The East Carolinian, January 13, 1981






�hc iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. 32
8 Pages
Tuesda, January 13, 19K1
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Union President's
Term Nears Close
B PAUL COLLINS
News Kdltor
Before that, she was chairperson
of the Student Union's entertain-
" Being Student Union president ment committee for about a year,
puts a burden on your time, but I "The president is responsible for
wouldn't trade the experience for selecting chairpersons and oversee-
any thing says Karen Mel awhorn, ing the total programming of the
the current president. Student Union McLawhorn ex-
Mcl awhorn's term of office plained. "The president must also
comes to an end in March, and the approve all expenditures and direct
the Student Union artist
She went on to add that the presi-
dent was also a member of the
Media Board, the Ledonia S.
Wright Afro-American Cultural
Center Advisory Board, the
Homecoming Steering Committee
and various other boards on cam-
search is currently on for her suc-
cessor, who will be chosen on Jan.
22.
Other Student Union positions
are also coming available, and ap-
plications will be taken within the
next month or so.
1 hope a lot of people turn out
for applications McLawhorn
said. "Besides getting involved, it's
an opportunity for students to meet
people and learn about entertain-
ment. It can be a lot of fun
Fun and entertainment, as
McLawhorn put it, are the purposes
of the Student Union. "It's simple.
The S.udent Union is here to pro-
vide entertainment for the cam-
pus
Mel aw hot n, a senior majoring in
housing and management, took
over the office in January oi 1980
and finished out the term of the
previous president, Charles Sune.
she then reapplied for the position
she 1980-81 school vear.
pus.
McLawhorn is also a member of
the Student Union Board of Direc-
tors, the board that governs the Stu-
dent Union. The Board is made up
of various student leaders and it is
the body that selects the Student
Union president.
"People in the Student Union
aren't popularly elected she said.
"The Board of Directors chooses
the president, the president chooses
the committee chairmen and the
committee chairmen choose the
committee members
Mel awhorn viewed the new pro-
minence of the Minority Arts Com-
mittee as one of the major ac-
complishments of the Student
Union during her administration.
"Minority arts has come up with a
lot of new activities to make people
more aware of minorities on cam-
pus
McLawhorn felt, however, that a
University Union Proposal now
under consideration could be the
biggest thing to happen during her
time in office.
According to McLawhorn, the
University Union Proposal seeks to
unite the Student Union and
Mendenhall Student Center under
the auspices of one authority.
"There are presently two fees that
students pay to support student
entertainment. We propose to unite
the two and hopefully cut out some
of the duplication. We hope to have
a proposal by March
Many students have criticized the
Student Union for not bringing
more major concerts to ECU, and
McLawhorn saw the situation as
regrettable.
"There are a lot of reasons why
we haven't had more concerts. Our
budget is very small, and last year
we lost a lot of money on our big
concerts.
"Also, a lot of the groups that
would attract large audiences are
See UNION, page 3
Pho�o tt JON JORDAN
Term Expires
Karen Mcl.awhorn's term as Student Union president will end on March 20
ECU Women Honored
SGA Supports Amendment
B PAUL COLLINS
Nr��H Editor
The SGA decided Monday to sup-
port an amendment to state law that
would allow the board of trustees of
each state college or university to
decide if that institution will sell
beer and wine on campus.
The student legislature passed a
unanimous resolution supporting
the matter, and Vice President Lynn
Jer will take the resolution with
her to the University of North
Carolina Association of Student
Government meeting this weekend.
UNCASG is planning to make a
recommendation on the matter to
the General Assembly, which is to
begin hearings on the subject soon.
"As it now stands Calder ex-
plained, "no beer or wine can be
sold on the campuses of state
schools. The amendment would put
the matter in the hands of each
school's board of trustees
Calder also explained to the
legislators a new measure concern-
ing parking in Greenville.
The Greenville City Council has
passed an ordinance that could pro-
hibit students from parking in
residential areas near campus bet-
ween the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.
To bring the ordinance into ef-
fect, one half the residents in a
neighborhood near campus would
have to sign a petition asking that
students not be allowed to park
there.
The City Manager would then
conduct a study to determine if stu-
dent parking presented an actual
problem in that area. If the city
determined that a problem existed,
it would allow residents to buy $5
parking stickers hat would entitle
them to park in the neighborhood.
Those without stickers would be
limited to two hours' parking.
Calder also voiced her displeasure
over a proposal by Athletic Director
Ken Carr that would move student
seating at football games nearer the
end zones and force students to pur-
chase tickets.
The SGA defeated a resolution
that would ask Carr to appear
before the legislature and discuss the
matter.
SGA President Charlie Sherrod
reported that the university's Calen-
dar Committee was "dragging its
feet" over the matter of a fall break
at ECU. "They have accepted the
SGA poll of students he said,
"but now they're going through
analysis and paralysis
He added that the committee had
not yet polled the faculty on the
matter.
Sherrod also told the SGA that he
had received many complaints
about Drop-Add, and that he was
told that students could continue to
add courses through Tuesday.
In another matter, Sherrod said
that the SGA was in "ridiculous
shape" as far as organization went
See SGA, page 3
NAACP 'Klan Watch' Starts
By MIKE DAVIS
Sl.ff Writer
Outstanding Young Women of
America, an organization based in
Montgomery, Alabama, have
honored two women from the East
Carolina faculty.
The 1980 Edition of thfl Outstan-
ding Young Women of America has
honored Greysolynne J. Fox and
Judith M. Thomas both of East
Carolina among some 15,000
Outstanding Young Women of
America nominations.
According to their organization's
chairperson, Mrs. Dexter Otis Ar-
nold, Outstanding Young Women
of America Awards Program seek-
to recognize and honor the talents,
abilities and successes of exceptional
young women throughout the
United States. These individuals are
being honored not only for their
professional achievements but for
their important contributions to
their communities, states, and na-
tion as well, she said. Otis Arnold
serves as chairperson of the Awards
Program Advisory Board and is
honorary president of the General
Federation of Women's Clubs.
One of the entries is that of Dr.
Greysolynne J. Fox, Assistant pro-
fessor of anthropology. Fox receiv-
ed her B.A M.A, and Ph.D from
the University of Wisconsin-
Milwaukee. This is the second time
Fox has been nominated for this
award.
In 1978, she was nominated by
Dr. Howell, then Vice Chancellor of
Academic Affars. This year, she
was nominated by Dr. W. Keats
Sparrow.
Fox, who is very deeply involved
with a joint career in teaching and
research, has been at East Carolina
since 1977. She said that students
who ask interesting questions are
the type of students that she likes
best.
Teaching is not all that she does
or is involved in. "Research along
with different activities yields dif-
ferent rewards she said. "It also
keeps you at the forefront of what is
going on
Fox's main area of study is in
primatology. the study of apes and
monkeys. Her current projects in-
clude topics such as communication
by use of smell among the Siamang
monkeys and trying to determine
what socializing factors exist among
primates.
She has traveled and studied quite
extensively. Her studies have taken
her to places such as Malaysia,
South Eastern Puerto Rico,
England, Singapore and Germanv.
Last summer, Fox went to Germany
to attend an international con-
ference on the Siamang monkeys
Fox also added that she is excited
about zoos and would like to travel
to various zoos all around the
world.
In addition to her undergraduate
and graduate work, she has studied
at Northwestern University and the
University of Chicago. She has also
had several articles about primates
published in journals.
Fox is also a member of the
Milwaukee Zoological Society and
Sigma Xi, the scientific research
society.
NEW YORK (UPI) - The head "In North Carolina, Klan
of the NAACP announced members were acquitted of chares
establishment of a "Klan Watch" of murdering people at an anti-Klan
Monday to monitor racial violence rally, despite videotape evidence of
anc charged a majority of "decent" the shootings. In Miami, a black
Americans have become bigoted. man's head was brutally smashed by
Executive Director Benjamin white policemen who were acquitted
Hooks described a resurgence of of wrongdoing by an all-white jury,
racism at the civil rights group's an- in Chattanooga, Tennessee,
nual membership meeting and called Klansmen were acquitted of
on President-elect Ronald Reagan shooting four black women
to "make sure the priorities of the Hooks said the upsurge in racial
black and poor are not forgotten violence, particularly Klan activity
The NAACP has been receiving will be monitored by NAACP of-
more bomb threats and hate mail ficials in each of the association's
than ever, he said. Politicians are seven regional offices,
decrying busing as reverse Hooks said all incidents involving
discrimination. the Klan will be reported by the of-
"The Ku Klux Klan has been ficials, who plan to work closely
teaching Boy Scouts and Civil Air with city, county and state
Patrol cadets how to strangle people authorities.
and fire guns Hooks said. "Black "What has brought on this sad
men have had their hearts cut out, state of affairs. Whatever the cause,
and black teen-agers have fallen vie- I fear that the real majority of de-
tim to the knife of an unapprehend- cent American citizens have become
ed slasher in New York City and captives of bigotry Hooks said.
Buffalo. "They have been intimidated,
,M����.�� brow-beaten, lied to, manipulated
JL ��� V-ijf and dragooned into conformity with
Of! HG IIISIQ6 segregation as a way of life in
mtmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm America.
"We must be determined to call
- them out of their hibernation and
Announcements awaken them to reality
Editorialsjj The n.AACP's board prepared a
Classifieds position paper to submit to Reagan.
Features Hooks said the NAACP is willing to
Fetters worjc wjln Reagan to reduce infla-
Sports tion and increase jobs.
"It's his methods we disagree
with Hooks said.
Her ECU involvement includes
being the faculty advisor of Lambda
Alpha, the anthropology honor
society. She also serves on the Na-
tional Executive Council.
She has also founded the ECU
Fold and Country Dance Club with
the help of Peter Fricke. The club
puts on about two shows annually.
One of her main areas of concern
is animals. She says that if any
animals become extinct, ecological
systems would then be unbalanced.
The second nomination is that of
Judith M. Thomas. She is an
associate professor of surgery,
whose main area of research is the
transplantation of tissues and
organs. Another area of interest is
immunological research, which is
that part of transplantation service
and research which help patients ac-
cept and keep their newly implanted
organs. Her research in im-
munology has been noted by several
medical societies.
Thomas received her B.A. degree
from Manhattanville College, her
M.S. and Ph.D degrees from New
York University.
One of her current projects is the
medical school's first kidney
transplant operation.
Thomas came to ECU in
September of 1979 in the position of
associate professor of Surgery. She
makes up a transplantation team
with her husband. Dr. Frank
Thomas, professor of surgery and
See WOMEN, page J
Recent Test
Scores Vary
Pnotc by CHARLIE SHERROD
Inauguration 1981
(SPS)�Suburban schools spend a
lot of money on their students, pav
teachers higher salaries and offer a
wide range of courses. As a result,
most students who attend these
schools score high on achievement
tests and go to college.
But that's not the whole story.
Vandalism, alcohol and drug use are
rising so fast in the suburbs that
they may replace urban schools as
centers of crime, drug traffic and
alcoholism.
For years these homogenous
residential communities have
boasted test scores higher than the
national average on standardized
tests, according to the National
Assessment of Educational Pro-
gress, and are well ahead of both ur-
ban and rural students.
The test score gap exists because
suburban schools have money to
spend on curriculum and teacher
salaries, National Institute of
Education Senior Associate Tom
Tomlinson said. Since per pupil ex-
penditure is figured through proper-
ty taxes, wealthy areas have more
money for education.
This money allows schools to of-
fer a wide range of pro-
grams�college preparatory as well
as vocational courses. Since they
can take advantage of the college
courses, about 75 percent go to col-
lege as compared to 50 percent in
other areas.
Suburban schools have con-
tributed, however, to a lack of em-
phasis on reading and writing ability
and have produced a generation of
students weak in basic skills, accor-
ding to education author Paul
Cooperman. Although suburban
students are ahead of others, SAT
scores have declined drastically for
all students in the last decade.
Suburban students are ahead in
other areas too�property destruc-
tion and drug abuse. According to a
report to Congress on violent and
safe schools, suburban schools ex-
perience more vandalism than urban
or rural schools.
"Kids in the suburbs have more
money so they are getting a large
share of crime and drug problems
National Institute of Education Ur
ban Team Leader Candice Sullivan
said.
Forty-eight percent of high school
students in the suburbs said beer
and wine are readily available to
them compared to only 40 percent
of city school students.
Sixty-one percent of suburban
students said they could buy mari-
juana at their school, and heroin use
in suburban schools has skyrocketed
since June. "We used to view heroin
as an inner-city slum drug. It has
been creeping into the suburbs for
the past year and is now reaching
epidemic proportions Drug En-
forcement Administrator Robert
Feldkamp said.
?
r
!� . -





