The East Carolinian, January 22, 1981






She �a0t Carolinian
r �-�
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
ol.55No. 3
����-��
8 Pages
Thursday, January 22, 1981
Creenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10.000
Computers Moved
At A Premium
By PAUL COLLINS
Glenn (.roue is a frustrated man.
"cp. simply, last Carolina
L niversity for main years has
underfunded data processing said
Crowe, Director of Computing and
Information Systems for the univer-
sity .
Foi Crowe, who took over the
position in August of last year, his
frustration reached a head this
semester when he was forced, due to
a lack of space, to move keypunch
machines used by students into the
foyer of Austin Building.
According to Crowe, he is caught
in a dilemma "1 don't like to
mistreat students, bin ! am out ol
space. 1 hae no place to put peo-
ple'
Crowe said he moved the
machines into the foyei to create a
quiet area he thought students
wanted. "If that's not true I'll move
keypunches back in tomorrow
No one was able to offer him
another solution to his space pro-
blems, Crowe explained, so he mov-
ed the keypunches into the foyer.
1 ee White, a computer science
major, said ot the situation, "It's
very distracting from what I've
seen. 1 he just need more room for
computers
Crowe explained that Computing
and Information Systems is one of
the tastest growing parts of the
university but that funding has not
kept up with the increased demand
tor serv ices.
"Students need to compare
themselves to other institutions he
continued. "I oi instance, we have
six programmers here at EC I . At
the same time thev have 39 at N.C.
State and (W at c aroiina. 1 think the
situation speaks tor itself
Computing and Information
Systems is charged with supporting
compute) services throughout the
university. 1 he registrar's office
uses the computers to process grades
and pre-registration forms. The
payroll is done in the computing
center, as arc various financial aid
functions.
And then there are the academic
users, students and faculty who use
the computers. "The Academic
Users Committee, which is faculty
members charged with speaking tor
academic interests, has implied that
I'm trying to make life difficult for
the students said Crowe.
"Actually, my primarv goal is to
serve students
One oi Crowe's biggest problems
has been a lack ot space. He has
emptied his supply room to make
office space, and the hallway is now
filled with row after row oi boxes.
"We're sitting m a tire trap he-
said.
1 he room that houses the actual
computers is half the size it should
be, according to Crowe. "The
maintenance people yell at me
everyday because we don't meet
specifications
One of Crowe's biggest space pro-
blems, however, has been finding a
place to put the people who work
for him. He has three people in of-
fices designed for one and will soon
move six into the space vacated by
the keypunch machines.
"1 would like to have additional
people he said, "but I don't have
any place to put them. People can't
work under such conditions. It was
getting so bad that some people
preferred to come in at night rather
than work in these crowed condi-
tions
According to Don Dunlap, the
manager ot programming, the
University oi North Carolina has
more space to store academic forms
than ECU has tor its entire com-
SeeCOMPl TERS. Page 3
Photo b GAP v PA'TtssOS
Students
Building
Shown Are Working On Computers In Austin
American Library Association Fights Banning Of Books
(SPS) The American Heritage
Dictionary was banned because it
explicit definitions for the
words "horny" and "bed
Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse
was banned because it was anti-
merican and anti-religious.
Ms Magazine was banned
because il was distasteful
And five ol Richard Brautigan's
book were harmed because oi
"excess ve use ot gross references to
and sexual activi-
t
rhose are just a few ot a growing
number of cases around the countrv
where librarians or administrators
have taken a book out oi a school
because ot its content. Judith Krug.
director ot the American 1 ibrarv
Association's Office tor Intellectual
I reedom, said the book banning
movement is part ot a growing con-
servative trend in the country and
ms the number ot book censoi
ship
increased fivefold 1
since Ronald Reagan was elected
Nov. 4.
"The library is there to provide
you with a tree choice Krug said.
"If you don't want to read it, don't.
But don't tell me I can't read it if I
want to
Onalee McGraw, an education
specialist tor the conservative
Heritage Foundation and an educa-
tion adviser to Reagan, disagrees.
"Would I want mv 12 or 13-year-
old to read Catcher in the Rye No.
1 don't think I would McGraw
said. "But would I mind it if he was
a freshman in college? Of course
not
Most authors are opposed to
removal ot a book because of its
content. Thev say it's a violation o
the first Amendment.
h feeling is that their objec-
tions are political and religious
author Kurt Yonnegut told SPS.
"These school committees behave
as though this is a Christian nation.
But under the Constitution, it is not.
icre is no established religion
Marcian Sielaff, a member of the
Phoenix-based I et's Improve To-
day's Education, said school boards
"can do whatever they warn. I don't
think you can deny that some oi
these books are an affront to the
values of some parents. You've got
to make the distinction between
freedom of expression and academic
freedom when you're talking about
minor students at the elementary
and secondary level
No one is in favor oi book censor-
ship. But conservatives on the issue
say the decision about choosing a
book should be made by the com-
munity. If the community feels a
book is obscene, the conservatives
say, then it should not be available
to students in their school libraries.
The book censorship controversy
results from a lack of court rulings.
Although the courts have con-
sidered book censorship cases
doens of times, there has been no
"landmark" ruling to set a prece-
dent for other judges. Experts say it
will take the U.S. Supreme Court to
decide the issue � which won't be
for at least a vear.
Until the Court rules, the deci-
sions ot local circuit courts will
stand. Under those rulings, it may
be OK for school boards in one cir-
cuit to ban a book because it is oi
tensive, while it may not be permit-
ted in another circuit. (There are 10
judicial circuits m the country.)
The book banning controversy
began in 1974 in Kanawha County,
W.V when a group ot protestors
fire-bombed a school because the
school refused to remove textbooks
the protestors said were obscene.
Since then, the courts have con-
sidered doens oi cases and issued
various conflicting rulings, leaving
administrators confused about their
rights regarding books.
"Obviously, you can't put in
every book, both because oi the
budget and because you don't want
to put in certain kinds of books
said Nat Hentoff, a columnist for
New York's Village Voice and
author oi The First Freedom, a
book about the First Amendment.
The problem begins, Hentoff told
Student Union Announces Buf f ett Concert
SPS. when librarians take books oii
the shelves that have already been
purchased. Although they can be
removed because they are un-
popular or obsolete, they should not
be removed because of content.
"There is nothing wrong with
weeding them (unpopular booksi
out. But taking a hook out because
it's offensive is something else
again. Then it is likely to become a
constitutional issue Hentoff said.
"No school board has the uncon-
trolled right to remove any book it
chooses he said. "It has to, in a
school situation, prove it is not
violating the First Amendment by
suppressing ideas
The conservatives urge more in-
put to school boards from parents
and the community. "A lot of this
could be solved if the schools had a
better policy to start with in getting
input from parents on what is and is
not deemed acceptable by the com-
munity Marcia Sielaff said.
And those policies are missing
from the rules of many schools
around the country, said Carolyn
O'Neal, a teacher rights specialist
for the National Fducation Associa-
tion. More than half of America's
schools have no policy for the selec-
tion or removal of textbooks.
O'Neal said, resulting in problem-
when an overzealous librarian wants
a book taken out.
McCiraw also supports clearly
defined policies and urges the use of
more "classics" in literature ciasses.
"You have such a tremendous selec-
tion that you don't need to go to
books that are more controversial
she said. "It's something tor the
community to decide in their
policy
But policies have not been the on-
ly problem in recent cases. They've
included everything from profanity
to material considered just too ad-
vanced for high school students.
Among those cases:
� In Northern California, five of
Richard Brautigan's books were
taken out of the Anderson Union
High School library because the
school board found them "without
substantial literary merit But the
attorney that filed a lawsuit against
the school said the board didn't
even read all the books.
"Of the five books that were ban-
ned, it appears the school board ac-
tually read one said Ann Brick,
who filed the suit on behalf of
Brautigan's publisher, the American
See BOOKS, Page 3
B PALL COLLINS
Nrws Kdllor
Jimmy But ten will be in concert
at last Carolina's Minges Coliseum
on Feb. 21, the Student Union an-
nounced Wednesday.
The Student Union Board of
I rustees must formally approve the
concert today in order to finalize
plans. "Everything else is go said
Charles Sune, chairman ot the Ma-
jor Attractions C ommittee.
The Buflett concert will be the
first of the school year for ECU. "1
.an't stress enough how happy we
are to be getting this concert Sune
said. "Almost every committee of
the Student Union has come up with

