has begun to move up the poll. In
last week's Associated Press Top 20
Women's poll, the I adv Pirates
broke in with a ranking of 19th. Just
a week later, the squad climbed a
notch to, the 18th position and
solidified its place in the Top 20.
The Lady Pirates now own a 17-4
overall mark on the season, with a
1-0 tally against NCAIAW opposi-
tion, but that mark will be on the
line Thursday at 7:30 p.m. as they
host the Tar Heels of UNC-Chapel
Hill. The Lady Bucs handed the
Heels an 87-75 defeat in the
Carolian Christmas Classic in
Chapel Hill.
But has that climb been as fast as
man) observers believe. Hardly, as
ECU head coach Cathy Andruzzi is
quick to point out.
"This program has grown a lot
she says. "This is my third year here
and we've really come a long way.
"These girls I have here now are
much harder workers than in the
past two years. That's not to take
anything away from those teams. 1
credit those teams for starting all
this. The progress of this year's
team is a product of the past two
years
When Andruzzi came to East
Carolina in the summer of 1978, she
CATHY ANDRUZZI: The ECU head women's basket-
ball coach shouts direction to her team during a timeout
here. She currently has the Lady Pirates ranked 18th in the
nation. (Photo bv (iarv Patterson)
found but a mere sample o the
tools she would need to build a team
competitive on the national AIAW
Division 1 level. In her first game as
the Pirate coach, ECU fell to Divi-
sion 11 Campbell 70-69. and later
that season dropped another to
Division II High Point 77-67. The
Lady Bucs went on to post an 18-11
mark that season.
Her second session afforded the
first real chance at recruiting An-
druzzi had had at ECU. Prize cat-
ches of that venture were All-
American candidate Kathy Riley,
Wagner standout Heidi Owen and a
(�0 shootei named Mar) Denkler.
I ha; version ol the I aJ Pirates
posted a 21-10 mark and finished
third at the NCAIAW "ournament
in Raleigh. Man) fell the) deserved
a shot at the Regionals, but the lack
ol a win over a name team probabl)
put an earl) death to thai possibili-
tv.
lhe 1979-80 I id) Pirates had
played one of the toughest schedules
in the nation, but most major op
position walked awa) handily. Old
Dominion's Monarches pounded
ECU 112-77 in Norfolk. South
Carolina's Gamecocks bruised the
Pirates foi a 9-54 win m the
Palmetto state. N.C . State escaped
the 1 adv Bucs' nap for an 81-76 win
in Minges Coliseum, and later trash-
ed ECU S4-4" in Reynolds Col-
iseum.
ECU jusl had not posted a win
against a name-brand opponent; un-
til Januarv 25, 1981. that is.
On that date the I adv Pirates
finall) made the break-through
Cath) Andruzzi had planned for for
two years. An 84-78 victor) over the
nationally-ranked Virginia Caveliers
in Charlottesville on Super Sundav
catapulted East Carolina into the
lop 20; a position which the team
really hasn't had time to sivoi yet.
A "8-7 victorv over N.C . State
last Wednesda) and a narrow 77 73
loss against 8th ranked Southern
Cal Frida) was expected to move the
Pirates further up the poll than the
18th slot, but the politics of the poll
just wouldn't allow it.
Nonetheless, Andruzzi is satis:
with the progress ot the prograi
"Everything we've done has
taken a lot o hard work she ex-
plains. "I've got to be pleased with
the kids" mental attitude We're
confidant, but we're humble. We
don't want anv let-downs. We know
where we want to be and we have a
long wa) to go to get there
Andruzzi looks al the national
tanking in a manner which man)
people ma) find difficult to unders-
tand.
"No last Carolina team gets
anything eas she states regretful-
ly. "You really have to fight the
name barrier. Main people don't
know if Last Carolina is in North or
South c arolina.
"1 love the tans; 1 love it when
those tans come in to veil tor the
team. Its effect is on the whole
athletic program; the whole school.
Right now the whole school is
" adv Pirate basketball, and
hat's great. But you can see
it in the communitv as well as the
school. People in coffee shops are
talking about Lady Pirate basket-
ball; people in laundries are talking
about Lady Pirate basketball;
everybody has gotten excited.