THL EASTCAROI INI AN
JANUARY 13, 1981
Announcements
CRIMINAL LAW
A new course Principles and
Procedures of Criminal Law
iCorS 4003 will be ottered during
spring semester at ECU The
three semester hour course will be
taught on Mon nights trom 6 30 to
9 30 pm with the first class
beginning on Jan 12 1981
The course will focus on the
nature, sources and types o�
substantive criminal law the
classification and analysis of
crimes and criminal acts in
general and the examination in
detail ot selected spec if ic criminal
procedures with special emphasis
upon responsibilities ot criminal
lustice professionals
Pre requisite for the course s
vonsen' of the Department
Chairperson Area businessmen
law enforcement officers private
sec urity personnel human service
oenvery personnel and other in
'eresteo persons are encouraged
and invited to enroll
Registration will begin on Jan
8 1981 and non ECU students
should register through ECU Div.
sion of Cont Education The
( ourse s open to eligible students
a'ECU interested individuals are
encouraged to register for the
� se and or contact the Depart
nenl Ot Soc ial vork S. Correc
i Sei . . rs tor additional in
formal 111 Allied Health or
Carol Belk Bldg )
RESIDENCE STAFF
Apr! canons are now being
by the Dept of Residence
reft Resident Advisors for Spr
g ' semester Any full time
student who has reserved a
residence hail room and has an
.i ng of 2 0 is eligible to ap
� - �� on ano application
f.neo from a
Residl � Hall Director or the
- � � ' � Life Office, 214
.s � Hard I
STUDENT UNION
PRESIDENT
Applications are now being ac
lepteo
Union
� �
'he quai
office of Student
� for the 1981 82
�' ons will Be
981 ano are
guesnuns reyara"N
ions for the oft-ce
' 6611 Da '����
CIC FELLOWSHIPS
Until February 1. 1981 prospec
five applicants from outside
Indiana may call toll free between
9 00am and 5 00pm E ST tor in
formation or application forms
The number is !800l 457 4420
Now m its fourth year, the CIC
Fellowships Program m the social
sciences makes awards m an
thropology economics,
geography history political
science psychology. and
sociology
The humanities fellowships are
available to students seeking doc
torates in American studies art
history classics comparative
literature English German,
linguistics music philosophy
religion Romance languages, and
Slavic languages
Fields covered By the natural
sciences, mathematics and
engineering program include
chemistry biological sciences,
agricultural sciences, physics and
geological sciences We welcome
inquiries concerning specific sub
fields
BAHAMAS CRUISE
Enter the world ot rum and sun
sh.ne take a trip to the Bahamas.
March t 15th The Student union
Travel Committee has already
planned your Spring Break for
you so make reservations now i'
Mendenhaii Central Ticket Office
Quad Hotem Room and Cabin
S499 00 Double Hotel RoomQuad
Cabin SS49 00
PRE COLUMBIAN
The ECU Dept of Sociology ano
Anthropology, in cooperation with
the ECU School ot Art, ,$ presen
ting a series of public lectures on
Pre Columbian Art
The lectures will be conducted
by Paul Clifford curator of the
Pre Columbian Collection at the
Duke University Museum ot Art
They win w '� 'he auditorium
of the � "k � �'��'s Center at
ECU at 7 30 p n .
and Jai It
s to be discussed nciude
"The Dawn of Civilization
I hr ugti -i Master � a" i
B The Great Em
(fSl jan 12
(aya One Half
;Jan 19. and
and Their
Other Half of
(ACT)
The American College Tes'
(ACT) will be offered at ECU on
Sat . March 28, 1981 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration, P O
Box 414. Iowa City, Iowa 52240
Registration deadline is Feb 27,
1981 Applications may be obtain
ed from the ECU Testing Center
Speight Bidg , Room 105
(AHPAT)
The Allied Health Professions
Admission Test will be ottered at
ECU on Sat. March 7 1981 Ap
plication blanks are to e com
pleted and mailed to the
Psychological Corp 304 E 45th
St . New York NY 10017 to arrive
by Feb 7, 1981 Application blanks
are also available at the Testing
Center, Speight Bldg Room 105,
ECU
LEARNING
A new program for increasing
Learning Efficiency will be of
tered by Dr George Weigand
beginning Jan 14. 1981 There will
be two groups One will meet on
Mon and Wed at 1 00 p m and
the other group will meet on Tues
and Thurs at 1 00 p m m Rm 305
Wright Anne The class is
available to all students Atten
dance is voluntary no formal
registration is required
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
An Episcopal service of Holy
Communion will be celebrated
Tues evening Jan 13, in the
chapel ot the Methodist Student
Center (5th St across from Gar
rett Dorm The service will be at
5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev Bill Hadden,
celebrating Supper will be served
following the service
the Cone
The MyS'1 '
of the Bow Tie
"The A jtec
SPRING BREAK TRIP
aic t? a an
iude transporta
00 Double hotel
Double
4- -
I - are tour rerod n ,
tures in the series, and each lee
tures a n ijde slides to dec '
actual examples of Pre
Columbian Art
The wealth of pub' I
mater,ai roaay ano the increasing
the ancient ar's o� "
hemisphere show thai Pre
Columbian ar can now ta�
Place as . i � " i it art e
pressions � �� . a � � Clifford
saic It is in pet it . � "a'ftf who
have ccr-M � �� , . ,s . � and
nave sampled� " �"� bounties
Si d now accept ano P' '�
� heritaoi � �" � by the I
� � a h havi � � �
gone
SKI TRIP
The ECU Ski tr.p to Snowshoe
over Sprig break is scheduled for
March 8 13. 1981 Students seekmq
lit should enroll in PHYE 1105
A room deposit of $10 00 is due
Jan 27 1981. at 4pm mMemorial
Gym, Rm 108 Contact Mrs Jo
Saunders in Memorial Gym
205 lor additional information
INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED
instructors are needed to teach
several short term beginning ivel
sorkshops or courses for the Crafts
Center at Mendenhaii Student
Center The areas tor which in
structors are needed are
darkroom techniques, iewelry and
silkscreen Graduate or 4th year
art students, or anyone who has
sufficient knowledge to teach a
course in any of the areas men
tioned, may contact Tana Nobles
Crafts and Recreation Director at
Mendenhaii, 757 6611
INTERNSHIP
Sophomores iuniors and seniors
currently enrolled in a N C col
lege or N C residents attending an
out of state college have until Feb
2 to apply for the Institute of
Government Summer Internsnp
Program m state government
Twenty four students will be
selected by an advisory commit
tee to participate in a living
learning internship in N C s'rfii
government directed by the in
stitute ot Government The In
stitute of Government interns will
work trom May 26 through Aug 7
Students will work 40 hours eacn
week m a responsible position m a
state department participate in
evening educational seminars ano
be paid approximately $130 prr
week
Students interested in the pro
gram should secure a brochure an
nouncmg the program and a state
of N C application form from
their college or university place
ment office or local Job Service ot
tice
Students interested in the in
stitute of Government program
should mail an application to the
institute of Government Knapp
Bldg 059A The University ot
North Carolina, Chapel Hill NC
27514 by Feb 2 1981
Applicants will be accec '
without respect to race sex. color
national or-an religion or nan
dicap
Lih Johnson a student of ECU
served as an Institute ot Gow
ment intern in state governn '
dut ing 1 � � ler of 1980
PRISON VISITS
Many ECU students have joined
Maury Correctional Facilities
Thurs nigt t visiting � � � We
go from 7 30 p m 9 00 p m Car
pooling ano pick up is ava-iar �
it s a friendly atmosphere ana en
lOyabie for ail !��� I I rge!
nely eople ourm n�
day season Ca
N.C.S.L.
� � . � � . tudent
Legislature w
� � '
� ;� � � me t " . � � �

