The East Carolinian, January 29, 1981






She iEaat (Earoltnian
A
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No�
10 Panes
Wednesday, January 29 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
( ire ulalion 10.(MM)
City Ordinance Calls For
Two-Hour Parking Zones
B NAM MORRIS
Sufi v
A parking
the Greenvill
seriously att
resident
1 he
ordinance passed by
e Otv Council could
x student parking in
;as around campus,
nance establishing
residential permit parking in two
hour parking ones will go into et-
feci on July 1, 1981
When signs are erected adjacent
Meets in the controlled reside
rial parking area, no person will be
allowed to park a vehicle for longer
than two hours between the hours oi
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through
Friday unless the vehicle has a pro
perly displayed residential parking
permit decal for the area.
The Citouncil ma) designate
controlled residential parking areas
based on six conditions determined
in a study by the city's engineering
department:
� A petition identifying the
boundaries of the streets within the
proposed controlled residential
parking area must be presented to
the Traffic Commission and signed
b at least 51 percent of the adult
residents living on each bloc1; of the
proposed controlled residential
pat king area.
� A parking study must be con-
ducted between the hours of 8:00
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. on a weekday
with one observation made each two
hours. The study must reveal that at
least 70 percent of the parking
capacity of the area is occupied.
� A minimum of 33 percent of
the parked vehicles must be
registered to addresses outside the
proposed controlled residential
parking area.
� The majority of the street
frontage measured at the right-of-
way line must be in a residential
zoning district.
� The property must be used in a
residential manner in order to
qualify for a residential parking per-
mit.
� This procedure will be ap-
plicable on a minimum per block
basis and may apply to one or both
sides of the street.
If these six conditions are met, all
residents owning vehicles parked in
the area for a period in excess of two
hours must purchase a residential
parking permit decal.
Each parking permit will be
issued by the revenue collector of
Greenville for an administrative
charge of $5.00 per decal per year.
The charge for duplicate permit
decals will be $5.00 and will not be
transferable to another vehicle. The
parking permit decals will be issued
on a calendar year basis, and will ex-
pire at midnight on Dec. 31 each
year.
Although it will be lawful to con-
tinue to park an authorized vehicle
in a controlled residential parking
area during the period between Dec.
31 and Feb. 14, if a residential park-
ing decal for the vehicle was issued
for the previous year.
The revenue collector may require
utility bills, notorized affidavits of
the landlord, auto registration
cards, and other documentation
naming the permittee and showing
an address within the controlled
See PARKING, Page 3
A new ordinance may limit student parking in
Photo By JOHN GROGAN
residential neighborhoods.
College Students' United Opposition Changes Direction
By HKl I NCORDKS
sIGTON, D.( (CPS) �
community's united op-
Ronald
mtle the
f 1 ducat ion is
united at all.
t keeping education
lized on a cabinet
irtmenl wa fl icial-
s propos
'Partmen
��ram
; I
the Noven victor)
wh peat vowed : rig
campaign to abolish the depart
mei
Thoufil memtx
f the
overtly support making education
into an independent, sub-cabinet
agency like the National Science
1 oundation.
Among the latter group, many
were hard-pressed to say how the ex-
istence of the department has made
much o a difference in the recent
past.
Indeed, the department has made
"little difference" in federal fun-
ding of college programs and finan-
aid, says Peter Gossens, lob-
t for the National Association
ol Independent Colleges and
. � e .
In tact, Gossens, who stressed he
was not speaking on behalf of his
ation, entured thai the
departmenl in its infancy may have
done more harm than good.
"During the confusion of setting
up the department, education
legislation has suffered he says.
"There were all those lines o
authority being set up, and no one
seemed to have the official Depart-
ment of Education word
"Frankly he adds, "1 don't
think it would matter a lot" if
education programs were demoted
from cabinet rank and centralized in
an independent agency.
Rumors during the first days of
the Reagan administration sug-
gested that after the education
departmenl is dismantled, its pro-
grams will be moved to the U.S.
Department of Health & Human
Services (HHS). The old U.S.
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare (HEW) was renamed
HHS after the new education
department was organized.
I ike others contacted for this ar-
ticle, Gossens felt that "agency
status is preferable to having the
department go back to HHS. We
definitely feel that shouldn't hap-
pen
Joel Packer, a lobbyist for the
National Association of State
Universities and Land-Grant Col-
leges who campaigned for the crea-
tion of the separate education
department in 1978-79, agrees that a
move back to HHS would "be
lisruptive Our big concern is
stability. Education was buried in
HEW
But Packer also says independent
agency status "wouldn't be that ter-
rible However, he adds, the direct
line to the president that cabinet-
level status represents has been
"helpful" since May.
"Having (former Secretary of
Education) Shirley Hufstedler being
able to make our case directly to
President Carter and the Office of
Management & Budget had an ef-
fect Packer says. "The budget. 1
think, would have been worse
without it
Hufstedler herself broke from her
speech introducing the last Carter
education budget to make the case
for keeping the department.
She predicted that dismantling the
department "will lead inevitably to
sharp cuts in federal support for
education programs" especially
because of the promised cuts in
domestic spending expected during
the Reagan era.
Education programs, she said,
will "face even more intense com-
petition" for fewer federal dollars.
Only a "cohesive central organiza-
tion" will give education the power
it needs to do well in the competi-
tion
Research Contradicts Previous Studies
President Decontrols
Price Of Gas And Oil
Campus Suicides Come In Bunches
thought,
v.1 de among college
relatively high
most expert- previously
rding to a recent
en
is
rwo i esearchers, Allen J.
ivartz and C hi ford B. Rcitler,
that the incidence of
"significantly lower"
. among
lent olds,
researchers' findings con-
studies, v hich
ide rate among
now a
suicide
am. .
nor:
I he
tradict mos
showed tli
here from 11 to
50 times higher than among others
ol the same age group. Schwartz
and several h officials,
however, concede that suicide rates
are difficult to measure and that
even this study may be slanted by
under-reporting
"There are so many ways people
can commit suicide and not have it
detected points out Dr. Randolph
C atlin, director ol Harvard's
psychiatric clinic "Some ways are
obvious, and some ways are com-
pletely hidden
"It's not hard to know it
somebody takes a gun and shoots
himself says Yale psychiatrist
Robert Arnstein. "but if he falls off
a cliff, he may have been just a bad
rock climber
�schwartz, a psychiatrist at the
University of Rochester, adds that
insurance restrictions � companies
don't pay in suicide cases � and
religious or family stigmas against
self-destruction may also cause
under-reporting of suicide.
Yet Schwartz and Reifler believe
their study � it showed a suicide
rate o seven in 100,000, versus 17.3
in 100,000 among all 20-to-24 year-
olds � is more accurate than the
previous research.
Schwartz claims earlier studies
were flawed by a "non-random
sampling of time The studies, he
says, tend to occur just after an ab-
normal number of suicides happen.
Campus suicides, in fact, do tend
to come in bunches. A University of
New Mexico research project into
suicide began early in 1980 after two
UNM Hospital staffers killed
themselves within five months of
each other. In a ten-week period
during spring, 1980, there were five
suicides at the University of Florida.
These kinds of statistical
"abnormalities Schwartz con-
tends, help swell estimates of college
suicide rates. Yale's Arnstein
agrees. "The actual rate is almost
impossible to figure out he says.
"If you count one or don't count
one, that makes a tremendous dif-
ference
Schwartz also attributes prior no-
tions of high college suicide rates to
the kinds of campuses studied.
Those notions came from "schools
like Harvard. Berkeley and Yale,
where the rates are higher
But Arnstein says suicide is un-
common at Yale ("We have one
about every other year"), while
Harvard's Catlin doesn't know the
figures. "These are not figures
schools tend to publish
In claiming that "student suicide
rates aren't really different from
those of other people of the same
age group Schwartz is consistant
with a growing suspicion that
stressful academic pressures may
not be as emotionally disfiguring as
previously thought.
Buccaneer Wins A ward
By MIKE DAVIS
staff Writrr
The Buccaneer has won the All
American Associated Collegiate
Press Award for college year-
books, it was announced Tues-
day.
This award, given by the
School of Journalism of the
University of Minnesota, is an
improvement over last year's
first-class award.
The All-American Award is the
second highest given by Min-
nesota. Only the Trendsetter is
higher. According to editor Bar-
rie Byland, this year's staff has
set its sights on the Trendsetter
i w 3 r u
Byland said the judging com-
mittee had praised the Buc for its
coverage of student life, its com-
prehensiveness and its creative il-
lustrations. The committee called
the Buc's creativity "a big plus
Student pictures for this year's
edition will be taken beginning
Feb. 2. Pictures will be taken for
four weeks at various locations
on campus. No appointment is
necessary.
The Buccaneer will receive a $4
rebate for each senior picture
taken and $1 for each junior,
sophomore or freshman picture.
According to Byland, savings
could amount to $20,000.
This rebate will enable seniors
to have their books mailed to
them without charge.
WASHINGTON (UP1) President
Reagan today ordered tne im-
mediate lifting of all federal price
and allocation controls on gasoline
and fuel oil a multi-billion-dollar
decision that will hit consumers in
the pocket book.
Reagan signed an executive order
eliminating the 9-year-old ceilings
on U.S. oil production and
marketing that were to expire Sept.
30.
The president's action will allow
oil companies to raise prices at will.
Reagan did not predict how much
prices will rise, but some analysts
say gasoline pump prices may go up
as much as 13 cents.
"Ending price contols is a
positive first step toward a balanced
energy program a program free of
arbitrary and counterproductive
constraints, one designed to pro-
mote prudent conservation and
vigorous domestic production he
said in a statement.
Reagan said the order "ends the
gasoline allocation regulations
which the Departments of Energy
and Justice cite as important causes
of the gas lines and shortages which
have plagued American consumers
on and off since 1974
Only 15 percent of the crude oil
processed by American refineries �
about one-fourth of the crude oil
produced in the United States is
still subject to price controls.
Reagan said restrictive price con-
trols "have held U.S. oil production
below its potential and forced the
United States to depend on oil-
producing nations.
Some industry spokesmen and
consumer groups disagree, however,
saying U.S. oil production is now
pushed to the limit and nearly every
innovative program to find more
energy is already being pursued.
Reagan said some minor provi-
sions of the current regulatory pro-
gram will not expire until March 31,
providing for orderly termination of
petroleum controls.
A fact sheet distributed with
Reagan's announcement said im-
mediate decontrol "is not expected
to have a major effect on the prices
faced by U.S. consumers
although it might speed up the tim-
ing.
SGA Buses To Run From
Women's Dorms To Minges
Photo By JON JORDAN
Steve King and the SGA Off-Campus Housing Committee met Wednesday
to discuss alternatives to help students.
The Student government will run
shuttle buses to and from the ECU-
USC women's basketball game Fri-
day night, President Charlie Sher-
rod indicated.
Two buses will depart from the
women's dorms on the west side of
campus beginning at 6:30 p.m.
Buses will run until everyone wan-
ting a ride is at the game, Sherrod
said.
The buses will leave from in front
of White and Clement Dorms.
According to Sherrod, the SGA
will try to have people in the dorms
urging students to attend the game.
"We know a lot of women
students don't go to the games
because it's a long way to walk
Sherrod said. "We want to get them
there and back.
"It would be great if we could fill
Minges
Southern California is currently
ranked eighth in the nation and has
lost only once this season. That loss
came to nationally third-ranked Old
Dominion.
The ECU women, ranked 19th, beat
State by a single point, 78-77, in
overtime.
It was the first loss against in-
state competition for the Wolfpack
since 1975.
The crowd at the State game was
estimated at 4,000.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds�
Features5
Letters4
Sports5
?
T





