The East Carolinian, January 27, 1981






lEaat (Earnlintan
S
w
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No
A
10 Pages
Tuesday, January 27 1981
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,(KM
Directors Name Maxwell As
New Student Union President
By PAUL COLLINS
The Student Union Board of
Directors announced Thursday its
choice tor 1981-82 union president,
and for the first time a minority stu-
dent has been selected to till the
position.
Ronald Maws ell, a junior major-
ing in music and arts management,
will succeed outgoing president
Karen MeLawhorn on March 20.
Maxwell is currently chairman of
the Minority Arts Committee and
has served on the committee since
the fall of 1979. He is also chairman
of the University Union Committee.
"I feel pretty good about it (being
named president). I've wanted to
hold the position of president since
mv freshman year said Maxwell.
"I'm looking forward to a good
year
On being the first black president
Maxwell said, "I think it's an ac-
complishment for the university.
The university is making progress; I
think we're moving ahead.
"1 feel really good being the one
to achieve it. I just hope I won't be a
single case. We've come a long way,
but we have a long way to go
Maxwell did not feel that being
black would affect his performance
as Student Union president. "I have
been involved in the Student Union
far beyond my position as chairman
o! Minority Arts he said, "and I
have not encountered any opposi-
tion
During the next tew weeks Max-
well will be involved in selecting
chairmen for the union committees
and will help formulate budget pro-
posals for the upcoming year. "I
think we'll have a young union he
said. "A lot of people who are cur-
rently chairpersons are
graduating
Maxwell said he has two main
goals for next year, to establish the
University Union and to bring a
broader cross section of students in-
to union activity.
"I think people working in the
Student Union could represent a
broader cross section. We need to
bring more minorities in
Maxwell added that he would also
like to see more lecture and theater
presentations on campus.
Maxwell will be attending a con-
ference in San Antonio in February
that will deal with general opera-
tions of student unions. "I think
this can be very important, especial-
ly if we go under the University
Union plan
This plan would unite the Student
Union and Mendenhall Student
Center into a single entity. "I think
that can be a big accomplishment of
the next year Maxwell remarked.
Maxwell was chosen over two
other candidates in a closed meeting
of the board of directors, according
to MeLawhorn. The other can-
didates were Adam Smith, a
member of the films committee, and
Angelia Bnnn, an assistant editor of
the Rebel.
MeLawhorn felt that Maxwell
was chosen because of his ex-
perience. "It was a tough decision
she said, "but Ron has had the ex-
perience.
"Ron will be an excellent presi-
dent
Ronald Maxwell was appointed as the new Student Union
president.
Kidney Transplant Nearly A Reality A t ECU
ECU Medical School's New Program Brings Hope To Many
By GEORGETTE F. HEDRK'k
A new prog: am at the Last
Carolina University School of
Medicine and Pitt County Memorial
Hospital will bring the hope ol a
kidney transplant closer to home for
citizens in eastern North Carolina
with end-stage renal disease.
Medical center officials were
notified this week that approval to
implement renal transplantation ser-
as been granted b the Health
ancing Administration of the
Department of Health and Human
Services. The program w:ll be
directed by the ECU Department of
Surgery.
The medical school's Office ol
Health Services Research and
Development estimates that 168 pa-
tients in the region will be medically
eligible for a transplant in 1981. The
Depart men! of Surgery expects to
pert cm in 25 procedures during the
first year of the program.
Dr. frank Thomas, professor of
surgerv and director of renal
transplantation, said the new service
would make renal transplantation
"more accessible and convenient"
to many patients who now depend
on dialysis to rid their bodies of
harmful wastes because their
kidneys have tailed.
"ECU and Pitt Memorial have
excellent physicians, facilities,
laboratories and staff to support
renal transplantation here said
Thomas. "We expect to perform
our first transplant bv the end of
January
Thomas said surgeons at Pitt
Memorial have removed more than
30 pairs of kidneys during the last
year. The kidneys have been
transported to Duke Medical
Center, headquarters for the
Southeastern Regional Organ Pro-
curement System that serves 18
states.
A computer connects the ECU
transplantation program with the
network of 136 medical centers
across the nation that participate in
the system. The computer is used to
match a donoi kidney with a com-
patible recipient, a process that
usually takes place within 36 to 48
hours after a kidney is removed.
Potential organ donors are usual-
Iv victims of strokes or severe head
injuries who have irreparable brain
damage.
Thomas said a patient requesting
a kidney transplant will first have an
educational consultation with a
nephrologist and a transplant
surgeon to discuss the risks and
benefits of dialysis and transplanta-
tion.
The next step will be to determine
if a kidney is available from a living
related donor � either a brother,
sister, father, mother, son or
daughter. Thomas said that 90 per
cent of transplants from living
related donors are successful and
that the survival rate declines as low
as 65 percent for recipients with
unrelated donor grafts.
Tissue matching, drug therapy
and immunological monitoring
Communications Major Being Developed
determine the recipient's chances of
successfully accepting the new
kidney.
rhomas said a kidney transplant
usually takes about two hours. The
recipient and living related donor
will be in adjoining operating
rooms, and once the kidney is
removed from the donor, it will be
rinsed with a cold solution and
transplanted immediately.
A patient who is not compatible
with a living related donor may
spend up to two years on a waiting
list before a suitable kidney is
located thn ugh the organ procure-
ment system Organs identified
through the computer network will
be transported to Greenville in a
special preservation machine that
will protect the kidney until surgerv
is performed.
Before and alter surgerv, a pa-
tient is treated with immunosup-
pressive drugs to block the body's
natural rejection of the new kidney.
Careful monitoring allows physi
cians to modify drug therapy, an ac-
tion which mav reverse a patient's
initial rejection of an organ.
Most paitents remain in the
hospital 30 days to test kidney func-
tion and modify drug therapy. After
leaving the hospital, patients will
visit the transplantation clinic for
additional immunological monitor-
ing. If a kidney is not rejected in 60
davs, Thomas said there is a 90 per-
cent chance for a successful graft.
In addition to permitting patients
with end-stage renal disease to lead
more normal lives, Thomas said
thai Transplantation is also more
effective than dialysis. Accor-
ding to a study in the NEW
ENG1 AND JOURNAL OF
MEDICINE, over a 10-year period,
transplantation is approximately six
times less expensive than dialysis
performed in a medical center and
nearly tour times less expensive than
dialysis performed at home.
See KIDNEY, Paye 3
BHADBIFKK1N
siManl Nr� dtlor
degree in communications will
be available for ECU students in the
fall of 1981, "that is if things go as
planned said Gerry Haskins,
assistant professor of drama and
speech.
Haskins is chairman of an ad hoc
committee for the communications
major, a committee appointed by
Angele Volpe, dean of arts and
sciences to lay out the recommenda-
tions for the major.
Also serving on the ad hoc com-
mittee are John Warren, Sally Brett
and Bill Borden of the Department
of English, and Jim Reese and
Carlton Ben from drama and
speech.
In addition to laying out the
course work for the major, the com-
mittee is responsible for putting
together a description of the major
for the catalog, and for insuring
that the program meets university
policies and requirements. The final
task of the committee will be to
prepare the authorization materials
for approval by the University of
North Carolina system.
"All functions of the committee
will, hopefully, be completed by the
end of February and we should have
final approval for the program by
fall semester of 1981 Haskins
stated.
The committee has also recom-
mended two new staff positions for
the communications major, one for
speech and one for journalism.
During fall semester of 1980 a
survey was conducted by the com-
mittee among students on campus.
Seventy-five of the students
surveyed expressed interest in the
major. Also during this time, 90
newspapers, radio stations and
television stations in eastern North
Carolina were surveyed by the com-
mittee. Of those responding to the
survey, two-thirds said they would
accept practicum students under the
program and one-half stated they
would pay practicum students a
salary.
The communications major will
have a core curriculum involving 17
hours of course work required for
all students. This curriculum in-
volves fundamental courses in jour-
nalism and broadcasting. The major
will then offer two tracks of study to
the student, a print track, which
concentrates in newspapers, and an
electronics track which concentrates
in radio and television. After com-
pleting the core curriculum, the stu-
dent should have a good idea about
which track to pursue.
"After receiving the degree, a stu-
dent should be able to switch from
print to broadcast or vice-versa
without much trouble Haskins
stated.
"From a public relations stand-
point, a major in communications
will be more valuable than a major
in journalism John Warren add-
ed. Warren also stated that over the
next five years, 400 jobs in com-
munications will become available
in eastern North Carolina.
The program, when implemented,
will be headed jointly by the Depart-
ment of English and the Department
of Drama and Speech. An ad-
ministrator of the major will be ap-
pointed and will act as a liaison bet-
ween the two departments.
Students with ideas or sugges-
tions, or those with interest in the
program should contact Gerry
Haskins at 757-6629.
Helms Tells Iran
To Take A Walk
WASHINGTON UP1 � Sen.
Jesse Helms invited Iran to "take a
long walk off a short pier" Monday
and said the United States should
not consider itself bound by the
agreement worked out between the
Carter administration and "a bunch
of bums
"I don't think the national honor
of the United States hangs on the
thin thread of living up to anything
involving a bunch of bums the
conservative North Carolina
Republican told reporters after a
McCallum Assumes Infirmary Post
Pho?o By JON JORDAN
James H. McCallum
By OTIS ROBINSON
Staff Wrilr
After serving 33 years as director
of Student Health Services at East
Carolina University, Dr. Cary F.
"Fred" Irons has stepped down,
and a new head has been named.
"My hobby has been my work
said Irons, who remains as a physi-
cian. "It has been very rewarding
and very satisfying. I just wanted to
step down as director
Irons joined the ECU staff as
director of the Student Health
Center (infirmary) in July 1947 after
serving as a medical officer in
World War II. He served as director
of the student health facility until
Jan. I, 1981.
"I have found it most interesting
and challenging said Irons. "It
has been a very valuable experience.
The staff has been exceedingly
cooperative. The administration has
been most helpful
Assuming directorship of the Stu-
dent Health Center is James H. Mc-
Callum Jr who has practiced
pediatrics in Williamston for the
past 20 years. "I am pleased with
Dr. McCallum Irons said. "I
believe he will do a fine job
Though McCallum assumed
directorship of the student health
facility on Jan. 5, he said his
predessor cannot be replaced. "I'm
not replacing Dr. Irons he said.
"You can't replace an institution.
He's an institution in himself. I'm
only relieving him of some of his
responsibilities
According to Kay Van Nortwick,
administrative manager of the Stu-
dent Health Center, a formal search
committee was used to locate the
new director. "I think he's outstan-
ding commented Van Nortwick.
"We're very fortunate to get him
McCallum is a Wake Forest
University alumnus and received his
M.D. from Bowman Gray School of
Medicine.
He completed an internship at the
U.S. Naval Hospital in Pensacoia,
Florida, and pediatrics residences at
N.C. Memorial Hospital in Chapel
Hill, and the Duke University
Medical Center in Durham.
The new official said he is op-
timistic about the future of the Stu-
dent Health Center. He said: "Dr.
Irons has done an excellent job. I
was fortunate enough to step in on a
fine program. My goal is to make a
good program even better. I want
this Student Health Center to be the
best in the state
The Student Health Services
staff, which McCallum will super-
vise, includes four physicians, a
consulting psychiatrist, an ad-
ministrative manager, two nurse
practitioners, 14 nurses, laboratory
technicians, a part-time pharmacist
and supporting clerical staff.
meeting in the Oval Office with
President Reagan.
"As far as I'm concerned they
can take a long walk off a short
pier
Helms said he did not discuss the
agreement with Reagan at Mon-
day's meeting, but had earlier
registered such sentiments with the
president.
Helms also said the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee will
hold hearings Wednesday on the
terms of the agreement between Iran
and the United States for release of
the now free 52 American hostages.
Reagan and Helms discussed per-
sonnel, economics, and other mat-
ters, said Helms.
Helms said his opposition to
Reagan's Defense Department
leaders is abating somewhat with
what Helms said was the imminent
appointment of Fred Ikle to a top
post in the department.
Helms charged that Secretary
Casper Weinberger and Deputy
Secretary Frank Carlucci knew
"scarcely anything" about defense.
But with the "arrival of Ikle and
others 1 think that will be
remedied he said.
On The Inside
Announcements2
I Jitonals4
Classifieds10
I eatures 5
I etters4
Sports8
I ntcrtainment7
A
i