FELLOWSHIP
� . . � . � � .
I � � ; a meet eacl �'
night at 7 p n th
� �� � Cuitu'
� ' �
Judge Says Garwood To Decide
CAMP LEJEUNE,
NX. (IPI) � Defense
attorneys say Pfc.
Robert R. Garwood
vsill be the one to decide
whether he testifies in
his court-martial on
charges of desertion
and collaboration with
the enemy in Vietnam.
With the defense
now putting the final
touches on its case, that
decision may come by
the end of the week.
"The decision has
not been made yet
civilian defense at-
torney Vaughan Taylor
said Monday. "It's
something the accused
has to decide
Thus far in Gar-
wood's court-martial,
his account of his 14
years with the com-
munists has been
related to the jury by
three psychiatrists and
one psychologist. The
defense is trying to
show Garwood was
driven insane by torture
and isolation and is not
responsible for his ac-
tions.
Corcoran, head of
psychiatry at the
School of Aerospace
Medicine in San An-
tonio, Texas, provided
Monday some of the
missing pieces in Gar-
wood's account of his
years behind enemy
lines, where he is accus-
ed by former POW s of
collaborating with the
Viet Gong in a series of
jungle POW camps in
South Vietnam.
Corcoran said Gar-
wood claims he twice
appealed to the North
Vietnamese to allow
him to return to the
United States. Cor-
coran, a specialist in
dealing with Vietnam-
era POWs, testified
Garwood told him he
asked the Vietnamese
to release him in 1973
after learning of the
mass release of captive
Americans.
"The answer he was
given was that he was
not an invited guest and
should be glad he was
still alive and given
food and clothing that
should have gone to the
Vietnamese people
Corcoran said.
Corcoran, who said
he was once convinced
Garwood was guilty of
the charges but now
believes Garwood's ac-
count of his actions is
true, said Garwood
made a second appeal
in 1975 shortly after the
fall of Saigon.
"You have no one to
blame but the
American govern-
ment he said Gar-
wood was told. "When
our relations with the
American government
are normalized, you
may be returned
He said Garwood
told him he was moved
from South Vietnam to
North Vietnam in 1970
and hospitalized for
several months after
being severely injured
in a B-52 strike.
"He was growing
desperate. He felt he
might not ever be abie
to return Corcoran
said. "He thought he
essentially had been
abandoned in Vietnam,
ATTIC
N.C, No. 3(jNIGHTCLUB-
Tues.
(in the Phoenix Room)
Eariy Bird Specials-
Wed-Thurs
PM
Fri. -Subway
wH.H3:30-7:00
SALE 40 OFF
Ladies' Velour Tops
Ladies' Jogging Tops & Pants
Ladies' Wrangler Tops
Men's Suits
Lee Denim Coats
Men's Wool Blend Sport Coats
Reg. 12.99 NOW $7.79
Reg. 18.98 each NOW $1 1.3" eoch
Reg 12.98 NOW $7.79
Reg. 56.95 NOW $34.17
Reg. 22.50 NOW $13.50
Reg. 49.95 NOW $29.97
MILL OUTLET CLOTHING
264 By-Pass in Front of Nichols
Hours: MonSat. 9:30 to 6:00
BOWLING
Sign up for a mixed doubles
bowling league for spring
semester at the Mendenhaii Stu
dent Center ground Moor bulletin
board There will be a Monday and
a Tuesday night league meeting on
a weekly basis The organizational
meeting for both leagues will be
held on Mon . Jan 26, at 6 00 p m
in the Bowling Center Bring some
friends and sign up today
For further information please
call Tana Nobles at 757 6�n
BILLIARDS
interested in ioimng a billiards
league7 Al! billiards players in
terested in forming a league to
meet weekly may s.gn up at the
Mendelhall B'lhards Center An
organizational meeting will be
held Mon , Jan 19 at 7 00 p m in
the Billiards Center Leauu
scores will be handicapped and
trophies will be awarded in
several divisions at 757 wn
Contact Tana Nobles for further
information
CRAFTS
Crafts workshops are now
available at the Crafts Center in
Mendenhaii Pottery darkroom
techniques, photography quiitmg.
silkscreen. beginning iewelry and
metalwork, floor loom wea.
batik, stained glass and macrame
are the workshops which an
available
All ECU Students student
dependents, as wen as facualV
staff and their dependents wt
MSC members arc-eligible to oar
ticipate Everyone must register
for the workshops a' the Crafts
Center no la'er rhan Saturday
Jan 24 Craf's Center hours are
3 00 P M unf.l 10 00 P M Mon
through Fri ano 12 00 until 5 00
p m Sat
For further information contact
ina Nol s6ii
I Ciassi Tied Ad Form
A.M.A.
The ECU chapter of the
American Marketing Association
is holding a membership drive
during the first 30 days ot the
semester Named the Albert U
Coniey Chapter, the organization
proposes to bring together the pre
fessional and the student -n the
field of marketing
Apphc ations may be obtained tw
contacting the officers Mi�o
McMahan or Elton Boney m A 226
Raw!
SENIOR RECITAL
Clarinetist Lawyer Crawford, ot
Goldsboro a senior in the ECU
School of Musi will perform a
rectal on Fri . jar 16 1981 a'
7 30 p m m the ftj. �
Rei ai Hail
C � awforo is a candidate for the
Bachelor of Musk degree in Music
tne'apy Me studies clarinet witl
Deh-rah Choda ki of the V fool of
Music faculty
Works to be performed t-
Wilson Osborns s Rhapsody,
Saint Saens Sonate and Leonard
Bernstein s Sonata Crawford will
be accompanied by Cynthia Creel
pianist The recital is free and
open to the public
JOBS NEEDED
Inmates at the Maury Corrp
tional Facility are looking for iObs
Many nma'es have been recom
mended for work release but Obs
aren't ava'abie If you have one to
offer or know ot one please
756 V324
STUDENT UNION
POSITIONS
Applications are be �
for Coffeehouse Chairperso'
committee m�
ly Pick up applications .n the STu
dent union Office Rm TM
Mendenhaii STudent Cen'er Call
757 6611 Ext 210
TRANSPORTATION
the Greenv,lie Publ.c Trri
tation Commission will meet
Wed , Jan 21 at 8 p m n' " �
Public Works Fa-
FORCES FOR
FREEDOM
Bracelets similar to those issued
for POW in Vietnam are now
available tor the men involve
fie aborted � pt in
Iran Bracelets are i3 eai t
proceeds from sales will I
establish a college tune f i �� .
children of these men
The address s
Forr es for F reedom
P O Bo� .
Tuluca � � � - � � v .
EXERCISE
The Dept of In'rar
��creational Services is offe-
asses in E�erose and W-
Control jail Exercise Aer
Conditioning and Slimnasl
Each class s designed to pr( .
information on I the purposi
exercse (2) the eft
Of activity .� M introi and
figure imprc I j .
and" ��
various exercises to mam � � � �
ibihty and muscle tones
Structure of . be
determiri. � a �� �� �
expr let �� � '
enro
For additional �
' i � � � , vli ze at 757 �
PARKING
The Green.
ly eet at j 00 p m
�. -
I
I PRICE II.SC for IS words. 05 for
I ��ch addition! word
i kr checks payjbl? to ln� C�ii
C.rolmitn
btryi�lion� count t on word
as do phone numbers and
hyphenai oni
MAIL TO
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Classified Ads
Old Sou'h Building
Greenville N C I'll"
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GYMNASTICS
Ri . stra'ion for the annual
' s progro-
ECU is s it 7 p.m or
20 and Jan 22 and the one hour per
et � � -�� �' 2o
Registration will be in the Qrm
room at M �
nasium ECU from 7 p " ' � 6
n ' evening
Cost of the 12
S .nciude'
phases Of g
I five through W
� �on
AED
� � i � � I pr
l. . A
� .