HI t AM (. K(1 INIAN I l IO 2s 1981
Announcements
FRISBEE CLUB
The Frisb�e i. lub vwill me
room 248 in MencK-nh.v
1980 at 7 p m An interest) � i
TWIG FELLOWSHIP IS
People learning the P bit S Hi
will kno the print pies
(he Word of God sets tortl
�s we apply these c pies 1
lives we learn ho �o n, . .
neip then1 selvi
�����
. . � � . . � � .
� . I God. I
� � �
v ludenl
ACADEMIC SKILLS
s st � '
r � ' 4 '
'
:
n .
� ' �

. I '
in Room M!
I
- 00 p n
ill thi

AMBASSADORS
ig i eb i Sunday .� ' M
it VS - B �� 1st and
SURF CLUB
I hei .a � � I
� � � ' . � ;� � it 7:01 i n in
301 i M I All .1 r
well led lo
IVCF
. . � T hursc
�� . �,�. ��
.�,��-
I of i � � � .
u -a. tmi
cso
WOMEN'S RUGBY
lea
I
-
AUDITIONS
.
� .
lor five � ' .
.��,
� - �
CO OP JOBS
� � .
. "
t �
. ��
-
SOCIAL WORK
I he n i Coastal Dtstr,(t of the
National Association of Soi ial
Isers w.ll meet Jan ?v at30
p m m the t aroi Belk Auditorium
� Eastarolina University
i'US
Aon � the topic
� �ns.ng Of Social Workers
will be Dr Tom Scullion ol UNC
Greensboro and Dr Constantine
- � laras � �� the I u Department
Of Social Work and Correctional
i
ah soi ai workers and m
�� �� � . fed to at
PI KAPPA PHI
? apps would � � '
. i . to their Beat th
� i ttv � hai lei K evet .
Thut � � ol ' H pm
" ssion and
vour
Beach 1
New Vviti � � �
HOW DO YOU
SPELL RELIEF?
r ecent and no1 ent piect
� � by !� .Kern

Ope' ��'��� Ian II 7 30
a lav pi
READING
rVhat I ' If
� � � Ri ading a
g � �. �
part' � teachers ot young
. � a � � ffered
v � �
'30
-
IN red i 1


INVESTING
. � the I
� � '
-

SOULS
ety of United
Students is sponsoring an essay
contest in celebration of Bl
History Month ! � . lopii is
A Ak E UP BLACt -v
The essay should bi if least
double sp���: pages The
try is I el 10
1st Pr.e i50 00 II ��
12S 00 3rd PriK SIS OC- If yi
ha -� �� . luestion; i � . �
� . a. � at ' n ; � �
v i e a1 '52 8981
CAREER DAY
rhe H � 1 Departmi I II
will be I i its thn
eet Day p
Ii
. �
(unities I � '� ' ry �
wh i c h � . i �
truck
mercha
I will be "Thi
�.��, I � � .
A ' ' A I '
lervii

. � . i �
I the history
i quest �
'
SIGN LANGUAGE
� � .
Fel
the multi ol
lenha I I �
A
� � .
to at
Any interested
. � be a
INTRAMURAL
SPEED READING
pe . i � last ' �
studei ' � " � � in
leresfed in reading rm � � i bi
with .in . � .on,
will be iff� i' d on Thursi. � .
ings at East KCarolina Ui
12 April 16
'����'�� I
I Continuing Education units
lor pa �
a vaila
Furthei information and
. ration forms iva
iron, to, otfici of Non redif Pro
ontmuinq
� � N f
� 757 6143
PHOTOGRAPHY
�'
i ues lay ev
I as' ' ��
.�� , � . the
imera
� , ire set for 7
ous
pant! �
Id ha ve thi


' �
��� ,ir.
' '�
� Con
SGA
tedday
A � IS fI
; .
wilt be hi V � � '
ANNOUNCEMENTS
oq an
noui at 5

lor the Thur'
noun emenl
�.
All anno
ble spaced a or
� � led
paper Met sage! I I be V
Shor I as possil

submitting thi
Ii
KARATE CLUB
A t ten I
����
. A ' - �
. 1
i req
RHO EPSILON
i) . �
A

FIRESIDE SUNDAY
� �
thi
JOBS
CHEERLEADING
INTERNSHIPS
PES
-
REVENGE
try la

hen
MCAT
� v
h a v
�-�-��
AED
� � �
�.
ACT
1
tAHPAT)
:
�� �
Students Limited
(Ontinued From Pane 1
lential parking
issued f o i
vehicles used by non-
resident - � ��
!rolled ai
� i
ill h