money, and everyone is supporting
this
Sune indicated that tickets will go
on sale Feb. 2 and for the first three
days will be available only to
students. "We want to give students
the best shot possible he said.
The Student Union is planning to
ask Dean Rudy Alexander, director
ol Mendenhall Student Center, to
change box office hours in order to
make them more convenient to
students. The present hours are 10
a.m. to 4 p.m and the proposed
hours are 12 to 6 p.m.
Students mav now charge their
St. Mary's Student Dies
An 18-year-old St. Mary's Col-
lege student died Tuesday of men-
ingitis.
Nancv Elizabeth Marlowe,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William
Anderson Marlowe of Wilson, died
about 4 p.m. at Raleigh's Rex
Hospital, where she had been in
critical condition since Friday.
Health officials said the bacteria
that caused her disease was not as
contagious as some forms of men-
ingitis.
Meanwhile, Wilson County
health officials reported confirma-
tion of another case of meningitis in
Miss Marlow's home county.
A high school senior, Teresa Ray
Thorne of Elm City, was hospitaliz-
ed with meningitis, officials said.
Miss Thorne attends the same
school, Ralph L. Fike High School,
from which Miss Marlowe
graduated last eyar.
But A. Thomas Stott, principal of
the school, said it was unlikely that
the two knew each other, since Miss
Marlowe's family lives a few blocks
tickets with either Visa or Master-
charge, Sune said. After the three
day period tickets will go on sale to
the general public at outlets across
Eastern North Carolina. "After the
three day period who knows what'11
happen he said.
Ticket price will be $6.50 for
students and $8.50 for the general
public. "If it does well Sune said,
"we plan to try one more concert in
late March or early April. It all
depends on the success of this show.
We're lucky to get this concert
Plans for concerts featuring Pat
Benatar and the Marshall Tucker
Band fell through earlier in the year.
The Benetar concert never
materialized, in part, because of a
conflict with athletics in Minges
Coliseum.
Sune remarked, however, that
this time the Department of
Athletics had worked with the Stu-
dent Union "one hundred percent
According to Sune, the Buffett
concert is the most expensive in
ECU's history and will cost in excess
of $20,000. Though a number of
"big" concerts have failed in the
See BUFFETT, Page 3
UNC Researchers
Fight Cholesterol
from the school, while Miss Thorne
lives in Elm City, outside Wilson.
It could not be determined
whether Miss Marlowe and Miss
Thorne suffered from the same
variety of the disease.
Miss Marlowe was sent to Rex
after reporting to the St. Mary's in
firmary Thursday with what she
thought was the flu. Her condition
was diagnosed as meningococcal
meningitis, an infection of the lining
of the brain and spinal cord.
Flealih officials did not receive
the results of the laboratory test un-
til Tuesday showing which strain of
the meningococcal bacteria had in-
fected Miss Marlowe.
Shortly before her death, St.
Mary's physician Hubert B.
Hay wood III said through the col-
lege's spokesman that the bacteria
strain had finally been identified as
meningococcus-C.
Even people in close contact with
victims of the C type incur only a
small risk of catching the disease,
health officials said.
Photo by JIMMY DuPREE
U.S. Capitol Building Shown On Inauguration Day
CHAPEL HUT (UPI) � Univer-
sity of North Carolina researchers
announced Wednesday they have-
found a relatively large group of
chemicals that will eliminate up to
60 percent oi the cholesterol and
other fatty substances in the blood
of laboratory rats and mice.
Researchers said the compounds,
called cyclic imide derivatives, act at
very low dosages and without any
apparent side effects. They said the
effect of the chemicals on humane
still has to be determined.
Involved in the research were Dr.
Iris Hall, Dr. George Cocolas,
James Chapman and Patricia J.
Voorstad.
"It's very unusual to find a series
oi agents like this that have such a
potent action Chapman said.
"This provides us with a great deal
of diversity and increases the
chances that one or more of them
will make it through clinical trials.
If one doesn't work, we will try
others
High levels of cholesterol in the
blood have been linked to heart at-
tacks, strokes and hardening of the
arteries although a recent study in-
dicated men with low cholesterol
levels may be more susceptible to
cancer.
Hall said there are several pro-
blems associated with low-
cholesterol diets now prescribed by
doctors.
"One is that low fat diets and
drugs currently on the market, even
at high dosages, reduce
cholesterol only about 10 to 15
percent he said. "Another is that
these drugs can have such in-
desirable side effects as increasing
female secondary sex characteristics
and causing liver tumors
Ot the roughly 7 5 imide
derivatives the researchers have
tested, about halt substantially
lowered fats in the blood of test
animals. Researchers said the imides
appear to work because they act on
cells that produce cholesterol at an
entirely different chemical site than
do drugs currently on the market.
The doses required are in the 20
milligrams per kilogram range �
about a tenth of the weight oi drugs
currently being prescribed.
"We're very happy about these
findings, but there is still a lot of
work that remains to be done before
we'll know if we have a winner
Cocolas said.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds8
Features5
Letters4
Sports7






I Hi I sU ROI IM l-WI m 22, 1981
Announcements
m
t
FORCES FOR
FREEDOM
(v g eietj , � ��
for P O.Ws in Viel �
avails:
N
Irant
proceeds h om .m s
es'abi si i -�� �

poe
LACROSSE
a1 6 W p.m in f
n it you warn to
BOXING
� �' Annual TKF Boxmg

i � it in Wright
' � . - - �� �'
. . � � �. r k i � usi
. - . � .
CBP
AM A
SPRING BREAK TRIP
The Student Union Travel Com
mittee has planned two trips dot
nq Spring Bieai. One is to Ft
I la .via the other is
a f t I audei dale Bah-v
Cruise Prii es irw lode 'i anspui fa
t.on. hotel accommodations and
the (lu-se For more .ntormation
go by Mendenhall Central Tickel
Office ii all ai W o6H Ft
Lauderdale Fia Trip Quad
room S:i9 00 Double hotel
room $309 00 r I uauder
Bahamas Cru � Ouaii
hotel room & quad cabin S49V 00
Double hotel roorr & quad ab.n
SS49 00
SOCIAL WORK
SKI TRIP