MINI COURSES
j.
g i n g (PR
i

10 00
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FOOD LAB

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���Man
3

Fla. Warden Criticizes Rather
RMlnklV Fla
I Pi
iuiil' to inn accusa
Muiut
iaith m
Honda lions on national televi
al Monday sion witho si gel
BS' Dan tin the a
! a '60 ol the stoi
nentar During the television
m Florida program, Rathei intei
lenied viewed two former
guai ds and formei I i !
inmate
d 1 he guai d� ' .t
on nuad ot
beai up
e making in
said One ot I he
gional foi guai I he
was Hie
� I
( H � .t "an
the sej . � cer"
ils, and even kill
I
m, on Dec
lei 7, 1979, with the
know -on
wa � i
McLawhorn Leaving
Office In March
'Buzz' Snyder,
formei head ol the
Special Squad, escorted
him to the dormitory
where Graham was
sleeping And pointed to
c ii aham .is the inmate
he wanted roughed up,
orl said.
"He said. 'Johnny, I
a sinai l a inmate
I wani you to busi him
in his damn head with
something I oii said.
1 oi; eiushed his skull
I a piece ol metal
pipe he said Snydei
gave him.
In return foi keeping
ihe inmates in hue. I Oi t
said he and other
"enforce! s" wei e given
di ues and then pick ol
iosexual partnei s.
In the I segment,
Snydei called Fort's
' v a lie, but luts
referred subsequeni
calls from reporters to
attorney. (im
: new saper in-
terviews with otl
� son officials.
"1 can eateg
den that the ad
ministration (ot 111)
vsould condone ex
cessive violence oi the
use of homosexuality as
a favor, as was charged
on the program Gray
said. "Whether th.it
happened, I don't
know, bul it has been
turned over to the out
side officials and. it it's
proven that it has taken
place, we will deal with
those people
Cirav did not deny
the existence of the
Special Squad, hut said
he preferred to call its
members "utility ol
ficers He said they
escorted prisoners to
and from their cells,
conducted shake
downs toi contraband
and organized searches
tor escaped inmates
�V a result ot then
work, he said, "they
aie involved in a lot of
use ot force situa
tions
Meanwhile, State At-
torney I ugene V hit
worth, ot Gainesville,
whose jurisdiction in-
cludes It I. blasted
state K ep A i net l
G i r a r d e a u ,
D-Jacksonville, who
appealed on the CBS
program, and said he
intended to find out it
(iirardeau had conceal
ed any evidence m the
Foi t case
hit w orth said it
was "very upsetting"
tor him to learn on na
tional television that
Gitardeau had evidence
in the case that had no!
been turned ovei to him
lust.
"I have reason to
believe Rep. (rirardeau
had knowledge ot
Fort's story as earl) as
last August he said.
"It he, in tact, had that
knowledge, which dealt
v,ith the commission ot
a homicide, it would
have been illegal foi
h i m no! t o have
reported it.
" T hat is something I
think I should look in-
to, and something 1
think the leadership of
the House ot Represen-
tatives should look in-
to the slate attorney
said.
Girardeau said the
state had not shown
any i merest in in-
vestigating numerous
other allegations ol
brutality against in-
mates and there was no
reason to think it would
in this ease. He also
said he wanted to pro-
tect hoi whose lite
"wouldn't have been
worth 10 cents within
the prison system" it
word trad gotten out
about his charges.
las! Sept em ber,
I oi I , a 6-foot,
300-pounder who had
been a! 1(1 since 196K
on second-degree
murder, robbers and
escape com ictions, was
moved lo an undisclos
ed federal prison tor his
own protection.
Photo or
Inauguration 1981
It. Gov. .limim Green hbn also sworn in last Saturdav
SAAD'SSHGk
REPAIR
I I JGrandr t.
TJH
Qualih Repaif
( ontinued from page 1
� he
.
and
od acad










9
Mthrough 2 1

Thomas Called Outstanding
( ontinued from page 1
transplantation p
Some ol hei signifi-
ini contributions are
�- appearing in
70 well-noted
She
piesented lectures.
me ol her profes-
nal travels hav e
iken her tl oul
U.Sanada and
She
sp � hi interna-
nal mi
meetines, several
w h i c h
.h
CO-
� ed
s' e has also bee:
jctor in micro-
School ol
Medicine. I he one
thing that she is most designed to honoi and
excited about, she said, recognize ex optional
is the upcoming kidney
transplant. women between the
Ihe Outstanding ages of 21 and 36, ac
Women's Program is cording to Otis Arnold.
SGA Approves
Alcohol Measure
( ontinued from page 1 '10!1 ommittee,
reported that the
and thai he hoped a Ms new bus would
committee would be be delivered sometime
formed to deal with the this week oi next, and
situation. the legislature passed a
In other business, bill thai will allow
Hen Singleton, chair- S.O.I .1 .V to receive
man ol the ppropna its funding.
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EATSUP





Qttlt iEaat (Earnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
L. HR1S LIC HOk, Gemtm Wetmgei
PAUI LlNCKE, Urecoroj Uhtrumt PAUL COLLINS, �, ��
Jimmy Dupree, �, Charles Chandler v�� �
Anita Lancaster, ���, i, David Norms, ,�,��
DAVl S VtRIN, �m(n,�ut
January 13, I9HI
Opinion
Page 4
ff Moore
Continues Outstanding Service
We have found that among the
ranks of the administrators on this
campus one individual stands out as
an exceptionally efficient, talented
and dedicated individual who has
toiled tirelessly in the service of the
university for many years. His name
is Cliff Moore, the vice chancellor
for business affairs.
Mr. Moore came to East Carolina
in 1962. Since that time he has
developed a reputation for ex-
cellence in administering the finan-
cial and fiscal affairs of the Univer-
sity.
He has always followed the letter
and the spirit of the law. He is a
company man who goes pretty
much by the book. However, he is
flexible and always willing to listen
to an opposing opinion. Mr. Moore
has proven to be one of the most
open-minded administrators on this
campus, always fair in his dealings
with students.
Mr. Moore came to ECU from a
state government post in Raleigh.
During the tenure of Dr. Leo
Jenkins, chancellor emeritus, Mr.
Moore oversaw the construction of
probably half the buildings on this
campus, including the athletic com-
plex.
He has served for a good while on
the athletic committee and has
shown a sincere committment to the
athletic program and its continued
growth.
Mr. Moore was the only high
ranking administrator, other than
Colonel Dick Blake, who served in
the Jenkins administration to be re-
tained under Thomas Brewer. That
?certainly speaks highly of Mr.
Moore's ability as an administrator
considering the many other fine
people who were not retained.
If this university had a few more
Cliff Moores we would be all the
better for it. In this administration
it is difficult to find men of good
character, strong will, and the
respect for tradition that Cliff
Moore has.
We hope that Mr. Moore stays
with us for a while � a long while.
States' Rights Lives
Sectionalism, especially in the
South, became very prevalent just
prior to the depression. There was a
centralization of power in
Washington and severe erosion of
Jeffersonian principles. States were
beginning to act in groups rather
than individually.
During the 1930's there was a
sweeping wave of Southern sec-
tionalism that was largely the result
of contempt for the policies of
Franklin Roosevelt.
The Civil War had left the South
defensive and sensitive to criticism
with a fear of ridicule. Southerners
feared the breakdown of the social
order because of Roosevelt's in-
terest in advancing the negro.
One South Carolinian com-
mented that FDR's attitudes on race
were '4an insult to every white man
and woman in the South The
Southern attitude was one of pater-
nalism toward the negro.
The South was hard hit by the
depression. Roosevelt's "new deal"
did little to benefit the South
because the lowest percentage of
federal expenditures went to the
South. As a result of this,
Southerners began to organize to
promote new industrial develop-
ment.
The Southern Newspaper
Publishers Association brought (or
forced) the pulp and paper industry
to locate new plants in the South.
Southerners were also organizing
their political leaders to lead the
economic fight. The Southern
Governor's Conference was
organized and it successfully fought
for equalization of railroad freight
rates.
From 1935 to 1945 the number of
industrial plants in the South in-
creased from 34,143 to 44,779, and
the value of manufactured goods in-
creased from 7.5 billion to 20.6
billion.
Northern politicians launched
vicious public attacks on the South
and fought bitterly against in-
dustrial development in the South.
Northerners feared that industry
would leave the cold, decaying
North with its big and powerful
labor unions. Already the textile in-
dustry had all but deserted
Massachusetts and the rest of New-
England for the Carolinas and
Georgia.
Even more touchy than the
economic issue was the issue of
race. The South felt that it could
best handle the negro and that the
North should mind its own
business.
Roosevelt was despised and
publicly criticized for. his racial
liberalism.
During the 1940's the South saw
many of its long time social and
political institutions being struck
down, such as the white primary
and segregation.
Almost as quickly as the old laws
were struck down new ones were
enacted by our legislatures.
Once again our representatives
are firmly entrenched as committee
chairmen in the United States
Senate, and our new president is
dedicated to the Jeffersonian prin-
ciples of government so near and
dear to the hearts of Southerners.
Sectionalism is a symbol of pride
and should be tossed before the feet
of Tyranny like a guantlet. Indeed
the South is rising again.
BACK IN
SADDLE AGAIN
Campus Forum
Defend Your Country!
f
How many of you love your homes?
How many of you love your families?
How many of you love your friends and
your freedom? All of you do.
What I'm writing about today is the
topic of picking up your gun and
fighting for your country. First of all 1
want everyone to know I'm not a
maniac, I don't want to go to war or
fight anybody�that's a totally different
story. My purpose is to get to the
cowards of the group and I'm probably
going to step on a few toes too. But,
that's tough.
The subject of fighting for your coun-
try is something I feel very strongly for.
My qualifications on this topic are plain
and simple. I love all those things 1 men-
tioned earlier and I will fight to protect
them and what I believe in.
From what I've read in my history
books and heard my grandfather talk
about, a lot of changes have taken place
in this country. Some good, but mostly
bad�in my opinion. According to my
grandfather and my history books, this
country seemed to have a lot of pride in
the days of WWII and the Korean War.
Everyone loved this country and didn't
like it a bit when its name was dragged in
the mud. Everyone wanted this nation to
be the best in everything, second in
nothing. There were cries of "Give 'em
hell Harry" everywhere and a feeling of
unity unprecedented at any time in our
history.
What about today? Do we have any
pride? Do we get upset when someone
burns our flag or slurs our name? NO!
Half the population shrugs their
shoulders and lights up another joint.
While the other half musters up the pro-
found wisdom and courage to say,
"Well alright this time but don't let it
happen again Does anyone honestly
feel good about that? I hope not, I really
hope not.
I hear a lot of reasons why people
don't want to fight for our country. I
really understand where a lot of them
are coming from too. There are those
who say they just couldn't pull the trig-
ger and kill another person. I really
don't know if I could either, but I look
at it this way, it's him or my family
someday not just me or him. Others say,
"I'm not fighting for a barrel of oil
Then they go out for a drive in their car
that gets 10 mpg. Another reason which
seems to pop up is fear of the Soviet
Union. But I'm pretty sure they're just
as afraid of us. Both the U.S. and the
USSR could blow up the world anytime.
Neither are anxioas to tight.
The only thing we really trail the Rus-
sians in is manpower. That's why Presi-
dent Carter issued the order for drat!
registration. That frightened a lot of
people, including me. But I realized it
was iKvessarv and 1 registered. But the
whole while I heard my peers saying,
"111 be on the first plane or bus to
Canada if they call on me That reailv
makes me sick to my stomach. If any of
you would sit down for 5 minutes and
look at what this countrv has given vow
instead o complaining about every little
thing that goes wrong, you'd see how
wrong you are. You all have clothes on
your back, food on your table, the
treedom to do or become whatever you
want. Now it makes me mad when 1
think about someone trying to take all
that away from me and my family. It's
enough to make me fight.
The final thing I want to bring up is
our heritage. Our countrv has alwavs
tried to give freedom and democracv to
all those who want it and I'll admit it has
gotten us in trouble a few times. But our
forefathers built this country on the
principle of freedom and the idea of
maintaining this freedom was supposed-
ly instilled in us. But apparently it has
died. People cried and had mass
demonstrations just because our country
took one step toward preserving that
freedom.
How many of you have relatives who
served in WWII? Ask them about pride
and they'll tell you just what I did.
For those of you who still refuse to
serve our country if and when necessary;
you might as well turn to your uncle or
grandfather that did serve and spit right
in his face.
Remember the old saying, "America,
love it or leave it"? To all of you who
won't support our great nation, if I had
the money I'd send you all to Canada.
Maybe not first class, but definitely one
way.
DENNIS SCHRONCE
Sophomore, Phys. Ed.
Last Word
The recent decision to drop field
hockey and the wrestling team has been
a great detriment to the coaches and
athletes involved. Years of practice and
putting time into a sport are suddenly
ended when university officials decided
to save money and drop these programs.
Sure the funding is not available, and
sure there just isn't enough money to go
around, and sure it's so easv to save
money b just not spending it. But what
about the human element What about
the feelings, emotions, and attitudes of
the people involved?
It is so eas tor an athletic director to
sit behind his desk and justify his
reasoning bv saying he's saving $50,000.
It's also so easy for him to sav. ��Well
now they (the athletes) can spend all that
time thev spcn, practicing on their
studies And it's also easv to just r
down the already small list of sch
funded sports and drop two or three
more of them whenever the need to save
money arises again
'Well I'd like to know () just where
has this $50,000 been these pas? few
years for wrestling and field hockev,
just how much more tactfully and S)
pathetically can you cancel a program bv
announcing their decision just as the
athletes' seasons are starting and then
saying all their efforts to save their
teams will be futile because the decision
is final, and (3) just when are these
brilliant solutions to university financial
problems going to end?
DAVID JEROSE
Junior, Geologv
EDITOR 'S XOTE: This is the last en-
try on the subject of the dropping
wrestling and field hockev which will
accepted for the Campus Forum section
Oj The East Carolinian.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Jovner Librar
r or purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s) I etier
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neath printed. All let-
ters are subject to editing for brevitv
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters bv the
same author are limited to one each H)
days.
Helms Assumes Committee Duties
North Carolina � Home
"I like calling North Carolina
home This familiar line has been
heard frequently during the past
year on the radio by many millions
who live in our great state and un-
doubtedly by countless travelers
passing through the Old North
State.
Our state is a leader in industry
and education. The university
system, perhaps the best state sup-
ported system of higher learning in
the nation, has fostered our growth
and enlightened our spirit.
It is a privilege to live here, one
that must be respected and revered.
There are those among us who
might belittle our people and our
society, but they are shallow and
without substance in their rhetoric.
Call us clannish, call us un-
cultured, call us backward, but our
pride is our shield and sword. Our
place is with our state. At her feet
we should kneel and at her foe our
gun should be pointed.
Protect and love North Carolina,
for the land and the folk are all that
makes life worth living.
WASHINGTON � We received an in-
quiry a day or so ago as to when a U.S.
Senator from North Carolina last served as
chairman of a major committee in the
Senate. The caller's inquiry was prompted
by the fact that I had just been elected
chairman of the Senate Committee on
Agriculture, Nutrition and Forestry when
the 97th Congress convened on January 5.
The late Senator B. Everett Jordan serv-
ed with distinction as chairman of the
Senate Rules Committee. Senator Sam J.
Ervin, Jr was chairman of what is called
a "select" committee in connection with
the Watergate investigation. Neither of
these committees, however, is among the
"major" committees of the Senate.
I simply do not know when the last
North Carolina Senator served as chair-
man of a major committee. But I have ask-
ed the Library of Congress to research the
matter, and let us know. We'll pass along
that information in next week's report.
TURNOVER � My moving up, in eight
Jesse
Helms
years in the Senate, from the lowest-
ranking member of the Agriculture Com-
mittee to the chairmanship of the commit-
tee is simply a measurement of the
astonishing turnover in the membership of
the Senate in recent years. Today, just
eight years after being sworn in as a
Senator, 1 rank No. 35 in seniority.
A total of 18 new Senators took their
seats on January 5. The average age of
members of the Senate is now just under
49. Ten years ago, the average age was 53.
With the election of Mrs. Paula Hawkins
in Florida, there are now two women in the
Senate.
Fifty-seven members of the Senate are
lawyers; 23 are businessmen. Thei are five
educators and five farmers. Two are
former astronauts - John Glenn and Jack
Schmitt. There's a former federal judge a
former airline pilot, and a veterinarian
Bill Bradley, the professional basketball
star of just a few years ago, is now a
Senator from New Jersey. Of the 100
Senators, 72 are Protestants, 16 are
Roman Catholics, six are of the Jewish
faith.
COMMITTEES - In addition to my
duties on the Agriculture Committee, I am
second-ranking Republican on the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee; I am chair-
man of the Senate Steering Committee
and a member of the Senate Rules Com-
mittee and the Senate Ethics Committee.
I need not worry about having any idle
time for the next few years.