I . I :
resident ia
ille late
S c v e
ced
' mailboxes.
Mailmen ai e not
allowed to deli ei mail
:e wit h
vehicles pai ked in from
Sewell feels
u i his ordinaance is a
mpromise and will
i. work as well
as it ha i Raleigh and
decai v in
bun
dow ol the vehicle
and will contain the
license number, ye
le, and identifica- mail!
tion number. rei
residential parking mail I
pern will not vveel
guarantee rvethe result of people parl
. parking
d r i v e w a v
plc pa Sewell further feels
ehicles in that the university
residents' should have access to
a the street of Greem ille
because the gas taxes
thej pa go towards
' maintenance. He
believes the university
should provide better
parking facilities that
ai e doscr to campus.
I C C'jV
reeeiv inc
Federal Budget Reforms
Student Loan Program
WASHINGTON,
).( (( PS) The last
deral education
budget prepared b the
( arter Administration
includes a batch ol fai
reaching reforms of the
Guaranteed Student
I oaris program that
will make fewer finan
c i a I aid dollars
available to f e w e r
students, and will raise
the interest rates on
those (iSl grants.
Currently all
students are eligible for
Guaranteed Student
Loans, but the Carter
budget asks that only
needy students get
GSLs from now on,
and that the amount of
the loan be lowered "to
the amount of the
need
Financial aid officers
would compute
"amount of need" by
figuring out how much
school costs, and then
subtracting how much
money the student
could get from other
sources, including
"reasonable family
contributions
1 he govei n men t
would also slop paing
the interest subsidy it
the new budget is ap
pi o ed I rider the cur-
rent system, banks are
allowed to charge
students nine percent
interest on (iSl s while
the government pays
rhe difference between
the nine percent interest
and the higher interest
rates the bank could get
it they'd loaned the
money to someone else.
But in its last das
under the Democrats,
the Department of
Education's proposed
budget had no provi-
sion for paying the in-
terest subsidy, and
allowed banks to
charge students a
higher interest rate on
the loans
( onsequently,
students could end up
paying GSI interest
rates in "the high
teens according to
the text accompanying
the proposed depart-
ment bucket.
I he Reagan Ad-
ministration will rev iew
the budget and submit
its own suggestions
"within a month or
so says a
s po k es w oma n tor
Reagan education tran-
sition team leader
1 orelei Kinder.
rhe last Carter
education budget,
released just five davs
before Reagan assumed
office, explained that
the CiSl program has
been the most expen-
sive federal financial
aid program, and was
m due need of control
and overhaul.
It predicted that the
CiSl program would
cost $3.2 billion by
1982, up from $367
million in 1977, unless
its reforms were
adopted.
The budget text
claimed the reforms
still left
" r e I a t i v e I y -1 o w - c o s t
loans available" to
students.
D item
POLICY
ch ot h� �dv�rti��d
ltana i� required to b� r�aXflly
available 'or � in mcis Kroger Sav-on
� icept a apeclflcally rvotexJ In thia ad If wa do
run out of an item we will offer you yowr choice of a
comparable item when available -efieet.ng tne umt aevinga or a
n�ck which will entitle you to purchaae tha adverttaed item at the
advrtieed price within 30 data
Items and Prices
Effective Thurs Jan 29
thru Sat Jan 31 1981
Before, During &
After the Game
Kroger Sav-on
has everything
��i sn5U
i
NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
OPEN SUNDAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031
1 1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY29
iliman
D ITEM
LtCY
�dlly
Sav-on
It � do
:��?�
�Q� x a
� t �h�
IC davt
I
North State'Throws Elegant Gala
SHINGTON An amDlified Drcseni the ,u� .w. � � C
WASHINGTON An amplified
countr) band twanged as cloaaers
stomped. The floor disappeared
un(fla altitude of Republicans.
l s Rep. James T. Brohill of
enoir was shouting as he turned to
his aide Phil Kirk. "1 tell you,
Phl � he yelled. "We jusi
underestimated. We grossh
underestimated
The Iar Hell reception, held
Monda night in the Longworth
House Office Building cafeteria
was a smashing, crunching success
At least 2,000 people paid $20 each
to celebrate the year ot the
Republican Party. I hev had won
the presidency and now held both of
North Carolina's Senate seats. It
was party tune.
No one mentioned the hostages.
Apportionment was the top political
topic ol the evening Mostly,
though, people came to celebrai
here because we lov
C i!
St
Gu). added,
Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan.
o Randlemai
Hei husbam
"Site's been fo
since 1964
Martin Caldwell ol raylorsville
didn't have to state her preference.
Her cowboj hal was all but hidden
beneath dozens o! Reagan buttons.
is m fust inaugural she
� sipping ; nk and bounc-
:ountr d "1 had the
opportunity of mv life
couldn't turn down
A certain highlight
that I
Jackson i 1 ee, state Republican
chairman, was sure that the part)
was the highlight of ail inaugural
partiev "1
awav
tickets awaj
shim Id
ail my ball tickets
"I gave mv gala
� I figure the North
' same up here
� tickets. But tins is
at, I dot think anybody
the go to the gala or not
Faye Eagles, secretarj of the
Nash Count Republican Party,
said she treated her mother to a trip
totheinaui ural d gs asabirthday
present. I he two weren't going to
any of the inaugural balls or the
gala "Bui we got seats foi the
swearing-in, and I mean that's tar
out she said.
(.oose humps
I enora Evans of Raleigh, who
ran foi a seat in the North Carolina
House last tall, has seen the
Reagans at several inaugural (unc-
tions. Each time she got goose
bumps
"I've fiad such an incredible
tune she said. "I find mysell be
ing so excited all the time, like some
dumb tourist, all the time, no matter
the circumstances Am time 1 pass
them on the street. I thmk. There
goes the next president ot the United
States
Mrs. Evans gave Washington the
ultimate compliment: "It's almost
like bemg in a Southern city
Be, kv Barbee of Raleigh was sit-
ting neai Mrs. Evans at die Tai Heel
reception. She admitted to being a
Democrat, proudl) and without
qualification. ��But I'll tell you this.
having a ball she said Then,
attet a look at the dancing, drinking
people around her, she added. "II
thev were having punch, there
wouldn't be a soul here
I inda Petty, wife of race car
driver Richard Petty (who's also a
Republican commissioner ol Ran-
dolph County), tough: the crowd to
get to the hors d'oeuvres table.
"Richard didn't come todav she
said "He's real busy. And if he
could see this crowd, he'd be glad he
didn't come
Mrs. Pett) had been fighting
c r o w d s since arriving i n
Washington. "We had to staj in
siier Hill. Md. Did you evei heai
ol it? ! ike I evel c ross (the Pettys'
home). It's not even on the map "
Someoi e noted that there were
more blacks than usual at this
Republican function. John Hawkins
ot Warrention took all the credit.
"I'm the only black Republ
(county) chairman in the state oi
North Carolina he said. "Maybe
the whole United States. I've nevei
seen vine before. And 1 brought 20
blacks with me
Hawkins could be blase about this
inaugural business he's been to
everv Republican president's in-
auguration smce Herbert Hoover's
in 1929
A tew Democrats showed up.
After all. it was a Iar Heel recep
tion, not just a Republican affair.
Democratic Rep. Ike I. Andrews
took the ribbing stoically�and
dished some out. too.
"Why are thev playing Ghost
Riders in the Sky Andrews asked.
"Republicans don't go to heaven
Andrews said he didn't feel a bit
"in of place. "I thmk people in
politics probably p-av less attention
(to party lines) than others normally
But I'm still 100 percent
Democrat I here are a tew good
Republicans and a. lew Democrats
who arc less than perfect
Other Democrats at the reception
were less than 100 percent. "I'm a
renegade Democrat from Pitt Coun-
ty said Jack W. Burns of Green-
ville, "and I'm 100 percent for
(Sen.) Jesse Helms. I didn't leave
the Democratic Partv. It left me "
As his friend Phil Allen of Green-
ville noted, "jUst Call Us
lesseerats
Helms dropped by tor about 20
minutes to shake hands. He had
family obligations and couldn't stay
longer, a Helms staffer explained
Sen. John P. East was always in
the center of a thick crowd c
wishers during his one-hour stay.
5 But it wasn't all Republican Par
ty unity at the reception, rension
lay just below the surfac lid a
party leader who asked to be
unidentified. This httle recep!
� a s run b v the B i
Republicans, he said, which aren't
the same Republicans as those from
the Congressional Club, Hell
organization.
"But we won talk about tl
now said his companion.
Network
Prhilege
Millions ot home viewers
enjoyed the coverage pro-
vided around the world by
the United States' three ma-
jor television networks. Pic-
tured at right is the tem-
porary studio erected for:
(L�R) ABC, NBC and
CBS. Anchormen of the
network news teams en-
joyed perhaps the best view
oj the ceremony afforded to
any oj (he various media
agents covering the in-
auguration of our nation's
40th president.
Capitol Stands Guard
Pictured on the terrace of the Capitol arc members oj
the SWAT team assigned (he duty of guarding the
ceremony. While their primary function oj the unit was in-
timidation, the sharp-shooters were in place and prepared
to retaliate in case of violence.
Large, Enthusiastic Crowd Gathered
As Reagan Takes Oath As President
����
iiim
U I, .
! IlltUI i
Crowd Awaits Processional
Thousands of supporters and several protest groups watch from the
Capitol grounds for the arrival oj the inaugural motorcade. As the
parade neared, cheers of support and anticipation bellowed from the
crowd.
WASHINGTON�With a broad
smile and sometimes quavering
voice, Ronald Wilson Reagan spoke
to the people for the first time as
president Tuesday�in the same
tones that marked his days in radio
and his campaign for the White
House.
Tens ol thousands o' spectators
crowded the west lawn ot the
Capitol and spilled over onto Penn-
svlvania and Independence avenues
to listen quietly to the 40th presi-
dent's inauguration address.
During his speech, the calm of a
bright, crisp da was pierced only by
the sounds of helicopters overhead
and �eight times�by polite ap-
plause or cheers that rippled up and
down Capitol Hill.
The shored-up Capitol West
Front, used in an inauguration for
the first time Tuesday, was
emblazoned by star-spangled bun-
ting and attended by virtually every
top dignitary in government. The
U.S. Marine band furnished
patriotic music.
A sudden break in Washington's
long cold spell allowed main spec-
tators to shed their coats.
Necks craned for a view of the
new president�and a glimpse of
President Carter on his last day in
office.
There were touches of spontanei-
ty and informality. While most
senators complied with the request
of Sen. Mark Hatfieid, R-Oreg to
wear morning suits, Sen. Barry M.
Goldwater, R-Ariz topped his with
a cowboy hat and boots.
And Sen. Charles Mathias,
R-Md greeted Sen. Nancv
Kassebaum, R-Kan with, "Nancy,
where are your striped trousers?"
Most House members wore
business suits.
Reagan spoke inspirationally,
calling on Americans to renew their
faith and hope and to make
sacrifices now that will help
America's future. But he gave the
crowd no word of the news it most
wanted to hear.
Shortly after he took the oath, the
52 American hostages were flown
out of Iran to freedom after 444
days in captivity.
Murmured rumors swept through
the crowd, but Reagan provided no
confirmation that Carter had found
success in his final hours in office
and solved the crisis that had
plagued his presidency and helped
blunt his bit for re-election.
Reagan, bidding farewell to
Carter and Vice President Walter F.
Mondale, shook their hands. For a
last moment, Carter and Mondale
waved goodbye, and the crowd ap-
plauded.
In the crowd, 7-year-old Randal!
Harmon of suburban West Friend-
ship, Md climbed on the shoulders
of his father, Rob Harmon, to get a
better view. At his father's prod-
ding, Randall proudly announced
he had voted for Reagan at school.
One spectator, Jane Byrne of
Short Hills, N.J called the speech
"absolutely marvelous but
wondered aloud why Reagan didn't
mention the hostages.
Wood Hall Young, 65, a longtime
Reagan supporter and an export
logger in Minneapolis. N.C also
said he was "a little disappointed"
no announcement was made
There were a numbei ol signs
along the parade route that the jo
at Reagan's inauguration was not
unmitigated. A siable group ol I I
Salvadorans waved sign.
chanted at one street corner
Equal Rights Amendment sup-
ports did the same a few tee! further
on.
And there were numerous hostile
signs held aloft here and there in the
friendly crowd.
One was directed at the new first
lady, who confided some weeks ago
that she keeps a small gun in her bed
table. "Nancy the sign said
"Even teeny-weenv guns kill peo-
ple
Staffers
Attend
Ceremony
Tuesday. January 20, 1981 was
a memorable day in the history oj
the United Stares not only
because it was the peaceful ex-
change of the Government from
one administration to another,
but also because it was the day of
freedom for 52 Americans who
had been held hostage in Iran for
the previous 444 da vs. Two
senior staff members oj The Fast
Carolinian were on hand for the
inauguration and this page is the
fruit of their efforts.
A
?