t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN I M ARY 27. 1981
Announcements
KARATE CLUB
A very imporlant meeting ot the
Karate Club will be held Thurs ,
Jan 2V in the Memorial Gym Doio
Please be there at 7 30 sharp
soc
There will be a meeting ot the
SociologyAnthropology Club or.
Wednesday Jai 28 at 7 00 p m m
BrewSter D 302 All are welcome
to attend It will be a short
meeting to organize the club for
the spring semester
Refreshments will be served Call
Jim at 7S6 5004 for information
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
An episcopal service of Holy
Communion will be celebrated
Tuesday evening. Jan 27 in the
chapel of the Methodist Student
Center i5lh Street across from
Gar reft Dorm) The service will
be at 5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev Bill Hadden,
celebrating
TO-NIGHT
The event that could be the Turn
mg point in your life Mendennail
Theatre 8 00 p m Don't miss it
IVCF
inter varsity Christian
Fellowship will meet Thursday
n.ght at 7 30 in the Methodist Stu
dent Center This week's topic is
the fulfillment of end time pro
phecy Everyone is welcome
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Women's rugby team meets
Tues. Wed. & Thurs. 4 6pm on
the rugby fields behind the Allied
Health Building No experience
needed, anyone is welcome For
more info Nancy 7S8 1160 or
Kim 752 6388
DELTA ZETA
t et freedom r,ng Delta .ela
toms the whole nation m welcom
mg home 52 brave Americans We
would like to remind all members
of our big brother organization
that there is a meeting at 4 p m
Wed Jan 28 at the house Please
it possible, bring your spring ac
tivify tee
GUITAR
instruction in playing the guitar
and banio will be offered on Wed
evenings at ECU. beginning Feb
11
Each hour long class, meeting
tor 10 sessions, will give bas I
sfruction m playma styles care of
the instruments and music fun
aamentals
banjo class will meet from
6 30 to 7 30 p m . and the guitar
c iass from 7 30 to 8 30 p m
According to instructor Roy
Kennedy, little or no previous e�
perience with the instruments is
required although participants
should br.ng their own banios or
guitars to class
Further information about these
other non credit evening
courses is available from the Of
? ice of Non Credit Programs. Oivi
Sion ot Continuing Education
ECU Greenville, NC telephone
757 6143
SOULS
The Society of United Liberal
Students is sponsoring an essay
contest in celebration of Black
History Month The topic is
"WAKE UP BLACK AMERICA
The essay should be at least 3
double spaced typed pages The
deadline for entry is Feb 10. 1981
1st Prize $50 00 2nd Prize
J25 00. 3rd Prize $15 00 If you
have any questions please call
Gracie Wells at 752 9802 or Eula
Moore at 752 8981
CAREER DAY
The History Department of ECU
will be holding its third annual
Career Day program on
Thursdasy, Jan 29. in Brewster
B 102 from 2 00 5 00 From 2 3, the
topic will be "Business Oppor
tunities for History Majors,
which will concern various fields
including retail merchandising,
trucking, restaurant and food
merchandising, and banking
From 3 4 the topic w.ll be "The
Mechanics of Seeking a Job"
which will include tips on how to
do well in interviews resume
writing, and testing on the job
From 4 5 the topic will concern
public history and public service
of the history maior There will be
a questions and answers session at
the end of each topic discussed All
history and humanities maiors are
urged to attend
GAY COMMUNITY
The East Carolina Gay Com
munitv will hold its weekly
meeting Tuesday Jan 27 at 5 00
P m The ECGC meets at 953 E
10th St at the bottom ot College
Hill New members are welcome
and we hope you will attend
ECU LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will hold
its first meeting of the semester
this Thursday night, January 29th.
beginning at 7 30 pm mtheMuIti
Purpose room of Mendenhall
The speaker Thursday night will
be Don Hicks the new North
Carolino Public Defender, who
will discuss his position and the
creation of the office Also, a short
business meeting will be held prior
to his speaking
All interested students are urg
ed to attend, and new members
are accepted at any time Thespr
mg semester will be an active one
for the club a trip to UNC Law
School is planned for February
20th, a trip to Washington, D C is
planned, and a Law Day event will
be sponsored by the Law Society
For additional information, one
may contact Lynn Calder at
757 6611. ext 218 (9 00 5 00) Or
758 9923
FELLOWSHIP
The Fountain of Lite Christian
Fellowship will meet each Wed
night at 7 p m m the Ledomas
Wright Afro American Cultural
Center Come out and enioy some
good Christian fellowship
PSI CHI
The Psychology Honor Society
will meet Wed Jan 28 at 7 00 in
Sp 112 Plans for spring semester
will be discussed All members
are urged to attend
FRISBEE CLUB
The Fnsbee Club will meet m
room 248 in Mendenhall on Jan 29.
1�80 at 7 p m All interested are in
vited to come
JOBS
The Office of Handicapped Stu
dent Services has employment op
portunities tor students interested
m becoming attendants to
wheelchair students For details
come to Whicharo Building, room
211 or call 757 6799
HARASSMENT
HOTLINE
The East Carolina Proiect on
Sexual Harassment t Dept of
Sociology and Anthropology)
wants to talk with students who
have had problems with an East
Carolina teacher If you have ever
been offended by sexual looks.
comments suggestions, or
touches, we want to near about
your experience Your confiden
tiality is guaranteed Your
sTatements will not be used to file
complaints agamst faculty
members Mon Thurs 2 p m 10
pm Fri Sat 12pm 4p.m Sun 4
p m 10 p m Call Linda Today
752 3484
A.M.A.
The ECU chapTer of The
American MarkeTing AssooaTion
is holding a membership drive
during the first 30 days of the
semester Named the Albert R
Conley Chapter the organization
proposes to bring TogeTher the pro
fessionai and the student m the
field of markefmg
Applications may be obtained by
contacting the officers Mike
McManan or Elton Boney in A 226
Rawi
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will meet on
Tuesday Jan 27 a' 4 00 p m in
Rawl 103 Attendance is man
datory tor all members
TRAFFIC
The ECU Tratl
presently beng. revised In
dividual a x' rtg v suggi 1
changes are requested to subm.t
Their suggesTions in wr.Ting to the
Traffic Department attention O'
ficer j A Karpovich no later than
Jan 31
(ACT)
The American College Test
(ACT) will be offered at ECU on
Sa' March 28. '98! Application
blanks are To be compleled and
mailed to ACT Registration P O
Box 414, lowa City. Iowa 52240
Registration deadline is Feb 27.
1981 Applications may be obtain
ed from the ECU lestmu Center
Speight Bidg Room 105
MSC
Applications tor Rooms are
available aT The MeThodisT STudenT
Center tor occupancy next sum
mer and fan For more informs
tion and application forms come
by the office between 8 30 and 2 30
weekdays
MeThodisT Worship sevices are
held on Sunday evenings m the
Chandler Chapel at the Methodist
Center. 501 East Fifth street The
services are informal and last for
30 m,nutes ViS'tors are welcome
Student Loans Up to $700 are
available tor members of the
United Methodist Church atten
dmq ECU For more information
contact Nancy Owens at 758 2030
or stop bv the office at the
Methodist Student Center
Wednesday even-nq fellowship
supper is held each week at the
Methodist Student Center begmn
ing at 5 30 p m Cost per person is
$2 for all you can eat There is a
short program following the meal
"Religion and Poliics is the
theme for the winter retreat spon
sored by the Wesley Foundation
STudenT Program Council The
retreat will be held in Washington
DC and will include visits wiTh
legislaT.ve personnel FurTher in
formafion is available from Dan
Earnhardt by calling 758 20j0
(AHPAT)
The Allied Healfh Professions
Admission Tesf will be offered at
ECU on Sat . March 7. 1981 Ap
plication Dlanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to the
Psychological Corp 304 E 45th
St . New York NY 10017 to arrive
by Feb 7 1981 Application blanks
are also available at Tne TesTmg
Cenier SpeighT Blog . Room 105.
ECU
Kidney Transplant
Nears Reality
Continued From Page I
In addition 10
Thomas, ECU physi
cians Walter J. Pories,
Charles Rob and Ed-
ward G. Flickinger are
members of the
transplantation team.
The team also includes
surgery residents Carl
Haisch and Robert
Deepe, surgical
transplant coordinator
Dennis Blessing,
medical transplant
coordinator Sandra
Bullock, and nurse
practitioner Diane
Meelheim.
Drs. Alfred L.
Ferguson, Thomas E.
Burkart and Wayne
Kendrick, clinical pro-
fessors of medicine,
will serve as nephrology
consultants along with
AUDITIONS
Scripts are now on reserve in
Joyner Library for the upcoming
Dinner Theatre production "And
Miss Reardon Drinks A Little"
directed by Steve Finnan There
are roles for five women and Two
men AudiTions will be held on
Feb 6 from 7 30 p m until 10 00
pm and Feb 7 from 2 00 pm un
til 5 00 p m
CHEERLEADING
The tape that served as East
Carolina University's entry into
the national cheerleadmg contest,
sponsored by the Inter national
Cheerleader Foundation, will be
shown n Mendenhall Student
Center on Friday, Feb 6, 1981 The
tape is scheduled to be viewed in
the newspaper reading section
from 6 30 to 7 30 and from 8 30 to
9 00 Everyone is mvited The tape
was produced by Dave Batch and
Jake Postma of the Audio Visual
Service Center of the School of
Medicine
MCAT
Mr John S Childers. Director,
ECU Testing Center announced
that the new Medical College Ad
mission Test (MCAT) application
packets have arrived in the
Testing Center. Speight 105 The
test dates for 1981 are April 4 1981
and September 12, 1981 The
deadline date tor the Apr,I 4 test is
March 6 1981 and the deadline
date for submitting application for
the September 12, 198! test is
August 14 1981
TWIG FELLOWSHIP IS:
People learning the Bible, so we
will know The principles ot living
The Word of God sefs forth Then
as we apply these principles To Our
lives, we learn how To help people
help Themselves and enioy life i
T.m 6 17. John 10 10 Join us in our
quesT To learn The Word of God.
which is The Will of Goo Every
Monday and Thursday aT 7 30 PM
Rm 212 Mendenhall STudent
entei
SIGN LANGUAGE
The Sign Language Club will
have its regular bi monThiy
meeTinq at 6 p m on Sunday. Feb
I in the multi purpose room of
Mendenhall Student Center There
will be a covered dish dinner
before the meeting and a caption
ed film afterward This weeks
film will be "Dr Zhivago'
All members are urged to aT
�� � : Any rtteresl . � � � a i
. �� � you need noT be a
� ber
JOB SEARCH
A series of workshops will be
conducfed by The Career Planning
and PlacemenT Office in the areas
ot interviewing techniques and
resume design "Interviewing
Techn.ques" is scheduled tor
Tuesday. Jan 27, and Wednesday
Feb 4 Resume Design will be
discussed on Wednesday Jan 28
and Tuesaa, Feb 3 There will be
two sessions each day one aT 2
pm and another at 3 p m n Rawl
102 All seniors s'o invited to at
tend
AMA
The Albert R Conley Chapter of
the American Market.ng Assooa
lion will hold ts first meeting for
the Spring semester on Wednes
day. Jan 28, 1981 in Rawl 130 at
5 00 Mr Frank Longmo of the
Allen and Longmo Advertisinu
firm will be the spea �
INTRAMURAL
There will be an ECU In
tramural Council meeting held on
Tuesday. Feb 3 at 4 30 p m in
Memorial 104 All representatives
are encouraged to attend For fur
ther information contact the in
tramural Office Ext 6387
INTERNSHIPS
The Co op Office 313 Raw t.
757 6979 6375. has applications and
iob descriptions tor sum" � �
employment opportuni' .
government Students are en
couraged to apply This program
offers stipends ot approx.m.r.
$125 p weefc rOf 125 ntern pro
� Is and students will work 40
hours per week for 10 weeks
CO OP JOBS
The Co op Office has current m
formation concern.nq career
related work experiences for both
undergraduate and graduate
students during su" mer, fa
spring semesters w ��
and private ag uding the
Pentagon Dept of the inter,or.
Fish and Wildlife Service. Dept of
Energy Federal Prison Sys
and Social Security Admimstra
t.on Private organizations include
IBM Duf Power Co . Burroughs
Wellcome ana of i i
Students are urged tc come by
the Co op Office to review Ob
descriptions and to talk to a Co op
coordinator concerning iob
posS'b'lities Man, positions' .
approaching deadlines Therefore
�sted sTudents should not
RECITAL
SChool ot Music seniors John
Moore and Allen Pettit will appta'
in recital Thursday Jan 29 at 7 30
p m in the A j Fletcher Recital
Hall For his portion of the pro
gram Moore will perform the
following trumpet works Haydn's
Concerto for Trumpet BEr
nard Fitzgerald's Ballad and
James F Burke s Mao
Trumpet Moore will be accom
panied on piano by Melissa Usery
Ptt,t will perform, on French
Horn. Mozart's Horn Concerto
No 3 Gliere s "intermezzo
Hartley s Meditation Cooke s
"Rondo in B Hat and Desportes'
Sicilienne et Allegro " Accompa
r.y.ng him on piano wil be Danny
Dial The final work on the pro
gram will be John Cheetham's
Brass Quintet Piece featuring
Moore and Pettit assisted by
Steve Anderson. Glenn Johnson
and John Jones Moore, a native of
Woodbridge, VA is a student of
James Sean of the ECU music
faculty. Pettit from Winston
Salem studies w.th James
Parneii Both are pursing the
Bachelor of Music degree m Music
Education
EXERCISE
� . Dept ot intramural
Recreational Services is offering
classes in Exercise and Weight
Control Jazz Exercise. Aerobic
Conditioning, and Slimnastics
Each class is designed to provide
information on (I) the purpose of
exet ��� . the effective results
of activity, (3) weight control and
figure improvement 4 Yoga
and relaxation techniques andiSi
various exercises to maintain flex
ibiiity and muscle tones The
sTrucfure of each class will be
determined m accordance a ��
express desires of the participants
enrolled
For additional information con
TacT Nanc y M'Ze aT 757 6387
RECITAL
Catherine Styron sophomore in
the ECU School of Music, will pre
sent a recital of piano music on
Friday Jan 30 at 9 p m in the
A J Fletcher Recital Hall Miss
Styron is pursuing a Bachelor ot
Mush degree program m piano
performance
A native of Davis NC she
studies piano with Dr Henry
Doskey of the ECU Keyboard
laculty For her program Miss
Styron will perform Scarlatti's
"Sonata m E Maior" and Sonata
m G Ma,or Beethoven's
Sonata Opus 110 and Brahms
Eight Piano Pieces Opus 76
There is no admission charge
and the public is invited to attend
FOOD LAB
The School of Home Economics
is sponsoring an Advanced Quanti
ty Food Lab this semester Din
ners are by advance "season
ticket only Meals are served on
Wed from 6 45 7 45 p m There
are two plans, each consisting of
five meals at $22 50 per plan, or
both plans for $45 00 per plan
For further information contact
Ruby Sheridan at the School of
Home Economics
FORCES FOR
FREEDOM
Bracelets similar tc those issued
for P O W s in Vietnam are now
available for the men involved in
the aborted rescue attempt m
Iran Bracelets are $3 each and
proceeds from sales will go to
establish a college fund for the
children ot these men
The address is
Forces for Freedom
PO Box 2501
Tuluca Lake, CA 91602
NURSERY
The Nursery School Program
operated at the ECU Dept of Child
Development and Family Rela
tions is now accepting applications
for the 1981 82 school year Ap
plication deadline is Feb 13
Open to children who have third
or fourth birthdays by Oct 15. the
program has limited spaces
available Any parent of a three
or four year old may apply Fur
ther information about the pro
gram is available m Rm 128 of the
ECU Home Economics Bldg or by
telephone. 757 6926 or 757 6908
PHYSICS
Tuesday. Jan 27 at 7 30 pm there
will be a meeting of the Society of
Physics Students Dr Joseph Nor
wood will be the featured speaker
and give a talk on reality Topics
of the meeting will include future
SPS planned excursions and elec
tions All members and prospec
five members are urged To aTTend
The meeTmg will be held m Room
E303
SENIOR
SHOW
Dale Nance ot Boonviile. NC. a
senior studenT m The ECU School
ot Art. will be having a show ot
pamlings in the Jenkins Fine Art
Center Foyer Jan 25 through Feb
1 A candidate for a B S degree in
art education Nance plans to
enter the M S program m art
education with a minor in pam
tmg
OPEN HOUSE
The city of Greenville Public
Works Dept cordially inv.tes you
to an open house honoring the
opening of it's new facility on Sun .
the first day of Feb . 1981. Two
O'clock unlil four o'clock, 15O0
��. street
SKI
Ski Snowshoe, West VA during
Spring Break 5 days and 5
nights A $10 deposit is due Tues
, Jan 27 at 4 p m . Memorial
Gym Final payments are due on
Thursday. Feb 12, at 4 p m in
Memorial Gym 108 For more in
formation contact Mrs Jo
Saunders at 757 6000. or come by
room 205 Memorial Gym
STUDENT UNION
POSITIONS
Ap; �� ns are being accepted
tor Coffeehouse Chairperson and
committee members immediate
. Pick up applications m the Stu
dent union 0ce Rm 234 m
Mendenhall Student Center Can
757 661! Ext 210
SPRING BREAK TRIP
The StudenT Union Travel Com
miTTee has planned two Trips dur
mg Spring Break One is to Ft
Lauderdale Fla and The oTher is
a Ft Lauderdale Bahamas
Cruise Prices include transporta
tion. hotel accommodations, and
the cruise For more information
go by Mendenhall Central Ticket
I ��� ce or call at 757 66H Ft
Lauderdale, Fla Trip Quad
hotel room $219 00 Double hotel
room $309 00 Ft Lauder
dale Bahamas Cruise Quad
hotel room &, quad cabm, $499 00
Double hotel room & quad cabm,
$549 00
ASSISTANTS
Graduate assistanfships Three
assistantships are available for
ECU graduate students interested
in working on socioeconomic
studies ot fisheries m North
Carolina Graduate students from
any field may apply but skills in
social science research methods
or natural resource management
or computing and statistical
analysis are sought a stipend of
$450 per month will be paid The
assistantships commence m
February. 1981 Further mforma
tion can be obtained from Mrs
Stack institute for Coastal and
Marine Resources ECU
telephone 757 6220
C'U physician Richard
Merrill. Drs. J. Richard
Gavigan, Edward O.
Janosko and Emmett J.
Walsh Jr clinical pro-
fessors of surgery, will
share responsibility for
the removal of kidneys.
Donor testing and
tissue matching will be
performed by Dr.
Robert Hanrahan,
assistant professor of
pathology and
laboratory medicine.
Before joining the
medical school in
August, 1979, Thomas
was a member of the
renowned kidney and
heart transplantation
team at the Medical
College of Virginia. He
is a founding member
of the American Socie-
ty of Transplant
Surgeons.
BOXING
The Sixth Annual TKE Boxing
Tournament will be held on Feb
24. 25. and 26 in Wright
Auditorium Registration begins
Jan 19 at the TKE house The
event is sponsored by Miller Call
758 7699 for information
PRISON
VISITS
Every Thursday a group of ECU
students visit Mavry Prison as
part of the Yokefellow program
THp men there really appreciate
our visits Prison is a lonely place
You can help bring some hap
pmess to someone's life WE leave
at 7 p m p.ck up service
available For more information
call 758 4906 or 756 9324
2 for $2.00 fttncas
Arby's Roast Beef beef rx
Sandwiches pS vfe
ihrough February 7, 1981 �if H i
only at participating Arbys 5I1 f"
2T6r"$273YSrTcaS
rby's Super 2JJL
Roast Beef gfV
I imit one couoor oer customerVahd throughrvhruanj 7 1981 fl f S
iLimit one coupon per customer Valid throughTebruary 7. 1981
N6t valid w ith any other coupon Valid onlv at participating Arbys
sir!
1
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of thasa advartiMd Hams Is required to bo raadlly avallabla for sue at or
bolow tho advartlsad prtco in ��ch AAP Stora, axcapt as specifically notad
In this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT JAN. 31, AT A&P IN GREENVILLE, N.C
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO
OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Highway 264 By-Pass Greenville Square
Shopping Center Greenville, N.C.
EXCLUSIVE AT A&P . .
Beautiful Diane China
This Week's
Feature Item
Saucer
79
c
each
50' COUPON
Save 50 on
Diane China
LIMIT PKG OF TWO
WITH THIS
COUPON
Salad Plates 634
WITH EACH $5.00 purchase ��
GOOD THRU SAT JAN 31 IN ALL A&P STORES
IN N C �SC EXCEPT AIKEN & BEAUFORT S C
FRESH FRYER
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH � ql �TflC
2 In A Bag, Limit 2 Bags c�jcen J3
Whole Fryers
A&P QUALITY CORN FED
Pork Roast
CENTER RIB
Pork
Chops
lb
Loin
End
A&P QUALITY
Ground Beef
In 5 Lb.
Roll
Pkg.
lb.
MARVEL .
Sliced Bacon 9o
i
Coca-Cola, Mello Yello, Sprite
Mr. Pibb, Tab, Grape Crush, Orange Crush
99
Litre Plastic Bottle
37 COUPON
ANN PAGE
APP
Orange Juice
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON
QQC
V2gal.
ctn.
II
1
I
I
I
631 I
GOOD THRU SAT JAN 31 AT AtP IN GREENVILLE. N C
I
I
I
I
I