"The greatest thing is the support
we've gotten from all the men's and
women's programs around the
school.
"Thev want quality; they want a
winner.
"We've just started in this pro-
gram Andruzzi states confidently.





I HI 1 AM C kul INIAN I I HKl rO �. 1981
,1
IM
Co-Rec Roller Hocke)
ftei the tusi week ol competition,
Rollei Hockey has gotten ofi to a greal
start Some ol the players look as though
they've had a loi ol experience on rollei
skates Others look as though they've
�ei seen a hockey stick 01 a pan ol
rollei skates
�vei ihe action liom the pasi
vp teams are as follows
l)GOI
2) PI c Kl ks
iKATER DATERS 11
4)1 KAPPA 1 11 111
rUFF-N-1 END1 R
i seen an Rollei Hocke
e, we urge everyone to come
Spoi aoi Id and take in sonic ol
I tames are played Monday
LOO 6:00, Wednesday
n sda fi on i 4 8
e contact
fivS" Ol
IM Sports 'N' Shorts
Hy 1 hoayne Grooms
� and�
(Jreqe Melton
Wrestlers Split
Weekend Pair,
Finale Coming
Office, EM
Mi
644
Basket hall
.iiannual basket -
ng smoothly with
season completed,
teams look like they
need during the
e hristmas break, others may need a little
help befoi e the season is through. Judging
on then past record and recent perfor
mance, the lop 1 ive men's and women's
teams are as follows:
h
(ii ooms' Five
I. Alpha Phi Alpha
2. Streak ol I ightning
lones Enforcers
4 Dougl Boys
5. Belk Stylons
M ottu n
Grooms' 1 ive
1 Dribblers
2 IB AC
3 rylei "We Bad"
4 I ylei Roundtree's Girls
s Woi mburners
o it you want to see some exciting ac-
tion on the basketball court, come by
U Gvm or Mingesolliseum.
U MI I 1AM
YFXVERTON
suit nli i
1 he wrestling Pirates
ol Easi c ai olina didn't
ii a s e such a ba d
weekend aftei all.
Mjei losing a heart-
breakei to Atlantic
Coast onf ere nee
membei Mary land.
2s 22. 1 riday night, the
Bucs bounced back to
whip icoigc
Washi H' the
follow ing evening
FREE!
ECU Soccer Teams Compete
I


ed because ol the P�a w
ince ol such A (
jverhouse teams as 1 he ECUtub, :
i lano a, UNC e minimum
apel Hill, N.C. six players foi the i i
state. Wake Forest, tire tournament, played
iprisingh pov� strong defense and l Ii
ful L'NC-Gi tl a 0-0
. N( H. 2 o.
P and
,1(1 (. lub happen- one
i be in the
ion in M rule,
lav's round robin Pirates tied the 1I
d Club 0-0, tied
Villanova 1-1, and
t c 1 -0, giving
win 12o pounds, Webb at
lames Ellison is also 142 and Mendell lson
having an excellent in the heavyweight
season for the Pirates class.
and impoved his record
to 18-4 over the Head coach Hachiro
weekend with two vie- Oishi claimed that his
tories, his also coining team was still hobbled
via pins. with the injuries that
have bothered the
Ellison's wins came Pirates for weeks,
in the 190-pound class
at Maryland and at 177 The ,nJuunes arc
George hurting us, he stress-
Washington. ed �ith� th� we
could have beaten
rhe Pirates gave the Maryland. We're still
rerrapins all thev could gv�n8 a 8ood efforl
pick up theii second .iaIUc before siiccum- and a couple ol oui
dual meet win ol the blilL, Frida night. g"s will probably go
yeai againsi five losses. Maryland earned a 7-2 !o ,hc Nationals
record into the match. rhe Buc grappiers
Ml s Butch Revils which was decided by retUrn home to Minges
continued his assault several crucial pins. Coliseum this Saturday
on h,s ,rs' undefeated l42-pound for a meet with Virginia
season by pinning two Q Tech AppaiacnKli;
opponents ove, the Webb baltled to a drau State and N.C. Central.