atlje iEaat (Ear0lmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
CHRIS LRHOK, (���, rai Manager
JlMM DuPREl . e�a.�
pAU1 LlNCKI I PAUI Coil INS.
Daw Si vi kin. �� �� Chari is Chanlm er ���
AMI I ANCAST1 R, �� VuW DAVID NORRIS. Features Edit
Januarv 29, 1981
Opinion
Page 4
Staff Courtesy
Criticism Causes Internal Problems
The right of free speech is granted
to everyone, to be used in a respon-
sible manner. It is even part of an
instructor's privilege to express per-
sonal opinions in the classroom.
However, it is outside the bounds
of being a responsible staff member
for an instructor to use this "faculty
privilege" oi free speech to criticize
or make personal judgments in a
classroom situation about another
member of the faculty. This action
not only has a negative effect on the
students' attitudes regarding the in-
structor being criticized, but the in-
dividual most harmed is the faculty
member who discusses a colleague
in a derogatory manner.
Students in general feel that this
action on the part of an instructor is
extremely unprofessional. Even if
the students agree with the opinion
being presented, it is a bad reflec-
tion on the instructor who allows
himself the privilege of talking
negatively to a class about another
instructor.
This is not to say that instructors
should not feel free to express per-
sonal opinions to students.
Debating differing viewpoints in
class can be a positive learning ex-
perience. On the other hand, it
would not be effective or desirable
for the administration to try to put
specific restrictions on what an in-
structor can say in a class.
However, expressing negative
opinions about another faculty
member on the part o' an instructor
is certainly a personal privilege, but
does not belong in the classroom.
Congrats
Congratulations and thanks are
in order for all of the 4,000 fans pre-
sent at last night's ECU-N.C. State
women's basketball game.
The Lady Pirate win was super
and so was the enthusiasm shown by
these many fans.
Special congrats go out to the
ECU cheerleaders. The job done by
this group was a vast improvement
over prior efforts. The cheerleaders
performance no doubt deserves an
A-plus grade.
Congrats to all concerned on a
job WELL done. Please let's do it
again when our nationally-ranked
Lady Pirates host eighth-ranked
powerhouse Southern Cal this Fri-
day nicht at 7:30.
TEN YEAR5 Of SAVING W PENN1E5 FOP, ACOLLEGE EDUCATION
AND ALL I'VE LEAftNEu 15 WT PfW IWOPs m?m TVMW67HAT
Dft WNrVt ft IMCONWNir NDGA TO 500T
r
Campus Forum
Group Opposes Liquor Bill
On February 17, the voters ol (Jrecn-
ville will have the opportunity to cast
their ballots on the Liquor-By-The-
Drink Bill. The voters should also have
the opportunity to know what the Bill
really implies. After a closer look at the
Bill, along with the effects of the Bill on
the community, the voters will then be
better prepared to cast their ballots on
the Liquor-By-The-Drink Bill.
Social establishments which do not
serve food and restaurants with kitchen
facilities and seating eapacitv oi at least
36 people are qualified for a liquor per
mit. Social establishment is not defined
by the Bill but includes places organized
for social purposes such as countr
clubs, veteran and patriotic groups.
recreational clubs, bars, lounges, and
discoes. The Bill does not mention any
Health Standards for the restaurants
and social establishments. Social
establishments which do not serve food
will be allowed both brown bagging and
liquor permits � no other state in the
nation provides the social establishments
with both.
Liquor may be dispensed 19 hours on
weekdays and 13 hours on Sundays �
over 75 percent oi the time both day and
night. Highway authroities report that
the most dangerous time to be on the
highways is between 4-8 p.m. on Sunday
afternoons. More accidents occur at that
time due to the heavj volume of traffic
from weekend trips. The community has
enough problems without the extra
patronizing of liquor outlets on Sunday
afternoons. The Bill puts no restrictions
on the distances between outlets nor
limitations at all to the number oi
licenses that can be issued.
The State ABC Board will issue all
rules, all licenses, and all permits but it
has not one single enforcement officer to
see that the laws and regulations are en-
forced. The N.C. Dept. of Crime Con
trol and Public Safety has only 74 of-
ficers � less than 1 per county � to deal
with liquor-by-the-drink, and they are
also in charge of all drug traffic across
the state. For a restaurant to have a li-
quor license, 51 percent of the sales must
be in food. But the State ABC Board has
no auditors to insure the rule is enforc-
ed. The Bill provides tor very poor con-
trol ol Liquor-b the-drink.
N.C. is a control state which means
that any liquor sold in the state is in state
owned or state controlled ABC stores.
All the profits from these stores go to
state and local governments to pa tor
some of the damages derived from the
use oi the product. Pitt County's annual
share of revenue received from the sale
ol liquor, beer, and wine is $738,946.71.
The annual cost of alcohol-related in-
cidents is $9,572,160.00 which includes
lost production, direct health care cost,
fire losses, motor vehicle accident losses,
cost oi crime, and cost of social
responses all due to alcohol use. For
every $1.00 received in revenue from li-
quor, beer, and wine sales in Pitt County
there was a $12.95 alcohol-related cost.
These figures were compiled by United
Health Services ol N.C, Annual Report
oi Public Revenues (N.C. ABC Board),
and N.C. Dept. ol Revenue Report
(1 xcise lax Division). The sale of liquor
will not necessarily profit the communi-
ty. In areas oi the state where liquor-by-
the-drink lias been approved, there has
been reported a substantial increase in
consumption and with the increase in
consumption an increase in alcohol-
related incidents.
The Report of the Distilled Spirits
Council in the U.S which is the liquor
industry, reported that every state that
has gone the route oi liquor-by-the-
drink has increased consumption. Of
course, the liquor industry wouldn't
support a bill that would reduce the sales
oi then product. A basic economic prin-
ciple says that the greater the number oi
outlets, the greater the sales of the pro-
duct, which the liquor industry knows.
Liquor-by-the-drink is a wa oi increas-
ing the outlet oi the liquor industries
product. The liquor industry, certain
restaurants, and social establishments
are interested in the profits from the sale
oi alcohol and not necessarily interested
in the alcohol-related incidents.
New York City has more bars per
capita than any other city in the world
but New York City is in bankruptcy. If
the selling of liquor were the secret of
economic development of a community,
then NY City would be the wealthiest ci-
ty in the world. Liquor does not help
develop a community but in fact
destroys it.
N.C. is about the 10th largesl state in
the U.S. but 47th in per capita number
oi alcoholics. N.C. doesn't have bars
spread all over which means less con-
sumption and less alcoholics. Liquor-by-
the-drink provides more outlets and
more consumption. The Liquor-By-The-
Drink Bill is a poor piece of legislation,
detrimental to the community, and im-
possible to enforce. Vote against LBD.
Concerned Citizens Committee
Greenville, N.C.
Editor's Vote: The preceding
was submitted by East Carolina Univer-
sity student representing the Concet
Citizens group. The Last Carolinian
wishes to thank the group for its com
and welcomes opposing viewpoints from
other concerned students.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view Mail or
drop them bv our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the author(s). I
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neath printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing tor brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. I etters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
davs.
Epi
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Southern GOP Returns To Prominence In Recent Years
The 1970's saw the beginning of the ris-
ing fortunes of the Republican party in the
South, and the 1980 elections gave a
tremendous boost to that rise of Dixieland
Republicanism.
In 1972 the once solidly Democratic
South went solidly Republican for Presi-
dent Nixon. That was probably the light at
the end of the political tunnel that
Southern D -publicans have been straining
their eyi ee since reconstruction.
To get a full understanding of this tran-
sition, from iron-clad Democratic loyalty
to the recent overwhelmling Republican
victories in our region, one must look at
history for a moment.
After the Civil War, it was the radical
Republican government in Washington
that forced a cruel and vicious reconstruc-
tion on our great Southland and robbed
our ancestors of their property and their
liberty. This served to fuel the fires of
resentment against the Republican party
for nearly a century.
Quite naturally, native southerners
rallied round the Democratic banner. For
in the later part of the nineteenth century,
the Democrats vowed that once restored to
Robert M.
Swaim
power they would return the South to its
former glory and promised that once again
white supremacy would be the order of the
day.
Thus, by the turn of the century there
was scarcely a registered Republican to be
found in the old confederacy.
This commitment to the Democratic
party was further reinforced when the
stock market crashed in 1929, plunging the
nation into the worst depression ever
known. Herbert Hoover, the sitting
Republican president, took the blame for
that, whether he deserved it or not.
By then the legacy had begun.
Everybody was a Democrat, not because
you wanted to be one but because you were
"born" one. "Granddaddy was a
Democrat, Daddy was a Democrat, and
by-God, I'm a Democrat And so it was
for a hundred years or more.
With the coming of Franklin Roosevelt
there was the advent of the welfare state,
and liberalism became the dominant
political philosophy that would guide the
nation for decades to come.
The Democratic party became the cham-
pion of big government, regulation of
business, welfare and giveaway programs,
and the erosion of the rights and powers of
individual states to govern themselves.
The Democrats developed a policy of
governing that took away the fruits of
labor from the productive people of this
country and redistributed it through an un-
fair income tax to those who produced
nothing, via welfare. This of course did
not sit well with the people of our region
who were by-and-large born and raised
with the puritan work ethic near and dear
to their hearts.
The Democrats were also the champions
of civil rights, which was seen by the South
as an intrusion on the rights of each in-
dividual state to tend to its own affairs
without interference from Washington.
Southerners, like most Americans, don't
like to be dictated to, especially not from
outsiders.
Lastly, one must consider the martial
heritage of the South, the strong feelings
toward the military and patriotism.
Southerners have always been quick to
answer the call to arms. Our people possess
an inborn characteristic that makes us anx-
ious to take up the sword to defend our
land and our traditions.
The Democratic Party lost sight of this,
and in foreign policy they became the party
of appeasement and weakness during re-
cent years, thus alienating Southerners on
yet another issue of major concern.
The people of the South are conservative
by nature and our environment, relatives,
teachers, schools and communities condi-
tion us to savor and protect our conser-
vative beliefs.
We, the people of the South, were
Democrats as long as the Democratic party
represented our interests and our
philosophy of how societv should func-
tion. Now it appears that the Democratic
Party has chosen to represent other in-
terests, therefore abandoning what was
once its strongest and most reliable consti-
tuency.
The Republican Party, by contrast, has
picked up the causes in which we believe,
causes that have been discarded by the
Democrats.
In 1976 ten of the eleven states of the old
confederacy gave their votes to native son
Jimmy Carter, the Democrat. By 1980 the
political winds swept ten of the eleven con
federate states into the Republican column
for Reagan and sent unprecedented
numbers of Republicans to the United
States Senate. North Carolina became the
first Southern state to have two
Republican U.S. Senators.
Governor Hunt, perhaps the most par-
tisan Democrat in the region, called this
sweeping tide "the winds of retreat
I would differ with Governor Jim. The
winds of retreat might more appropriately
be called the road to prosperity and a
return to individual liberty and freedom.
t
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IHI l S i K()1 1MAN
Features
ia- i ky 29, lyni
Page c
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Epidemic Of Hollering Strikes ECU
Bv Oils ROBINSON
W ril.l
Have you evei boon walking to
class oi sitting in youi room and
d someone yell, "oo ?
Well it you attend last Carolina
University 1 am sure sou have hoard
n more times than you care to ad-
mit.
Monday morning 1 was staring
out my dormitory room window
and 1 saw one clean-cut, intelligent-
king young fellow walking up
1 C 's (. ollege Hill Drive c was
gracefully making his way past a
ing students w ho were
five mi :lass. I hen.
he look a
Jeep breath and made a deafening
earn that started a chain reaction.
Well, aftei about five more happy
hollerers got in on the action, the
hollering stopped. Scratching my
head in sheer awe, 1 tried to figure
out whv would what appeared to be
a quite enjoyable game suddenly
stop. Then 1 surmised it was one ol
two reasons. Either the hollerers
had developed an acute case ol
laryngitis, or the were touched b
the foul language o a student they
had awakened at 8:05 a.m.
Arbitral hollering is common at
ECU, but no one has a detinue
reason as to win students make the
strange sounds during the da. Dr.
Charles E. Garrison, an E l
sociologist, takes a real interest in
the subject of hollering on campus
"1 live only about a half mile from
the dormitories, and 1 can hear the
students hollering late at night he
said. "There is no social definition
as to why students holler, bui 1
believe thai most holler because ol
! rust rat ion
.lames Eular, an ECU freshman
and hollerer, says he screams
because o uneasiness. "Taking
tests builds anxiety he said.
"Aftei the test is over, 1 often holler
because it makes me feel better. It's
a way to release tension
Eulai added that the size of the
dormitory rooms also plays a major
role "When 1 get a chance to get
out of this chicken coup, I'm so glad
that 1 just shout tor joy he
remarked. "Living in this two bv
tour room can make anybody want
to scream sometimes
Whatever the amount ot steam
hollerers need to blow off, most
prefer to scream in groups. One ex-
ample of the group hollering game is
a monthly activity which ECU men
refer to as a panty raid. In this gala
gathering, about 500 of the campus'
foremost male hollerers unite at
midnight. The men parade across
campus relieving non-hollerers of
study time and sleep.
According to Psychology Depart-
ment Chairman Dr. Wilbur A.
Casteilow, the group hollering con-
cept is widely used "Many
psychologists use a process called
elementary primal scream therapy
he stated. "It is a process whereby
people in a group setting are en-
couraged to scream until they are
fatigued. Through screaming they
are allowed to express and release
emotions of sorrow and fear
The ECU psychologist added that
people prefer to holler in groups
because of de-individualiation. He
described the process as one in
which a person does certain things
in a crowd or group that he would
not do it he were not in that group
"lor example he explained, "it
someone saw me hollering at a foot-
ball game they wouldn't say 'look at
Dr. Casteilow hollering But it they
saw me walk down the hails ot this
(psychology) building and scream,
several people might question mv
behavioi
Casteilow commented that the
chain reaction thai follows when
one person starts hollering is an
aspect ol social learning. "Students
develop a disinhibition and the first
holler is a stimulus he explained.
"I hey say, 'It he can do it, I can do
it.
A more simple reason why some
students holler is for tun. Rodney
Paul, a junior and champion
hollerer says, "You let people know
you're having a good time
According to Casteilow, hollering
is an attention-getting device.
"Some holler because they want to
see the expression on the face ot
others he remarked. "The more
unexpected the others are, the better
they will be surprised.
I asked a young lady who had jus!
made the one-note tune why did she
just holler. She answered, "I teei so
good today, 1 just felt like scream-
ing Then I asked her what does
she do when she does not feel so
good. She replied, "I scream
louder
So I see hollering is just another
part of the ECU life style. It I can't
beat them, I guess HI have to join
them. On that note, I conclude this
article with a loud WOOW!
Pointers' Performance
Dazzles Attic Crowd
pnoto by GABY PATTERSON
rhe Pointer sisters performed in concert to an enthusiastic crowd at the Attic in downtown Greenville Tuesday
By JOHN WEYLER
Slaff Wriler
"We are indeed delighted to be
here the lady on stage said, and it
looked as if indeed they were. So
was the crowd, an estimated 700
plus who had paid $8.50 a head for
the privilege of seeing the Pointer
Sisters in concert, at the Attic, Tues-
day, January 27.
The jam-packed, hot but happy
crowd was a little better dressed
than the average Greenville
downtown mob: few cowboy hats
were in sight I hey were mostly
young, of course, and most white,
somewhat suprisingly. But all were
in good spirits.
Back in the Attic's Phoenix
Room, 3 PM, a fine four man com
The Legacy Of John Lennon
were just young
r ;es started
� contemporary
was lucl older
in higl ool buying all
albums a-
lev Ut, so I
fat back
grew up witn ti
as i
f the I s con-
image,
trtney was the cute, boy-
with the expressive eves
. sister fell -c with. He
i the Beatles' classic
tunes such as "Yesterday" and
"B.a � still sound as
they did the
first tin Ringo was
ihe one who provided the
the songs, and con-
tribu uple ol songs o his
Beatles that interested
me the ' ge 1 larrison
and John ! ieorge was the
laid-back mysterious one of the
group that seemed more interested
in writing the deep, spiritual songs
which usually contained religious
overtones. He has been referred to
as the "silent Beatle and added a
sense o mystique to the group.
But the Beatle that affected me
the most was ihe leader, and radical
of the group, John Pennon. He
wrote or co-wrote over halt of the
Beatles" material, and he and Paul
provided the backbone to the legend
known as the Beailes.
I say that John affected me more
than the other three because his
songs conveyed ideas similar to
those that 1 strongly believe in. His
songs, both during the Beatles and
his solo work expressed feelings of
love and peace, which were concepts
he believed would make this world a
better place to live in. The thoughts
that John tried to express in his
songs over the course of his musical
vareer showed what a sensitive and
deeply caring man he really was.
Everv song he wrote came straight
from his heart, and most of his
earlier solo material were attempts
to make the public aware of all the
suffering, greed, and hate that exist
m this world. He understood that
awareness was the first step to
change, and that change is necessary
in order tor us to coexist peacetullv
on this planet.
Even those who don't particularly
care for his musi, can ap-
preciate the feelings he tried to ex-
press. As a songwriter and musician
myself, I can understand what a
task it is to pour your soul into a
song and labor over it until it is just
right. I not only admire his songs,
but also Ins ability to express the
love thai he felt for his wife and
child. He had the courage to stand
up and fight for what he believed in,
no matter how much political op-
position he laced. He even retired
from recording albums for five
vears just so that he could watch
and help his son. Sean, grow. That
is what 1 call unlimited love.
I still feel a deep sense o loss, but
I guess that there is nothing 1 can do
about that except to let time lessen
the tragedy. I could go on and on
about the impact John had on the
world, his music, his attitudes, and
See LENNON, page 7, eol. 7
bo, were pulling forth some ex-
cellent jazz rock fusion, while in the
mam room was the big show. The
Pointer Sisters concert was to be
filmed for national broadcast, and a
man came on stage to prepare the
crowd. "We were selected lo do this
because of our reputation for being
a hell-raising crowd he said,
eliciting the expected response.
1 he 1' backup band ap-
did they, the
. Sisters ot the eighties,
Am: md Ruth. Dressed in
- v I940ish outfits, sin:
dlv, they into a
number from their latest album,
"Spe Mosl ol the
music that night was from their new
album, rhe songs, in order with a
tew unidentified exceptions, were as
follows: "We've dot the Power
"Special Things "Yes You Can
"Evil "lire "(She's Got) The
Fevr "Fairytale "He's So
Shy "Could I be Dreaming
"Who Do ou Love and
"Happiness"
Ihe stunning sisters sang and
swayed. Audience applause was so
intense it stopped the show � right
in the middle ot the seventh song,
"Fire Ihe Pointers simplv had to
cease singing ad1 let the applause
die down before they could con-
tinue.
Ihe Pointers are noted lor their
musical eclecticism. Their pop-
disco-rock-jazz-country-funk for-
mal included an old but good jazzv
Dizzy Gillespie lune, a Doobie
Brothers number, and their own
original Kent ucky-fried
"Fairytale Concerning the latter.
they told a little story.
Die hack-up band provided ex-
cellent accompaniment. Thev con-
sisted of three guitarists, a drum
mer, a man on ke boards and one
on piano and synthesizer. The
isters themselves plaved a tam-
bourine and a cowbell. All blended
together flawlessly. The onlv
criticism that could be leveled
against the show is that perhaps it
was a bit too commercial. Taking
time out to tell the audience the
name ot each song and what album
it's from may be viewed as
friendliness bv some, selt-
promotion by others. This is a mat-
ter for debate.
Anita, June and Ruth played till
about 11:20, said goodnight, and
left the stage. The crowds clamor
was so great, however, the Pointers
came back tor two encores. Finally
the show ended with ihe sisters smil-
ing, shaking hands and sliding oft
the stage. It was evident a good lime
had been had by all. As the lyrics to
one of their songs went, "I bet you
won't torget me when I'm gone
This could certainly be said of the
Pointer Sisters that night.
Campus Wildlife
Strange Creatures Stalk ECU
B I)AMI) NORR1S
Ftstwn t dii.T
Although our campus is largely
covered with such trappings ot
civilization as buildings and pave-
ment, many forms of wildlife still
manage to establish their habitats
here.
The ubiquitous squirrel is perhaps
the most common form ot campus
wildhte (excepting, ot course, the
wily cockroach.) fed bv acorns and
large quantities of discarded
crackers and candv bars, the cam-
pus squirrels teem in abundance all
over E I
Dogs inhabit ECU in great quan-
tities, too. By aetmg hungry in front
ot the people leaving the snack bar,
any dog can make a reasonably
good living (especially if he likes
1 wmkies and jelly doughnuts.)
From their behavior, many ECU
students may seem to qualify as
wildlife, although by most defini-
tions they are actually at least semi-
domesticated
The most interesting forms of
wildlife on campus are not quite so
easy to find as squirrels and dogs,
although many of us feel their ef-
tects on our ecology every day.
Some of these animals, are, unfor-
tunately, on the verge of extinction:
some, unfortunately, are not.
lor example, the ECU campus
once teemed with herds of empty
parking spaces. These creatures are
flat in appearance, with a hard,
almost pavement-like shell with
yellow stripes. Often, they were ac-
companied by parking meters
(creatures that survived by consum-
ing nickels and dimes.)
In recent years, the empty parking
space has become an endangered
species due to a tremendous increase
in the numbers of their traditional
enemy, the automobile. Today, the
empty parking space can be most
easily found hiding at night or
weekends in some of the more
secluded regions of the campus.
In many large cities of the United
States, the empty parking space has
entirely disappeared, except in small
refuges known as parking garages.
One animal not in danger of ex-
tinction (right now, they are quite
tinct) are the clock crazers. This
rarely-seen animal apparenth
derives all its necessary nourishment
by damaging clocks in campus
classrooms. Because of these little
varmints, every clock on the ECU
campus has a different time, and all
of them are wrong.
Tiny parasites known as pencil
shredders lurk on the walls of many
ECU classrooms. Easily
recognizable from their metallic
shells (and their being bolted to the
wall), the pencil shredder waits
disguised as a harmless pencil
sharpener until an unwary victim ar-
rives. With the deadly efficiency of
a South American piranha, the pen-
cil shredder can destroy a helpless
pencil within a few seconds, lead
and all. (It discards only the metal
tip and the eraser as indigestible.)
Brought into this country by
migratory Tunisian ducks, a tiny
microorganism called Algae Soap-
sudsae inhabits such areas as the
See CAMPUS, page 6, eol. 7
Photo bv JON JORDAN
The Sixth Annual Rebel Art Show is now on exhibit at the Greenville Museum of Art until Jan. 31
Rebel Winners Announced
The Sixth Annual Rebel An Show
is being held January 24 - 31 at the
Greenville Museum of Art.
The show, co-sponsored by The
Attic and Jeffrey's Beer and Wine
Company, was open to East
Carolina University students.
Jurors and Judges for the show
were Clarence Morgan, Painting
and Drawing instructor at ECU;
Michael Ehlbeck, Printmaking in-
structor at ECU; and Mary Anne
Pennington, Executive Director.
Greenville Museum of Art.
Kris Gunderson won Best in Show
and First Place in Sculpture for an
untitled limestone sculpture.
Gunderson won First Place in
Design for a small bronze entitled
"Cupbearer Second place in
Design went to I aura Jackson for
her quilted Batik, "Birds of a
Feather
Jim Jacobs was awarded First
Place in Painting tor his oil "MB
5 Robert Dick took second place
with his acrylic and oil, "Field of
Deception
First Place in Drawing went to
Paula Patterson for "Figure with
Green Second Place in Drawing
was awarded to Stacy Heller.
Maria Mclaughlin won First
Place in Printmaking with a color
lithograph titled "A Garden: Pro-
tected, Privileged, and Private
Elaine Miller won Second Place for
a color lithograph titled "Tain
First Place in Photography was
awarded to Susan Ward for "Figure
in Transition Roche! Roland won
second in Photography for her un-
titled piece.
Kathy Sholar was the First Place
winner in Mixed Media for her
watercolor and hand-made paper
piece titled "Island of the Blue
Hearts Second Place in Mixed
Media was awarded to M.A. Hutto
for his untitled construction.
Honorable Mentions were also
awarded to Robert Dick, Nam Ji
Kim, Sid Davis, Kim Furstenberg,
Tom Grubb, Gary Hinnant, Rox-
anne Reep and Mike Loderstadt.
t
i