40&COUPON
"JBStf
APP
37Q!
630 I
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON
GOOD THRU SAT , JAN 31 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE N C
30 COUPON
AP
A SUPERB BLEND, RICH IN BRAZILIAN COFFEES
Eight O'clock Bean Coffee
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON
GOOO THRU SAT , JAN Jl. AT AAP IN GREENVILLE, NC.
1-lb.
bag
199;
632 !
fO� FftfSMMESS AMD SAVINGS
CALIFORNIA CRISP ICEBERG
Lettuce
large
head
EASTERN RED DELICIOUS
Apples
U.S. Extra
Fancy
3
lb.
bag
99
c
BUTTERY RICH
California Avocados
00
Large
14 Size
39�
5
30 size
only
I
ail pr

enter
Natioi
Educi
Jem
i
Pa
I
"Bu f
I
I
I
ld
A
B
agr i
brt. I
man
i
rai
ly raidf
rerr
park

fie-
ri
H
mil I
I
indvM
vimrj
cull
hi
"ap
ing i
spe(
I):
i
the I
du
"ai
I H v
(t e
the
the
mmmmmm
�f





THt I AS! C AROl INIAN
JANUARY 27, 1981
1
I
I
I
I
1
?
632
1
I
I
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
f
A
Student Population Increase Upsets Predictions
(C PS) - In a rever-
sal of recent trends and
in defiance of almost
all predictions, white
males again have taken
over as the majority of
entering college
students, according to
Andrew Pepin of the
National Center for
Education statistics
(NCES).
During the 1979-80
academic year, women
tor the first time com-
prised more than 50
percent of the
American student
population. While
women are still in the
majority, men are now
apparently catching up.
Part-time students,
in addition to full-time
minorities and women,
were the factors that
really kept the enroll-
ment of the last decade
up there Pepin says.
"Hut now the men are
the major factor
Statistics from the
American Association
oi State Colleges and
Universities (AASCU)
confirm that the male
student population has
grown by 10.6 percent
in the lav i academic
year, while the female
increase has been 8.5
percent.
Predictions made
five years ago by
almost every education
observer, including the
NCES, suggested that
college enrollments in
general would start a
decade-long slide in
1980, but schools in-
stead are finding
themselves with an
average enrollment in-
crease of 3.2 percent.
An earlier University of
Alabama estimate put
the population jump at
5.1 percent. Enrollment
would have been push-
ed up more by the in-
flux of white males if
not for a sharp drop in
part-time students, ex-
plained the AASCU's
Jacob Stampen.
Pepin adds that the
inaccuracy of the
predictions was due not
to miscalculation, but
to an inability to
foresee the drastic ef-
fect of the economy on
enrollment.
Pepin himself an-
ticipated a drop in col-
lege enrollment propor-
tionate to the drop in
the number of high
school graduates, but
his formula, which pro-
ved dependable in the
seventies, is too
simplistic now because
of monetary factors, he
cedes.
"The tight job
market influences the
immediate futures of
high school graduates
most profoundly he
explains.
"An 18-year-old
man or woman will
often decide to go to,
school full-time when
they cannot find a job
in order to put off the
job hunt until the
market opens up Ad-
ditionally, he says,
many young people
find it more and more
necessary to have better
training in order to get
a job at all.
The job market is
particularly small for
ex-military personnel,
Stampen says.
"The Vietnam war
drained the college
population somewhat
in the seventies he
says. "Veterans are still
coming back from ex-
tended duty, and
they're finding it im-
possible to get a job,
t h e v go back to
school
"This accounts
much of the increase in
male students, I would
estimate Stampen
theorizes.
In the same category,
Pepin says that college-
age men and women
are finding enlistment
"even less of a choice
right now With the
draft over and male
military enlistment
slowly decreasing, the
male student enroll-
ment will naturally go
up.
Judith Stich, of the
American Council on
Education, attributes
the jump in the
numbers of male
students to new campus
recruiting. New
methods have resulted
in an older student
population. Stich says
that half the nation's
college students this
year are over the
"traditional college
ages" of 18 to 22. She
also holds the economic
situation responsible
for the new trend.
"If you're out of a
job, then you're not
giving up anything to
go to school she says.
"People who get laid
off especially like to
return to school to im-
prove their skills so
they won't get laid off
again. A lot of college
drop-outs are going to
finish school, par-
ticularly at community
colleges, for this
reason
"Even those who are
in a financially good
position � the majori-
ty of whom are males
statistically � find that
they must get another
degree in order to sur-
vive the competition
she contends.
Colleges are fully
aware of the trend
toward older students,
Stich says, and they're
trying to encourage it
by making their institu-
tions more accessible
by offering night and
weekend classes in
vocational areas. She
says there is still a
"great deal of potential
to increase
enrollments" by way of
such "non-traditional"
schedules.
But if college enroll-
ment has increased by
3.5 percent, the drop-
out rate is going up at
"twice that rate
Pepin points out.
"It's also a problem
of economics again
he explains. "People go
to school and soon find
out that they simply
can't afford the new
tuitions, in addition to
the fact that they can't
make it academically
when enrollments are
so large
"Because so many �
usually minorities �
are forced to drop out,
schools want to make
up for the loss of one
particular student's tui-
tion with tuition from
another student. They
have to keep recruiting
all the time
The drop-out rate of
poor and minority
students has, in turn,
also helped leave
schools with an unex-
pectedly high propor-
tion of white males
among
bodies.
their student
In light of how
wrong most enrollment
projections have been,
Pepin and Stampen
agree that it is
"impossible" to tell
what direction future
trends will go. Stitch
says schools can com-
pensate for the loss of
18-22 year-old students
if they "recruit effec-
tively" in the
"non-traditional"
areas, but she said
she'd make no predic-
tions.
"We're all just going
to have to wait and see.
These predictions are
becoming a dangerous
business says
Stampen.
The East Carolinian
SfrvtttH ' � munily
Published every Tuesday ana
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
.ny the summer
The Eas' Carolinian is the o�
t cial newspaper o� Eas'
Carolina University owned
operated and published tor and
by the students ot East Carolina
University
Subscription Hates
Busii'i S3S yearly
All others $25 1- �' .
Second class postage paid a'
Iirei rrville N C
The East Carolinian ottcev
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus ot ECU
r,r. envilM N C
Telephone 757 614 617 �30�
HAPPY BIRTHDAY
HUNTER FISHER
iimmi
� - '
SAAD'SSHOt;
REPAIR
1 1 i Grande Ave.
758 1228
Qualm Repair
TkeKe)SM�
ori� 14 MOU�
Savin Copiot B11' -
o� Legal size 5
l�KM
?
.�MM- F'WWf � III H. J-� rtV I 'f
�MM RMS CMMW'�m�j i n
Wwtrwr Cta�wwttt�" t H
��� ftanc'4 - M
� V�W�e BwawWtWJ� i M
kmiMtg WywMtf, i u
��� j w Co�Mamm M
�" fit M'M M 4 �
��� W�M1� lvuMt'a � t
MCA- ThMM ImwcfM�m JM
��MCC �I"���C �m M J ��
' "F� � Tlft �M D -��.�K m , M
RMS Part - �.
ClM Iwmw Mm M (Mr'Mm. t n
mmmtmCifm S �����'M mi 7 �t
0M�fK��c'Mm 1 �t
� -�"W'� �" M mi in
l�iif i Cm �'�M ml 4 M
W ���� $�� jrf m-TMmJ � T)
' yt�-n rnei ' m �'Miw �
� Cov IIMilm mi 4 � �
.����� ���(��X m. J J5
l�fl�'M' W" ��
CH St'O � ��
���HI x
Caaaa? Of l M
Mtft ic�13 M
.4 Keg & ice Deliver .
2r�5 �
'Oir. ���n� S
��! 1"?
0D0�
for
Authorities Find
Hydroponic Grass
Better Than Best
(from)
CHAPEL WHERE
NOVATO, Calif. �
The technological
revolution continues in
agriculture. 1 he latest
breakthrough is in the
marijuana sector.
Police in this San
( ransico suburb recent-
ly raided a warehouse
rented in an industrial
park and found a
"sophisticated" state-
of-the-art setup for
u ing the weed
hydroponicall) .
Hydroponics, the
science of growing
plants in soil-free,
mineral-rich solutions,
is commonly used for
indoor cultivation of
tomatoes and
:mbers.
The 2(X) plants under
cultivation were "lush,
bushy and potent" and
"appeared to be grow-
ing faster than nor-
mal police said. The
plants were four feet
tall. Walter Sears a
special agent for the
Drug Enforcement
genc. points out that
the hydroponically pro-
duced pot contained
"at leat twice as much
I H C
(tetrahydrocannibol:
the active ingredient) as
the best Columbian
grass
The market value of
the raided crop is put at
more than S200.000.
Officials glumly
speculate that commer-
cial cultivation of mari-
juana is moving in-
doors, and gaining
scientific finesse. "This
is the first major
hydroponic operation
we've come across, but
we're definitely going
to see more of them
Mr. Sears predicts.
Pot -gi owing is big
business. The DEA
estimates that 1,000
tons of sinsmilla, the
top quality domestic
variety, was produced
in the US in 1979. The
market value of that
crop was more than S4
billion, though 1,000
tons was just over 7
percent of the mari-
juana consumed in the
US that year.
The marijuana
growers need to protect
their livelihoods.
"They're moving in-
doors to hide plants
from the law, and, not
so incidentally, from
rip-off artists says
Mr. Sears. Fran
McDcrmott, California
state coordinator of the
National Organization
for the Reform of
Marijuana Laws, says
"Hydroponic p o t -
farming is definitely the
wave of the future,
assuming that cultiva-
tions remains illegal
Half a dozen makers of
hydroponic gear adver-
tise their wares in
� 'High Times'
magazine.
Myron Gilbert,
special agent supervisor
for the California
Justice Department,
says seizures of indoor
gardens growing
commercial
quanitites" doubled to
more than 20 last year
in Humboldt and Men-
docino counties, he
says the agency is plan-
ning to bust at least 20
more indoor gardens.

OPTICIANS
3 CONTACT
� LENSES
Soft Contacts . . . .
. V?