weekend '� �" while B-ent Chambers 1 he match is sel to
seas�n reCOrtl t0 pui up a stuggle before begin at 12 noon. With
rhe 1'n ate AH losing to I"erp Kevin the prior cancellation
m0I. ltl won the Colabucci, the nation's of the ECU wrestling
177 pound class againsi s e v e n th-ral e d program bx Athletic
v Aland and then 167-poundei Director Ken Kan. this
moved up to the In the win over GW, marks the last tune that
190-pound class against other Pirate victors in- the Pirates will wrestle
GW to hat eluded David Jerose ai in Minges.
Films Posters
Are Now Available!
You C an Own
Pictures And Synopses
Of AH 27
Spring Semester
Pop Films,
Double Features,
And Special Films
Pick Yours Ip Today
At The Information Desk
In Mendenhall
FREE!
em two pints.
In Sundav's sii
md, I he
� u again

PREPARE FOR:
A
RIGGAN
SHOE
REPAIR
111 W. 4th St
QraanTtlla, N C
i I in h
�. a m e.
N.C
ying then
d-fough
Eleven N.C. Players Vying
For Pizza Hut Cage Classic
W K HII �
Durham; and Mike C rum ol l
i ii amat I ol Mt. (1 ast)and Larn Bt
iave olive. � UCl.A est).
I hese ' �� directed
� nominees were
among 150 top eligible WUmu
, Hul seniors placed on the the tinal ol the NCAA
ballot by a pane! ol Basketball ! oui
1 ri ght veteran basketball me 1 �
b televised na-
illy bHs Spot ts
pril 4 from the 1 .is
p as Co n vent ion
B
lonv
writers representing prevailed
(K
V the beginning ol
the current N H
season, more than 50
players who par-
ticipated in past Pizza
Hut v lassies were in the
1C i s(i pi ofessional league.
12N( Among them are such
ch section ol the come-fn ind vie
U countrv. tory.
Duke rhe final selection ol A
�rl (llsLins the teams will be made no
v oasKitis , �. nivision 11 ind NA1A K stars as Deiner s
b college basketballs uimsi m n,n
, odd experts writers, stars, representing
I, . in. broadcasters and schools as
u � . coaches vuih eight State. Bn.u Cliff, 1
Watts players elected to each Haves and lexas A&l.
learn. l"wo additional
plavers on each squad tic Pizza Hut
� etball
MCATLSATGMAT
SATDATGRECPA
Join our "Early Bird" and
Summer Classes In Preparation
for Your Fall 1980 Exams
� Pel � Centers open days, evenings and
veeKends
� Loa he it Dedicated full-time staff
� . ties for review of
class ie ' supplementary materials
. � ed instructors
y i -sed lessons
� . - itudy materials constantly
trchers expert in their field
� Opportune � irisfer to and continue study at
.er 85 centers
OTHER COURSES AVAILABLE
GRE PSYCH GRE BIO - MAT PCAT
OCATVAT TOEFL - MSKP NMB
VQE ECFMG-FLEXNDB NLE
C�li D�vs E�enmgs & Weekends
owntown areertrllte
Across From
Bount-Harv�y
Parting In
Front & Bac
01 Shop
PHONE
(758-0204
Carolina East Mali
cafeterias
Serving Daily 11 0"A M8:00 PM
Fri & Sat Till 8 30
rhompson, Portlana
rhompson, Boston's
1 arr Bird and Utah's
Darrell Griffith.
5
Wkaplak
Educational Center
TtST PRtP��TI0N
SPECIALISTS SINCE 1931
Exculive P�r�. Bltffl E
ITNChiptl Hill Blvd
Durham N C JT7G7
fl�l ��f DM
' . wee -� '� ' t � � Ml
Fo' mto'mjtion jDoui ttttf centers OUTSIDE H t SUTt C�U TOLL fllEE 80C 223 1782
Vi w
will be selected at-large. Basketball c lassie,
which has raised m
C oaehes foi the Piz- than $500,000 foi
za Hut Basketball various chanties since
classic will be Denny its inception in 12.