1





1 111 t M I Kol ll W
JANUARY 24, 1S8I
L&lfjoG AfyuT CottcGr- Th Wfito Ni
81 Piviip Aioeis
Poiajo THCHALL ioomp
we fuse box I
t
Campus Wildlife
i-2i-fi
Senior Recitals Abound This Weekend
Allen Pettit o 1
Winston-Salein and
John Moore of W ood-
bridge. Va brass
students at
la-
Carolina Universit
School of Musk, will
perform a joint senior
recital Thursday, Jan
29, at 7:30 p.m.
The program, set foi
the A.J. Fletchei
Recital Hall, is free and
open to the public.
Pettit is a candidate
for the Bacheloi ol
Music 1- d u c a '
degree with a conc
tration in French hoi n
He is a horn student ol
James Parnell.
Moore, also i
education studt
concen t r a t e d
trumpet and is a
dent of James Searl.
Assisted b three
other brass students,
Pettit and Moore will
be featured in the
Sehero from John
C h e e t a m' s H r a s s
Quintet Piece
Petti; is the on ol
Mr. and Mrs. J. Walter
Pett it o: Wi
Salem. Mooi t
are Mr. and Ml
Charles C Moore,
2270 Longview Drive,
Woodbridge, Va
Violinist Robert Kiev
ot W i 1 m i net on, a
senioi student in the
East Carolina Universi-
ty School of Music, will
per or m in recital
I hursday, Jan. 29, at 9
p.m. in the A.J. Flet-
chei Music Center
Recital Hall here.
lsle will be accom-
panied b pianist Carla
Snow .
violin student of
l)r. Paul Topper of the
ECU strings faculty,
lsle is a candidate for
the Bachelor of Music
1 ducation degree.
His parents are Mr.
I Mrs. R.W. Isley of
Wilmington.
Venessa Malloy of
ilmington and John
Robert Jones Jr. ol
Goldsboro, both senior
students in the East
Carolina University
School of Music, are
scheduled to perform in
recital here.
Ms. Malloy, a voice
student of Gladys
White and a candidate
for the Bachelor of
Music Education
degree, will perform
Friday, Jan. 30, at 7:30
p.m. Jones, a tuba stu-
dent of Bruce Mosier
and George Broussard,
will perform Monday,
Feb. 2, at 7:30 p.m.
Both recitals will be
held in the A. J. Flet-
cher Music Center
Recital Hall and are
free and open to the
public.
She will be accom-
panied by pianist Dan-
ny Dial and assisted by
bassoonist Matt Mor-
ris.
Her parents are Mr.
and Mrs. Benny
Malloy, and her grand-
mother, Rosa L.
Malloy, all ol Wilm-
ington.
Pianist James
Gilliam will accom-
pany, and Jones will be
assisted by a student
clarinetist and three
student brass per
formers.
Pianist
Sty ton o'
sophomore
the Last
University
Catherine
Davis, a
student in
Carolina
School of
Her parents are Mr.
and Mrs. Reginald
Stvron ot Davis
( ontinued from payc 5
Wrighl I
times ol the yeai i
soapsud-lii e cun
hence its ill
Also contnbutinj
blem, but in a different �
colorful ti I
constantly she I
plumage, wh
pieces ol papei with
them. Some ornitl
is done by these bii
the destructioi
ty parking sp
their p
automobile wind;
A flagrant viol
maxim "W ierd a I be
seen
pip
E !
1 heii
ing
.