79
95
10
ECU
Student
Discount
on
glasses
6th Annual TKE
Boxing Tournament
will be held
in Wright Auditorium
February 24, 25 and 26th, 1981
GirTCompetition February lOatElbo
HEAT UNIT INCLUDED
Guaranteed Fitting Or Your Money Refunded
SEMI SOFT & HARD LENSES AVAILABLE
-EYEGLASSES-
SINGLE VISION
PLASTIC OR GLASS
LENSES
(SELECT AAQC
GROUP OF i
FRAMES! fm &
UP TO PLUS OR MINUS 5D
Any Tint 36 95
EYEGLASSES
BIFOCALS
PLASTIC OR GLASS
LENSES
'SELECT OROl'P " ' M pj5
OF FRAMES i�X
ANYTlT 0 TT
UP TO PLUS OR MINUS 5D
GREENVILLE. N C
PMYSICIANSQUADR ANGLE
BLOG A UOS W 4TH ST
Ad lo E C�rolm� Eve Clime
CLEAR-VUE OPTICIANS
Gracnfrti Store Only
ws
7� 14
OFFICE HOURS
9am 5 JO p m
Mon , Tuei . Thun
, am lpm Wednctday
Fri
Registration begins
January 19th-Feb.6th
at the TKE House-951 El 10th St
between 6-9 p.m.
Ring Girl Info CaB 757-3156
?
Valentine
Messages
for 1 st 15 words
each additional word � 5C
CLASSIFIEDS SOLD
M-F 2:00-4:00
BISCUIT TOWNE
INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIALS
1011 Charles Street Phone 752-1373
N�
Available
All Day
Every Day
Open
Mom 9pm
Son thru Thijrs
11am 10pm
Fri & Sat
A
Western SteerQ
Family
STEJIKH0VS&
3005 E
10th Street
Greenville N C
(Beh.nd Hastings I
Take Out Service
Available
7588550
FAST
Soup & Salad
$J99
Chicken Filet
Sandwich
Baked Potato or French Fries
99
& EASY DELICIOUS LUNCHES
i
Diet Plate
4 oi Chop Sirloin
Cottage Cheese fc Fruit
$199
1
Child's Plate
4 01 Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toast
Steerburger &
Bowl of Chili
$199
No Potato
Steak Sandwich
Potato & Salad
J99
N
0
RIB SPECIAL
Two Jumbo BBQ Beef Ribs,
Homemade Biscuit, French Fries and Coleslaw
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
CHICKEN SPECIAL
Two Pieces of Southern Fried
Chicken, Homemade Biscuit, French Fries
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
ft
S129SJ79
DARK WHITE
&
Steerburger
With Baked Potato
or French Fries
Without Potato
BISCUIT SPECIAL
Steak Biscuit Country Style
Gravy and French Fries or Chicken Biscuit with French Fries
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
$1 29
Banquet & Party
Facilities
Available
Plain Ptpprrt t Omont
or MjiKroom Gravy
Bak�4) Poialoor French fr
129
Soup
89
SPECIALS DAILY "SSSiTKEE?
m ndoy A Wadnctdov
Beef Tips
D�ily ipetnit itr.wl oiiri band potato or 'renchjri�t l�flL
1 �s4or Thyror
8 oz. Chop Sirloin
sjs�
DELICIOUS 30 ITEM SALAD BAR
MEET AT
BISCUIT TOWNE
And Enjoy Delicious Home Cooked Meals
At Inflation Fighting Fricestll
i





Sije iEaat (Ear0liman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
CHRIS IHOK, tm
Jlln DuPREI . i
Paui I inc ki . ; . Paul Collins, Mmedii�
Dave Si w rinw.��� Chari esChandler spomi
M! I M S11 k. f, � tm DU'll) N( )kklS, F�yrrs �t,tor
W8BRSW8�&W WMM
lanuan Z . Wi
Opinion
Page 4
Student Fees
Media Increase Desperately Needed
The time has come for the ECU
Media Board to request a student
fee increase.
When the board was created in
1978 the Board of Trustees
allocated exactly 50 of SGA's
SI2.75 per-student-per-semestcr ac-
tivity fee to the media board. That
activity fee has not been increased
since 1970.
It is most difficult to operate in
the 1980's on 1970 dollars, everyone
knows what inflation has done to
the dollar in the last ten years.
The media board must fund three
printed publications, one
photography lab, and a radio sta-
tion. At present the board receives
only about SI50,(XX) a year in stu-
dent fees.
The needs of the newspaper,
literary magazine, yearbook, radio
station, and photo lab far exceed
that amount.
A fee increase is needed not only
to make up for ground that has been
lost to inflation but also to hedge
against future inflation.
The cost of printing has soared
astronomically over the past five
years, primarily because so many
products used in the printing in-
dustry are derived from oil.
The cost of paper itself has gone
up dramatically. Newsprint, the
cheapest paper made, increased in
price by over 300 during a 12
month period in 1978-79. In 1977-78
the cost of printing this newspaper
was roughly $29,000. This year the
costs of printing may exceed
S60,000, double the costs of three
years ago.
Chemicals and film are two pro-
ducts that have become increasingly
more expensive as the price of oil in-
creases.
Things are not going to get any
cheaper, the prices of materials can
only go up.
The costs of production materials
used to produce this newspaper
have doubled in price in the last 18
to 24 months.
The media board should look not
only at what it needs now to cope
with rising costs, but they must also
consider what the needs of the
media will be five years down the
road.
TTmE FoLLoWlNG BROADCAST CONTAfN&
i g)CENE� �F Explicit sexuality.
DUE. TO MATURE &UB0ECT MATTER
I PARENTAL P1&CRETION & ADVI&ED.
BLVJE0EANS
COMMERCIAL.
'WEASE SIR. I WANT SOME MORE!
TH� EAST CAKOUNIAN
r- Campus Forum
Foreign Language Aids Students
I am writing in reference to a letter
that appeared in the Thursday, January
15 issue of the East Carolinian. The arti-
cle implied that there is no longer a need
for (or maybe never was a need for) the
study of foreign language. Actually the
author's arguments seemed very weak.
first of all. it seems highly improbably
that simply a group o foreign language
"brethren" would be able to keep the
foreign language requirement alive.
Furthermore, it is somewhat im-
mature to say that a course should be
eliminated simply because it is an
"obstacle' that is supposedly unrelated
to one's major. Were this a valid argu-
ment 1 could say that, as a Spanish ma-
jor. Math 1065 should be eliminated
from requirements because an inter-
preter does not need to know how to
work out a binomial expansion problem.
I also disagree with the article that
foreign language courses are not
"extremely difficult Learning another
language is relatively simple if one first
has a mastery of his own language,
which every college student who has
taken English 1100 and 1200 should
have.
All it takes is attentiveness in class and
a little practice, just like most other
classes. Also, learning another language
can broaden one's English vocabulary.
So many English words come from
foreign words andor have prefixes or
suffixes from ther languages.
More important, though, than the
mere fact that every student will even-
tually take a course that does not appear
useful, is that know ledge of a foreign
language is not only desireable but ex-
tremely advantageous. Anyone that
takes notice of today's business trends
would see the strong influence there is
from other countries. Business
endeavors are no longer confined to na-
tional relations, but are now on an inter-
national scale.
Many businesses have offices in other
countries or need products manufac-
tured in other countries. Surely any one
who wants to get ahead in the business
world would want to speak the language
of his associates.
A lack of communication can often
cause extreme confusion, which can cost
a company precious time and money.
Even those people not in the field of
"international commerce or government
service overseas" would benefit from
being able to communicate on an in-
telligent level with the many foreigners
in this country today. Contrary to what
the author wrote, foreign language can
be used in almost every career.
Store owners, doctors, secretaries and
lawyers, along with other professionals
will eventually cross paths with a person
from another country. Also, anyone
who looks down on foreign language has
apparently never applied for a job.
Almost all job applications ask
whether or not the applicant can speak a
foreign language. And since the Euro-
pean languages are often similar in many
aspects, knowing one language can
allow one to partially understand
another language without having any
prior knowledge of the language.
Hopefully 1 have made my point of the
importance of foreign languages in col-
lege requirements very clear. And for
those who never do take a foreign
language, I hope that he or she never has
to travel abroad; but fine wine; enter in-
to an international business firm; visit
New York, California, Florida or Loui-
siana; go to an opera, watch Sesame
Street (even little kids learn Spanish);
purchase products made only in foreign
countries; or cross paths with any one of
the 200,000 non-English speaking people
in the United States as of 1976 (the latest
figure), a number which has surely in-
creased tremendously in the last 5 years.
CAROLYN GERMAN
Sophomore, Spanish
The editorial concerning the study of
foreign languages at ECU displayed
both arrogance and ignorance, the fight
against which is one of the missions of a
Foreign Language Department on any
campus. Articles such as these are the
best argument for the study o foreign
language since they only reemphasize all
the points made in the recent report of
the President's Commission on Foreign
Languages, the Senate of ECU showed
its support of the study of foreign
languages years before the above report
pointed out the provincial attitude and
tragic isolation of the USA resulting
from a decade of nonchalant attitude
toward foreign languages.
The present lack of foreign language
specialists in business (last summer
Chase Manhattan Bank paid S480 week
to MBA candidates with know ledge of
1 rench to do their internship in Interna-
tional Business), foreign service, the
military, civil service, etc hd forced
the academic world to re-evaluate its
priorities. As a result ol it, foreign
languages are now being reinstated in
those schools which had neglected them
in the past two years. A reflection of this
process is clearly felt at E l where, in
the past two years, the enrollment in
language classes has boomed.
If foreign languages were oi no value,
the Civil Service job application form
would not contain slots for anything
from French to Russian and the Military
would not spend millions each year on
language training in their National
Defense schools m Colorado and
California. There, just as at ECU. the
knowledge o a foreign language cannot
be acquired b swallowing a magic cap-
sule i.e. by cramming before exams. It is
a study that does require time and great
discipline, but then, isn't that what the
pursuing of a true education is all
about? For those who cannot or will not
tackle such a challenge, there is a great
variety of B.S. programs in which the
study of a foreign language has been
deleted.
Maria B. Malbv
Professor,
Dept. of German & Russian
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj new. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner I ibrary.
For purposes oj verification, alt letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature o) the author(s). Letters
are muted to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neath printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permuted. Letters by the
same author arc limited to one ea. I
da vs.
t
Reagan Inauguration Brings Back Memories For Senior Senator
WASHINGTON � It has occured to
me, so many times during the eight years
that I've been in the Senate, that the Lord
has blessed me with the privilege of wat-
ching a great deal of history unfold. Not
all of it has been pleasant, but in the
decades ahead historians will still be
pondering the events of our time.
That is why, I suppose, a hundred
thoughts raced through my mind on
January 20, as I watched Ronald Reagan
become President of the United States.
There he was, just a few feet away, right
arm uplifted, pledging his faithfulness to
an anxious nation and his commitment to
its Constitution and its principles. He will
try, not always successfully, but he will try.
He will do his best.
THOUGHTS � One of my friends in
the Senate asked me what I thought about
during the ceremony on the Capitol steps.
Jesse
Helms
That was easy, 1 told him; I was thinking
of something Ray House 'old me long ago.
And who, the Senator asked, was Ray
House. He was my high school principal,
the man who told the members of the
senior class that we could achieve almost
anything we wanted in this country � if we
worked hard enough.
I told that story four or five years ago to
Ronald Reagan. I remember how he smil-
ed. There had been a man who had in-
spired and encouraged him, also, many
years ago.
REAGAN � I remember so many per-
sonal vignettes involving Ronald Reagan
� a blur of cities and towns and states in
1976, and again in 1980, where we attend-
ed campaign dinners and rallies. That cold,
sleeting night in Greensboro in 1976 when
he came down the ramp of the plane that
had brought him from New Hampshire. A
day in the mountains of North Carolina, a
quick trip to Kinston, the ear-splitting rally
in Burlington when Jimmy Stewart came
to "speak for Ron and Nancy
I remember the defeat in Kansas City in
1976, the visit in the Reagan home in Los
Angeles in 1973, the late evening telephone
calls through the years.
But most of all, I remember how this
man choked up every time he tried to talk
about his love for America.
PEOPLE � I do not suggest that all
Americans will agree with everything their
new President does or says. I may not
myself. But one thing cannot be denied
him: He has great faith in the American
people. How many times have I heard him
say, All too many people are elected to
govern. We should remind them that we
are elected to serve
I am convinced that this belief was
stamped indelibly upon his consciousness
long ago. It is not a cliche; it may somehow
prove to be his undoing. There is a fine line
between governing the people and serving
them. The latter will require that the peo-
ple be asked to sacrifice. That is not the
way to win popularity.
ADVICE � What advice would you
give President Reagan? I have given him
mine: Stick with the principles you've been
espousing all these years. Level with the
people. Talk with them. Explain to them,
over and over again, why the country is in
trouble today, and spell out the onlv means
of solving the great problems of our time.
Deep down, the American people want
to be free. 1 believe that, and I also believe
that they don't want socialism, and that
they don't really expect things of their
government that no government can or
should do. In fact, 1 remember countless
occasions when I have spoken in almost all
of the states of the union, and the au-
diences always nodded in agreement when
I mentioned Thomas Jefferson's well-
known advice � that the best government
is the least government.
So Ron Reagan, a friend, has now
become President Ronald Reagan, Chief
Executive of the greatest nation in history.
We will see how he handles this awesome
assignment. He has our prayers, and our
best wishes.
1
I
ill
I
I