-
. . .
mpiered a
mester hi
Dr Agnes Hostetler will teat ri
the German language course
French will be taught by Patm ia
Domenjo
Further information abou' ft i Si
and other spring semester non
�. � � mt ses � iva ibli �
the Offii i � ' Non Credit Pro
grams Division ot Continuing
Educ ation. ECU Greenville NC
lelepl ' '57 6Uj
CHESSBACKGAMMON
Every Tues night at 7 00 p m
hess and t,a kgammon play's
ut '� .� ��,�� i ��� ehouse at
friendly
petit ' pie with difft
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. . i � a i � a few
PHYSICS
esdav ai 77 at 7 I , theri
etmg of thi �. �
� lent! it lost ' N
wood m � � � peat
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I the meet .�. tuturi
planned excui
pi
SIGN
LANGUAGE
��. (in Program for Hear ng
impaired Students v.n sponsor a
non credit beginning Sign
language lass starting Thursday
Jan 21 at 6 30 p m The class will
� � � i v. ' y Thursday for IS week
the ECU campus in Brew'
B a tig room 70 The book that
will be used is "The Joy of Sign
ing by Lott.e Riekehot Theiass
a 'i be tree ot charge to a
who would like to come No pri
registrat on ot enrollmei l � � I
quired This class is open to ECU
stud - to the ����� � " . �
commun ity � � �
pub' . ersity
DeiM � � l a � � �� '
� � . � � � tors topr thi -a
be Ron Gill a a Dixon
1729 for I i'
GTU
Honor �
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� at 4 p n
Brewster C203 �� nen
BOWLING
jp for a n � � I A
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Center groc
board Therevt � �� � v
a 'uesda.
a week'� basit
meeting foi
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CRAFTS
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THl I AST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22, 1981
NT
TO ITEM
POLICY
Mdlly
S�v-or
I mm do
tern oi a
ngt or �
� t th�
40 davt
0
o
OFF
SUGG
DETAIL
ALA Fights Banning Of Books
Continued from Page 1
Civil liberties Union
and several teachers
and students "On the
others, they may have
�ked at the clipped
pasages tor the bad
words. But they didn't
lead the books and, of
course, that is crucial
California Superior
Court Judge William
Phelps ruled the books
were not legally
obscene and ordered
them replaced on the
library's shelves
Brautigan's book the
Vbortion "does have
some sordid and coarse
material in it Phelps
said in his opinion.
"Nevertheless, I think
it does show the conse-
quences of an un-
wanted pregnancy and
certainty could not be
said to entirely without
redeeming social im-
portance for minors
and adults
� In Rockville, Md
English teacher Cyril
1 ang was suspended
from his job in
November because he
insisted on teaching
Aristotle's Poetics and
Machia velii's The
Prince, books ad-
ministrators said were
too difficult for high
school sophomores.
! ang was charged with
insubordination and
misconduct in office.
His case is currently
pending an appeal
before the school
board.
� In the M ouni
Diablo School District
in Califonria, Ms.
magazine was taken
from the shelf in the
school's library because
the school board found
the social, political and
moral philosophy of
the magazine
distasteful. The ACLU
has filed a suit against
the district. The suit is
now pending in a state
superior court.
� In schools in Texas
and Indiana, the
American Heritage
Dictionary was taken
out because parents
and school baord
members objected to its
candid definitions for
some words.
But while much of
the controversy sur-
rounds library books,
classroom textbooks
have come under fire
too, most notably from
a family in Texas who
run a textbook evalua-
tion service from their
Crowe Needs Room To Expand;
Students Left Out In Hallway
home. Mel and Norma
Gabler have been called
the two most influential
people in the textbook
industry. If the Gablers
don't like a book,
publishers say, it pro-
bably won't sell
anywhere in the coun-
try.
"The schools are
promoting the values of
a slim minority said
Mel Gabler, who
checks the books for
bias before they are
purchased by a school.
Along with his wife and
eight staffers, Gabler
reads books that are be-
ing proposed for use in
Texas schools and then
makes recommenda-
tions about them to the
state board of educa-
tion.
Continued from Page 1
pule! center. Dunlap disparity not only m the
left a position at relative numbers of
Chapel Hill to come to programmers at the
I (. I in November. two schools but also in
"There's a great the relative salary
Buffett Coming
To ECU In Feb.
Continued from Page 1
past at E I . Sune
thought Jimmy Buffett
warrented taking a risk.
��(. oncerts bv their
v erv nature are i iskv.
Sure we're taking a
risk, but .limmv Buf-
fet) 's popularity is wa
up there
5 ne said thai the tor-
mat for I :ert had
not vet been decided
upon. "We ma) have
an opening act, or we
a three-hour
t �
'Evening With Jimmy
Buffett "
Buffett, whose music
could be called a blend
of country and rock,
also appeared at ECU
four years ago.
Buffett will be tour-
ing behind a new album
entitled �'Coconut
lelcgiaph" which is
scheduled for release
next week.
His last album was
"Volcano
grades Dunlap main-
tained.
Dunlap fell that
years of neglect could
not be remedied over
night. "It's going to
take some time
Crowe is optimistic
that his problems will
be solved in time; he is
just not sure how long
it will take.
"Dr. Brewer and the
administration are on
lop of the situation
Crowe remarked.
"They see what a zoo
this place is. They are
behind us all the way
In fact, Crowe said,
the administration has
made the computer
centei one ol its top
budget priorities for
upcoming years.
Robert Maier. vice
chancellor for
academic affairs, said
that new housing for
the center would pro-
bably not come until
the medical school
moved to its new
facilities or a new
classroom building is
built.
Maier. who was not
aware that the keypun-
ches had been moved
into the Austin foyer,
said, "1 think the
operation of the com-
puter center is one ol
the most important
academic and ad-
ministrative centers on
campus.
The East Carolinian
, �. � � . w.icon tnunif)
fine 192
Published every Tursday and
Thursday during the academic
year ana every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the ot
dc.ai newspaper ot East
Carolina University owned
operated, and published tor ano
: , the studen's ot East Cai
Univei � �
Subscription Rates
Business J3S yi'V
All others $25 yearly
Second class postage pad at
Greem lie N C
� � . ; � � �� � �� i
�� � Old South
PUS Ot ECU,
Greenville N C
Telephone 757 6366 6367 6309
�i Hi ad Out ��' thi 6
I nnn 11 nu d (
is ot its . art
tht Students
East Carolina
A 3-Da, First Class Weekend
on Hilton Head Island Sllit
"J HIS IS NO! Jkl Sea Pines at Hilton Head Island, one
�IKlJOj resori merica. will treat vou to 3 days and 2
v
T
: m. - j�' in t private luxury villa near the heach foi $65 pei person
" V A n�i as additional inducements, wcli include iw. eoniineni.il
� A ni
�jhl cookoul or buffet, free tennis and a day's bike
ill lioHu this Because the people who make ihese kind ol
�.�idier win to East Carolina im one of the othei eight
IT PAYS TO HAVE
ALUMNI IN HIGH PLACES
A M
� Sea Pines
�" AT HILTON HEAD
�i �!��- I '��
and
Name
ddre
Cit
�1
Zip
telephone
Icposii for $25 Please arrange .1 x Da I irsi Class Weekend for
Ino of bedrooms I for the weekend ot Ign 1st and 2nd
! I l- Feb 20-22 Fen 27 March I
Or C all Toll Free l-MJO-fUS-oPI
1-800922-7042 in S C
East Carolina
Jan. 23
CHAP'S
Highway 258 N. Kinston
Eastern Carolinas
Newest And Finest
Private Club
Bill Dill
and the
Rhondells
Chubby
Checker
Wednesday Night's
are Ladies' Night
Members and
1 heir Guests
Welcome
Happy Hour From
All ABC Permits 5:00-7:uOpm
Jan. 24
Buying Cold � Silver Coins
Also Sterling Silver
Paying lop $
Come in lor rRfclE estimate
Carolina Compact
Rivergate Shopping Center
Price may vary depending on market
t� want or
MtMWAMCV
tmrnuwH ��� mtrm ���
c� WWOl Pmr
itmrmHm call tin
I1MI ' ffM MUlMr
mniliMI totwwn
AM tPM
ust tell us ,
at you want.
Your ArtCarved representative will be on campus soon to show you the
latest in class ring designs With dozens of styles to choose from, you'll be proud to select
your one-of-a-kind design Just tell us what you want. And be on the
lookout for posters on campus to get you where you want
"ECU Official Class Ring"
JAN. 27-30
Student Supply Store
Lobby Wright Building
IRJQIRVED
WEDNESDAY 18 NOW
i?

TACOS
Located at 512 W. Greenville Blvd.
(next to Tarheel Toyota)
a9
NOW
On Sundays
Too!
756-2072
o
'This weekend at the Coffeehouse:
cK
VC5
I
o
A uditions
te
Jan. 23 & 24 9:00-11:00p.m.
Rm. 15 Mendenhall
Admission Free
OOOOQQQOQOOQOQOOQOOQOQOOQOOQOQQQQiMMMMIcO.PQgPOOOQOPP
GORDON FULPS
GOLF AND SKI SHOP
LOCATED AT GREENVILLE COUNTRY CLUB
OFF MEMORIAL DR.
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK - 8:00 A.M. TIL DARK
756-0504
ALL SKI WEAR FOR MEN,
WOMEN & CHILDREN
25 to 60 OFF
INCLUDES: JACKETS, VESTS. HATS.
BIBS, OUTFITS, LONG JOHNS AND SOCKS
GLOVES 20 to 50 OFF
ALL SKI POSTERS - BUY ONE
GET ONE FREE
CREST LINED WIND-BREAKER JACKETS 12 OFF
ALL TENNIS & JOGGING SHOES 50 OFF
ALL SNOW BOOTS - REDUCED AS MARKED
ALL SKI & TOTE BAGS 25 OFF
ALL SOP SKI BOOT TOTES WERE $10.00
now $6.00
ALL SNOW SKI'S
REDUCED FROM 25 to 60 OFF
SKI TRIP TO SNOWSHOE - MARCH 5-MARCH 8
ROOM AND BUS - 4 TO A ROOM
APPROXIMATELY $110.00 - TIMBERLINE LODGE
ALLGOU BALLS SI3.00 Do.
ALL GOLF CLUB & REPAIRS - 12 NOW UNTIL FEB. lit
CLOSEOUT ON ALL IZOD SWEATERS
WET T-SHIRT
FEB 1 st
Sponsored By
1TI

Jolly Roger
$100.00
25.00
Case
First Prize!
2nd
3rd
Admission $2.00
6th Annual TKE
Boxing Tournament
will be held
in Wright Auditorium
February 24, 25 and 26th, 1981
�Ring GirT GompeObon February 10 at Hbo
Registration begins
January 19th-Feh. 6th
at the TKE House - 951E. 10th St
between 6-9 p.m.
Ring Girt Info Call 757-3156