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1 HI si CAROl IN1AN
Features
JAM KY H. ISH1
Page 5
Sharing Is The Key In Bell-Arthur
B DENNIS ROGERS
HH I ARTHUR- The two in-
cidents occurred 50 years apart, but
there is t� connection.
Bruce Strickland, the 72-year-old
chairman of the Pitt County Board
oi Commissioners, told me: "Our
house burned down when 1 was a
young fellow, and we had $800 in-
surance on it
Strickland said that the $800 was
used by buy lumber and that people
in the community�including
carpenters �pitched in to rebuild
the Strickland house.
"That's the kind of place Bell-
Arthur was
John Haughn is 30, a native of
Massachusetts who works as food
and beverage director of the Holi-
day Inn in Greenville. He said: "A
few day ago we had a family burn-
ed out. They were offered a free
room at the Holiday Inn, but they
never had to use it. The people of
the community took care of them.
"That's the kind of place Bell-
Arthur is
There are many Bell-Arthurs up
and down our highways. You ride
down the road, catch a glimpse of a
sign pointing off down a road bet-
ween the pine trees or tobacco fields
and wonder what in the world a
"Bell-Arthur" is, or a "Chuckle"
or a "Luck
"I've had many opportunities in
my life to move to town
Strickland said. "And I've never
wanted to go anywhere else but Bell-
Arthur
Haughn said simply: "I've lived a
lot of places, on both coasts,
Miami, Atlanta, but I've never lived
anywhere that I liked as much as
Bell-Arthur
These folks like Bell-Arthur, a lit-
tle community in western Pitt Coun-
ty.
It wasn't always Bell-Arthur. It
used to be known as Beaver Dam.
But the railroad came through
about the turn of the century, and as
they often did with railroads, they
established a depot every seven
miles along the track.
Beaver Dam was seven miles from
Farmville and seven miles from
Greenville.
L.C. Arthur owned the land for
the depot, and after he sold it to the
railroad, they named the town after
him.
But that got confusing, because
there was another town called Ar-
thur in North Carolina at the time.
So they looked around for a new
name while at the same time keeping
the old one.
Enter Clarabelle Smith (some say
her name was Joyner). She was the
station master for the Norfolk and
Southern Railroad and was the
daughter of one of the hamlet's big-
gest merchants, the owner of the
local sawmill, which was the main
attraction for having the depot there
in the first place.
You can figure out the rest. Ar-
thur stayed as part of the name, and
they took Bell from Clarabelle, giv-
ing the town its new name of Bell-
Arthur in 1933.
Bell-Arthur is quiet now, a couple
of stores, a few houses. The train
hasn't stopped in a long time at Bell-
Arthur.
But it wasn't always so.
Folks from Bell-Arthur love to
tell the story of the town's first
police officer, Wiley Jones.
Bell-Arthur, if it had a police of-
ficer, had to have a jail. So they
built a one-room jail, just a cell.
Since Wiley was the law and they
had 'em a jail, they just had to have
a prisoner for the jail. So Wiley sent
out, found a lawbreaker and ar-
rested him.
The good old boy didn't see the
logic of Wiley's argument, but he
was a good Bell-Arthur fellow, so he
obliged and gave the town a
prisoner�he locked Wiley in the
jail.
Most of Bell-Arthur burned down
in the late 1920s or early 1930. No
one ever knew who started the fire
or why.
That was the official end of Bell-
Arthur as a chartered, incorporated
town. But it still has its own post of-
fice and road sign.
And it still has people who love it.
"Bell-Arthur?" resident Gladys
Edwards said, "It's the best
Old-Time Religion
Meant Camp Meetings
It's As Cold As Ice
I s K IRDAN
The colder temperatures accompanying winter have made lor some intriguing examples of contemporary ice
sculpture as depicted in this photograph of the iceburg in the fountain on campus.
ROBF.K1 M.SUAIM
Vst tm Ihr 1.� nrral M�n�fcf r
During the early 19th century, the
United States experienced "The
Great Revival" that was particularly
strong in North Carolina in the
form of camp meetings.
Camp meetings were almost an
exclusive activity of Baptists,
Methodists, and Presbyterians.
The meetings were held by roving
ministers across the state. Usually
advertisements were placed in the
local newspaper w ell in advance of a
camp meeting to insure maximum
participation by the local popula-
tion.
When camp meetings first began,
they were held outdoors with little if
any protection from the elements.
Folks would come from miles
around on foot, horseback, and in
wagons to spend four or five days
listening to various preachers. Often
crude huts with pine bark roofs were
constructed by the congregation to
shelter themselves.
e Health Hazards
Sickness Stalks The University Campus
Bv DAMDNORRIS
tr�lufe� Jdttof
Now thai winter is upon us, the
flu and all those other annoying
viruses and things are going around.
People aie being advised to take
sensible precautions, like wearing
warm clothing, eating thirty oranges
a day and buying lots of cold
medicine.
But. disease prevention is not so
simple for college students. They are
susceptible to a bewildering array of
other diseases that may strike not
onl) in winter, but in any season.
Some of these diseases can be
serious health hazards; others are
mostly behavioral disorders.
Many diseases strike right in the
classrooms of our college campuses.
For instance, a sickness known as
midterm plague sweeps across cam-
puses in epidemic proportions dur-
ing the middle of each semester.
This strange disease has only one
symptom: it causes students to miss
important midterm exams. It can be
easily prevented by studying, taking
crip courses or taking courses
without midterms.
Pop-test pox affects only faculty
members. The major symptom is a
rash of pop-tests lasting for a few
weeks, or in serious cases, the pro-
fessor's entire academic career.
Spring fever decimates the ranks
of students during the last month or
so of school. There are no real
symptoms for spring fever, except
jme F0K A FOP tt
Davidson College
Closed By Flu
DAVIDSON, N. C. (UPI) � An
outbreak of a flu like illness manag-
ed to do Monday what only the
funeral of John Kennedy and a Viet-
nam War protest had done
previously � cancel classes at
Davidson College.
Davidson spokesman John Slater
said an estimated 300 of the school's
1,400 students were suffering from
"flu like symptoms" and the facul-
ty's executive committee voted to
cancel classes Monday and Tuesday.
TCP. Zimmermann, academic
president, said canceling classes
"will allow sick students to concen-
trate on health rather than
homework for a few days
The classes were expected to be
made up on Saturdays later in the
year, Slater said.
Students returned to campus
from the holiday break Jan. 5 and
by Friday the 23 beds in the college
infirmary were full and about 250
students visited or called the campus
infirmary during the weekend.
Dr. Ron Hunt, the school physi-
cian, said he suspects the illness is a
strain of influenza, although no
cases have been confirmed.
The dean of students' office Mon-
day dispensed juice, soup and
aspirin to students confined to dor-
mitory rooms, school officials said.
Hunt said the illness probably
reached a peak during the weekend
and will continue to infect students
for a few days before tapering off
next week.
The students had a fever of 102 to
104 degrees Fahrenheit and com-
plained of headaches, muscle aches
and a cough.
"They feel rotten for two to three
days and it takes about a week to
recover fully Hunt said.
Will Terry, dean of students, said
Davidson does not take lightly the
cancellation of classes. The only
previous cancellations occurred for
the funeral of President John F.
Kennedy and a one day moratorium
protesting the Vietnam War.
Students began returning to cam-
puses over the weekend at state sup-
ported colleges, but spokesmen said
Monday no similar illness had been
reported.
an extreme aversion to attending
class. The main cure is a four-day
weekend at the beach, or a sudden
panic when final exams get close.
Many students who are afflicted
with eight o-clock classes also
develop a condition known as caf-
feine dementia, long thought to be
a form of drug abuse, authorities
are slowly coming to realize that
caffeine dementia is really a disease.
Students begin drinking large quan-
tities of coffee to stay aw ake for ear-
ly morning classes, or for late night
emergency studying. Soon, the caf-
feine attacks the victim's central
nervous system, rendering sleep and
relaxation almost impossible.
Rock shock syndrome is a
disorder that attacks the hearing of
unfortunate students. Its major
causes are listening to records all
night through a set of headphones at
full volume, and standing in front
of the speakers while an especially-
loud rock band is playing. Victims
of this disorder do not listen to war-
nings that their hearing may be
damaged, since they can no longer
hear anything.
Neckus redius is a mental disease
increasing in frequency in the
United States. There are a number
of warning signals for this disease,
so it is possible to test yourself to see
if you are contracting this disease. A
few of the test questions are printed
below.
1. Do you have a morbid desire to
set fire to Christian symbols?
2. Do you like to run over
mailboxes?
3. Do you enjoy driving around
and shooting out streetlights?
4. Did someone have to read this
test to you?
While some diseases are increas-
ing in frequency, some are disap-
pearing. For instance, millions of
students were kept from going out
on weekends by Saturday Night
Live Fever, a disease that kept vic-
tims at home watching a popular
late-night comedy show. Recently, a
weaker strain of the Saturday Night
Live Fever virus has appeared, and
now relatively few people remain at
home watching television instead of
going out on Saturday nights.
Many authorities consider the
massive outbreak of discomania
during the late 1970's to have been
an epidemic mental disease, but opi-
nions vary on this subject. (The opi-
nions depend on whether or not the
particular authority was affected.)
The most devastating disease that
the average college student is likely
to suffer from is the hangover. It
leaves its victims violently ill for
what seems like years, and then in a
shaky and weakened condition for
hours after that.
The hangover strikes young
adults in the prime, or should I say,
the time of their lives; in other
words, after a really good party.
The first warning that a hangover
is imminent is the victim waking up
after a party (often in some strange
place) still very drunk. At this state,
the victim's mouth usually feels like
someone has been wiping off his
shoes on his tongue.
Walking is difficult at this stage
of the disease, and is usually
undesirable since it makes the victim
feel sicker than necessary.
The most severe part of the
hangover, accompanied by throw-
ing up and a strange desire to am-
putate one's head, usually lasts less
than 24 hours. Nearly everyone
recovers from even the worst
hangovers, although it is hard to
convince the sufferers of that fact.
(It is difficult for a hangover suf-
ferer to interest himself in statistics.)
Within a few days, the body
recovers its equilibrium and the last
vestiges of headaches and weakness
fade away.
Perhaps the most unfortunate
thing about the hangover is that it is
a recurrent disease. It's too bad that
it isn't like chicken pox and can be
erased once and for all.
The fiesty ministers always
preached "hellfire and damnation"
in the truest sense of the words.
They attacked the vices of card
playing, drinking, and even the
wearing of fine clothes.
Throughout the night they would
shout the praises of the Lord and
warn that only repentance and
prayer would save the sinners in the
audience from the certain fate of
"perishing on the fierv rocks of
Hell
Usually the preachers would
describe in detail the perils of Hell
with its molten lava, fire and painful
suffering. The obvious purpose in
this was to instill fear in the con-
gregation in hopes that the fear of
sure punishment in Hell would deter
the masses from committing any of
the sins so detested by the clergy.
Often there would be exorcisms at
the services. The first few rows in
front of the alter were always reserv-
ed for those who felt the need to
pray and be saved.
The members of the congregation
were often so moved by the services
that they got the "jerks
Parishioners who experienced this
described it as a pleasant and reveal-
ing experience. Even though the
body jerked and jumped violently
the parishioners claimed they felt no
pain but rather they felt they had
been touched by God.
all appearances of bein, dead while
they were attended to by the
ministers.
Every now and then a devoted
parishioner would go into a coma
after the jerks. In the coma state
they would lay on the ground giving
One of the most peculiar scenes at
a camp meeting was the "barking
experience This was the act of a
parishioner getting down on all
fours and barking like a dog.
Supposedly all of these activities
were the result of being touched by
God and "seeing the light
Such activities made camp
meetings unattractive to educated
ministers and the gentry who looked
upon the meetings as ignorant
gatherings of low class people.
The meetings were particularly
shunned by the well-to-do because
the preachers so often attacked their
leisure activities as being sinful and
certain to result in a trip to Hell.
The early camp meetings were
very popular among the masses,
sometimes drawing as many as
6,000 people in rural areas such as
Greene County.
This early religious experience
was probably the root for today's
strong fundamentalist beliefs in
North Carolina.
It is easy to see how and why the
state has such strong religious and
moral traditions when one looks at
the earliest religious activities that
involved camp meetings and river
baptisms.
Today camp meetings are a part
of history for the most part,
somebody must have found a cure
for all of that "jerking
History Professor
Publishes Book
The presence of America's Navy
in European and Near Eastern
waters during the late nineteenth
and early twentieth centuries is the
subject of a new book by an East
Carolina University historian.
Dr. William Still Jr professor of
history at ECU, is the author of
"American Sea Power in the Old
World: The United States Navy in
European and Near Eastern Waters,
1865-1917 published this month
by Greenwood Press.
The 280-page book, which in-
cludes several photographs of ships
and naval officers, is Number 24 in
Greenwood's "Contributions in
Military History" series.
Still traces the American naval
presence from its beginnings as a
European Squadron during the Civil
War, designed to protect American
shipping from Confederate
raiders�a noncombatant role
which did have significant implica-
tions for America's foreign policy.
While not involved in European
politics, the U.S. had strong
cultural, economic and
humanitarian interests in Europe
during the late 1800's especially in
the Mediterranean.
Diplomatic crises which threaten-
ed the stability of the Near East,
North Africa and other regions are
surveyed in Still's book, with discus-
sions of American naval response in
each instance.
He focuses on the Navy's involve-
ment in protecting American philan-
thropic and missionary interests in
the Ottoman Empire, which
ultimately ended in the use of
"gunboat diplomacy" to oppose the
Ottoman massacres of Armenians in
the 1890V
While the Navy's activities in
Northern Europe were primarily
concerned with "showing the flag
these displays were significant in
furthering America's international
policies before and during World
War I, as Still outlines.
The book also discusses the
logistical problems of maintaining
fleets thousands of miles from their
home ports.
A specialist in military and naval
history, Dr. Still is the author of
"Iron Afloat: The Story of the Con-
federate Armorclads" (Vanderbilt
University Press), "Confederate
Shipbuilding" (University of
Georgia Press) and articles in
various historical journals.
Recently he has been actively
working in various projects in
underwater archaeology, including
studies of the wrecked Union
ironclad "Monitor" while lies top-
side down off Cape Hatteras, and
bottom surveys of Edenton Bay and
nearby waters.
A Columbus, Mississippi, native,
Still has degrees from Mississippi
College and the University of
Alabama.