f





Sc?
r
� hen
vell-
ment
now
hief
ttor.
Jsome
our
I HI t si i k�) im
Features
I AM MO 27, 1981
Campus Sociologists Survey
ECU Students' Dating Habits
Dating behavior of university
students is the subject of a new
study by noted East Carolina
Univesity sociologists David Knox
and Kenneth Wilson.
Using a random sample of 334
E U students and a 21-question
survey, the researchers discovered
several interesting facts, some of
which may be news to parents of
college-aged students:
Most students said they usually
met potential dating partners
through friends, rather than at par-
lies or in class.
Cioing cnit to eat, to a special
event (such as a football game), to a
patty and then back to one of the
partner's rooms is the typical dating
evening,
"Our relationship" is the most
popular topic o' conversation,
followed by talk about studies and
I his pie seems suspended in midair as it hurtles toward its victim at the annual Sigma Sigma Sigma Pie I hrow last mutual friends. Sex was discussed
Friday night at Chapter V less than five percent of the time.
An Impending Splatter
Photo by GAPY PATTERSON
� Half of the women surveyed
and 70 percent of the men believed
that first-date kisses are ap-
propriate. By the fourth date, all
but three percent of the women felt
that kissing should take place.
�Almost half of the men in-
dicated a belief that sexual inter-
course is appropriate by the fifth
date, and 25 percent o the women
agreed.
�While most students believe six
or more dates should precede the
partners' engaging in sex, eight per-
cent of each sex said intercourse
could "appropriately" take place
with no previous dates.
The Knox-Wilson report also ex-
amined the role of alcohol and mari-
juana in dating behavior.
"Over half of the students said
they drank alcohol on their last
date, with fewer reporting use of
marijuana noted Knox. "One
quarter of the men and 20 percent of
the women said they smoked mari-
juana on their last date
I he study also concerned
students' feelings about parental in-
volvement in their dating-mating
behavior.
"Women were more likely than
men to report that their parents
tried to influence those they dated
Wilson said.
"And, when asked, 'To what
degree have your parents interfered
with your dating relationships?' the
same pattern held � women were
significantly more likely to say that
their parents interfered
Although 25 percent of the
students responding said they felt
"negative" or "very negative"
about their parents' attempts to in-
fluence or interfere in their
datemate selection, most students
"regard their parents' involvement
See DATING, page 6, col. 4
Lennon Items Selling Well
Fans Seek Souveniers Of Ex-Beatle
By JOAN WEY1 IK
2
en nor i
SUt
in 7 bu
John 1 ennon was murdered on
Decembet 8, 1980, and soon came
the inevitable wave of merchandise
designed to cash in on the ti
Special record sales.
tons, posters, 1 mums, and in
numerable one-shot magazines
only a pan of the mac i
memorabilia to
these items ha . others
locally,
lilts
have not. I
and what do
themselves, (hose
material, think al
downtown Greet
the toliowing results:
Pipe Dreams I aniasy .mts on 5th
Street was selling a variety of heart-
shaped 1 ennon and Beatles but)
and a Beatles I shirt. Da id R
on duty at the store, said, "As a
business major i can see ii from the
person's standpoint; that
. t because people do
items. Hut as a consumer I
don't like it
He went on 10 s;�v that personally
imeone's death
explained the
angle. It's all a matter i)'
� demand, he said. It peo
The ECU Percussion Knsemhle has been invited to perform for the Per-
cussive Arts Society Convention in Washington, D.C. on January 27.
Percussionists Perform
The East Carolina University Per
cussion Ensemble has been invited
to perform for the Percussive Arts
Society Convention in Washington,
D.C on January 27, 1981. The
January performance marks the se-
cond appearance of the Percussion
Ensemble at a PAS convention
within the past five years. T he group
also performed for the 1977 PAS
convention in Knoxville.
Other performances on the tour
include Indian River High School in
Chesapeake. Washington High
School in Norfolk. Garfield High
School in Woodbridge and Her-
mitage High School in Richmond.
Musical selections scheduled for
performance by the ensemble in-
clude contemporary original percus-
sion works, solo selections and
transcriptions of ia compositions.
The Ensemble will be directed by
Harold A. Jones of the East
Carolina University faculty and
graduate students Marks Shelton
and Tim Haley.
pie did not want to buy the I ennon
items, then other people wouldn't
sell them.
Rav Bryan, managei ol Apple
Records, reported a sudden surge in
the selling of "Double Fantasy
Lennon's last album, which was
released shortly before his death. It
and oldei Beatles albums were
selling real well, Bryj ted. On
display were a new I ennon
memorial I -shirt, and an old 1960's
Beatles fan magazine. Bry �
that while he was not necessarily
looking to sell the rare magazine, he
would if he was ottered enough
1 ike main others ,
Bryan commented on the hug
mercialization of Eh is Presley
occurred aftei Ins death m 19" and
still continues today. Comparing w
to the 1 ennon "legacy he said. ' !
don't think it (1 ennon's death) will
be merchandised neat as much as
Elvis, 'cause I ennon's fans
smarter I just think tl will
not support it. "
I he Book Bat n was selling
poster, and a very recent . back,
"Strawberry fields Forever; lohn
Lennon Remembered ' He pro
bablv wasn't even in his grave
before they came out with
book Meted Pattv Broglio,
working at the bookshop, fellow
employee Sheri Lawrence com-
mented, "1 didn't like him to begin
with, so it didn't make a bit of dif-
me I think it's a waste
of money
The c entral New and Card
Shop, on ill, selling at
least six one shot specialty
magazines about 1 ennon. a woman
working there, who asked not to be
tified, said that the magazines,
' the new all-Lennon issue of
"Rolling stone" were selling well.
she noted that she found the
"Rolling Stone" cover, a bizarre
to showing a nude 1 ennon curl-
iround In- wife, YokoOno, to be
"disgusting She reported no in-
crease in the sale ol Beatles books
that were already on stock before
mooting.
I la Mushroom, also on the mall.
- ied no I ennon material.
Man ! )onna Fabar said she
would consider selling such items it
it was ii i taste, but, "I'm not
gung ho about something like
He left a lot of good music
d vibes and 1 think that
d be enough.
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
New Wave Night
New wave fans enjoy a niyhi of dancing to their music at JJ's.
Preparing Steak Can Be Easy
By KATHY WEYLER
si�fl U nlrr
Probably some o' the most
magical words to any student, on oi
off campus, are "Come over for
steak tonight These words, we
would all agree, are wonderful to
hear, but they are equally wonderful
to say because cooking steaks can be
almost as easy and as much tun as
eating them.
When you plan to cook steaks,
the first thing you must do is buy
them. This is the hardest part. After
all, meat is expensive these days, so
don't expect to breeze into your
favorite supermarket and walk out
with two steaks for less than about
$6.(X). You can however, get the
most for that S6.00 if you know the
ropes.
Be very observant of the meat
department in your supermarket. If
any of the beef is very gray or, God
forbid, greenish, hasten to another
store. I his means the beef is old and
the department manager doesn't
care who knows it. Good steaks
should be blood red, perhaps with a
slight brownish tinge, and the fat on
them should appear soft and moist.
Once you've found some nice-
looking meat, start reading labels.
Chances are this will be confusing if
you haven't done it before. In
genet al. all stores put the following
information oi meat labels: cut of
meat, grade ot meat (indicator of
quality � hopefully "A"), price per
pound, pounds in the package, and
total price of the package. Be sure
you can tell which is which as it is
very embarrassing to reach the cash
register and realize that 1.35 is the
weight of the meat, not the price.
"How do I know what to buy?"
you may wail in despair. The
amount you want to spend is most
likely going to be the determining
figure. I have preference for rib-eye
steak because it is not too horribly
expensive, has no bones and not too
much fat, and two nb-eyes fit nicely
into the broiling pan in my toaster
oven.
Sirloin and T-bone are other good
choices; however, thev have bones
Attic Most Popular Nightclub
In Recent Student Survey
A recent poll of Fast
Carolina students con-
ducted by Preston Pro-
ductions showed the
Attic to be the most
popular club fre-
quented by the
students. The survey,
taken from a random
selection of listings in
the student directory,
was done in two time
periods. A total of 209
students were polled:
75 in April of 1980 and
the remaining 134 in
November of this year.
A total of twelve
questions were asked,
the first four categoriz
ing the student by sex,
dorm or off-campus
residency, classifica-
tion, and major. The
remaining eight ques
tions were as follows:
(1) Do you evet go to
the nightclubs in
Greenville?
(2) How many times
pet month on the
average?
(3) How many
nightspots do you
usually visit pet night?
(4) Name your three
favorite nightspots in
order of preference.
(5) What is your
favorite live band that
plays the local
nightspots9
(6) Which radio sta-
tion do you listen to the
most?
(7) How do you
usually find out what's
happening at the
Cireenville nightspots in
the way of specials,
bands, concerts, etc.?
See DOWNTOWN, page 6
CLUBTotal1st2nd3rd
ATTIC116662723
ELBO ROOM82353314
PANTANA BOB'S98214334
JOLLY ROGER42171114
JJ'S MUSIC HALL43171016
CHAPTER X22868
SUNSET11065
CAR. OPRY HOUSE3512158
PEACHES3021
PAPA KATZ15735
TREE HOUSE266812
RATHSKELLER10136
NEW HORIZON5401
and bones are waste unless you have
a dog. When meat is weighed, bones
and fat are part of the total weight,
so buying steaks with a lot of bone
and fat is just feeding your
wastebasket. Some fat is desirable
since it keeps the meat from being
loo tough.
Do not be deceived into buying
round steak or flank steak because
of its lean appearance and affor-
dable price tag. It requires a lot ot
tenderizing to be palatable.
So now you've bought your
steaks and you're ready to cook
them. There are dozens of ways to
cook steaks. 1 recommend broiling
because it is fairly fast and better for
you than frying. When you broil a
steak, much of the cholesterol-
packed fat cooks out.
lo broil steaks, you will need a
toaster oven that broils or a regular
oven, and a broiling pan. This is a
deep pan with a slotted or per-
forated rack that fits on top o' it.
Hopefully your toaster oven has
one.
If not, steaks can be broiled in a
casserole dish, though the fat will
not cook out very well this way. The
same goes for a regular oven,
although if you have this kind of
oven, you can improvise a broiling
pan from a baking dish with a cake
rack fitted on top. Before broiling,
put about two tablespoons of water
in your broiling pan.
Depending on the condition of
your oven, you will probably need
to broil your steaks eight to fifteen
minutes on each side, keeping in
mind that thick steaks take longer to
cook. After broiling both sides at
least eight minutes each, cut into a
Meak to test the center. "Doneness"
is a matter of personal preference,
but remember that it may be
dangerous to eat undercooked meat.
I prefer a medium-done steak, with
the center a pale pinkish-gray.
See PREPARING, page 6, col. 1






HI si K()I INI AN
I AM K 27, 1981
LtfMAjAJG .bout CollCgc Thc H)tc lAjy
6Y Df)V M)tfis
Audio-Visual Portfolios
Help Job Applicants
Julius Caesar A uditions
Auditions for the
East Carolina
Playhouse production
of Shakespeare's epic
tragedy "Julius
Caesar" will be held
Thursday and Friday,
Feb. 5-6.
Auditions will be
conducted at ECU's
Brewster Building,
Room C-103, from
7:30 to 10:30 each even-
ing, or by appointment
with Edgar Loessin,
director. Loessin may
be reached at the ECU
drama and speech
department, 757-6390.
Each auditioner is
asked to prepare a long
speech or soliloquy
from the script, which
need not be memoriz-
ed. Copies of the pla
are available in the
reserve room of ECU's
Joyner Library.
"Julius Caesar" per-
formances are schedul-
ed for April 7-11.
Dating Habits Surveyed
Continued from page 5
in positive terms the report said.
Drs. Knox and Wilson plan to
present the results of their campus
dating study at a meeting of the
Southern Sociological Society in
Louisville, Ky in March.
The April issue of the journal
"Family Relations" will carry an ar-
ticle based on the research.
Knox, author of several books on
family life and numerous articles in
popular magazines and professional
journals, is director of a marriage
counseling program at ECU. He
also practices as a private marriage
counselor.
Wilson is developing a book.
"Sexual Harassment with col-
league Linda Kraus. He has col
laborated with his wife, Christa
Reiser, also of the ECU sociology
faculty, on previous research pro
jects.
BALTIMORE, Ml) (CPS) - No,
he has no connection � physical or
spiritual � to the video dating in
dustry, he says.
But Eugene Williams, a dean at
Sojourner-Douglas College here,
wouldn't mind putting a little show
business m a similarly personal area
of students' lives: the job interview.
Williams thinks students should
be going to job interviews with a
complete audio-visual presentation
of themselves, all the better to sell
themselves to prospective
employers.
"We're not trying to help that
prospective teacher who has some
beauty and shiny teeth Williams
explains. "We're trying to give peo-
ple the opportunity to demonstrate
their abilities
The "opportunity" comes in
something Williams calls I he
Audio-Visual Portfolio, which he's
no trying to market to students na-
tionally.
The student who bins � prices
start at S42.95 � will get the chance
to present work samples, an
autobiography and even a profes-
sional philosophy through a slide
presentation, accompanied by an
audio cassette
"It a person is applying tor a
teaching position Williams sas,
"the pictures will show him working
witli students, interacting with
parents and the community.
through the tapes, the employer
can hear what the person actually
sounds like in the classroom
Ruth Parcell, of UCLA's career
office, likes the idea. "Ans way a
student can present himself more
imaginatively would be good she
enthuses. "And it certainly would
be interesting to try
But reaction from other plase
ment counselors is less sanguine.
"I would sa anything that would
help in presenting yourself long
distance should be tried say-
counselor Mary Compstone
Portland State Universit)
"However she adds, "I can
see the value ot delivering this
local employer tor an inter
Why put anything between you
the employer it you can helj
1 rank Hallgreen, director
Career Placement at the I rtivei
of Nebraska, sees "no particular ad
vantage" i the a ppr o a(
"Personal interviews are crucial
Students have to learn how to pre
sent themselves
An audio-visual presentatii
Hallgreen adds, may not be flexible
enough.
"Each situation is different
Hallgreen argues "A fixed presen
tation doesn't allow for change It
sort ot like a touched-up picture
"We primarily see people goinj
to management, business, health
and human servies as a
spokeswoman tor Harvard's C areer
Placement Service. "1 Jn't think
that it (an audio-visual presentation)
would be appropriate at this le
or that employers would find it
useful
'
Downtown Survey Taken
Photo by JON JORDAN
I his work b Professor Donald Sevauer is on display with other works in
the annual ECU School of Art Faculty Show in the Gray Gallery in the
Jenkins fine Vrts (enter
Preparing A Steak
Can Be Simple
Continued from page 5
is more to cooking a steak,
. than just sticking it into
the broiler for a few minutes. Part
of the art of cooking a steak is
enha - its flavor, thereby
g the need foi steak sauce.
I -i - ire a few tried-and-true
MlS.
Sa peppei � your tablet op
diments are necessities tor a
:ak. Sprinkle about one-
ispoon on each side before
ng sail � available in the
n of any supermarket.
Sprinkle lightly on each side before
broiling.
Lemon-pepper � a remarkable
seasoning brought to my attention
mst last summer. Buy it in the spice
section of any supermarket and
sprinkle lightly on each side before
broiling.
The absolute best way I've ever
tound � On each side before broil-
ing: Pour about one tablespoon of
Worcestershire sauce, sprinkle light-
ly with lemon-pepper, finish with
about one-half teaspoon chopped
chives (find them in the good old
spice section) and a pinch of dried
parsley.
Now enjoy your steaks with a
special guest and cross steak sauce
off your shopping list forever!
Continued from page 5
The results of the
data compiled was
f r o tii 113 dorm
students and off-
campus residents; 103
males and 1()6 females;
46 freshman, 40
sophmores, 49 juniors,
64 seniors and 10
graduate siudents.
Of the 209 polled,
188 students visited
nightclubs while 21 did
not. Visits per month
averaged 7.86 per stu-
dent and an average of
1.63 clubs were visited
per student per night.
The favorite club for
first choice preterence
was by far the Attic
with 35 percent of the
votes. The Elbo Room
was second with 19 per-
cent and Pantana Bobs
with 11 percent ranked
third. The Attic also
clearly ranked first in
overall votes with Pan-
tana's second and the
Elbo Room third.
The favorite bands in
order of preference
were as follows:
(1) Brice St.
(2) Sidewinder
(3) Super Grit
(4) Jesse Bolt
(5) Lain't (Pegasus)
(6) The Nighthawks
and
(7) Badge.
It must be noted that
only seven of the tour-
teen clubs on the survey
use live entertainment
all or part of the time.
The top six radio sta
tions in order ot
preference were: WITN
with 24 percent,
WQDR with 20 per
cent, WOOW with 13
percent, WRQR with
13 percent and WMYK
with 8 percent. WSF1
and WRA1 both
received 7 percent each.
As tor advertising,
alter word ot
mouth most of those
surveyed tound out
"what was going on"
by calendars, The East
c arolinian, posters,
and tadio in that order.
Mitchell's
Hairstyling
and Beauty Salon
Pitt Plaza
STUDENT SPECIAL
Cut-Blow Drv and
Condition
Keg. $15.00 Now $9.95
(�(xd I'hru Jan. 23-r"eb.7
7 16-2950 756-4042
A�OT0Nt If TO
ttfftWItKO
FRtCMANCY
pre�Acr ttft. txrlf c
lr. ta prWtm prgoer
cr owrmltng Pgr fvrffwr
llMoWi�tl�ft c�H III MM
(toil tr�� nvmt�r
tno Ml ISM) b�r�.n
A.4W f.M wo�ri
luwtn mmmmft
fnwmH$m�m9t.
ft
MALPASS
MUFFLER SHOP
2616 E. 110th St.
Greenville, N.C.
758-7676
Custom Exhaust Systems
Tune-ups, Brake Service
American and Foreign
Car Parts
TKE
Little Sister
HH
Raw Egg Eating,
and Chugging
Contest
Reduced Beverage
Prices and Door Prices
ELBO ROOM
TUES JAN. 27th
25 ADVANCED 50C DOOR
King Sandwich
&Deli
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
for Student Convenience
Daily Hours:
Monday-Thursday 11:00-8:00
Friday-Saturday 11:00-9:00
Sunday 12-6
Daily specials for ECU Students
from 5:00 p.m. till closing.
Check Out This Great Savings
Call ahead for take-outs
752-4297
(Colonial Heights Shopping Center)
ATTIC 61
, ELECTRI ASYLUM RfCOROlMG ARTISTS
EPIC RECORDING ARTISTS
Tilt . TO II. KOfSTIPfO . lay 97
IUC. to �ll:C, imour UwW. Cl
CAPRICORN RECORDING IRTIS1
THUR
� C0� Iti'MBI I -
ION '
JAN.29
PfCOROIRG ARTISTS
-U j
uarniuuni . iuiuhuhu artist
FRI.
JAN. 30
SAT.
JAN.31
WED, JAN. 28 MUG NIGHT
with
STRATUS
INFO:AT
GIFT GALLERY
I
t
1
� m