milii
species kn
Music, vsill perform in
recital Friday, Jan. 30,
at 9 p.m. in the Fletcher
Music Center Recital
Hall.
A candidate for the
Bachelor of Music
degree in piano perfor-
mance, Ms. Stvron is a
student of Henr
Doskey of the ECU
keyboard faculty.
SAAD'SSHOK
RfcPAIR
I 1 Grande Ave.
758-1228
QualiK Repaii
"� 'II
lie Happy t SUm�
ooin �� �ooa
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I � P j
1�1 ����� lfvv.
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$�
eg 4 iceDei
Winter Clearance
SALE
Savings
up to
50
All sales final!
No refunds!
Alterations extra!
THE EARLY
BIRD f
EXPERT STYLING
FOR BOTH MEN
AND WOMEN
BY APPOIMMLM
ONL
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PREPARE FOR:
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Join our "Early Bird" and
Summer Classes In Preparation
for Your Fall 1980 Exams
� Permanent Centers open days, evenings and
weekends
� Low hourly cost Dedicated full-time staff.
� Complete TEST-n-TAPE5" facilities for review of
class lessons and supplementary materials
� Small classes taught by skilled instructors
� Oppctumty to make up missed lessons
� Voluminous home-study materials constancy
updated by researchers expert in their field
� Opportunity to transfer to and continue study a:
any of Our over 85 centers
OTHER COURSES AVAILABLE
GRE PSYCH GRE BIO MAT - PCAT
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SPECIALISTS SINCE IMS
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TELEGRAM SERVICE CENTER
BUFFETTUILLE, FL
vmes post
o n u t
Telegram ri
gpV - US MAIL
JIMMY BUFFETT is
coming.
Sat February 21.
8 P.M Minges Coliseum.
Students $6.50
Public $8.50
Tickets go on sale Monday
at 10 A.M. in Mendenhall
BISCUIT TOWNE
INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIALS
1011 Charles Street
Phone 752-1373

.
4
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RIB SPECIAL
Two Jumbo BBQ Beef Ribs.
Homemade Biscuit, French Fries and Coleslaw
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
ft $1"
1
CHICKEN SPECIAL
Two Pieces of Southern Fried
Chicken, Homemade Biscuit. French Fries
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
$129 $79
DARK
WHITE
BISCUIT SPECIAL
Steak Biscuit'Country Style
Gravy and French Fries or Chicken Biscuit with French hnes
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
$1 29
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MEET AT
BISCUIT TOWNE
And Enjoy Delicious Home Looked Meals
At Inflation high ting Hrices






I til ! AM C AROl IN1AN
JANUARY 29, 1981
mgo
le
I
brVoiii

ics Sat.
12 Price
Grtppet
kth Top S�itch
U'rive
b'hru
�ndow
Happenings
Lennon 's Legacy
Thursday 29
� 5 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Arm Wrestling
� 7 p.m. Gamma Beta Phi, Mendenhall Student
Center Auditions Rm. 244
Friday 30
� 5. 7:15, and 9 p.m. Movie: Bronco Billy, Hen
dri Theatre
� 7:30 p.m. Women's Basketball: Southern
California, Minges Coliseum
Saturda 31
� 5, 7:15, and 9:30 p.m. Movie: Bronco Billy,
Hendrix Theatre
Sunday 1
� 2 p.m. Soul Food Dinner, l.edonia S. Wright
Afro-American Cultural Center
� 3 p.m. Women's Basketball: Appalachian
State University, Minges Coliseum
� 5 p.m. Musical Production: A History oi
Music In The Black Church. Hendrix Theatre
Sunday 1-Saturday 7
� Black Arts Festival
� Art Exhibition: Black Arts, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Gallery
Monda 2
� 6 p.m. Intramural Arm Wrestling Par-
ticipants' Meeting, Memorial Gym 104
� 7 p.m. Student Dietetic Association, HE 121
� 7 p.m. N.C. Vocational Association,
Mendenhall Student Center Rm. 24S
Monday 2-Monda 16
� Intramural Weight Lifting Entries Due,
Memorial Gym 204
Mondav 2-Wednesda 18
� Intramural Co-Rec 2-on-2 Basketball Entries
due. Memorial Gym 204
Tuesda 3
� 4:30 p.m. Intramural Council Meeting,
Memorial Gym 104
� 5 p.m. Deadline: Intramural Racquetbal)
Doubles
� 3-5 p.m. Intramural Arm Wrestling Tourna-
ment, Memorial Gym
� 4-5 p.m. 8:30 a.m6 p.m. Red Cross Blood-
mobile. T.B.A.
Wednesday 4
� 4 p.m. Intramural Racquetbal! Doubles Par-
ticipants' Meeting, Memorial Gym 104
� 5 p.m. Clothing and Textiles Association
Meeting, Van Landingham Room
� 7 p.m. Psi Chi Meeting, Speight 129
� 7 p.m. Student Nurses Association, Nursing
101 � ,
� 8 p.m. Minority Arts Film Series: Black
History Lost, Stolen, or Strayed and Black
Shadows on a Silver Screen, Ledonia S. Wright
Afro-American Cultural Center
MOVIES
Plaza
Thursday 9
� "Xanadu" (PG) Shows at 3:30, 5:20, 7:10,
and 9 p.m.
� "Divine Madness" (R) Shows at 3:30, 5:20,
7:10, and 9 p.m.
� "Any Which Way You Can" (PG) Shows at
2:45, 5, 7:15, and 9:30 p.m.
Starting Friday
� "Any Which Way You Can" (PG) Shows at
2:45, 5, 7:15, and 9:30 p.m.
� "Holy Terror" (R) Shows at 3:15, 5:15, 7:15,
and 9:15 p.m.
� "The Incredible Shrinking Woman" (PG)
Shows at 3:30, 5:20, 7:10, and 9 p.m.
Bucaneer
Thursday 29
� "Nine to Five" (PG) Shows at 1:15, 3:15,
5:15, 7:15, and 9:15 p.m.
� "Windwalker" (PC.) Shows at 1:10, 3:10,
5:10, 7:10, and 9:10 p.m.
� "The ldolmaker" (PG) Shows at 2:00, 4:30,
7:00, and 9:30 p.m.
Starting Friday
� "Nine to Five" (PG) Shows at 1:15, 3:15,
5:15, 7:15, and 9:15 p.m.
� "Windwalker" (PG) Shows at 1:10, 3:10,
5:10, 7:10, and 9:10 p.m.
� "Suddenly A Woman" (R) Shows at 1,3, 5,
7, and 9 p.m.
SCHOOL OF ART
January 15-February 8
� Annual Faculty Show-Works by the E.C.U.
School of Art Faculty
SCHOOL OF Ml SIC
� Sunday 1; E.C.U. String Workshop � Infor
mal Concert, 1:00
� Monday 2; John Jones, tuba Senior Recital
7-U
� Wednesday 4; School of Music Young Artist
Finals, 7:30
NIGHTLIFE
Attic
� Thursday � NANTUCKET
� Friday � ST1LLWATER
� Saturday � WINTERS BROTHERS
� Sunday � FABULOUS KNOBS
� Wednesday - THE YOUNG INVADERS
(BLAZE) College Night
Carolina Opry House
� Thursdav - C&M TRAVELING SHOW
� Friday - J. MURPHY MARTIN BAND
� Saturday - J. MURPHY MARTIN BAND
� Wednesday � CABIN FEVER
Chapter X
� Thursday � Pi Kappa Phi "Evening Delight"
7-10 p.m.
� Friday � A Nu Pi "End of Week Party" 4-8
p.m.
� Saturday � Kappa Alpha "Nickel Nite"
� Tuesday � Sigma Phi Epsilon "Ladies
Night"
� Wednesday � Sigma Nu "50,50 Night"
Elbow Room
� Thursday � Kappa Sigma Fund Raiser 7-9
p.m.
� Tuesday � Delta Sigma Pi Male Best Chest
Contest
� Wednesday � 1st Elbow Space Invaders
Tournament and Gents Nite
JJs Music Hall
� Thursday � WILD ACCUSATIONS
� Friday � ALAN'S NEW WAVE PARTY
� Saturday � LEGENDARY BLUES BAND
If you have anything you would like put in
Happenings, please send to: Nancy Morris, The
East Carolinian, East Carolina University,
Greenville, North Carolina 27834.
Continued from page 5
his committment to peace and
brotherly love, but his vsords can ex-
press far more than 1 could ever
hope to:
Imagine there's no countries.
It isn't hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion, too
Imagine all the people living life in
peace
Imagine no possessions, I wonder if
you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people sharing all
the world
You may say I'm a dreamer,
But I'm not the only one
1 hope some day you'll join us
And the world will live as one
JOHN LENNON
BACK
II
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BELOW WHOLESALE i QUANTITY PRICES
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4 no
50
Buffett Tickets
On Sale Monday
rickets for the Feb. 21 Jimim Buffet) concert
m sale Monday at 10 a.m. in Mendenhall Stu-
Center. 1 'he first three days oi ticket sales
will he limited solely to the campus. "We wani to
concentrate on campus sales before we distribute
tickets to our various outlets said Charles Sune,
chairperson of the Student Union Major Attrac-
tions Committee.
Students, as well as the public, will be able to
purchase tickets to the concert during the first
three davs of sale-
MALPASS
MUFFLER SHOP
2616 E. 10th St.
Greenville, N.C.
758-7676
Custom Exhaust Systems
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American and Foreign
Car Parts
SUPER
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52.99
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D.A. KELLY'S FINAL CLEARANCE
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Jan. 29-30
9 1981 ArtCarved Class Rings. Inc
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Reg. $9.98 to $22.98
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f. �� p � �� Ml MM � W0H