THE fcASl C AROI IMAN
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VC Symphony
Requests Money
RAI FIGH, N.C.
UP1 The North
Carolina Symphony
will ask the General
Assembly to give it a
$200,000 increase next
vear.
Symphony president
R. Max Abbott told the
symphony's board of
trustees Tuesday the
svmphons is requesting
$1.4 million this year
and $1.5 million for
1982-83 from law
makers.
Abbott said season
ticket sales are down
S43.0O0 from last year
but the decrease has
been offset by increases
in single concert sales
and contributions.
Comptroller Don
Wall said symphony of-
ficials do not know why-
there has been a
Local
A rtists
Exhibit
faculty and alumni
artists oi the East
Carolina University
School of Art are
among thirteen North
Carolina artists whose
works are on display
this month at the Foun-
dry Gallery in
v ashington, D.C.
Art faculty members
Randolph Osman and
Norman Keller are
represented in the
show, along with
George Brett, an artist
and educational media
specialist.
ECU alumni artists
participating in the ex-
hibition are Barry
Bailey, Kim Irwin,
ernessa Riley, John-
nie Mizell, John Quinn
and Rosie Thompson.
The "Thirteen from
North Carolina" show
opened Jan. 6 and will
run through Jan. 31.
Paintings, sculptures,
drawings, prints and
soft fabric works are
included.
Ms. Thompson, who
now lives and works in
Hillsborough, and
Washington artist
Shirley Koller coor-
dinated the show. The
Foundry Gallery is
located at 2121 P
Street, N.W
Washington, D.C.
A Foundry Gallery
spokesperson noted
that the 13 North
Carolina artists "have
a special affinity to
their environment.
"Their contact with
each other as artists is
mutually supportive
and they have similar
goals, although their
work is diverse and
reflects each individual
artist's personal ex-
ploration of that en-
vironment he added.
Gallery hours are 11
a.m. through 5 p.m
Tuesday through Satur-
day.
Meeting
Scheduled
There will be a
meeting of the students
and faculty of the ECU
School of Art on
Wednesday, Jan. 14
from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
The meeting will be
held in the Hendrix
Theatre in Mendenhall
Student Center. Atten-
dance is required.
decrease in season
tickets.
"It could be reper-
toire, it could be
scheduling, it could bo
the advertising mix or it
could be economics �
or a combination of all
of these he said. "We
just don't know why
Single concert ticket
sales are up from
$12,500 to $18,400.
Senior
Recital
Scheduled
Saxophonist Willie
Morris of Greenville,
senior student in the
East Carolina Universi-
ty School of Music, will
perform in recital
Thursdav, Jan. 15. at
7:30 p.m. m the Met
chcr Music Center
Recital Hall.
Among works tor the
alto saxophone to be
presented are Alec
W ilder s So n a t a i n
1 ou r 1 o emenl s,
M i 1 h a u d ' s
"Scaramouchc
I ben's "Concerto da
Camera" and a J. Ber-
nadaus transcription of
the Vittorio Monti
"Czards "
Morris, a student of
Brad Foley of the EC l
instrumental faculty, is
a candidate for the
Bachelor o Music
Education degree.
His parents are Mr.
and Mrs. W.I . Morris
Jr. of 801 West Fourth
St Greenville.
?5aak�.
Welcome Back
Student Special
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OYSTER BAR
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Eric Binford
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I HI i AM i -RO IN1AN
Sports
I AN! ARY 13. 1981
Page
U for sale at or
taffy not9(3 j

R

623
48
8
0
rP?
Pan Am Victorious
Behind Green 9s 30
Photo by GARY PATTERSON
ECU'S Dave Underwood Goes Up For A Slam nni
Revils Leads
Pirate Win
By CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports rdllor
Powerful Pan American got 30
points from All-America candidate
Ken Green and rolled to a 82-67 win
over East Carolina Saturday night
in Mingcs Coliseum.
Green scored 21 of his 30 points
in the first half alone, as the Broncs
rolled to a big 47-32 halftime lead.
Coach Dave Odom's Pirates got
no closer than ten points in the se-
cond half as Green's presence inside
and some hot outside shooting by
the other Broncs stymied each ECU
comeback attempt.
The Pirate loss followed an over-
time win over UNC-Asheville
Thursday night. The Bucs took that
one as Charles Watkins led the way
with 18 points, two of which came
via a crucial set of free throws late in
the game.
Watkins came back with 19 points
in the loss to Pan Am but was not
the top ECU scorer against the team
that has downed Indiana, Mar-
quette and Wichita State this
season.
Senior center Tom Szymanski got
the scoring honors for that contest,
coming away with 20 points and
nine rebounds. Most of the 6-11
Szymanski points came because of
good positioning under the basket.
Following the game Odom prais-
ed the Broncs highly. "Pan Am is
by far the best team we've played
this year and probably the second or
third best we've played since I've
been here. 1 think Duke last year
and maybe Maryland could have
beat them.
"They're a type of team that does
not do many things, but they com-
pliment everything they do like an
architect planned it
Green, too, played up to an
"architect's plans said his coach.
"Apple (Green's nickname)
played exactly the way he's suppos-
ed to said Pan Am coach Bill
White. "He's supposed to get 20
plus points and 10 plus rebounds.
He was just as consistent tonight as
ever
White complimented the Pirates'
play. "East Carolina was as scrappv
as anybody we've played. They are
young and tender, and made a lot of
mistakes, but they hustle as well as
anybody we've seen
Odom, too, felt the Pirates per-
formed admirably.
"1 felt we played rather well he
said. "We rebounded reasonably
well and followed our game plan
about as well as we could. We pro-
bablv had more assists tonight than
all year
All five starters for the Broncs,
now 10-4, scored in double figures
against the Bucs. Point guard Mike
Carroll was runnerup to Green in
the scoring column, getting 14
points.
The other three starters �
Reuben Cole, Robert Kirby and
Curtis Glasper � each tallied 12
points.
In addition to his 30 points,
Green also came away with 14 re-
bounds. Mike Gibson was the top
rebounder for the Pirates, pulling
down 11.
The Pirates, 6-7 following
loss, took on much-improved Rich
mond last night (Monday) in Minges
Coliseum before hosting Atlantic
Christian Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
Bledsoe Departs;
Cites Game Time
Following his team's 82-67 loss to
Pan American Saturday, ECU head
basketball coach Dave Odom an-
nounced that sophomore guard
Mike Bledsoe had left the team.
"It's very simply a lack of playing
time Odom said. "He has of-
ficially dropped out of school. He
and I had a very amiable talk with
no animosity. He feels to be happy
he must play and I couldn't promise
him that
Bledsoe, who started three games
early this season for the Pirates at
point guard, saw his playing time
dwindle to near-nothing with the ar-
rival of Charles Watkins.
Watkins, a former Marine, has
been with the Pirates only six games
but has started five and is the team's
leading scorer with a 17.2 per game
average.
Before Watkins came on the scene
Bledsoe had steadily been losing
playing time to freshman guard
Herbert Gilchrist. Still, it is the
stunningly successful arrival of
Bledsoe
Watkins that apparently sent Bled
soe packing.
The Raleigh native played in ten
games for the Pirates, averaging 4.4
points per contest while shooting
35.7 percent from the floor and 73.7
from the free throw line.
Hv VMI IHMIUWKH'N
suff v rtttf
East Carolina, led by All-
American Butch Revils, captured its
first dual meet win ol the wrestling
season Sunday by downing Bucknell
University 22-18 at Minges Col-
iseum.
The victory upped the Pirate
record to 1-3.
Revils pinned Steve Greenly at
58 of the first period to head the
1(1 win. The Pirate team captain,
ranked fifth nationally in his
177-pound class, upped his seasonal
record to 13-0 and improved his
career standing to a phenomenal
102-10-1.
Other Pirate wins were by Jeff
Leaf in the 188 pound class, who
defeated Dawn Banhoff, 6-2; Gary
Webb at 142, who defeated Walt
Zimmerman 8-2; Chris Giles at 150,
who defeated James TenBrook
15-7, and James Ellison in the 190
pound class, who defeated Mark
Baker 11-7.
In the 134-pound class, Tony Mit-
chell found himself down 8-0
against Pete Courtney, but bounced
back to take the decision, 12-11.
The Pirates now look forward to
meeting Northern Iowa Thursday
night at Minges Coliseum. The
match is especially meaningful to
Revils because his counterpart, Joe
Gormally, was the opponent who
stopped him in the Nationals last
year and ruined his quest for a na-
tional championship.
The match is scheduled for 7:30
p.m.
Lady Bucs 2-1 In Fla
Play At Home Saturday
Riley (L), Andruzzi
By JIMMY DuPREE
Mil or
Having posted a 9-3 record with
only three home games in the early
portion of the schedule, the Lady
Pirate basketball squad finally gets
another taste of Minges Coliseum
action Saturday at 7:30 p.m. when
they host the Indians of William and
Mary. Following that, they play six
of their next eight contests at home.
The Lady Pirates posted a 2-1
mark on a recent trip through the
'sunshine' state, losing to the
University of Florida 74-67 and then
besting Stetson 101-67 and Florida
State 78-67.
Senior All-America candidate
Kathy Riley led the Pirates in the
loss to the Lady Gators with 25
points and 11 rebounds. Junior Sam
Jones added 12 points and
sophomore Mary Denkler con-
tributed 10 points and eight re-
bounds.
"It was just a flat game says
ECU coach Cathy Andruzzi. "I've
gone over the game, over and over,
and there is no one who stood out.
If someone stood out in the first
half, they didn't have a good first
half.
"If someone stood out in the se-
cond half, they didn't have a good
first half. We didn't get consistant
play from anyone. We just didn't
get our game together and Florida
played a tremendous game. I think
very honestly that if we played a
them again, we'd beat them
Senior point guard Laurie Sikes
netted a personal season high 17
points in the victory over Stetson,
with Riiey adding 15 points, senior
Lydia Rountree adding her season
high of 14. Center Marcia Girven
posted 12 points and nine rebounds
and Denkler added 11 points and
seven grabs.
"We played well at Stetson and
again at Florida State adds An-
druzzi. "The girls did and excellant
job against FSU's 1-3-1 zone.
"We made some adjustments in
our offense the afternoon before
that game because we had been hav-
ing trouble against that defense. The
girls picked it up really well and did
a super job that night
Karr Discusses ECU Athletic Future
EDITOR'S M)Tt The following is (he first of a two-part feature of
an interview in which East Carolina Athletic Director Ken Karr
answered questions from The East Carolinian concerning recent mat-
ters (tf controversial nature that have arisen within his department.
Question: There has been a great deal of criticism from ECU
students concerning your recent proposal which, if put into effect,
would have students paying an admission price to get into a home
football game. Please explain your reasoning for this part of the pro-
posal.
Karr: Basically the reasoning is that we must find a way to establish
an accounting system that enables us to account for all the seats on
that side of the stadium. Further we must structure the stadium in a
such a way that we are able to market it at the hightest possible value.
Beyond that it is going to be necesary, as we attempt to fund our
program in the future, to either request an increase in the student fees
or this is an alternative that would seem to be somewhat more
equitable in that it would be a use tax concept. Basically it would be
better for us to tax those people w ho come to the games as opposed to
taxing every student. We have a ton of part-time students. We present-
ly tax them but to tag all of those with an increase If we could solve
our problems with a use tax for those who come would be more
equitable at this time. 1 would say those are the two main concerns �
the fact that we need that side of the stadium generate more hard
dollars for the program and numberr two we need to be able to ac-
count for each person who sits there.
Q: When do you see this proposal becoming official?
K: This has already gone past these hurdles. Now it's a matter of us
getting it prepared in such a way that we can make the total student
In future years we have to
do everything we can to con-
tinue our relationship with the
Big Four of the ACC, Beyond
that we need to do everything
we can to bring the highest
possible level Division I com-
petition to Greenville.
�Dr. Ken Karr
body very much aware of it.
Q: What plans do you have for football scheduling in the future?
K: In future years we have to do everything we can to continue our
relationship with the Big Four of the ACC. Beyond that we need to do
everything we can to bring the highest possible level Division I com-
petition to Greenville. Some of those games may well have to be
scheduled as late as 1987. I think we need to get on with scheduling
those contests.
Q: You have stated an avid interest in forming a new conference.
What have you done in this area and what are the hopes of such a for-
mation. ?
K: There are certain basic guidelines that are handed down on a con-
ference being recognized within the national framework. Basically
that is that you must have six institions and that they must participate
in a minimum of six conference sports.
Q: Can you reveal the teams that are interested at this point?
K: Presently the four schools that withdrew themselves from the
ECAC South � namely William and Mary, Richmond, James
Madison and Old Dominion � and ourselves are five of the six that
we hope to form the backbone of the new conference. We are sear-
ching for a sixth. I would say as a timeline that it is vital for us to have
this sixth institution identified and the conference put together no
later than March 1 of this year for scheduling purposes. If we are
unable to do that then perhaps we will be forced to be on hold for
another year.
Q: You came under fire from some circles with the dropping of the
wrestling program. Wrestling and field hockey were both dropped.
How much money do these two sports represent annually, and where
will this money go in the future. ?
K: For this fiscal year field hockey has an operating budget is about
$10,700. Wrestling's is about $26,000. When you say where will this
money go you're assuming this money is always out there to spend. If
we have that sort of resources in the future those monies will be
redistributed primarily through the non-revenue areas to upgrade the
quality of those sports. Part of our motivation here is that we must do
less and do it better.
Next issue: Dr. Karr will deal with questions concerning overspen-
datures in the ECU athletic budget. He will also compare the situation
he presently faces with the Pirates with the one he once faced at San
Diego State University, an institution he built from athletic mediocrity
to one of the top programs on the west coast.
i
1
1





8
rHl L S1 C AKOl INIAN
JANUARY 13, 1481
'Father Mac' Combats
Abuse In Athletics
Reprinted below is
an excerpt from the
writing of a news col-
umnist commenting
pertinently about inter-
collegiate athletics. It is
selected because The
East Carolinian feels it
makes a point and
discusses a topic that
will interest readers.
Publication herein,
however, does not imp-
ly endorsement of the
views expressed b) the
author.
B BILLGLEASON
hu ' Hun I imvs
There are two little
newspaper stories thai
have stayed in the
memory bank since last
Ma . 1 he were
retrieved and examined
again the other day
during a long conversa-
tion with Monsignor
Ignatius McDermott of
Catholic Charities.
The stories, which
were not much more
than "items ap-
peared in the Sun-
Times and other
newspapers two days
apart. The first quoted
Hubie Brown, coach of
the Atlanta Hawks pro
basketball team, as say-
ing, "Cocaine is a big
drug among athletes.
These are guys with
money The second
story, a few inches
longer, reported the
death oi Terry Furlow,
who played guard for
the Utah Jazz and
Michigan State. In the
wreckage of Furlow's
car. police investigators
found open and empt
alcoholic-be erage bot
ties, marijuana and "a
white, powdery
substance believed to
be cocai n e
McDermott, who is
known to two genera-
tions of alcoholics and
narcotics addicts as
"lather Mac saw
Terry Furlow play. Go-
ing back over a half-
century, the priest has
watched almost every
Midwestern college
basketball player of
note and thousands of
Chicago-area high
school players.
Basketball is McDer-
mott's addiction. On
Supersectional day
(and night) during the
Illinois Class AA high
school tournament, he
tries to see four games,
starting with the Public
I eague championship
in early afternoon. He
never has failed to get
to at least three tourna-
ment sites.
This man knows
more about basketball
than most coaches, and
he knows much more
about narcotics addic-
tion than most parents.
When he was a
young priest assigned
to the Charities at Ran-
dolph and Des Plaines,
Father Mac gave his
spare time to the
alcoholics who lived on
nearby Skid Row.
Later, he found time to
counsel victims of drug
abuse. Out of that grew
Addictions Consulta-
tion and Educational
Services (ACES) of
Catholic Charities, and
out of that grew the
Central States Institute
of Addiction.
He's a big guru in the
counseling business, a
national leader in a
field that isn't exactly
overcrowded, but he's
also just another
basketball buff who is
saddened when he-
reads reports of the use
of cocaine and free
base b piaver' in the
National Basketball
Association.
He is saddened but,
like Judge Earl
S:ravhorn of the Cook
County Criminal
Courts, who recently
expressed his opinions
to me, he is not surpris-
ed. Like Strayhorn,
McDermott knows that
drug addition does not
begin in the NBA and
then filter down to in-
fluence school kids in-
sidiously. It begins with
school kids and then is
carried into the NBA,
into the National Foot-
ball League, into Major
League Baseball by
school kids who have
grown up to be
athletes.
Like Strayhorn, the
priest is tired of
rhetoric and excuses
from those who know
nothing of the subject
or, knowing something
of it, either ignore it or
laugh about it.
"The problem begins
with a permissive,
apathetic society
McDermott said. "In
the wake of that, I
suspect that media
disclosures about the
NBA and the arrest of
Ferguson Jenkins on
narcotics charges will
cause a very small rip-
ple. What has surfaced
is only the tip of the
iceberg
Because at least 70
percent of the players
in the NBA are Black,
many white persons
dismiss the incidence of
cocaine use as a "Black
problem A man who
has been very close to
college basketball told
me that he doubts if
there is any player on a
big-time team who is
not addicted to some
kind of drug. 1 asked
Father Mac if he con-
sidered that statement a
distortion.
"Probablv, but not
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bv too much he said.
"Back in 1976, a Nor-
thwestern University
study embraced high
school students in ur-
ban, suburban and
rural schools. The
students were Black,
white, Asian and Latin.
"The study revealed
that only 28 percent of
those kids were
chemical- or alcohol-
free. And it found that
the peer pressure of the
72 percent upon the 28
percent is enormous
Consider, as McDer-
mott does, the peer
pressure within a high
school basketball team.
If the 10 members of
the team should con-
form to the study's
statistics, at least seven
of them will go into a
season using
something. The other
three players must be of
strong character to stay
away from something.
The priest has
understood the enormi-
ty of the pressure and
of the problem for a
long time. "In 1963 we
did a study in a
Chicago high school
he said. "Over and
over, these seniors told
our psychologist, 'Our
habits are formed. Get
out of the high schools
and get into the gram-
mar schools
He knows too well
that many of you will
read this and think,
"Who gives a damn
about those overpaid
bums in the NBA?" He
knows too well that the
high school basketball
player who comes to
practice under the in-
fluence of cocaine
might be yours. You
should give a damn
about that, but you
probably won't.
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1
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 13, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 13, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.101
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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