3te iEaat (Hutoliniun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
CHRIS LlC'HOK, General Manager
Jimmy Dupree, &�
PAUI LlNCKE, P.reaur u, AJvemun PAUL COLLINS, Vrm Editor
Dave Severin, Sw,wv1 ,anaKer Charles Chandler
Ami a Lancaster, w��� Manager David Norris.
Sporis Editor
eatures Editor
Januar 22, IsKl
Opinion
Page 4
ECU Computors
Out-Dated System Causes Problems
With the harrowing experience of
drop add just beginning to leave the
student's minds, it seems that by
next fall, something could be done
to make it a less frustrating ex-
perience. No one seems to unders-
tand why the process is so
unorganized. The basic problem of
inefficiency, however, seems to lie
with our out-dated computer
system.
After seeing the inefficiency in
just the registration process at this
University, it is not surprising to
find that everything from registra-
tion to financial aid is handled by
one, huge antique computer. Just
recently, the computer has begun to
stay in operation 24 hours a day,
still not enough time to effectively
handle the workload.
According to an administrative
source in the Computer Depart-
ment, the entire registration pro-
cess, for example, could be
streamlined into a fairly simple pro-
cedure by rewriting the current
system, which seems to be a relic of
the old ECTC days. However, the
personnel, equipment and space
needed to make the Computer
C enter run more smoothly cost
money, and getting that money
takes a lot of dedication, time and
hard work on the part of the
members of the department.
luckily, the University has gotten
some excellent new directors for the
computer program this year. Work-
ing with a willing administration,
they are slowly but steadily making
some headway into updating the
computer system. However, many
changes they've made to provide
more room for administration and
equipment have met with opposi-
tion. Moving the key punch ter-
minals into the hall is one example
of changes which students have
been dissatisfied with, although this
arrangement seems to work effec-
tively at N.C. State, which has ap-
proximately three times more space
for their entire Computer Depart-
ment than East Carolina. Also,
some faculty members seem to think
that the quality of the students'
educations are being infringed upon
by some of these changes.
Instead of criticizing, it would be
much more productive for the
students and faculty effected by
these changes to find out exactly
why they are necessary. There are
exciting new developments taking
place in the Computer Center. Pro-
gress that has long been needed will
benefit the entire ECU Community.
With the support of the student
body and faculty alike, our Com-
puter Center will soom be out of the
Dark Ages, making a procedure like
dropadd a much more pleasant ex-
perience.
1-GUE5SWE GET TOKHME'EA INTO THE
STONFAGE NOUjHUH PAD?
-Campus Forum
Dorm, Fraternity Spirit Urged
1 would like to commend two groups
for their outstanding d i s p I a ot school
spirit at our last home basketball game
against Atlantic Christian � the Phi
Kappa Phi fraternity and Scott Dorm
These two groups finally added a
touch of excitement that is needed so
much when our men and women's
basketball teams take the court in
Minges Coliseum. We have little tradi-
tion here in basketball and there's only
one way to create tradition. You have to
start today!
It more groups would take the interest
that Phi Kappa Phi and Scott Dorm
took at this game in helping our team
and our cheerleaders to make Minges
Coliseum as exciting place to pla and
watch college basketball, and hopefully,
make Minges and intimidating place tor
visiting teams, we could begin to see
something really happen here at last
Carolina in basketball.
1 would like to personally challenge
Phi Kappa Phi and Scott Dorm to con
tinuc their efforts and be leaders on
campus for school spirit.
But at the same time, I would
challenge other student groups to join
these two and make your mark as well at
basketball games in the future.
Tradition and great basketball can be
had at East Carolina. But it will happen
only when our entire student body and
community gets behind the Pirates in a
big way in Minges Coliseum.
KEN SMITH
Assistant Athletic Director
OSHA Defended
1 would like to make just a few com-
ments on Robert M. Swaim's article of
January 20th.
Mr. Swaim states that OSHA's "work
for safety rules" are "just another load
of federal red tape and excessive paper-
work It is sad to say, but it appears
that the companies need someone to
hold a club over their heads. The public
has certainly had the opportunity to see
what industries do without such "red
tape From the birth of the industrial
revolution, up until now, the laborer has
had to fight for his rights; it seems that
the right to personal health and safety
should be guaranteed. Maybe if this
"red tape" had been present earlier, less
people would have suffered from brown
lung.
Also, I find it hard to shed a tear tor
the poor oil companies. Somewhere in
their budgets they could have found
enough money to pav some intelligent
soul to tigure out the "intricate and con-
tradictory price rules If the did not
know what actions were legal, perhaps
the oil companies should have made
such discoveries before taking any illegal
action. Remember, ignorance ot the law
is no excuse.
And finally, as tor the actions ot the
EPA, 1 think that no cost would be too
much to keep our rivers clean, our
mountains intact, and our air clear, tor
we count on these tor survival. Mr.
Swaim. have you ever lived near a pulp
and paper industry or seen what these in-
dustries do to a beautiful, clear river?
the smell is sickening and the destruc-
tion to the rivers and all of nature is
tragic and unnecessary. S u r e 1
somewhere along the way someone has
told you about the intricacies of the food
chain and the necessity to preserve it. I
would like to quote John Seiberling:
when a man from some mining interest
said that "wilderness doesn't pay
Seiberline commented, "What do you
mean wilderness doesn't pay? Does your
chinch pay? Do your children pay? Does
your green lawn in the front of your
house pay? Wilderness is a spiritual
place. It has a value that can not be
bought. Wilderness protects watersheds
and prevents floods. It helps maintain
air quality
So, Mr. Swaim, I think you have plac-
ed your sympathies with the wrong peo-
ple. Maybe somewhere along the way
you will find that greed is very destruc-
tive, and unfortunately, without some
government control; the "sanctuary of
privacy" that you seek might be
devastating to us all.
IRENERUSNAK
Junior Nursing Student
Professor Responds
I read your editorial "Why Foreign
Language" with great interest. 1 would
like to clarify a few of your misconcep-
tions. First of all, you mentioned only
two of the many job opportunities open
to students who are fluent in a foreign
language: Teaching and International
Business. With the decline in our
population, teaching jobs are declin
in many fields � but international
business is a wide open field, lor in-
stance, there are over 50 German and
Vmss firms in and around Charlotte.
NC � there is a large French plant
(Michelin) in SC. All ot them need bi-
lingual emioyees Did you know that the
beginning salary ot a bi-lingual se
is SIN,000"?
Then there is the great field ot
tourism. Travelers from Europe flock to
this country and cannot find bi-lingual
people in the travel agencies, airports.
bus and train stations nor in the store-
Have sou thought of the tremendous
portunities with the government, m
eluding foreign service, which are open
to students who speak one or more
foreign languages'1 Mam of our
students go on to graduate school wh
at least a reading knowledge o a foreign
language is required. Why? Weil, there
are people doing research all over the
world in many languages and you might
need it to write your own thesis or disser-
tation.
All these are material reasons � but
there is more to it: Our world is getting
smaller everyday. Planes rush you across
the ocean in a few hours. Not everybodv
speaks English on the other side, if you
want to make friends, understand peo-
ple, you can only do it if you understand
their language. I have raised five tri-
lingual daughters and they have really
had many opportunities in their careers
which they would never have had with
English only.
I've been here at ECU only since last
September and I don't know who were
the wise people who had foresight
enough to keep the requirement. Main
other universities who dropped it are
sorry now and will reinstate it this vear
or soon thereafter.
The President's Commission on
Foreign Languages which had concluded
its study last year recommends the
reinstating of language requirements in
high schools, colleges, and universities.
So, we are ahead of the trend � not
behind! Congratulations to a liberal arts
faculty who have the imagination and
foresight which is lacking in many other
places. 1 am proud to be part of it.
Dr. Agnes Hostettler
Professor,
Dept. of Foreign Languages
Branch, Brown Proceeded Helms As Agriculture Chairman
W ASH1NGTON � It turns out that two
North Carolina Senators preceded me in
serving as chairman of the Senate
Agricultural Committee � but that was
some time ago.
Senator John Branch was elected chair-
man in 1827, and served for two years.
Senator Bedford Brown became chairman
of the committee in 1833. He too served
for two years. So it has been 146 years
since a North Carolinian served as chair-
man of the Senate Agriculture Committee,
which has been expanded in its respon-
sibilities to include forestry and nutrition.
BOTH � Senator Branch was born in
Halifax County. Senator Brown was born
in Caswell County. Both were graduated
from the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. Both were lawyers.
Interestingly enough, Senator Branch
also served as Secretary of the Navv and as
Jesse
Helms
Governor of Florida. He gained the latter
post by appointment ot President Tyler
after Florida had become a state but before
the new state could adopt a constitution
and elect a Governor. He served for a little
over a year as Governor of Florida.
Senator Bedford Brown was a lawyer,
but never practiced law. His biography
states that he was a "planter He was ap-
pointed to the Senate when Senator Branch
resigned. He resigned from the Senate, ac-
cording to his biography, "because he
would not follow the instruction of the
General Assembly of North Carolina.
In 1842, Bedford Brown moved to
Missouri, then to Virginia, then back to
North Carolina where he was elected to the
state legislature. He is buried in Caswell
County.
OTHERS � North Carolinians in the
U.S. Senate have served as chairmen of
many committees and subcommittes
through the years. Few of them served as
chairmen of major committees, however.
Senator Nathaniel Macon was chairman
of the Senate Foreign Relations Commit-
tees in the 15th Congress (1817-1819), and
again in the 19th Congress (1825-1827). I
am second-ranking member of the com-
mittee today.
Senator Willie Mangum, according to
the Library of Congress, served as chair-
man of two committees in the 27th Con-
gress (1841-1843) � the Committee on
Naval Affairs and the Committee on Select
Printing, whatever that was. The Library
of Congress reports that in the early days
of the Senate, scores of committees were
organized, and that obviously is correct:
The record shows that Senator Mangum
was chairman of the "Select Committee on
Motion to Provide Desks on the Senate
Floor for the Reporter to the Senate.
COMMERCE � Senator William H.
Haywood served as chairman of the Senate
Commerce Committee in the 29th Con-
gress (1845-1847). Senator Josiah W.
Bailey was chairman of the same commit-
tee from 1939 until his death in 1947.
Senator Robert R. Revnolds served as
chairman of the Senate Military Affairs
Committee from 1941 through 1947.
Senator Furnifold M. Simmons served
six years (1913-1919) as chairman of the
Senate Finance Committee. He also was
chairman of the "Committee on Disposi-
tion of Useless Papers in the Executive
Department
Senator B. Everett Jordan served for ten
years, beginning in 1963, as chairman of
the Senate Committee on Rules and Ad-
ministration. Senator Sam J. Ervin served
as chairman of the Senate Committee on
Government Operations, also the Select
Committee on Presidential Campaign Ac-
tivities, better known as the Watergate
Committee.
I was certain in my own mind that
Senator Clyde R. Hoey had served as
chairman of a Senate committee, but the
Library of Congress did not confirm it. 1
want to check that out.
Ki
lb
in '
1
Ma