Sports
Gain Thrilling Overtime Win
Lady Bucs End State String
B CHARLESCHANDI KR
"You won't sun ive foi 65
sign in jam packed Minges Col-
the above slogan
Wednesday night. I he bearers ot
the Men were exactly right, too, as
! as! Carolina's lMth ranked 1 ad)
Pirates ended nth-ranked N.C
State's 4 game in-state winning su-
ing in a overtime thriller, 78 77.
noisy, crowd oi 4,000 fans, a
an 1 C I. women's game.
e battle between, the state's
itio tally ranked teams go
own to the wire
; was a baitle 'eaturine
, i State's 5-10 1 rudi
1 acey and I CU's six fool Mai
Denkler, but it was little 5 6 1 ydia
Roundtree thai turned out to be the
v 5 vard Karen Brab
son stole a cross-court 1 ady Pirate
pass and converted up, the
Wolfpack led 77 76 with 26 seconds
1 dia Roundtree
remaining in the overtime.
1-C'l went without a timeout
following Branson's bucket, choos-
ing to patiently look foi an opening
inside, preferably fot centei Marcia
Girven.
Roundtree found an opening,
though, and took a teammate's
pass, double pumped, and calmly
laid the game winner in with five
seconds remaining.
Slate Mgnaled for a timeout with
three second left but tailed on a last-
ditch attempt to pull the game out.
" 1 his is a tremendous victory tor
1 ast Carolina said I ad Buc
coach Cathy Andruzzi following the
wild affair. "It's great especially
because we did not pla our best
game, by fat At times our offense
nisi stood around. We had the poise
it takes when we needed it,
though
Granted, I . I did not impress
with its 36.1 percent shooting mark,
e's 42.5 ratio was little better.
Still, the game must go down as
one ot the greatest in the history ol
women's basketball in North
( arolina
"There's no doubt confessed
V( . Suite coach Kay Now. "that
this game did a lot for women's
basketball. 1 just hate that it had to
some at our expense
Neitl ei earn held a substantial
'cad to: any period ol time, State's
16 10 lead early being the biggest
antage ot the night
1C I foughl back from that six-
poini deficit, scoring ten straight to
take a 20-16 lead halfway through
the opening hall.
Denklei scored eighl ot those ten
and went on to lead all soicrs with
29. State's 1 ace tallied 24.
ODU Wins
Whi East
is
aining a n ovei
N.C State, the Pirate men
Richmond, a
.1 the
: than their female
. irts.
he Pii fell behind early
;atch up, l
d Dominion in I he
� - Scope by a 76-6"
ODl ied 39-26 hall
ased the cad to 20
� efore the Pirates
impressive com
Hues could newer get
closer than nine, though, as
the M - were unite suffi-
cient at the free throw line in
the game's late stages.
I he Monarchs, now 13-5
and earlier winners over third-
ranked DePaul, were led by
Mann's s points.
Bobby aughn added 17,
while 7-foot cen ei Mark West
tallied 12 and star forward
Ronnie Ms doO 10.
Pirate Barry Wright, a
native ol nearby Portsmouth,
u.is the game's high scorer
with Is) points. Center lorn
Szymanski added 17 and tor
ward David Underwood 13.
I he Buc record fell to 9-10
with the loss. E( I returns
home to host Samford in a
7:30 p.m. game nexl Monday
Minees Coliseum.
Both clubs had their chances to
pull the game out in regulation.
Slate led by three and the Bucs by
four, both leads coming in the final
four minutes ol the second period.
An 18-foot jumper b ECU point
guard Laurie Sikes with 1:49 re-
maining m regulation put ECU up
b four, 72-68, and seemingly in
command o the game's outcome.
Slate all-star I acey took over, hit
ting a turnaround jumper to narrow
the lead to two and latei canning
two tree throws with 0:25 left to
knot the score at 72.
A last second jumper at the end
ot regulation by lady Buc Kathy
Riley missed its mark as the game
went into overtime.
I lie Pirates were forced to play
the overtime period without the ser-
vices o Denkler, who had fouled
out with 2:35 remaining in regula-
tion.
Following the game. Andruzzi
praised the performance ot her
stellar forward.
�"Mary did a tremendous job in-
side said the ECU mentor. "We
were a little concerned with hei on
the bench when we started the over-
time
With Denkler out. the Bucs were
forced to move the much smaller,
but taster. Roundtree from an out-
side position to the inside.
As it turned out, the move was a
game-winner.
"I didn't know whether they were
trying to get the ball to me or not
Roundtree said o the last shot.
"When 1 got it, 1 saw hands in front
o! me and tried to shoot it high. I
had confidence it would go in
The game-winner by Roundtree is
somewhat ironic, as she and An-
druzzi had an early-season squabble
that almost resulted in Roundtree's
dismissal from the team.
Bui, sas the 5-6 Roundtree. all is
forgotten and well now.
"I'm ery happy right now she
said, "i feel that my problems have-
made me a better ball player
he 1 ady Pirate win was the tirst
by a North Carolina team ovei the
Lady Wolfpack since lsT6, a fact
that makes Andruzzi proud.
"This is a win tor the entire
university she said. "We've had
such great support, especially since
the ranking came out Monday.
We've received flowers and
telegrams, and this crowd was
something else tonight
Supporting Denkler's 29-point
output was Rilev's 15 and Sam
Jones' 14 points.
The win pushed the ECU mark to
16-3 and came on the heels o an
84-78 upset win ovei 15th-ranked
Virginia on Saturday. State fell to
12-5.
I he 1 ady Bucs continue then trek
through nationally-ranked teams
this Friday night when eighth-
ranked Southern California comes
to town tor a 7:30 encounter.
4
A Turning Point
A big moment in ECU'S big win last night
over N.C. State was captured in the above
photo. With ECU down 16-10, Lady Pirate
Marcia (.irven (23) fires a shot that missed
its mark. Teammate Mary Denkler (34) was
on the scene and followed the shot, even-
tually pulling off a three-point play. The
three points were the beginning a 10-0 ECU
surge. (Photo by Gary Patterson)
Denkler Battles Slump, Comes
Back To Spark Lady Pirates
B JIMMY DuPRKE
l-dii.T
Any athlete who has competed on
the intercollegiate level has ex-
perienced slumps or slow starts in a
given season. But few, if any, have
gone on to have the type of season
East Carolina's Mary Denkler has
this year.
After hitting in double figures
against the Lady Pirates' opening
opponant, Virginia Tech, Denkler's
statistics fell during a tour o' New
York and continued to flounder un-
til until a December 18 matchup
with Indiana at the Carolina
Christmas Classic, when she tallied
17 points to regain her confidance
and aid the Pirates in their fifth vic-
tory of the season.
She slipped below double digits
against Massachusetts, contributing
eight points, but has been a major
offensive factor in each of the Lady
Pirates' last 11 games.
"After the first game (Virginia
Tech), I wasn't all that upset says
Denkler. "1 played really bad
against Queens (no points, one re-
bound) and Wagner (eight points,
two rebounds).
"1 was starting and my head real-
ly wasn't into it. Last year I always
came off the bench, so 1 had a
chance to get into the game before I
was on the floor. 1 was playing
lackadaisical1
The sophomore from Alexandria,
Virginia has upped her scoring
average to 12.3 points per outing
and her rebounding has improved to
6.1. Her .550 field goal accuracy
mark leads the team, as she has con-
nected on 9 of 169 attempts.
Denkler credits third-year head
coach Cathy -ndruzzi for her rally
to stardom on the 19th tanked 1 adv
Pirate squad.
"The coaches have been working
with me and Marcia (Girven) trying
to make get more aggressive in-
side she explains. "I hey had con-
fidence in me. It just took a little
time for things to work out
Andruzi has worked with her
pne recruit for the past two years
trying to prepare her for matchups
against tallei foes. The hours of
work have paid of for both Andruz-
zi and Denkler.
"We knew Mary was a natural of-
fensive ballplayer says Andruzzi.
"She's got an eye for the basket and
has great inside moves. But we're
proudest about is her defense this
year. We're putting her against
some good offensive players and
she's holding her own
Denkler netted hei season-high ol
26 points and 11 rebounds Sunday
against nationally ranked Virginia.
a 84-78 which helped the lads
Pirates move into the Associated
Press 1 op 20 ()ne unusual aspect ot
Denkler's performance was that she
was suffering from the flu at the
time o' the game and her participa-
tion was doubttul when she made
the trip.
"I knew 1 would plav against
Virginia all along she savs. "1 was
a lutle sore, but I really wanted to
play against Virginia. I was really
psvehed for that game alter they,
beat us (58-52) in the Queens lour
nament
Denkler feels the national ranking
of her team will add a little pressure,
but insists it will be a positive factor
in the long run.
"It gives us a lot ot confidence'
savs Denkler. "We know we have to
work harder � we have to keep win-
ning
It took a while lor the lady
Pirates to gel as a unit, and Dneklei
cites early injuries to key players ,4s
a primary reason tor the late
blossom of the team.
"We didn't have a chance to
work together as a team Denkler
explains. "We reallv needed time to
get to know cash other on th .
And learn the patterns
Confidance, consistancy and
staying together as a unit are Marv
Denkler's kev goals tor the team for
the remainder ot the season
kev matchups against Southern C al
and North Carolina as well as the
NC MAW rournament remaining,
the I adv Pirates will need a blend of
these qualities to reach their
seasonal noals.
Marv Denkler
t
1