w
is
ice
In
rts
mi
.�
IN 29
IN. 31
I HI 1 SAkoi INIAN
Entertainment
M H 27, IVM
Clint's 'Bronco Billy'
Free Weekend Film
This Friday and Saturday night at
5,7:15 and 9:30 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theatre,
the Student Union films Committee
will present Clint Eastwood's
critically acclaimed "Bronco Billy
Admission is by ID and activity card
oi MSC Membership.
"Bronco Billy" has onl) one star.
but surely one is enough when he is
among the biggest box-office attrac-
tions in the world. Here, though,
1 astwood plays handsomely against
type, replacing his "Dirty Harry"
figure with a good-as-gold rodeo
stai who refers to his fans as "little
pards prays for them not to "ae!
tangled up with hard liquor and
cigarettes" and hopes his wild West
show will make enough money to
pa for a ranch "where city kids can
come out and see what the West was
really like He lavishes his kind-
ness on everyone from runaway
heiresses to Vietnam deserts, from
one-handed cowboys to pregnant
Indians. He is stirred to righteous
anger only when a bad guy mauls his
best gal or breaks a little boy's piggv
bank. He is too good to be true �
except in a sweet-sou led dime-novel
movie like this here
Eastwood plays the platitudinous
Billy with tongue firm in his lean
Clint Eastwood has acted in six of the last seven films that he has
directed.
Malcolm McDowell:
Hates US Television,
Enjoys New Play
B KENNETH R.CLARK
l Pi 1 Hep MM
NlW YORK UP1 - Malcolm McDowell, an English actor whose
yardstick quite naturally is the BBC, took a break in the labor oi fret-
ting over the impending arrival oi his first born last week to sav a tew
words about American television.
Words like "drivel "pulp" and "abysmal
McDowell's latest role � that of the volcanic Jimmy Porter in John
Osborne's "1 ook Back in Anger" � will premiere Eeb. 24 to a poten-
tial television audience oi 1.6 million. But only because cable televi-
sion does not lie beneath the baleful glare oi the Nielsen ratings.
McDowell did the play last year to critical acclaim Oft Broadway.
He'll do it now for Showtime Pay Ielevision Service which serves Ns
cable systems nationwide.
�"None ol the networks would have touched us with a barge pole
he said. "It's this dreaded word 'ratings It totally controls the pro-
grams ol the Big 3 so whal you get is pulp � the son of thing in which
you can go and get a cup of coffee and come back and it really doesn't
make much difference.
"I've seen extraordinarv programs on television here � mixed in
with all that drivel we're made to watch most nights . . . But I just wish
one prime time hour per week would be used bv the networks for a
"Masterpiece Theater" or something.
"Network executives think the viewer has got the mind oi a child of
seven and as long as they think of it that way then the programming is
going to be abysmal
I hat oft his chest, McDowell returned to the two subjects nearest
his heart � his play and his pregnant wife, American actress Mary
Stenburgen, star oi "Ragtime" and winner oi her own flock oi
theatrical awards.
"The due date is the 26th McDowell said, "but it could happen
any time mm. Mary intuitively feels it will be a boy, but I don't care.
Just as long as we have a healthy child. This is just the biggest thing in
my lite right now
"Look Back in Anger" and the thrill of recreating it for television is
a solid runner up. "1 talk nonstop in that play and on television the
camera can go oft and do reaction which is verv good he said. "On
stage, it's difficult to know where the audience is looking. On TV you
can control what you want the audience to see . . . Cable is an amaing
phenomenon. It's going to make a dent in the networks and I think it's
going to be very good competitionwise
McDowell is less eager to talk about his last foray into filmmaking.
He starred brilliantly as the Roman emperor Caligula in the Bob
Ciuccione movie oi the same name � a film that turned out to be a
multi-million dollar extravaganza of sex, sodomy and slaughter.
"It was written by Gore Vidal, who's a very respected writer
McDowell said ruefully. "It had a lot of very respectable names
associated with it � John Gielgud and Peter O'Toole. And also, it
was a marvelous part. I tried to bring a new slant to the character �
Caligula, the original anarchist. Unfortunately, it was all lost . . . it's
verv difficult to find the performers in all the mire that was put in later
bv the producers who were just trying to make a quick buck � which
they've done. They've made a fortune out of it
For a while after release of the film, McDowell went on the televi-
sion at every opportunity to excoriate it. But no more. "1 finally
realized that the more I said about it, the more people wanted to go
and see it, so 1 don't really talk about it very much now he said.
The eagerly awaited McDowell offspring arrived Friday � an 8
pound 3 ounce girl named Lilly Amanda.
That he'll talk about.
cheeks, but the mock sentimentality
is only a cover tor the movie's ge-
nuine sentimentality about becom-
ing the person you really want to be.
Billy, you see. was a New Jersev
shoe salesman who decided that he
wanted to be a cowboy. In fact, no
one in his troupe � from the snake-
dancing Indian to the baby-faced
roper � is what he seems to be.
A character like Billy McCoy,
who makes Rockv Balboa sound as
cynical as Celine, has not graced
movies since John Wayne's
"Singin' Sandv" westerns of the
mid-30s. His nemesis turned
girlfriend recalls the snooty mad-
caps ot the old screwball comedies.
It was George Orwell who wrote:
"A I 50, everyone has the face he
deserves " Orwell was dead at 46;
but Eastwood, who turned 50 on
May 31. keeps trucking manfully
through middle age with the face his
movies deserve � sun-burnished,
granite hard, seamed and serene.
(lint Eastwood rivals The Electric Horseman' in this woo fin shuckin critically acclaimed horse opera.
Eastwood On Film Directing
Clint Eastwood is the number one
box office attraction in the world.
In his film "Bronco Billy he con-
tinues to broaden his popular ap-
peal, following the unprecedented
success ot both "Every Which Way
But Loose" and "Escape From
Alcatraz
Clint EAstwood, the director, is
no less a film presence than Clint
Eastwood the actoi and siar. Tins
interview took place just as
Eastwood was preparing "Bronco
Billv" tor its final version, involving
himseli with both the editing and
soundtracks oi the film.
In addition to your tremendous
success as an actor, you've also
made quite a reputation tor yourself
as a director. What led to your deci-
sion to direct film?
"I feel that directing is the logical
extension of acting if you want to
move into a lota! concept oi film,
rather than limiting yoursell to just
one component of the process. Ob-
viously, as the director, you can
maneuver the whole show. You're
not the creative artist, so to speak.
the writer gets that credit, but
you're the interpretive artist, work-
ing with the writer's intent.
"It just otters more of a challenge
to me after 200 hours of a television
series and numerous movies, and I
really do enjoy the work and diversi-
ty of filmmaking, particularly from
behind the camera
Are there any directors you
especially admire or use as examples
for your own technique1
"I've admired a lot o' directors,
but mainly for individual shows. 1
always liked Lord's The Quiet
Man for example, or Kurosawa's
early Samurai films like 'Yojimbo'
and 'Redbeard But 1 don't think
I've ever been an afficionado of one
particular director. I've always liked
various directors for certain efforts
o theirs
Do you feel that you have your
ow n v isual style?
"I try to have a different style for
every picture. 1 probabiy do have a
Style, which is more of an approach,
really, thai I rely on to get specific
kinds of effects. However, I like to
let the picture dictate what I might
choose lo do.
"I know that I'm learning more
as a director, and that I've made a
lot oi change- in the transition
from, sav, 'Play Mistv lor Me' to
' I he Outlaw Josey Wales' or 'The
Gauntlet It just seems that each
production unfolds in a different
wav
Which film was the most difficult
for you as a director
"I think that 'The biger Sane!ion'
was the toughest, technically,
because n took place in Switzerland
on the side oi one of the most
treacherous mountains in the Alps.
That made the logistical aspects of
the production very tricky in terms
of our shooting schedule, in addi-
tion to being physically difficult
What do you look for in a scrip
"1 look for entertainment value.
When I read a script it should enter-
tain me, like a hook. It should
create visual pictures and be able to
hold my interest, either through ac-
tion, suspense, humor, or whatever
device the writer is working with. It
sounds simple, but finding a good
scrip! is verv tedious work
How do you get the best perfor-
mance from an actor or actress
"1 think the best performances
come from the best working en-
vironments. Actors become very in-
secure verv easilv, due to the nature
ol the profession, so you need to set
up that positive atmosphere.
"There are a lot of critics or film
buffs who like to project the idea
that directors evoke great perfor-
mances out of actors, which I think
is baloney. I he actors have the in-
strument and the ability, if they're
smart. to do the job that the director
wants to see. What's needed is bas
communication in a comfortable
setting, preceeded by good casting, I
might add
Do you find it difficult, as in yo
current film "Bronco Billy to
both act and direct simultaneously?
"Well, this is the seventh film
thai I've directed, and out oi the
seven, I've acted in six of them, with
'Breezy1 being the only exception.
Anne Eambert plays Miranda in Peter Weir's exquisite 'Picnic At Hanging Rock A
mysteriously beautiful girl described as a 'Botticelli angel' by her teacher, Miranda believes
that 'everything begins and ends at exactly the right time and place The picnic is no picnic
in this rich Australian film of 1979.
Peter Weir Corner
Aussies
In Hendrix
This W'ednesdav nigh! at S p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center's Hendrix Theatre, the Student
Union films Committee presents Peter Weir's
amazing "Picnic At Hanging Rock Admission
is free with ID and activitv card or MSC Member-
ship Card.
Following the film, coffee and doughnuts will
be served in the Multi-Purpose Room, downstairs
in the student center. Students, faculty and staff
interested in discussing he film with others are in-
vited to attend.
"What we see and what we seem are but a
dream � a dream within a dream I his line,
spoken under a mist-shrouded volcanic cliff, sets
the ethereal, mystical tone ol "Picnic At Hanging
Rock" right from the start. As he did m "The
I ast Wave his excursion into the occult world of
aborigines, Australian director Peter Weir i- set-
ting you up: behind his Ivrical surfaces he means
to unearth a reality ordinarv folks know not of.
"Hanging Rock made in 1975, leaves no doubt
thai Weir is unusually good at this sort o' thing,
one of the strongest talents m the booming
Australian movie industry.
The setting is a proper Australian boarding
school for girls, run bv one Mrs. Applevard
(Rachel Roberts), an imposing figure oi Victorian
authority. On St. Valentine's Day. 1900, her
white-clad charges go oft tor an outing at Hanging
Rock. Led by the angelic-iooking Miranda (Anne
Lambert), four oi the girls wander in the primeval
wilderness. One returns sereaming in terror. The
other three vanish.
What happened to them on the cliff? The ques-
tion obsesses the schoolgirls, the surrounding
community and the young gentleman (Dominic
Ciuard) who spied on them with erotic interest as
they started their ascent. Were Miranda and her
followers seeking a sexual apotheosis on Hanging
Rock, an escape from the life-denying restraints of
the world? After all, just before she disappeared,
didn't she enigmatically remark: "Everything
begins and ends at exactly the right time" � as if
she knew what her fate would be?

?
r.�. . wtapMMMI





Sports
Lady Bucs 19th, To Host State
and n
B Jl1n DuPRl V
I Jil.ir
It's been a long ume in coming
iow that it's finally arrived,
ECl head basketball coach Cath
. and hei 1 ady Pirates just
luite know how to react.
Knd uzzi has worked since hei ai
rival ai Eastarolina to form a win
ning team thai deserved national
recognition. 15 3 record thus tar ting corps, but thus fai hei statistics
inthel98 - reason and a weekend are shorl oi those she establisl
victory ovei nationally 15th ranked prioi to a 1979 back
Virg brougl ndruzzi one step Riley continues I
ei ultimate goal. Pirates with an 18 8 its pei game
1 he 1 ady Pirates moved into the average Jones follows with a stead)
19th position in the Associated 14 7 average with Denklei
Press Women's Basketball lop 20 tributing 12.3 and centei Ma
� was announced Monday. Girven 10.3 Girven lead
d i 84 78 Sunday Pirates in rebounding with 9 1 pet
Charlottesville to push the outing, with Denkler grabbing 6.1
the 17th slot in tins Andruzzi looks forward to the
t v
e ava
w eek
NC 1 - matchup wii
k in said Siae. but noi in regard I na
a Monda i oon tional P'1 aspe
"We do have an
sn i s :ij now. improve on oui record, I ays
until aftei we've "If we improve in the poll, we im
r�la v State " P'ove in 'nc P �
TT Pirate mentoi '�State lost to Mai a
ample reason to worry, as the (80-60) and they're
Wolfpack brings a national rating down here hottei thai
0j 3th to Minges Coliseum haven't been challenged
Wednesda at 7:30 p.n lasi Carolina before rhey'n
tune the 1 ad 1' d an this game lightly.
N. Stat� : was bet "1 think they're
Wo mg and well prepared
,9 5 ictorv in the not be as strong as
1972 ; teams have been, but th
seasoi Sine N(-s ! cadv
"
is an 4 83 Aftei the 1 ,d Pirai
75
i Is over the past
N.C. St;
vill be tin rest b.
(�iren (.els Jump
Wrestlers
Fall To
Tar Heels
Hi WII 1 I M M-l VERTO.N
24 '�
-
NC-CH - � stit
. should be called
: Can lina no at K). 1 he Lady
time 6-1 juni I ri H
sie I hoi . n na Maria 1 ope.
Mi-America Kathv Ha
s . - I:
�s an M .iding su
"US(
olfpae k now Andi uzzi "Tl
I l ace to fill the tenders. e'n
departed stars Genia tough inside
Beaslex. K La wii
d Pirates
Wolfpack star- some to speculate as I
Coach Andruzzi (left). Players Celebrate Another Win
�s -A 1!
a
see '
bt it
help us a
says
e will be .
20 meai i
druzzi admits, but continues, "It br-
a great deal of publicity
univesity as a whole Every!
profits, and 1 think more pe
start to rally behind
- etball at 1 asiai
" hen 1 came nere, we ��
build a great ;
"S e've taken it si ��p -�
a
Andi �. . ' a � �i ha