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A
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IQ
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It
I
live
ite
Lit
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1
1H1 I S1 CAROLINIAN
Features
JANUARY 22, 1981
Page 5
ECU Art School Faculty Show Opens
J1 b�
Li
�Kitt Hawk Series 2 an ink and watercolor drawing b Richard La-
ing. is among Ihe approximate); KM) works in Ihe Fasturolina University
school of Art Annual Faculty Kvhihition now on view al ECU'S (�ra
Gallery. Ihe exhibition runs through Feb. 8.
By FRANCEINE PERRY
K I Ne� Burriu
The 1981 Faculty Show at East
Carolina University's Gray Art
Gallery � an annual showcase of
representative works by members of
the ECU School of Art faculty �
features a great diversity of art in
media, technique and mood.
More that 30 faculty artists con-
tributed approximately 100 items to
the exhibition with examples of their
recent work, said Randolph Osman,
gallery directory.
Osman himself is represented by
three works, two color pencil and
watercolor images of migrating
salmon and a porcelain cylinder
pierced by a rectangular slab whose
surface is air brushed, ornamented
by gold luster and topped by several
colorful features from his flv-tvping
kit.
Other images of fish appear
throughout the show, in lithographs
by Michael Ehlbeck and a giant
ceramic platter by Charles
Chamberlain.
The gallery space is dominated by
two huge sculptures � an imposing
steel and oak piece by Robert Ed-
miston and an eye-catching arrange-
ment of rope rigging, partly de-
barked tree limbs, autumn leaves
and bales o! hay by Norman Keller.
One of the most spectacular of
Paul Hartley's mixed media can-
vases in "One Hundred Arcs and
Isabella which has the Spanish
queen who befriended Columbus
surrounded by curves and round
shapes suggesting planets, rainbows
and ship's wheels.
Other notable works on display
are the carved cherry wood dressing
table and standing mirror by Terry
Smith; Clarence Morgan's collages
of handmade paper, fabric swatches
and postage stamps; fabric weavings
by Joe Buske and Janet Fischer;
striking sterling silver necklaces by
Ms. Fischer and John Satterfield;
silkscreened and photoscreened
designs in reds and blues by Sara
Edmiston and a textured nude by
VVes Crawley.
Traditional photography is not
evident in this year's faculty show-
newer photo techniques are used in
the Polaroid groupings of Henry
Stindt and in Dorothy Satterfield's
repeated commerical images in
"Apple Cider "New York, New
York" and "Cola
Craft lovers may miss the spec-
tacular quilted hangings shown
previously by ECU art faculty
members, but miniaturists should
take note of Elizabeth Ross's hand-
crafted miniature furniture arrang-
ed in room settings.
Many of the works are whimsical,
such as Charles Chamberlain's twig
birdhouse standing on real turkey
feet. Art Haney's porcelain and ear-
thenware fruits and vegetables pun-
ningly entitled "Two Matoes" and
"Three of a Kind Beat a Pear" and
the Michael Ehlbeck prints featur-
ing Mickey Mouse ears.
Gallery visitors should pay par-
ticular attention to the darkly
mysterious intaglio landscapes of
Michael Voors, Ray Elmore's
rendering of antique toys (horses on
wheels, a cracked, crazed doll's
head) and Paul Hartley's small cir-
cus scupture, with moveabie wheels,
pulleys and gears and realistic
figures of circus performers and
sideshow freaks.
Gallery director Osman points
with pride at Daw Davenport's
"Knowledge of Time a large
assembly of watercolor designs
made up of individual squares and
attached by Osman and the artist
directly to a white gallery wall I ike
meny two-dimensional works m the
show, this watercolor is executed on
ruled ledger paper.
Printmaker Donald Sexaucr, one
of ECU's more prolific facultv ar-
tists, shows a touching depiction of
Cuban "Boat People" ("Your
Tired, Your Poor, Your Huddled
Masses"), an intriguing young cou-
ple in medieval dress, each encircled
and separated by vine-like bands
("Cages") and a startling group of
"Alice in Wonderland" characters
portrayed as inactive marionette
(L.Cs Gift").
According to Osman, a university
art gallery serves "several functions,
all of them educational.
"The faculty show is a most im-
portant tradition, enabling the cam-
pus and the general public to view
evidence of the faculty member's
development as artists in their own
right.
"It's also beneficial for the
students to see their teacher's work,
in a well-designed exhibition setting
such as a gallery like this affords
The ECU Faculty Show will be on
display in the Gray Gallery, located
in the east end of the Leo Jenkins
Fine Arts Center, through Feb. 8.
Gallery hours are 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
on weekdays and 1 - 4 p.m. Sun-
days.
Work For Rebel Show
To Be Submitted Friday
The Sixth Annual Rebel Art Show
will be held from Jan. 24-31 in the
Greenville Museum of Art.
Work to be submitted for the
show will be accepted only on I-ri-
day Jan. 23 from 12 noon to 8 p.m.
in Room 1105 (The Printmakmg
Department) of the Jenkins Fine
Arts Center. Do not send work to
the Rebel office.
Each piece must be complete and
ready for exhibition. Paintings must
be wired if necessary and sculpture
must be self-supporting. Artists are
to avoid special wiring and hanging
installations. All 2-D work must be
matted and acetated or preferable
framed.
Artists may enter a maximum of
two pieces in any of the following
categories: painting, drawing,
sculpture, printmaking, ceramins,
photography, mixed-media, and
design (metals, fibers, and wood).
There will be a non-refundable
fee of one dollar for each piece sub-
mitted.
Awards this year include a prize
of S75 for first place and S25 for se-
cond place in each category plus a
$200 Best o Show prize and a
number o purchase awards. The
prizes are donated by the Attic and
Jeffries Beer and Wine Company.
Special Films Offered
List Includes Peppermint Soda, Dr. Strangelove
Peter Weir's
At Hanging
1 he plot con-
1 ho Student Union Hints Com-
mittee is presenting a diversified
lineup oi special foreign. American,
and classic Films thai includes thir-
teen Wednesda) evening screenings
as well as two special late shows.
C ottee and doughnuts will be served
si each single Wednesday night
film and guest speakers will discuss
finer points with interested students,
faculty, or staff members in atten-
dance. Ml films will be shown in
Mendenhall Student Center's Hen-
dn Theatre and admission is tree
with ID and activity card or MSC
Membership C ard.
On January 28,
spellbinding "Picnic
Rock" will be shown.
cerns Miranda (Anne Lambert) and
a group of three friends who ascend
Hanging Rock, a geological forma-
tion in Australia. One girl, pudgy
and asexual, turns back halfway;
the other three mysteriously disap-
pear, as does the middle-aged
teacher chaperoning the girls from
Appleyard College on their Valen-
tine's Dav picnic in 1900. One girl is
later found alive; her companions
are never discovered, and she has no
recollection of what became of
them. The film is rich in visual sym-
bolism, with beautifully at-
mospheric photography and a haun-
ting musical score.
On February 11, Stanley
Kubrick's "Dr. Strangelove: or
Wov. I I earned to Stop Worrying
and I ove the Bomb" comes to Hen-
drix Theatre for the first time ever.
In this wildly comic nightmare, the
President of the US and the Premier
of the USSR cooperate in a bizarre
effort to save the world from total
disaster.
On February 13 and 14, rock
group led Zepplin's immortal 1973
Madison Square Garden ap-
pearences are captured on film for
an 11 p.m. late show screening of
"The Song Remains fhe Same
Cioddard's "Breathless" comes to
Hendrix on February is. One of the
most important films to come out of
the "New Wave" that developed in
France during the early sixties, the
film literally rewrote the grammer
of film and established that the
manner in which a storx is told can
be more important than the story
itself. Jean-Paul Belmondo's first
majoi roll, a parody ol Bogart's
anarchic gangster, made him
famous.
On March 4. the Films Commit-
tee presents an H.G. Wells Double
Feature with the classic "Time
Machine" and the more recent
"Time After lime In "The Time
Machine a turn-of-the-century
scientist invents a time machine
which lands him in the year 802,701.
There he discovers Eloi, a gentle
race of people who are terrorized by
a civilization of grotesque ape-like
creatures, the Morlocks, who live
underground. In "Time After
Time" (1980), Wells (portrayed by
Malcom McDowell) discovers that a
Jose friend of his is really Jack the
Ripper. The killer escapes the police
in an innovative time machine just
unveiled bv Wells. Wells follows
him to the year 1979 in a terrifying
and visually dazzling journey in the
same machine and pursues him
through modern-da) San Francisco.
"Seven Samurai" is brought back
bv popular demand and will be run
on March 18. "Samurai" (better
known as "The Magnificent
Seven") is Akira Kurosawa's exul-
tant concoction of adventure,
romance, action, humor, suspense
and colorful characters is fast paced
and totally absorbing. Ihe plot,
about seven skilled fighters
recruited to free a farming village
from the scourge of a bandit army
was, of course, remade in the
American version in the late sixties.
The second late show of the
semester, 11:30 p.m brings the
magic of The Beatles to campus on
March 20 and 21. Ihe film is "Lei It
Be an exhilarating documentary
of the making of an album by The
Beatles. There is jamming of old
songs and painstaking work on n�w
ones. In search of a new direction,
the group plays an inspired concert
on the roof oi their I ondon offices
and create quite a stir in the process.
On March 25, the Films Commit-
tee presents its final double feature
of the semester, a Classic American
twin bill with the 1934 movie, "It
Happened One Night" and the 1959
comedy "Some Like It Hot" starr-
ing Marilyn Monroe. "It Happened
One Night winner of five major
Academy Awards, gives us Clark
Gable and Claudette Colbert in a
runaway romance between a tough
guy and a society girl � a rough dia-
mond and a polished jewel. "Some
Like It Hot" is one of the all-time
great movies � winner of six major
Academy Awards. The story is
about two Chicago musicians, Tony
Curtis and Jack Lemmon, who are
on the lam and how they get mixed
up with an all-girl band and its
ukele-playing vocalist, Monroe.
Renoir's amazing film "Grand Il-