�-s
I
� �: .�

even-
rhe
)-o k r
'5

I HI I ASI C AROI IM
IANUARY29, 1981
Morrison Regrets Tech ys A dmission
Ml ANTA(UPl) �
Dwayne Morrison
warned Cieorgia lech
athletic officials the
uere throwing the
ellow Jackets basket
ball team to the wolves
when they joined the
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference.
But that warning fell
on deal eats and now
Morrison and his
players arc paying the
price of competing in
the toughest college
basketball conference
in the nation.
Foui of the other
seven ACC teams �
2nd-ranked Virginia,
6th-ranked v a k e
i orest, 1 1 tli-ranked
North Carolina and
13th-ranked Maryland
� are classed a supei
powers. A fifth, Clem-
son, was included in the
top 20 iust three weeks
ago, and the other two,
Duke and North
( arolina State, can. ac-
cording to Morrison.
"pla with anybody in
the country
"1 told (then lech
athletic director) Doug
Weaver when he began
negotiations with the
ACC several years ago
that we couldn't com-
pete against those peo-
ple, not for maybe five
years at least said
Georgia Tech's basket-
hall coach.
"1 didn't want iis in
the ACC tot selfish
reasons. W e showed we
amid hold our own in
the Metro Conference
(where lech spent three
I but theC
s a supei basketball
conference.
'1 told Coac h
Weaver we were in for
a rude awakening
said Morrison. "I'd
been around the ACC.
1 knew what to expect.
But it you haven! been
around it, you don't
know what it is
Cieorgia lech began
us ACC play last year
and its conference
record after a season
and a half is 1-20. The
lone ACC victory was a
6 2 6 1 upset over
Virginia which went on
to win the National ln-
vitation Tournament at
the start o what is now
a 21-game winning
streak.
I he Yellow Jackets
� who lost last
season's scoring leader
Brook Stppe to the
books and 7-foot Steve
Neal to an ankle injury
haven't come close
to winning an ACC
game this season. In
their last four con-
ference outings, they
lost to N. C. State
93-68, to Virginia
85-48, to Clemson
"2-48 and to North
Carolina 100-60.
"Through all this,
I've been proud of our
placers said Mor-
rison. "Even while be-
ing so obviously out-
manned, they never
quit. They've shown
they have class and
charactor even it they
don't have the sort of
talent it takes to com-
pete in the ACC
Stories arc starting to
tp up n: the local
media that Morrison is
on his way out. One
even predicted his suc-
cessor would be
Virginia Coach Terry
Holland. Tech Athletic
Director Homer Rice
insists the stories "are
pure fabrication" and
Holland insists he has
never spoken to Tech
officials about such a
move.
"The mental side of
it disturbs me said
Morrison. Our
players hear this son of
thing and they don't
know what to believe
It has to affect their at-
titude. Such stories,
always credited to
"anonymous sources
have a way of gaining a
certain amount of
credibility if repeated
often enough
Morrison feels lech
has made some head-
way on his five-year
prediction but said the
Yellow Jackets lost
ground when they lost
Steppe and Neal for
this season.
"Our problem really
dates back to the year
(1978-79) we were plac-
ed in limbo when we
were unofficially com-
mitted to the ACC and
the Metro Conference
crossed us off its list
said Morrison. "That
had a disastrous affeel
on our recruiting and
we are still feeling it
Morrison feels those
Tech boosters who
have been complaining
about the Veil o w
Jackets' lack of success
in ACC basketball
hould face up to
reahtv.
"Those other (ACC)
teams are already
there he said. "If we
think we can do in two
years what they did in
20 or 30, then we're
sadly mistaken. Right
now, we suffer from an
identity gap. We talk to
prospects who don't
even know we're in the
ACC who think we're
still in the Metro or an
independent.
"That's going to
change. But it is gomg
to take time. Once we
gain the identity we
seek, we'll be able to
recruit on a more equal
footing. The good high
school prospects know
all about schools like
North Carolina and
Maryland. We've got
to educate them so far
as thinking about
Cieorgia Tech as a place
to go to school and play
basketball
"You've got to get
talent that fits in said
Morrison. "We've got
some good talent but it
doesn't compare to that
of other AC C teams
Can Cieorgia Tech
ever be a serious con-
tends in Atlantic
C oast Conference
basketball'
"You've got to have
dreams, you'vt got to
bave imagination
Morrison said fiercely.
"I look at where we're
going, not where we've
been. This ball club will
get better. The ones
with charactor always
do when their backs are
against the wall
But Morrison then
took a wist tul
backward look.
"If we hadn't chang-
ed conferences he
said, "we'd still be a
winner
AtORTIONtl-FTO
imxiiKW
f�a�MAMCY
� IH 00 "��� mctvwvt"
�HKim �Mf. Mr if :n
n It ' vt , atd �WMWW Prrwi e� o�omg Par torRwr
UMMi Wf' ji7IMOffft�tl�A c�n III HI)
Brn(��u ' ff�� nvmh.r
trA.M I P.M KNMW
M�MlOrfMu�Mil �
cBBtl'NMlMtrtwM.
CONGRATS!
To the Lady Pirates
for their BIG win over
State Wednesday.
GOOD LUCK!
Friday against No. 8
Southern Cal
From the staff of The Fast Carolinian
4���!2�bixL MJujzI �
2 for $2.00 wast
Arby's Roast Beef beef r$
Sandwiches pi l&fo
Lmit one coupon per customer Valid through February 7. 1981 . I iV J
Not valid with any other coupon Valid only at participating Arbys Vll
2Tof $2.3Zflmencas
Arby's Super
Roast Beef
IlLimit one coupon per customer Valid through Dru
N(.t valid uith any other coupon Valid onjv a: rarr
204 E. 5th Street
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEK'S SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT RERELEASES
$8.98 list for $5.98
STYX
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THE CLASH
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ON SALE
MOST IS 50 OFF
APPLE RECORDS T-SHIRTS
Regularly $4.50
$3.99 WITH COUPON
WE BUY USED ALBUMS
CHAPS
Highway 258 N. Kinston
Eastern Carolinas
Newest And Finest
Private Club
Jan. 30
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Jan. 31
Bill Pinkney
And The Original
Drifters
Wednesday Night's
are Ladies' Night
Members and
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Welcome
Happy Hour From
All ABC Permits 5:00-7:00pm
SALE 40 OFF
Ladies' Wool blend Blazers reg. 59.95 NOW 35.97
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��
I





10
I 1 if t S1 i KOI !
�M K 29, il
State Gets Double Win classifieds
B TIM W11 I JAMS
Malt VS run
Still hampered by the flu buc and
a case ot the midseason doldrums,
ltl' men's and women's swim
teams made a respectable showing
at N State Tuesday.
1 he I ad Pirates were tough
against the sixth ranked team in
Al Division I, losing b a 75-61
score The men. having had a heav
workout the morning before the
meet, lost 73-40.
ssistant Coach Rick Kobe ex
plained, "Right now we aie icalK
naming hard for the important
meets at the end of the season, so we
sort o conceded this meet to
prepare better for later meets,
especially the nationals.
"We didn't give the kids any rest
before this meet and it showed up in
their times, except for Jennifei
layes who breaks a record every
lime she 'jumps in the pool
laves, a freshman from Raleigh,
became the fust woman to break
29.(K) seconds in the 50 yard
backstroke with a 28.63. This time
would have been fourth in the Na-
tional Championships last year.
Coach Ray Schari expects her to
break 28 seconds, which could give
hei a national title, before hei careei
is over.
laves also won the 50 freestyle in
her initial trj at that race for III
Julie Malcolm won the 100
breaststroke with a personal best
tune of 1:13.8. Dordi Henriksen
qualified for the AIAW Division II
Nationals in the 100 butterfly
(1:01.3) and also won the 50 butter f
iv (28.4).
fhe 200-freestyle relay team
( Mar io McHugh, Solly Mirlnugei,
Sally C ollins. Ion McQueston) also
won thai event
1 or the men, Doug Nieman won
two races (KXK) and 500 freestyle).
In the l(XM) tree, David Giovine
tunshed thud, and had his best tune
so tar this season.
.Ian Wiklund raced in first in the
2(H) freest vie, as did I he 400 freestyle
relav team (lack Go war, Nieman,
John Bennett, Wiklulnd).
Both teams swim against South
Carolina and fennessee, this Satur-
day . in Columbia, S.( .
Promotions Being Planned
Sev
motions ai
C arolina m
im r
was
K I
spei. I
en's
pr o
Plan
East
askel
Minges
week, i!
V t,
K
Moi
w hen
the Pirate ho
'Old. It
Hut nigl
photos
he j
the
ph
On
Sam February 7 the Pirates Hut restaraunts.
be Pizza host Athletes in Action
Color team and it's group night.
the Pirates .n group ot 15 oi generous supply ol
en away. -V more will be admitted the photos will be
ol the io the game tor SI per available but tans are
will be a person. Participating urged to arrive al the
s2 parties are asked to br- Coliseum early
e pi. the ing a list of the persons (gametime is 7:30p.m.)
nville Pizza in then group with in order to assure
Saturdav them to the game. receiving one.
Women's Rugby Starts
A women's rugby isted. Prior attempts to eluding matchups with
team has been formed be recognized by the Appalachian State and
at ECU and all in- ECU Intramural South Carolina.
terested girls are asked department have failed. Anyone interested in
to try out. 1 he club has several trying out should call
This marks 'die first home matches planned. 758-1160 and ask for
vear the team has ex- beginning in March, in- Nancy.
Taco Bell
Daily
Special
2.00
Monday Plus tax
Enchirito, Bean Burrito - Small Drink
Tuesday
Burrito Surpreme, Tostada - Small
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Wednesday
Beefy Tostada, Taco -Small Drink
lhursday
Beef Burrito, Pintos n Cheese - Small
Drink
f riday
Combo Burrito, Taco - Small Drink
Saturday
Two Taco Surpremes - Small Drink
Sunday
Two Tacos, Pintos 'n Cheese - Small
Drink
What It Is Angel Flight is an honoary, professional service
organization with the objectives of becoming involved in the com-
munity. We help sponsor the Red Cross Blood Drive and we also
sponsor families during holidays.
Fun Activitieswe have keg parties, dances, bake sales, cook
outs, and a military ball. Our biggest joy is being together. There is
no Military Obligation.
Dates To RememberFebruary
3 (Tuesday); ice cream party 7:00 Wright Annex
4 (Wednesday); Wine & Cheese party 7:00 205 F Fast Brook Apts.
5 (Thursday); popcorn party 6:30 Wright Annex
Become an Angel
Valentine
Messages
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Carolina East Mall
FOR SALE
NAVY BLUE 1948 Volvo 144 tor
sale Needs owner that is wiihnq
to do repair Call lit �743
FOR SALE Miyata Americana 10
speed perfect condition, one year
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new. 32 watt Superscope power
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COUNSELORS For western
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camp Room meals laundry,
salary and travel allowance E�
perience not necessary but must
enioy living and working with
children Only clean cut non
smoking college students need ap
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write Camp Pmewood 1801
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WANTED A i iJ- to Charlotte and
back this weekend fall David
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OVERSEAS JOBS Summer year
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FLORIDA BEFORE SPRING
BREAK Minges Coliseum
Feb 21 BE THERE'
JERRI A star brings life to the
darkest night GPJ
FOR RENT
WANTED Female roommate to
share three bedroom house Big
front and back yard Garage
Electric heat and only halt mile
form the mall and one mile form
Pitt Community College Only 580
Mo plus ' utilities Call Anita or
Ann at 756 90H or leave message
at 757 6346
APARTMENT For rent. Two
rooms modern bath and kitchen
study Call 752 3020 alter 6 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Tar River
Apartment Call Lisa 752 0653 or
7 58 5479
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED To share large house Walk
mg distance to campus 570 rent
plus fraction or utilities Call
752 3444
ROOMS FOR RENT 575 per
month utilities included lor info
call 753 3480
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share two bedroom King s Row
Apartment Half rent and
utilities Call 752 085 or leave
message at 748 9707
FOR RENT One and two
bedroom apartmen's watei and
cable included All kitchen ap
piianced pool ECU bus every ,
hour Call '58 4015
FEMALE ROOMATE Wanted to
share a two bedroom Eastbrook
apt Halt rent and utilities A non
smoker please fall 752 4443
L IBE R AL MINDE D MALE To
shan on?� bedroom apt 575 00 mo
plus half utilities Mike 752 3501
ROOMMATE WANTED
Eastbrook two bedroom kitchen
den bath HOC 0C deposit 5Q7 50
plus utilities Call 758 663
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
tor 3 bedroom duple� on W 4th S'
565 00 month 758 75i2
FOR RENT SmaM ap's tor
males Near campus
590 00 $125 00. utilities included
1'jl 241 days
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED Share nice village Green ap'
S100 00 rent and half utilities Can
757 3151 or 758 4029
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASEDFROM2 00 4 00M F AT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
FICE
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If you need money (or fall clothes or (ootbslt tickets, now Is a
good time to tell your gold and silver valuables. And here's a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
$
Almost everyone has a high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
lair prices and good service.
Wl PAY CASH ON.THLSPOT
FOR JIWIIIT, VAIUAIIISARYTHIM
MARKID10K - UK - UK.
S GOLD S
� IINCS � NiCKUCIS � WATCNIS � 0UM0NDS
� CLASS llCS � WIMINC IAIDS � DIITAl
COLD � IIACILITS � MO0CNIS � 10CKITS
� CHAINS � UCNTIIS � CUff LINKS � lAttlNCS
RAVINC ON TNI t�OT
C AIM I OR ITIMI M A IK ID
STERLING SILVER
RI6AR9UIS Of CONDITION
� COFFEE SERVICES � GOBLETS
� RINGS � SPOONS � TRAYS � KNIVES
� FORKS�NECKLACES�BRACELETS
� FRANKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE
$
& RING
401 S.EVANS ST. open
S.EVANSST. OPEN930530MUN bAI
MONY KOUSE SOUTH) PHO N E 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER.
?





Title
The East Carolinian, January 29, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 29, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.106
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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