.�
a
.
vt
-



:
e ECl
tcr-
eason.
11 i beat a
a as hobbled bv in-
� dn'l
ipp-
.
Heels jumped out to a
w inning the t irsl
. P � ites never
ki � tted I C 's sieve Gib-
111 ni the 177-pound
Pirate Ali-
pponent
ccurred.
Revils' success, says
()islu, is not onlv
m in matches,
ompei in practice.
forn :h here,
lives in Greenville and works out
B
A (

1I
h Oishi said, "as doe
it up. w !n' w ,is onci
is tor
11 16-9
sophomort
r he I IniversitN ot
and in the eves oi (hshi is
team's 'leaders along with
trai
Mai
on
Re.
Mendell ryson also performe
well tor the Puates bv winning the
hcav- - . :lass with a pin oi Jack
- 2 oi the match. "He is
still learning Oishi pointed out,
"and will gel better when he cor
recis his mistakes
Gary Webb also turned in a good
performance tor the Pirate ai 142
pounds bv tying Pete Pierce. "He's
the best recruit from last year
Oishi noted, "and has shown much
improvement
Wrestling at 167 pounds was a
first for James Ellison. Oishi said,
even though the Pirate wrestler was
defeated bv Ian Michaels. Ellison
had to lose 10 pounds for the match,
a mat.h that Oishi called a good ex-
perience for his wrestler.
"We wanted to win this match
very badly Oishi stressed. "They
had beaten us three or four times in
a row. but our team was jus) too
weak because of the injuries and the
sickness
The Pirates take a 14 record into
this Friday night's match of
Maryland.
Underwood Scores 22
Bucs Edge Baptist
UH VKI 1st HAMM 1 K
i
Bap isi o poini
period late
Pirates tallied
i 65 59 i tvei
Monda) night in Minces
ed be junioi
Underwood's 22
hi spot in a
a ECl 's lackadaisical
plav almosi result in utter embarass
ment.
Bar tist, a small college
Charleston, S.( battled from a
one-poii time deficit to take a
seven point lead halfway through
the second period, 47-40, before the
Buc defense got tough.
I he Pirates scored eight straight
and took the lead at 48-47 at the
when I nderwood con-
nected on a 15-foot jumpei.
1 he clubs exchanged buckets to
leave the Bucs up, 52 51, before
tI guard Battv V right went to
the line with a one-and-one oppor-
tunitv.
I he Portsmouth, Va. native can-
ned the tnd miss
as the Pirate - tun ed the ball ove
Baptist with 22
I ECl up, 53 51.
15 tooter bv McKithei B I
two secoi ds remaining I
contest and sent it into overtin
gain I ndei w ood was the bt ij
spot, scoring six overtime points as
Pirates w
ictoi '�
� .
E( 1 head coav h )a Odom
nutted aftei the contest that his club
had not had a stellar performance,
but ,uk that something good may
come out ol the game.
��I told the players that behind
ever) cloud is something bright he
�� l his is the first time we've
been that tar behind a team we
should beat and came bask to win.
Out guys hung in there and that is a
good sign
I he Pirates continued their
somewhat poot shooting oi late, hit-
ting on onlv 44.9 percent of then
field goals. Contrastly, Baptist
ned 55.1 percent.
I he big stat, though, comes from
the free throw hue. where EC I
outscored the vistiors 21-5
;
"We did
" r v .
-

Odom
L'nde
"Ba
Dav�

clute
e. H e
competitiv c
Od
Pirates, now l l. we
"It I
about this
said "Mosi ev
a pei iod
and eatlv Febi ai I I
victim oi that
I he Pii ates ne -
ednesdav, whei
Domin
with the Monarchs.
Perry, Parzych Star
After State Loss
By CHARLES CHANDLER
sports dtlor
Walkins Fires Over Fern
Phiiln H hjr
Stales Walts Boards
I nderuood Fires
RA1 EIGH � N.C. State shot a
blistering 75 percent in the second
hall and got a school-record 15
assists from reserve guard Max
Perry to turn back last Carolina
77 52 in Reynolds Coliseum Satur-
day night.
I he Pirates stayed close tor most
oi the early part oi the game and
were down bv onlv vine, 22-21. with
six minutes remaining before inter-
mission.
lhe Wolfpack went on a flurry,
though, and were up 32-25 at the
hall
lhe Pack put any chances the
underdog Bucs had of pulling an
upset to test at the outset of the se-
cond period.
State outscored the Pirates 16-2
during the first six minutes of the
final penod and set the stage for
what was to be termed by Pack
coach Jim Valvano the best o halt
ol basketball played bv N'CSU all
year.
The dominant force for those
crucial six minutes was6-11 forward
I hurl Bailey. lhe Seat Pleasant,
Md. native scored six of the 16
points, four coming on layups and
the other two on a slam dunk.
In comtast to State's incredible
shooting second half, 1 C I shot on
lv 32.4 perceni despite taking a I
lv good selection oi shots
"We didn't take bad shots to si
the second halt Pirate coach Dave
Odom said, "they just wouldn't go
down. We couldn't seem to get
anything to fall. When that happens
you begin to get frustrated
1 qually frustrating tor the Pirates
all evening had to be the plav ol two
Wolfpack reserves. Perry and for-
ward Scott Parzych.
Perry filled in foi injured star
Sidney I owe. going on to break the
record oi 14 assists in a game that
was held jointly bv I owe and ex
State star Monte I owe.
Paryeh roamed inside and out ol
the Pirate defense almost at will,
scoring a game-high 22 points and
pulling down seven rebounds in onlv
23 minutes of plaving time.
The 6-7 junior connected on 9 ol
12 from the field and four ol six
from the free throw line.
The Wolfpack lead reached a high
�� 26 points on sev ei al oc.
late in the game be
from both sides began see
1 : e Pii ates � scoring by
sophomore guai d Charle Wat!
who tallied 12 poit
forward Morris H c wl
finished with 10.
Odom said that the loss
disappointing one foi him and I
players but added thai tl e Bucs put
out the effort needed to w
"dames like this coa ike the
responsibility for said.
long as the players give you good t
tort you can't be upset And we got
that tonight
Odom said the team, though -
mg bv 25. was much bettet than it
had been earlier in the vear He also
gave warning oi next year's visit to
Raleigh.
"There's no doubt he claimed,
"that we'te a much better team than
we played over at Duke (in Iron
Duke Classic) this year.
"And next vear when we come in
here our guvs will be a vear older.
Heck, thevMI all be shaving regulari-
ty bv then. We'll be a much better
team then
I w
f� into'





rHE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 27,1961 9
3
i
r He also
s ISlt tO
claimed,
cam than
(in Iron
come in
ar older
k regulari-
h better
?
r
Prepare For Longwood College
Pirate Gymnasts Drop Two
Flying High
By CANDICE
MATHEWS
Staff Writer
ECU's women's
gymnastics team went
on the road last week,
gymning against two
Atlantic Coast Con-
ference teams. On
Wednesday, the Pirate
gymnasts met with
Duke, losing by a score
of 129.1-117.85. Then
on Friday the Lady
Pirates traveled to
Maryland, losing again
bv a score of
134.6-113.1.
Duke and Maryland
are both strong gym-
nastics teams, and the
ECU gymnasts did not
really expect to win
either of the meets. In-
stead they concentrated
on hitting their routines
cleanly and on reaching
their point goal for this
year of 120.00 total
points per meet.
In Wednesday's meet
against Duke, the
Pirate gymnasts came
pretty close to achiev-
ing both of these goals.
On the vault, Louise
Matthews, performing
a handspring-full
twisting vault, set a new
Daniel Named Outstanding Athlete;
Rogers Captures Collegiate Honor
CHARLOTTE
I I'l) 1 ormer Fur-
in 1 niversit) goiter
who last
-c.i e first
. , on the 1 PGA
lour to earn more than
0,000 in one year,
been named profes-
al athlete of the
u in the Carolinas by
ottt Athletic
Club.
Daniel, � lives in
Charleston, S.C was
competing in a tourna-
ment in Florida and
was unable to attend a
banquet Tuesday night
to receive the award.
She aeeepted in a film-
ed presentation.
Daniel earned
5231,000 last season
and was named
1 PGA's 1980 Golfer of
the Year.
Runner-up in the
professional category
was stock car driver
Dale Earnhardt.
Heisman Trophy
recipient G e o rg eI
Roeers of the Universi-
ty o South Carolina us
named college athlete
of the year b the
Charlotte organization.
Rogers rushed for
5,019 yards in his
career.
Other finalists in the
collegiate category were
N orl h Ca r oli n a
linebacker Laurence
Taylor and Stump Mit-
chell, a running back
for The Citadel.
Lexington running
back Joe Mclntosh,
who scored 19
touchdowns and rushed
for more than 10 yards
per carry as a senior,
was named high school
athlete of the year.
Other finalists were
William Perry, a defen-
sive standout from
Aiken, S.c, and Kan-
napoiis quarterback
Ethan Horton.
Art and Camera
EXCEPTIONAL
MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
We Offer
� � �
over
$3 4 years
� 30 days paid vacation an
� ' financed graduate
programs
su. imily health plan
� tore responsibility and
leadership oppor-tur.ties
� world a ide travel and
adv � �
� Prestige and personal
growth potential
526 S. Cotanche St.
Doui Town
Current Opportunities
Nuclear
Engineering
Business
Management
Aviation.Law
Nursing
1 Medical School
Scholarships
Civil
Engineering
Shipboard
Operations Ilfi&&��$$�$$&&&
Intelligence JJjp,kvvfi��f
riLM
� AAAAi
FwVt.
Most Liberal Arts Major Eligible
The Navy Officer Information Team will visit campus
on 27,28,29 January An information desk will be set up
tside the Book Store An interview or test can be ar
ranged by calling 1 800 662 7568 toll free I 9jSt
������������" JjfL .
THE EARLY
H KODACOLOR
IK developed and Printed
$3.23:
$4.81
12
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY'
No Foreign
Film
20
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
PREPARE FOR
MCAT � LSAT � GMAT
SAT�DAT�GRE�CPA
Join our "Early Bird" and
Summer Classes In Preparation
for Your Fall 1980 Exams
Permanent Centers open days, evenings and
weekends
Low hourly cost Dedicated full-time staff
Complete TEST-n-TAPEsm facilities for review of
class lessons and supplementary materials
Small classes taught by skilled instructors
Opportunity to make up missed lessons
Voluminous home-study materials constantly
updated by researchers expert in their field.
Opportunity to transfer to and continue study at
any of our over 85 centers
$$s$ss$$s$s$$$$$$$$$f.�
KODACOLOR
Developed and Printed
$5.53
EXPOSURE C7 Q7
ROLL ONLVV � � 7 f
OTHER COURSES AVAILABLE
GRE PSYCH GRE BIO � MAT � PCAT
OCATVAT TOEFL MSKPNMB
VQE� ECFMG FLEX-NOB NLE
24
EXPOSURE
ROLL ONLY
FILM DEVELOPING
20 EXPOSURE CkO
KOOACHROME
AN0 EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
36 EXPOSURE CQ 1C
KODACHROME P J � M J
Educational Center
TEST MIEPMUTI0N
SPECIM.ISTS IIMCI 1131
Call Days Evenings A Weekends
Ei�cwtlvt Perk. tMe
j7�ech�i��i miii �ivd
Durtl.m, N.C 1777
(flf)tf-�7M
For informal.c" Acoui Other Center ir More Tra" 85 Maior US Otiei s Abroad
fer utan.iti.i- ib.ut ether centers OUTSIDE N T STATE CALL TOLL FIEF. NO 223 1712
KODACHROME
ANO EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
$$$$$$$$$$$!
LOW. LOW PRICES ON
Movie
PROCESSING
SJ�
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROME
PROCESSING ONLY
$2.11
SUPER � ANO STANUAftft , VOVlES
LIMITED OFFER
oppm txprntt.
WWfffW
ECU vaulting record
and claimed second
place with a score of
8.95. Elizabeth Jackson
and Claudia Hauck
also executed clean
vaults, receiving scores
of 8.3 and 8.1, respec-
tively.
On the uneven bars,
Claudia Hauck took
fourth place with a
score of 7.25. Jennifer
Bell and Elizabeth
Jackson also perform-
ed well, receiving scores
of 7.15 and 7.05 for
their routines.
Lisa Tamarru ex-
ecuted a clean beam
routine, claiming se-
cond place with a score
of 7.7.
On the floor exercise,
Claudia Hauck and
Elizabeth Jackson tied
for fourth with scores
of 7.7. Lisa Tamarru
was awarded fifth place
and a score of 7.45 for
her routine.
ECU's final score,
117.85 points, was their
highest thus tar this
season. According to
coach Jon Rose, "The
score for the Duke meet
ranks us about 10th in
the nation among Divi-
sion II teams
Friday night at
Maryland the Lady
Pirates didn't do quite
as well as they had
hoped. Still striving for
120.00 points, ECU
was only able to score
113.1 points.
On the vault, the
Pirate gymnasts again
executed clean vaults.
Claudia Hauck took
fifth place with a score
of 8.15. Louise Mat-
thews and Susan
Lawrence also scored
well, receiving an 8.1
and an 8.05.
ECU had no major
falls on the uneven
bars, and Claudia
Hauck received a 7.5
for her routine.
The ECU gymnasts
didn't do as well on the
beam as they did at
Duke. "We were very
shaky, which hurt the
over-all score badly
said Rose. Lisa
Tamarru claimed third
place on the event with
a score of 7.1.
ECU has two weeks
to prepare for their
next meet, traveling to
Longwood College on
Feb. 7.
Photographer
Needed
for Photo Lab
Apply with the
Media Board Secretary
ECU Gymnastics Action
Saw fl Carolina East Mall
m Serving Daily 11 00 AM -8:00 PM
�t i i o-7 Fri. ft Sit. Till 8-30
Tuesday, January 27
Lunch- Salisbury Steak. 2 vegetables � ��$1.99
Supper- Braised Beet Stew on rice ���$ 1.99
Wednesday, January 28
Lunch- Stuffed Green Pepper. 2 vegetables$1.79
Supper- Corned Beet with Cabbage $1.99
Thursday, January 29
Lunch- Chicken n Dumplings. 2 vegetables$1.79
Supper- Veal Parmesan, tossed salad w dressing$2.39
Friday, January 30
Lunch- Ham and Macaroni. 2 vegetables �$1.79
Supper- 1 rout Almondine. slaw, hushpuppies$2.49
Saturday, January 31
All Day- eal Parmesan, tossed salad with dressing $2.39
Sunday, February 1
All Day- Baked Ham with hot potato salad$2.19
Monday, February 2
Lunch- Salisburv Steak, 2 vegetables$1.99
Supper- Smothered Chicken, mashed potatoes.pan gravy $1,89
"East Carolina's Party Center