lusion" will be screened on April 1.
A war film without a single battle
scene, "Illusion" focuses on French
prisoners during WWI and the
cultured German commandant (Eric
von Stroheim) in charge of their
prison camp. Von Stroheim respects
one of his prisoners, an aristocratic-
French career officer, as his equal,
and Renoir examines dying codes of
chivalry and disintegrating class
structure through their relationship
in this classic drama.
A profoundly touching celebra-
tion of the American experience,
'Ihe Emigrants will be shown
April 15. The Swedish film recounts
the dramatic Swedish emigration to
America in the middle of the 19th
century.
The last Wednesday film of the
semester is Diane Kurys' charming
"Peppermint Soda" to be shown on
April 22. This French film centers
on the friends, family, classes, vaca-
tions, sulks, sexual misconceptions,
pop records, bad grades, adven-
tures, and misadventures of a
French-Jewish schoolgirl from sum-
mer to summer in the epochal year
of 1963. One o' the biggest grossing
films in France, it won the Prix
Louis Delluc (Best Picture) in 1978.
Single Wednesday films begin at 8
p.m. and double features are run at
7 and 9 p.m.
The Beatles star in Let It Be, one of two late shows scheduled this semester
by the Student I nion Films Committee.
Leaving The Dorms May
Require Adjustment
By DAVID NORRIS
tmlurr Kditor
L-ZMIrOb JfSOUT COLICU T( H)p AJ)f
One of the ironies of college life is
the fact that by the time you get us-
ed to living in a dorm, you've decid-
ed to finally more off-campus. You
have more time to adjust to off-
campus living, since you'll be doing
it for the rest of your life.
There is quite a difference bet-
ween living in a dormitory and liv-
ing in a house or apartment. For in-
stance, there are usually fewer peo-
ple living in a house than a dorm,
which means that there are usually
not as many weird people around.
On the other hand, there are
fewer people to borrow stuff from.
I 3UT ITS VjoiaJ 3 Aj4.�
A)0 iAjfcvC ftf)uy
Gor -tvgoiv suep ;
31 PMV AJoierfb
that's om aakl
Vou (ajcvvjf 6oTH(f tf AAr
m
Out of 500 people in a dorm, one is
bound to have some salt or catsup
or whatever you need to borrow. In
fact, you can usually borrow
vacuum cleaners or hair dryers too.
Living with only a few people in-
stead of a few hundred will cut
down on the availability of bor-
rowable stuff.
Isolation is one of the main
drawbacks to living in a house or
apartment. You might have entire
herds of friends in your former
dorm but don't count on them drop-
ping by too often if your new place
is more than a few blocks away. (Of
course, there are always some peo-
ple who you like staying isolated
from.)
Leases are lots of trouble to put
up with, but are pretty much in-
evitable. Some parts of the lease
take a long time to read ("Things
the Tenant may not do"); but lucki-
ly, some sections are pretty short
("Services the Landlord agrees to
provide"). Most leases have clauses
forbidding things that you may have
enjoyed in the dorm, like throwing
firecrackers through people's tran-
soms and making loud and excessive
noise all night.
By the way, you should remember
that you are out of the dorms
because your neighbors won't call
the hall advisor to make you keep
quiet � they call the police. Many
neighbors like to do that, so they
listen with their ears next to your
wall waiting to tell the police about
how excessively loud you drop pins.
To get back to happier thoughts,
there are two really wonderful in-
ventions that you can have when
you leave the dorm, a real kitchen
and cable TV.
A real kitchen is any kitchen that
does not consist of hotplates and
toaster ovens on the floor or on top
of a desk or a portable refrigerator.
Cooking is much easier when you
don't have to drag the stove out
from under the bed every time you
want to cook something. There is
also more room to store Hirty
dishes, so you don't have to wash
them very often.
Cable TV is great for those who
like to stay up all night, to say-
nothing of those who like to watch
inaugurations on fifteen different
channels at once. It can be
detrimental to academic work; if
one is of weak character, it is easy to
succumb to the temptation of wat-
ching TV all day to the exclusion of
everything else.
Since a television is the only piece
of furniture that some people own,
moving into a new place poses some
problems if the place moved into is
unfurnished. (If it's furnished, it
might have ugly furniture, making
what could be another serious pro-
See LEAVING, page 6, col. 1
T
i
� vi
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 22, 198!
Happenings
Leaving Dorms Requires Change
Thursday 22
� 8:00 P.M. Artists Series: Julliard String
Quartet; Hendrix Theatre.
Friday 23
� 5, 7:45 and 10:30 p.m. Movie: The Shining;
Hendrix Theatre
Saturday 24
� 2 p.m. Women's Basketball; James Madison
University, Harrisburg, VA.
� 5, 7:45 and 10:30 p.m. Movie: The Shining;
Hendrix Theatre
� 7:30 p.m. Men's Basketball; NC State,
Raleigh, NC.
Sunday 25
� 2 p.m. Women's Basketball: University
Virginia Charlottesville, VA.
Monday 24
� 7:30 p.m. Men's Basketball. Baptist College,
Minges Coliseum
� Jan. 26-March 5 Intramural 5-Piayer Basket-
ball: Memorial Gym and Minges.
� Jan. 26-March 5 Intramural Co-Rec Roller
Hockey: Twin Rinks
Wednesday 28
� 8 p.m. Movie: Picnic At Hanging Rock.
� 7:30 p.m. Women's Basketball: NC State
University, Minges Coliseum.
� 7:30 p.m. Men's Basketball: Old Dominion,
Norfolk, VA.
NIGHTLIFE
Attic
� Thursday: ARROGANCE (Record Bar Hug-
ger Festival)
� Friday: PEGASUS PLUS (Taint)
� Saturday: PEGASUS PLUS (Taint)
� Sunday: Alpha Delta Pi SUPERBOWI XV
PEGASUS PLUS (Taint)
� Tuesday. POINTER SISTERS w3 p.m.
� Wednesdav: MAGIC CAT (Mug Night)
� Thursday: NANTUCKET
� Friday: STILLWATER
� Saturday: WINTERS BROTYHERS
Carolina Oprv House
� Thursday: LEGENDARY GEORGE JONES
w BILL LYERLY BAND; Tickets go on sale at
the door at 8 p.m. for $11.
� Friday: BILL LYERLY BAND
� Saturday: BILL LYERLY BAND
� Wednesday: C&M TRAVELING SHOW
� Thursday: C&M TRAVELING SHOW
� Friday: J. MURPHY MARTIN BAND
� Saturday: J. MURPHY MARTIN BAND
Chapter X
� Thursday: Pi Kappa Phi "Evening Delight"
7-10 p.m.
� Friday: A Nu Pi "End of Week Party" 4-8
p.m.
� Saturday: Best in Beach Music
� Sunday: Kappa Alpha "Nickel; NIte"
� Tuesday: Sigma Phi Fpsilon "Ladies Night"
� Wednesday: Sigma Nu "50, 50 Night"
JJ's Music Hall
� Thursday: ALL STARS
� Friday: SUN BELT
� Saturday: MILLIONAIRES
� Wednesday: BILLY TENT
� Friday: ALAN's NEW WAVE PARTY
� Saturday: LEGENDARY BLUES BAND
School of Art
� Jan. 15-Feb. 8: Annual Faculty Show. Works
by the ECU SChool of ARt Faculty to be on
display in Gray Art Gallery.
School of Music
� Sunday, Jan. 25: Faculty Chamber Recital,
3:15 Mozart: Serenade in B-flat; Recital Hall of
the A.J. Fletcher Music Center.
� Jan. 23, 7 p.m Saxophone Recital in the A.I.
Fletcher Music Center Recital Hall; Robert
Keller, senior student of ECU School of Music.
you have anything you would like lo put in
Happening, please send to: Nancy A. Morris, The
Easi CAroliniun, East CArolina University,
Greenville, NC 27X34.
Continued from page 5
blem, unless you like
ugly furniture.)
Student interior
decoration is a
fascinating study in
itself. It differs from
traditional decoration
in its reliance on infor-
mality -nd improvisa-
tion. A lack of coherent
furniture is another
standard feature.
Off-campus places
come in two main
types: houses and
apartments. Both have
their good and bad
points. (Some par
ticular places, though,
have just bad points.)
Houses are
sometimes hard to
heat, except in the sum-
mer. Some of them
have holes in the floor,
leaky roofs and things
like that. It takes alot
of furniture to fill up a
house comfortably.
On the positive side,
you may get a house
that is old enough to be
historically interesting.
Freezing in Victorian
opulence is nicer than
just freezing in a plain
old dorm room.
Houses are nice to have
parties in, since there is
more room for the par-
ty to expand in than
most apartments. Most
of the older houses
around here have
fireplaces; they are nice
for keeping warm and
fun to watch, too. (At
least a fire in the
fireplace is more fun to
watch than a little heat
vent that blows
lukewarm air out of the
floor.)
Apartments are
usually newer than the
local rental houses, parties since they are
They are clean until so-
meone messes them up. nicely carpeted and
Apartments are nice for comfortable.
Senior Show Planned
ANNUAL
P Pli THROW
m
COmE THROW A � AT
THE SIG01A OF YOUR CHOICE!
FRIDAY, JANUARY 23
CHAPTER
3 30p.h. REDUCED BEVERAGES
ALPHA PHI
SOROK11YKUSH
HURSJAN.22
6:00 P.M.
MON.JAN.26
6:30 P.M.
KORMORt
INFORMATION
CALL: 75ti 4265
(K 7 nV! M
Rhonda Lynn Philips
of Raleigh, a senior stu-
dent in the ECU School
of Art, will be having a
show of art works in
the Mendenhall Upper
Cases from Jan. 25 to
Feb. 1.
The exhibition is to
include w e a v i n g s
(shawls, garments, wall
ts and Dillows).
toil
batiks and stitchery.
Phillips is a can-
didate for a B.S. in art
with a minor in textiles
Her future plans in-
clude graduate school
or teaching in the Pitt
County area. She is the
daughter of Bruce
Phillips and Shirley
Meadows
TOWNE
INFLATION FIGHTER SPECIALS
1011 Charles Street
Phone 752-1373
;mH
N
SJi
NH
M
O
N
D
A
Y
T
U
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S
D
A
Y
W
E
D
N
E
S
D
A
Y
RIB SPECIAL
Two Jumbo EBQ Beef Ribs,
Homemade Biscuit, French Fries and Coleslaw
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
�gj l ��
CHICKEN SPECIAL
Two Pieces of Southern Fried
Chicken, Homemade Biscuit, French Fries
From 5 p.m. 'til 9 p.m.
$129$ J 79
DARK
WHITE
BISCUIT SPECIAL
Steak BiscuitCountry Style
Gravy and French Fries or Chicken Biscuit with French Fries
From 5 p.m. til 9 p.m.
SI 29
1
MEET AT
BISCUIT TOWNE
VOTE FEB. 17
for
MIXED
DRINKS
GREENVILLE RESTAURANT
ASSOC.
SAV-A-TON
GASOLINE and CONVENIENCE
STORE
- OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY - 7 DAYS A WEEK -
PEPSI
AND
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DEW
LITER
CIGARETTES
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EVERYDAY
LOW PRICE
CAROLINA
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10(
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CHECK OUR
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$2
39
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MILLER
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AND MOST
OTHER
MAJOR BRANDS





ihrilling () Contest
Sports
Wright's Shot Lifts ECU By 49ers
P A
I tQ f p c
Mm. I. KJ
)own WVU
Injuries A Problem
Wrestiers Ho
Heels Saturda
W ill ! M !
Win At Charlotte Is Good Medicine
( harles
( handler
Y





8
"HI I s I t VKOI NIAN
I M K 22, 19M
Men's and Women's
Intramural Sports Program 1980
�Spring Semester
- 1981
Attivilv
� � � Basketball
R R , � Ho k. (.
rri lArestling
Hat quetbafl Doubles I
I
�eigl Mt i
1 " l"wi Basketball
Sw m Meet
t R Ra ��
w r esl
oum
Sol �
� im& Ind '
� . Watpi P. .�
Entry Date
Jan 8 Jan 20
Jar 8 Jan 20
Jan 19 Jan 29
Jan 19 Feb 3
Jan 2b Feb 10
Feb 2 Feb 16
Feb 2 Feb 18
Feb 9 Feb 24
feb 9 Feb 24
Feb lb Feb 27
Mar 2 Mar 18
Mar 18
Mar 18
Mar 18
Mar 2
Mar 2
Mar 2
N. . l
.
Mar 2 Mar 25
Mar 2 Mar 24
Mar lb Mar 27
May 23 April 2
Mar 23 April 8
Mai 30 Apni 9
Mar 30 April 13
Mar 30 April 13
April b April 17
April 6 April 17
Plav
Begins
Jan 26
Jan 2b
I eb 3
feb 5
I eb lb
Feb 18
Feb 23
Feb 25
Feb 26
March 3
March 19
March 20
March 23
March 24
March 26
March 30
Mar, h 31
A; II
Apriifi
April 13
April 14
April 14
April 21
Apru 21
Date
Jan 22
Jan 22
Feb 2
Feb 4
Feb 12
Feb i
feb 19
Feb 24
feb 25
Mai
Mar, h 1H
Mar, h 29
Mar. h 19
Mat, h 23
March 25
March 2b
Man '
April b
I earnaptains Meeting
Time
7 IK- ,
4:00 pm
6 (0 p m
4 00 p in
01
u
' 00 p m
00
4:00
ou p m
'00
300pm
8 (HI () it;
00 : � n
4:00
b 00
p
b ,K
A CC, SEC Tops
Plate
Br� .� st � I
Skateun .Hci
Memorial ln.j
Men
MS(.
Mi moria � I
M� nona 104
v moi i 104
Men. ;
Memoria 104
B II
Bn � stei B
Brewstei B
Mem. rial 104
M.
Mi
Mi n � a
lhe Atlantic Coast
( on t erence and
Southeastern Con-
ference continue to
dominate the I I'l lop
rwent) weekl) rank
ings o! college basket
hall teams.
Six oi the top 12 in
tins week's rankings
come from the i
and the si, with three
members each
represented in the Jan
d doen.
I he numbei goes to
seven out oi 20 when
nu in her 18 North
(. arolina is included.
A C m e m h e r
Virginia and Wake
Forest are two ot only
three major unbeatens
remaining in the coun-
tr and are ranked se-
cond and fourth,
respectively. lop-
ranked Oregan State is
I lie other unbeaten.
SEC members I Si;
and Kentucky rank five
and six, respectively.
1 he ildcats can be ex
pected to fall, though,
following an HI -67
drubbing al the hands
ot none othei tl
I su.
Maryland (A and
rennessee (SECclose
cm the si some, rank
ing seventh and I2tl
respectively.
A big -ii iwdow n
building in the( . as
V a k e Forest and
Virginia head towards a
meeting next I uesd;
January 2. Should
both remain unbeaten
up to thai contest, tl
game will Like
phenomenal national
imortance.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
pr l'C ision
ath hard
:ondtt,on
M lor
� hnq
ftl uce Spr
n Gi rt-nsboro
� S8 1223 before
V SA
all
and hall
IS paper trained
00 home Can
1 p rn
�uq FM radio
us' inspected
estern
summer
laundry
PERSONAL
ar , p ibi,c for
small
.6 6��i
�BMV NtVt STOOP
'�i I, m n�t f )'� f -�.
l.vfc "��� I �� '
-fiifrt U�fciHv I
IV01 r��ri ti i
NEW OPTOMETRIST Needs
part t.me receptionist Call
75� 4780 or come by 1805 Charles
Blvd
DO YOU HAVE Springsteen
tickets lor Greensboro- I want
them ! 758 6780
BAGS II you want something to
play with, go and find yourself a
toy cause baby my time is much
too expensive I don't want no little
boy But if you are serious don't
qo playing with my heart makes
me furious And if you want me to
love you baby I will Tell it like it
IS The Pr,s
SON OF A SON OF A SAILOR
Sailing to Minges soon
COUNSELORS For
North Carolina co ed
camp Room rr
salary and travel allowance E�
perience not necessary but must
enioy l,v,ng and workmg w.th
children Only clean cut non
smokmq college students need ap
ply For application and brochure
" ' Camp Pincwood 1801
Clewi and we v ami B. rh fi
FOR RENT
WANTED Female roommate to
share thret bedroom house Big
front and back yard Garaq,
Electnc heat and only hall mile
form the mall and one mile form
Pitt Community College Only S80
Mo plus utilities Call Amta or
Ann at '56 90 or lea mssaqe
6J66
AAD'SSHQfc
REPAIR
NICE Two bedroom apartment
Heat and water furnished Phom
756 1050
APARTMENT Fo. rent Two
rooms modern bath and kitchen,
study Call 752 30?0alter 6 00 p m
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted
to share two bedroom Tar R.ver
Apartment Call Lisa 752 0653 or
758 5629
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED To share large house. Wall
ng distance to campus J70 rent
plus fraction or utilities Call
752 3444
ROOMS FOR RENT $75 per
month utilities included tor ,nfo
call 752 3480
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
to share two bedroom King s Row
Apartment Half rent and
utilities Call 752 0865 or leave
message at ?58 9707
MALE ROOMIMAT E Needed (oi
two bedroom duplex at 1312 B E
14th St
FEMALE ROOMMATES
WANTED Cypress Gardens. S80
pel month plus utilities partial
furnished semi private Call
752 5947
FOR RENT On and
bedroom apartment water and
cable included All kitchen ap
plianced pool ECU bus even
hour Call 758 4015
HOUSE FOR RENT FaCU .
N I a j bedroom
2 bath S3'C '56 6967
F E MA I F ROOMMA 7 I
WANTED Half rent and utrhtii
Call 758 0�25
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED FROM 2 00 4 00 M I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OF
FICE
r-
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
COUPON
Free Battery
Charge
Western Auto
629 Dickerson Ave.
ph. 752-2042
Offer Expires 1 27 81
EARLY
I ' regan State�(1 J-0)
iru.inia 2�(13-0)572
DePaul Hi(15-1)4i
A Waki t t�rt-yt(14 0)484
! 1 (14 1); i
'� Kcntu k(11-2)' -4 .
Murslaiul(12

:(13 2)
(15-1)-
li1 76
i(
"�i'y ' p-
1 '� ,
(11-2)
'(II 2)�
.(12-
� Nnrltiiiiuiitia(12-4

ka(12 2)
'Lv
-
PREPARE FOR
Photographer
Needed
for Photo Lab
For More Information
Call Chap Gurley at
757-6994
(i

AN
I
K
u
�K! SIYLING
BOTH MiA
WOMEN
!
Ml.
SHIRLEY'S
KUT& STYLE
301 EVANS ST. MALL
MINGES BLVD. SUITE 206'
Dr. R. Ted Watson
(Optometrist
is proud to announce
the opening ot his omce at
1805 Charles Boulevard
736-4780
( omplete professional vision arc:
Spectacle � Prescriptions -ontact Lenses
10�o STUDENT DISCOUNT
Office I lours: MonKri. b:30-5KX)
Saturday 9KK)-l:tHJ
IKICATLSATGMAT
SATDATGRECPA
Join our "Early Bird" and
Summer Classes In Preparation
for Your Fall 1980 Exams
� Permanent Centers open days, evenings and
weekends
� Low hourly cost Dedicated full-time staff
� Complete TEST-n-TAPEs facilities for review of
:lass 'essons . . iementary materials
� Small classes ta ht by skilled instructors
� Opportun ty to make up missed lessons.
� fun us home-study materials constantly
updated Dy researchers expert in their field
� Opportunity to transfer to and continue study a'
any of our over 85 centers
OTHER COURSES AVAILABLE
GRE PSYCH GRE BIO -MAT PCAT
OCAT-VAT TOEFL MSKPNMB
VQE � ECFMG - FLEX � NOB � NLE
for $2.00 SP
rby's Roast Beef beef rsx
andwiches ges Vtvfe�
one coupon per customer VaM through February 7 1981 Lf PV
aHduithan. nlyatpart Niri r
2 for $2.32 Americas
Arbys Super roast
Roast Beef beefr
Sandwiches 9?S. $ft
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
KflPUN
Educational Center
TCSt P�Pll�TI0N
SPtCULISTS SINCt UJI
C�n Diys Evenings & Weekends
Excutivt Park, 8IO4 E
3'0C Chapel Hill Blvd
Durham. N C. 17707
(�l�)4�-�7M
tt� Abi
For mtormjt.on atoul ether centers OUTSIDE N T STUTt CAU T0U FHE MS 223 1782
If you need money for fall clothes or football tickets, now Is a
good time to sell your geld and sliver valuables. And here s a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
$
Available
All Day
Every Day
Open
! 1 a.m9 p.m.
Sun. thru Thurs
1 1 a.m10 p.m.
Fn.&Sat.
Steer
Family
A
j
3005 E
10th Street
Greenville, N.C.
(Behind Hastings Ford)
Take Out Service
Available
758-8550
�� -
FAST & EASY DELICIOUS LUNCHES
Soup & Salad
$199
Diet Plate
4 oz. Chop Sirloin
Cottage Cheese & Fruit
Chicken Filet
Sandwich
Baked Potato or French Fries
$199
Child's Plate
4 oz. Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toast
$69
Steerburger &
Bowl of Chili
$99
Potato & Salad
$99
Almost everyone has a high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Check your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring Into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
(air prices and good service.
No Potato
Banquet & Party
Facilities
Available
Steak Sandwich
229
Plain, Peppers & Onions,
or Mushroom Gravy
Baked Potato or French Fries
Steerburger
With Baked Potato
or French Fries
Without Potato
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Monday & Wednesday
Beef Tips
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 22, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 22, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.104
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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