Mend a broken
heart � Feb. 14
through
Classifieds
M-F 2:00-4:00
SPEND YOUR WEEKEND
AT THE BEACH WITH
NANTUCKET
FEB. 7 -SATURDAY
NIGHT ONLY
AT THE
BIG SURF
ON THE BOARDWALK ATLANTIC BEACH, N.C.
COMING FEB. 138. 14� CIRCUS
Tuesday, February 3
Lunch- Bilked Spaghetti, 2 vegetables
Supper- lam Steak, candied yams
Wednesday, February 4
Lunch- Stutted Green Pepper, 2 vegetab
Supper- 1 rout Almondine. slaw, hushpuppies
Thursday, February 5
Lunch- Liver & Onions, 2 vegetables
Supper- Veal Parmesan, tossed salad with dressing
Friday, February 6
Lunch- Baked Spaghetti, 2 vegetables
Supper- Devil Crab, hot slaw, hushpuppies
Saturday, February 7
All Day- Country Steak, steamed rice
Sunday, February 8
All Day- ' Baked Chicken and yellow i
Monday, February 9
Lunch- Chicken Pan Pie, 1 vegetables
Supper- Country Steak w steamed rice
SI.89
S2.29
$1.79
S2.49
SI.79
S2.39
SI.89
S2.89
SI.99
S2.59
S1.89
$1.99
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nighth )KX)-9:0Opm
Tues. Fish Fry- All I he Fish You Can bat With A Mug
()t Youi Favorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Deli ious Calabash Shrimp W ith French
Fries, Cole Slaw and Our Famous 1 iushpuppies$3.VV
Thur. Family Night A Seafood Sampler With Calabash
Shrimp, bried 1 ish. Oysters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tues,Wed, 1 hur(Oyster Bar Only) 1 Doz. laltshel!
Favorite Beverage
$2.99
T
tSea Pme at Hilton Head Out of th G �' "� H
ii Waking this I npn cedt nn .1 Offei to tf i
' East Carolina
A 3-Day, First Class Weekend
on Hilton Head Island $lht
h
lh HIS
, IS N( )1 A K KI Sea Pines at HiHon Head Island one
� tVfho tmesi resorts in America will treat you to ' days ai
jgafOSMCKS
"�iiswsotfwti
23? t S EVANS ST EXT GREENVILLE
Ph. 756-2011
YL JL�Jy nights in a private luxury villa neai the beach toi 165 pei ;
X "d � "kfiuonal mducemems. weH mdude rmi amtinental
breakfasts� Saturday rtipht cookout oi buffet, free tennis and a day s bike
rental All on us
Whs are we really domg ihrs Because the rxplo who make these kmd ol
company decisions either went to East Carolina oi one the othet eight
colleges we ve invited
IT PAYS TO HAVE
ALUMNI IN HIGH PLACES
A Mail lo
-Sea Pines
H AT HILTON HEAD
Reservations I)epi
Hilton Hea.1 Island
S( 299�
Name
Address
City
Slate
telephone
ip
(ientlemen
Here is m depoM foi 125 Pteate �fTrnnge a J-Day RnM I laas Weekend for
IM of peoplcl Ino ol bedroomsl for the weekend ai Igwe Is) at
choicel Febl3l5 Feb20-2J Feb27-Marchl
Or (all Toll Free UWKNt45-6Pl cf rarnll
l4KX-922?042 in S.C taSTarun





Michelob fans pu
witch for Schlitz
of 200 Soyal
Budweiser drinkers
also prefer Schlitz
"I was confident"
states Schlitz Chief
Frank Sellinger
d: Si
preferred
K I
M
tsers Beer fans surprised at choice of Sc
-
i �
Do it vourself-try the "Great
An an Beer Switch" test
alone
!xv:
terdoN
ample 1
- � ; sandch�
� tei V �
I .
�.
J�
&fr
�&.
DISTRIBU rEDIN GREENVILLE BY TAYLOR BEVERAGECO INC





Title
The East Carolinian, February 3, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 03, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.107
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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