January - February Calendar of Events
January
Tues. 27th TKE Fund Raiser
Wed. 28th Dorm Special - Gents Nite
Thurs. 29th Kappa Sig Fund Raiser 7:00 - 9:00
February
rd Delta Sig Pi Male Best Chest Contest
th 1st Elbo Space Invaders Tourn. & Gents Nite
-th Sig. Ep. Fund Raiser
Ith 1st Annual Mens All Campus Arm Wrestling
th Ladies Nite Valentines wPeter Adonis!
th Kappa Sig Lil Sis Fund Raiser
�ith Mens Arm Wrestling Semi Finals
9th Beta Lil Sis Fund Raiser 7:00 - 9:30
Wed. 25th Finals Mens All Campus Arm Wrestling
Watch for further details on these and other upcoming event-
including - Mud Wrestling - Best Legs - Bikini Contests and More
Call 758-4591 for more info.
ELBO SEMESTER MEMBERSHIPS NOW ON SALE

i





10
1 HI 1 S1 (. K()I IN1AN
JAN1 AKY 27. lyhl
Sampson, Virginia Dominate Ohio St.
(UPl) - Ohio State
learned Sunday why
most teams generally
opt for zone defense
against second-ranked
Virginia.
Allowed to roam in-
side against a man-to-
man, 7-4 sophomore
Ralph Sampson scored
a career-high 40 points
and pulled down 16 re-
bounds to lead the
undefeated Cavaliers to
an 89-73 drubbing o
the Buckeyes.
Sampson sprained an
ankle and missed a tew
minutes ear!) in the
game. But when he
returned, he poured on
a variety o dunks and
12-fool lumpers to key
15-point halftime lead.
Sampson had 24 points
in the first half.
"Ohio State was not
crowding a whole
bunch of people in
there said Virginia
coach Terry Holland.
' W e go to him
(Sampson) when we
can. Our offense is
geared to get the ball to
him
In other weekend
games m the Atlantic
C oast Con fere nee
Saturday, I8th-ranked
North Carolina smash-
ed Georgia Tech
KK)-60; Duke took a
?5-5 wm over Clem-
m'ii; seventh-ranked
Maryland lost 73-70 to
the Cavaliers to a !3th-ranked Notre
Swimmers
Sail Past
Seahawks
B TIM WILLIAMS
Mafl Wnirr
Even with the flu bug
keeping some swim-
mers out oi action and
hindering other's per-
formances, both ECU
swim teams managed
fairl) easj victories
Saturdav against UNC-
The women romped
by with a i()l -46 score
while the men won
"0-43. outswimming a
supposed!) tough
Wilmington team
which had beaten Old
Dominion earlier in the
season 1 C I lost to
ODl . although n was
because of disqualifica
tion in one event.
"1 s' a lot ol them
being sick, I thought
the swam fail 1 well
ECUacl R i) Scharf
said. "We had onlv ten
people a ice
rhursdav because
kness, so under those
:um stances 1 was
pleased with our per
formance
The Pirates were
without the services of
their best sprinter,
Moria McHugh, se-
cond best breast
stroker, Brian Duncan,
and back stroker Bjorn
Johansen.
Rick Michaels was
sick and still took se-
cond place in the 100
Freestyle which Coach
Scharf said was an im-
portant race because it
"broke" the meet
open. ECU's Jack
C iowar claimed first in
that race.
Clowar finished se-
cond in the 50 Freestyle
by .01 of a second in a
race which he appeared
to have won but he
touched near the gutter
on the timing pad in-
stead of in the middle.
Doug Nieman (200
11 and 200 Backstroke
winner) and Jan
Wiklund (1000 and 500
Freestyle winner) were
also very impressive for
the Pirates.
Other ECU winners
in the men's competi-
tion were Matt
McDonald (200 Breast)
and the 400 Medlev
relay team (Nieman.
McDonald, Kevin
Richards, Clowar).
Norwegian Dordi
Henriksen was outstan
ding for the Lady
Pirates, winning three
races (50 Butterfly, 200
Butterfly, and 100
1 reestyle). Jennifer
laves broke the varsity
record in the 50
Backstroke with a time
of 29 She also on
the 200 Backstroke.
Other two-race win-
ners were Sally Collins
(200 and 500 Freestyle),
ramrm Putnam (100
and 400 1M). and Julie
Malcolm (100 Free
Style and 200 Breast).
Lori McQueston won
the 50 Free Style.
in the diving com-
petition, in which EC I
has no coach, Kim
Lowe was very im-
pressive winning both
one meter and three
meter events. Coach
Scharf stated that with
proper coaching Kim
could possibly qualify
for the National Cham-
pionships. Jn the men's
competition, Mike
Aman took two second
place finishes.
Both teams swim
against national power
N.C. State today at 6
P.M. in Raleigh
Buying Gold � Silver Coins
Also Sterling Silver
Paying lop $
Come in lor rRLL estimate
Carolina Compact
Kivergate Shopping Center
Price mav vary depending on market
SophomoresJuniorsSeniors
EARN OVER $850 PER MO.
DURING LAST TWO YEARS
OF COLLEGE
Get a head start on an exciting, challenging
position after graduation. While you finish
school, we will pay you over $850 per month to
study and maintain good grades. We have the
best graduate level nuclear training program
in the world and math, physics, chemistry,
technical majors and engineering students
can qualify. U.S. citizens less than 27 years
old, a 3 0 GPA or better, and good health are
the requirements. We offer a projected salary
of S65,000 after four years.
For more information send college transcript
to:
LT RUSS JOWERS
NAVY NUCLEAR
PROGRAMS MANAGER
100) NAVAHO DR.
RALEIGH, N.C. 27609
OR CALL 1-800 662 7568
Dame; fourth-ranked
Wake Forest raeed past
North Carolina
Asheville, 99-68; and
North Carolina State
trounced East
Carolina, 77-52.
Ohio State, playing
its third game in lour
days, narrowed the
margin to 53-47 in the
second half, hut Jeff
Jones hit a three-point
pla; to pull Virginia,
now 16-0, out o trou-
ble. Buckeye center
Herb Williams then
fouled out and the
Cavaliers were able to
expand their lead.
"We w ere i he
straight man in the
comedy act today
said Ohio State coach
Eldon Miller. "The
fouls took the game
avav from us and we
can't play with our
centei on the bench,
especially a gainst
Sampson
Nort h c arolina
coach Dean Smith said
he expected his Tar
HeeK, coming ofl a key
win on the road against
Wake Forest, to relax
some agamst Georgia
Tech Saturdav.
"1 didn't ex peel
anything like this. I was
worried about a let-
down after the the
Wake Forest game
Smith said. "But the
players got themselves
read) to p!av
Senioi W WooCi
scored 24 points and
Freshman Sam Perkins
added 18 to pace the
lai Heels, who moved
with ease through the
lech defense and forc-
ed 29 turnovers on
defense.
"I thought in the
first 10 minutes our
defense dictated the
way the game went
Smith said. Yellow
Jacket coach Dwane
Morrison called the I at
Heels "awesome
I" Durham, Duke
got its newly adopted
deliberate offense
working and posted its
second straight AC C
win over Clemson
behind Vince Taylor's
20 points.
Blue Devil coach In College Park, Kcl-
Mike kiyewski said ly Tnpucka hit six free
he was more pleased throws in the final two
with his team's defense,
while (lemson's Bill
1 oster admitted the
Tigers "didn't plav
with a lot of en-
thusiasm or a lot of in-
tensity
minutes, including two
with five seconds left,
to give the lighting
Irish the win over
Maryland.
The Terps trailed b
eight points with just
under six minutes to
Play, but Buck
Williams hit five
straight points and
bac k -1 o-bac k fast
breaks by Greg Mann-
ing and Albert King cut
the Irish lead to 65-64
with just under three
minutes left and set up
the race the the finish.
Wake fores! bounc-
ed bad from its first
loss of the sea'on
agamst UNC-Asheville
as five Deacons hit for
double figures and a
tight man-to-man
defense forced 24 tur-
novers.
Classifieds


U��' 4
v-
lI Swimming Action
Fosdick's Seafood Savers
Nighth H � l
Tues. Fish Fry- All The Fish You Can rial With A Mug
CM Your Kavorite Beverage$3.99
Wed. Shrimp Treat- Delicious Calabash Shrimp W ith Krench
Fries. Cole Slaw and Our hamous 1 hishpuppies$3.99
Thur. Family Night A Seafood Sampler W ith Calabash
Shrimp, fried Fish, Oysters and Deviled Crab$4.99
Tues,Wed,Thur(Oyster Bar Only) ! Doz. 1 lalrsheH
Oysters (Steamed or Raw) And A Mug Ot "i our Favorite Beverage
$2.99
-si
FOSSICKS
Ph. 756-2011
�r I S. EVANS ST EXT GREENVILLE
ALL SKI WEAR FOR MEN,
WOMEN & CHILDREN
25 to 60 OFF
INCLUDES: JACKETS, VESTS. HATS.
BIBS. OUTFITS, LONG JOHNS AND SOCKS
GLOVES 20 to 50 OFF
ALL SKI POSTERS - BUY ONE
GET ONE FREE
CREST LINED WIND-BREAKER JACKETS 12 OFF
ALL TENNIS & JOGGING SHOES 50 OFF
ALL SNOW BOOTS - REDUCED AS MARKED
ALL SKI & TOTE BAGS 25 OFF
ALL SOP SKI BOOT TOTES WERE $10.00
now $6.00
ALL SNOW SKI'S
REDUCED FROM 25 to 60 OFF
SKI i RIP : O SNU WSHOE - MARCH 5MARCH 8
ROOM AND BUS - 4 TO A ROOM
APPROXIMATELY $110.00 - TIMBERLINE LODGE
ALLGOU BALLS S13.00Doi.
ALL GOLF CLUB & REPAIRS - 12 NOW UNTIL FEB Ut
CLOSEOUT ON ALL 1ZOD SWEAT Es
GORDON FULPS
GOLF AND SKI SHOP
LOCATED AT GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
OFF MEMORIAL DR.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK - 8:00 A.M. TIL DARK
756-0504
FOR SALE
NAVY BLUE 1968 Volvo 144 for
sale Needs owner that is willing
to do repair Call 7S8 974?
FOR SALE Mi�ata Americana 10
(peed, perfect condition one year
old 5145 Call 758 589
FOR SALE Becker speakers.
new. 32 watt Superscope power
amp Total value 5375. sell tor
1150 758 1773
FOR SALE Nine week old female
puppy Half Irish setter and half
German shepard Is paper trained
and wants a good home Call
758 5825 after 4 3D p m
FOR SALE V W bug. FM radio,
good rubber Just inspected
Runs great Clear title 757 1478
FOR SALE Parade drum
Premeir, Chrome Excellent con
dition Call 757 3210
FOR SALE Two bedside tables
525 each Call 758 5585 after 5 30
FOR SALE Twin sue mattress
512 00 Will deliver if necessary
Call 7S2 4487
FOR SALE Two Bolivar
Speakers made fey JBL 5120 for
Iht pair Call 758 3753
PERSONAL
SUNSHINE STUDIOS Will be of
lei "ig classes in ballet ian exer
Cise and yoga for a very special
New Tear s rate 2 for the price of
1! To enroll call 758 0736
COUNSELORS For western
North Carolina co ed summer
camp Room meals laundry
salary and travel allowance Ex
perience not necessary but must
enioy living and wui ng with
children. Only clean cut non
smoking college students need ap
ply For application and brochure
write Camp Pinewood 1801
Cleveland Rd Miami Beach, Fl
33141
NEED TYPING Professional
full time typing, IBM typewriter
Call 758 5301 or 756 1062
WANTED A ride to Charlotte and
back this weekend Call David
nights 752 0652
RIDE NEEDED To northern
Virginia Friday 30th Will pay hail
o� entire cost Tom at 758 7277
LADIES Our furniture will be
here Friday GPJ CWM
FOR RENT
WANTED Female roommate to
share three bedroom house Big
tront and back yard. Garage.
Electric heat and only half mile
form the mall and one mile form
Pitt Community College Only 580
Mo plus utilities Call Anita or
Ann at 756 9on or leave message
at 757 6366
NICE Two bedroom apartment
Heat and water furnished Phone
756 1050
APARTMENT For rent Two
rooms modern bath and kitchen
study Call 752 3020 after 6 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bed-oom Tar River
Apartment Call I ,sa ;2 0653 or
758 5629
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED To share large house Walk
mg distance to campus 570 rent
plus fraction or utilities Call
752 3444
ROOMS FOR RENT 575 per
month utilities included for info
call 752 3480
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share two bedroom King's Row
Apartment Half rent and
utilities Call 752 0865 or leave
message at 758 9707
MALE ROOMMATE Needed for
two bedroom duplex at 1312 B E
14th St
FOR RENT One and two
bedroom apartments water and
cable included All kitchen ap
plianced pool ECU bus every �
hour Call 758 4015
FEMALE ROOMATE Wanted to
share a two bedroom Eastbrook
apt Half rent and ut.iities Anon
smoker please Call 752 4443
HOUSEMATE WANTED Own
room plus s'udy studio Room m
house two blocks from art
building 587 50 plus half utilities
Call 758 33C8
LIBERAL MINDED MALE To
shrirt on bedroom apt 575 00 mo
plus halt utilities Mike 752 3501
ROOMMATE WANTED
Eastbrook two bedroom kitchen
den bath 5100 00 deposit. 5107 50
plus utilities Call 758 6693
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
for 3 bedroom duplex on W 4th St
$65 00 month 7S8 7532
FOR RENT Small apts tor
males Near campus
590 00 5125 00 utilities included
752 2615 days
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED 575 00 mo Private
room one third utilities Tar River
Estates 758 5854
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Two story apt with a
private bedroom full bath kit
Chen and den I'm a quiet person
and gone on weekends 756 '882
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASEDFROM2 00 4 00 M FAT
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
FICE
RIGGAN
OnUt HI W. 4th St, Qr��nvttf. N C REPAIR
Jowntown Qr�nv Across From Bount-Hsrvsy Parking In Front ft BsdcjMH Of Shop J$
phonf ;Jj
758-0204 lifllrV
i I
Date: Jan. 27-30
ECUOFFICIALCLASS RING"
Place' Student Supply Store
Lobby, Wright Building
Deposit Required MasterCard or Vii accepted
I mi ArtCarved Class Rings f,h
?
1
t
. .





Title
The East Carolinian, January 27, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 27, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.105
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy