The East Carolinian, January 8, 1981







She l-aat (Earolintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 No. 31
10 Paes
Thursday, January 8, 1981
(ireenville. North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
John East Sworn In;
May Find Going Rough
B PAl IOf I INS
: ast, the former East
Car. ical science professor
who was sworn in Monday as North
a's newest senator, has been
the inadvertent cause of some em-
nenl among his colleagues.
�. tte has passed legislation
ces the removal of barriers
handicapped from public
gs all ovei the nation but has
rid that the U.S. Capitol is only
ble t East, who is
a w heelchair.
Ea� Id not come down the ai-
the swearing-in because
the not accessible to
i :ed instead bv
� person in
. i - �
wheelchair can get
namber but without
l get to the desks at
sit. nor into the
. atmosphere of the Senate
immittee hearing rooms
. to wheelchairs, but
ro nis hae ramps
diases where the
: heii aides sit.
Similarly
thai c
the underground tun-
ned the Capitol with
� buildings present a
problem for the handicapped. The
tunnels themselves are accessible to
the wheelchair-bound, but the sub-
way cars are not. Therefore, the trip
b wheelchair is a long climb up a
gradual incline.
People in wheelchairs do get
about in the Capitol but only with
difficulty, according to John Lan-
caster, an attorney for the American
Coalition of Citizens with
Disabilities. "Things are not real
good. 1 find there are steps
everywhere he said. "You can get
around on a wheelchair if you're
good at it, but only if you're good
The Senate, he feels, has not lived
up to the spirit of the laws it has
passed.
There is a $2.7 million project
underway to make the Capitol
barrier-free, but it will not be com-
pleted until at ieast 1982.
The Architectural Barriers Act oi
1968 requires that all buildings con-
structed with federal funds be made
accessible to the handicapped, and
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 sas
that firms or agencies receiving
more than $2,500 in federal aid will
lose the money if their programs are
not accessible to the physically han-
dicapped.
According to East campaign
director Ann May, Sen. East is not
encountering too many problems.
"There were really very few pro-
blems when we were in Washington
for Senate orientation a couple of
weeks ago she said.
According to Capitol architects,
only two major renovations will be
necessary to accommodate East.
Plans are underway to build a lift
device so East can get up the three
steps to the cloakroom and a
specially fitted toilet adjacent to the
cloakroom. The cost is about
$10,000.
Architects had considered putting
a ramp on the Senate floor in order
to allow the new senator to move up
and down the aisle. The idea was re-
jected, however, when it was found
that the ramp would be unsafe to
maneuver on, said Elliott Carroll,
an executive assistant to the Ar-
chitect of the Capitol.
To enter the well of the Senate,
East will have to take a roundabout
route from his seat in the backrow
where all freshman senators sit.
East's offices are on the fifth
floor of the Dirksen office building
and seem to pose no problem of ac-
cessibilitv for him.
Sen. John Kast, shown here with his family, may encounter some difficulty maneuvering
in the Capitol.
Publishers Control Textbook Prices
B PAUL COLLINS
indred dollars foi books.
I can't understand it Students at
Carolina utter similar cries
hundreds of tunes each semester.
"It seems to me we're getting
ripped-off said Dan McCTintock,
an ECU sophomore. "1 don't know
if it's the bookstore or what, but 1
feel that someone is ripping us off
This typdies the attitude of many
ECU students, who spent more than
$1.1 million last year for textbooks
However, students know little about
the purchase of textbooks except
"We send requisitions to every
department said Roger Bullock,
assistant manager of the Students
particular book has sold in deciding
how many to order
The Students Supply Store, which
includes the bookstore, Wright
Soda Shop and the Croatan, is an
auxiliary foundation of ECU. This
means that the store, although a
part of the university, receives no
support from the school or state and
must be wholly self-supporting.
The major alternative to the
Students Supply Store is the Univer-
sity Book Exchange (U.B.E.),
managed b Don Edwards. Located
on South Cotanche Street, U.B.E.
was established in 1967 as a private
business and has no connection with
the university.
After receiving requisitions and
projected course enrollments from
the individual departments, the
Supply Store, when asked to explain Students Store supplies U.B.E. with
what goes in to purchasing tex-
tbooks
"We u s e projected class
enrollments and a history of how a
the information.
The stores then order the books.
"We try to get as many use
books as possible Bullock said.
"They are the best buy for the stu-
dent and really for us too
Edwards cited the reasons for try-
ing to obtain as high a percentage of
used books as possible. "Basically
here are three reasons " he explain-
ed. 'One is the iower cost to the stu-
dent, second is the greater profit on
used books and finally there's the
fact that the resale price of an old
book is the same as that of a new
book The resale value of a book
remains constant no matter how
many times it is used.
Both sources obtain used books
from two sources: book buy-back
and used book wholesalers.
If a used book has been requisi-
tioned again, sells for more than $2
new and is in salable condition, both
stores will pay the student 50 per-
cent of the new price.
The stores then resell the books at
75 percent of the original price.
"These figures apply as long as the
book is used at ECU Bullock ex-
plained.
Books that are no longer to be us-
ed at ECU can sometimes be sold to
wholesalers.
The price a wholesaler will pay is
determined r the book's potential
marketability. "For instance
Bullock said, "if a new edition
comes out, the value of the book
drops way down
According to Edwards, the use of
a book tends to go in cycles of about
three years.
What the cannot buy in used
books, the stores must buy new
from the publisher.
Bullock estimates that he deals
with 250 to 300 publishers each
year.
The publishers suggest a retail
price and give the stores a standard
discount of 20 percent. Both U.B.E.
and the Students Supply Store use
the suggested retail price.
Ordering books is a tricky
business, according to Bullock.
Since publishers will accept only a
limited percentage of returns, the
stores must be careful not to order
too many books.
"We want to have a book on
hand for every student who wants
one Bullock said, "but at the
same time, we have to be careful not
to have too many books
In contrast, U.B.E. orders books
for 40 to 50 percent of the projected
enrollment at the freshman and
sophomore levels. The store
generally orders a smaller percen-
tage of books for upper-level
courses.
The publishers deal directlv with
teachers and professors. Samples
are shown by the publishers, and the
teachers then pick from the books
available.
"We have no control over what
books the teachers requisition
Bullock said.
As part of the university, the
Students Supply Store turns over all
distributed profit to the Faculty
See BOOKS. Page 2
Endorsement Effect Minimal
South To Need Engineers Soon
In the next 10 years, shortages of
engineers and other high technology
graduates are likely to persist both
in the nation and in the South, ac-
cording to a new report from the
Southern Regional Education Board
iSRLB). These manpower shortages
may be eased, however, if more high
school student take a rigorous set
ot math courses and if women and
blacks shift to the high technology
fields
The SREB report focuses on the
relationship between the study of
mathematics by high school
students and the supply oi high
technology manpower. "To a con-
siderable extent the report main-
tains, "the production of engineers,
mathematicians, physical scientists,
and computer programmers
depends on a strong background in
mathematics
However, women and minorities
� who helped to create the recent
boom in higher education
enrollments � have not been very
inclined to study mathematics in
either high school or college. Fur-
thermore, one Southern state
estimate that only one out of 10 of
its recent high school graduates has
taken trigonometry, the essential
pre-calculus course.
The report, entitled Engineering
and High Technology Manpower
Shortages: The Connection with
Mathematics, was prepared by
SREB economist Eva C. Galambos,
who concludes that the present low
level of participation in these high
school math courses represents a
"fundamental constraint" on a
See JOBS, Page 2
By BRAD KLTROW
North arolina Hrev,
Those who argue that editorial
endorsements have little, if any, ef-
fect on voters can cite the results of
this fall's election as convincing
evidence. Most of the North
Carolina newspapers that endorsed
candidates supported incumbent
Democrats Jimmy Carter for presi-
dent and Robert Morgan for
senator, but both were unexpectedly
defeated in the state.
Of the 53 dailies surveyed by the
North Carolina Press Association,
15, or 28.3 percent, endorsed Presi-
dent Carter. Republican Ronald
Reagan was endorsed by nine, or 17
percent, and one paper, or 1.9 per-
cent, endorsed independent John
Anderson. More than haif the
papers surveyed � 28, or 52.8 per-
cent � chose not to endorse can-
didates.
Robert Morgan was endorsed by
22 of the 53 dailies, or 41.5 percent.
Republican John East was endorsed
by only two papers, or 3.8 percent,
and 29, or 54.7 percent, did not en-
dorse.
Three of the 20 non-daily
newspapers surveyed endorsed can-
didates, and all supported Carter
and Morgan.
The state's dailies generally dif-
fered with others across the nation
on endorsements for president.
Reagan was supported by 443, or
42.2 percent of the 1,653 dailies
surveyed by Editor & Publisher.
Carter trailed with 126 en-
dorsements for 12 percent, and
Anderson was supported by 41
papers for 3.8 percent. Again, many
of the newspapers surveyed � 438,
or 42 percent � chose not to en-
dorse a candidate.
Most of the state's large-
circulation dailies, including the
Raleigh News and Observer and The
Charlotte Observer endorsed both
Carter and Morgan. The largest
papers to endorse Reagan were the
Winston-Salem Journal, The
(Winston-Salem) Sentinel and The
Greensboro Record.
Reagan's editorial support came
largely from papers in the western
and Piedmont areas of the state. He
was endorsed by the Asheville
Citizen and Asheville Times, the
Asheboro Courier-Tribune, the
Concord Tribune and the Kan-
See ENDORSEMENTS, Pane 3
Hotline To Deal With Sexual Harassment
Sociology Professor Ken Wilson
By PAUL COLLINS
Nmn Editor
Sexual harassment of female
students by teachers at East
Carolina is a problem that has been
largely ignored, but two people at
ECU would like to change that.
An assistant professor of
sociology, Ken Wilson, and a
graduate student who asked to be
identified only as Linda are conduc-
ting a sexual harassment hotline
beginning today.
Conducting the hotline from her
home phone, Linda will take calls
from students during specified
hours. The purpose is to have the
students describe their encounters
with sexual harassment.
All calls will be confidential and
will not be used to file complaints
against faculty members, according
to Linda.
Many harassed students do not
talk to anyone because they do not
know where to turn, she said. "For
women who are victims it can be a
very emotional thing. The vast ma-
jority of the time it happens in the
classroom setting, and the students ranging from verbal harassment to
have such things as grades and physical assault.
teacher recommendations to con-
sider
Therefore, she added, most cases
of harassment go unreported.
Wilson and Linda first became in-
terested in the subject several years
ago when an article on the subject
appeared in the campus newspaper.
A letter Wilson wrote to the
editor put Linda in touch with him,
and they then began their research.
They have conducted two
previous studies in 1979 on the sub-
ject. The first study was conducted
in the spring of the year by
telephone. The survey dealt with
touching and propositioning only.
The results indicated that about nine
The two looked at the results to
see if the victims differed
significantly from other women
students. They found that the vic-
tims did slightly better academical-
ly, were more socially competent
and rated themselves as more
physically attractive than did non-
victims. "But really Wilson add-
ed, "there was not really too much
difference
In November last year, Wilson
and Linda presented their results
from these surveys to the Commit-
tee on the Status of Women at ECU.
Joseph R. Maiolo, chairman of
the Department of Sociology and
percent of the women surveyed had Anthropology, has also asked them
encountered such harassment.
The second survey, conducted in
the fall, was taken in classrooms
and dealt with all forms of sexual
harassment. One third of the
women surveyed indicated they had
been subjected to some sort of sex-
ual harassment by a teacher.
Seven categories were included,
to conduct a symposium on the mat-
ter in the spring.
The University of California at
Berkeley is the only other school in
the country to publish studies on the
matter.
Although the two universities are
difficult to compare, Wilson said,
his impression is that the situation at
Berkelev is "strikingly similar" to
ECU.
Commenting on the lack of infor-
mation about the subject, he said,
"I think sexual harassment is being
studied, but studies are not being
published
"It's a new issue Linda added.
"The problem has been studied
more in the workplace than in col-
leges, but it is being studied more
They hope that their results will
allow them to make constructive
recommendations to various ad-
ministrative offices at ECU.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Classifieds
Features5
Letters4
Sports5
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8, 1981
Announcements
PRE-COLUMBIAN
The ECU Dept of Sociology and
Anthropology, m cooperation with
the ECU School o� Art, is presen
ting a series of public lectures on
Pre Columbian Art
The lectures will be conducted
by Paul Clifford, curator of the
Pre Columbian Collection at the
DuKe University Museum of Art
They will be held in the auditorium
of the Jenkins Fine Arts Center at
ECU at 7 30 p m Jan 1? Jan 19
and Jan 26
topics to be discussed include
Tne Dawn of Civilization
Through the Mastercrattsman
Period" I Dec 8 The Great Em
pires to the Conquest" Uan 12).
The Mysterious Maya One Half
of the Bow Tie Uan 19) and
The Aztec and Their
Predecessors The Other Malt of
the Bow Tie" (Jan ?6!
There are four remaining lee
tures m the series, and each lee
tures will include slides to depat
actual examples of Pre
Columbian Art
The wealth of published
material today and the increasing
interest in 'he ancient arts of this
hemisphere show that Pre
Columbian art can now take its
place as one of the great art ex
pressions of the world Clifford
sa'd It is imperative that we who
have come to the New World and
have sampled all its other bounties
should now accept and protect this
rich heritage left us by the high
civilizations which nave come and
gone "
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
An Episcopal service of Holy
Communion will be celebrated
Tues evening. Jan 13, in the
chapel of the Methodist Student
Center (5th St across from Gar
reft Dorm) The service will be at
S 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev Bill Hadden.
celebrating Supper will be served
following the service
TENNIS
All women interested in trying
out tor the women's tennis team or
anyone interested in the program
is invited to come and hear the
new coach discuss the upcoming
season The meeting will be held in
Rm 145 at Mmges, Jan 12 at 3 30
SKI TRIP
The ECU Ski trip to Snowshoe
over Spring break is scheduled for
March 8 13. 1981 Students seeking
credit should enroll in PHYE 1105
A room deposit of J10 00 is due
Jan 27, 1981, at 4 p m m Memorial
Gym Rm 108 Contact Mrs Jo
Saunoers in Memorial Gym Rm
205 tor additional information
(AHPAT)
The Allied Health Professions
Admission Test will be offered at
ECU on Sat . March 7, 1981 Ap
plication blanks are to be com
pleted and mailed to the
Psychological Corp 304 E 45th
St , New York, NY 10017 to arrive
bv Feb 7.1981 Application blanks
are also available at the Test.nq
Center, Speight Bldg . Room 105,
ECU
SEMINAR
A weekly seminar on the ap
plications of group theory to the
physical sciences is planned for
the Spring Semester This subject
should be of special interest to
chemists, physicists, geologists
and mathematicians The aim of
this course of lectures will be not
merely to prove a batch of
theorems, but rather to acquire an
understanding of a language for
describing systems and
phenomena by their symmetry
properties Students and facualty
are invited to attend Students and
taculty are invited to attend
Students who participate may
receive one or more semester
hours of course credit by register
mg the PHYS 6526, Readings m
Physics An organizational session
for the purpose of arranging a
suitable time will beheldinPE213
of the Physics Bldg at 4 P M on
Mon Jan 12 For further infor
mation. contact Dr Terence
McEnally at X6894 or 752 3993, or
m PE 102 of the Physics Bldg
JOBSNEEDED
inmates at the Vaury Correc
tionai Facilit arc look mg for Obs
Many inmate' have bepn recom
mendea for work release. bu' iobs
aren't available Ifyovha core to
offer or know of one please call
756 9324
(ACT)
The American College Test
(ACT) will be offered at ECU on
Sat, March 28. 1981 Application
blanks are to be completed and
mailed to ACT Registration P O
Box 414, lowa City, lowa 52240
Registration deadline is Feb 27,
1981 Applications may be obtain
ed from the ECU Testing Center.
Speight Bldg , Room 105
STUDENT UNION
PRESIDENT
Applications are now being at
ceotert for the office of Student
Union president for the 1961 B?
school year Applications will be
taken until Jan 16. 1981 and are
available at the Mendenhall Stu
de�t Center information desk if
you tav any questions regarding
the qualifications for the office,
please call 757 6611 Don't hesitate
to get involved
CIC t-eruLOWSHIPS
Until February 1, 198 prospec
five applicants from outside In
diana may call toil free between
9 00 a m and 5 00 p m EST tor in
formation or application forms
The number is (BOOi 457 4420
Now m its fourth year, the CIC
Fellowships Program in the social
sciences makes awards in an
thropology, economics,
geography, history, political
science, psychology and
sociology
The humanities fellowships are
available to students seeking doc
torates m American studies, art
history, classics, comparative
literature. English, German,
linguistics n usi�, philosophy,
religion, Romance languages, and
Slavic languages
Fields covered by the natural
sciences, mathematics and
engineering program include
chemistry, biological sciences,
agricultural sciences, physics,
and geological sciences We
welcome inquiries concerning
specific subfields
BAHAMAS CRUISE
Enter the v rid o' rum - S mii
shine "ake a tr , to the Bahar- ;
Mart 5ttl T SVjdent U'
Travel Committee has already
planned your Spring Break for
you, so make reservations now at
Mendenhall Central Ticket Ofice
Quad Hotel Room and Cabin
49� 00 Double Hotel RoomQuad
Cabin J549 00
CRIMINAL LAW
A new course. Principles and
Procedures of Criminal Law
(CorS 4003) will be offered during
spring semester at ECU The
three semester hour course will be
taught on Mon nights from 6 30 to
9 30 n m with the first class
beginning on Jan 12. 1981
The course will focus on the
nature, sources and types of
substantive criminal law. the
classification and analysis of
crimes and criminal acts in
general, and the examination in
detail of selected specific criminal
procedures with special emphasis
upon responsibilities of criminal
lustice professionals
Pre requisite for the course is
consent of the Department
Chairperson Area businessmen,
law enforcement officers, private
security personnel human service
delivery personnel and other in
terested persons are encouraged
and invited to enroll
Registration will begin on Jan
8. 1981 and non ECU students
should register through ECU Divi
sion of Cont Education The
course is open to eligible students
at ECU interested individuals are
encouraged to register for the
course and or contact the Depart
ment of Social Work &, Correc
tionai Services for additional in
formation (312 Allied Health or
Carol Belk Bldq
INTERNSHIP
Sophomores, luniors and seniors
currently enrolled in a North
Carolina college or North Carolina
residents attending an out of state
college have until February 2 to
apply for the institute of Govern
ment Summer internship Pro
gram in state government
Twnety four students wii be
selected by an advisory commit
tee to participate in a living
learning internship in North
Carolina state government
directed by the Institute of
Government The institute of
Government interns will work
from May 26 through August 7
Students W'il wo'k 40 hours ea r
week in a responsible position in a
state department, participate m
evening educational seminars and
be paid approximatpiy $130 per
week
Students interested in the pro
gram should secure a brochure art
nouncmg the program and a State
of North Carolina application form
from their college or university
placement office or local Job Ser
vice office
Students interested in the In
stitute of Government program
should mail an application to the
institute of Government Knapp
Building 059A, The University of
North Caroma, Chapel Hill. North
Carolina. 27514 by February 2
1981
Applicants will be accepted
without respect to race. se. color,
national or,gin. religion, or nan
dicap
Lib Johnson, a student of East
Carolina University, served as an
institute of Government intern in
state government during the surr
mer of 1980
Jobs Plentiful For Engineers
Continued From Page 1
rapid ex-
pansion of high
technology manpower.
In addition, main
school districts current-
ly are plagued by shot
lages of math teachers,
due in pan to the main
better-paying oppor-
tunities f o I
mathematics graduates
elsewhere in the job
market. And recent
trends in enrollments
and degrees make the
current shortage ol
high school math
teachers seem likely to
continue. In the South.
half as many bac-
calaureate degrees in
math were awarded in
1977-78 than just seven
years earlier.
The nation's growing
concern with industrial
productivity a nd
technological achieve-
ment is likely to spur an
even greater demand
tor high technology
manpower, the report
says, mirroring
America's reaction to
the launch of Sputnik
twenty years ago. Vet
the traditional source
of new scientists and
engineers � young.
Bumps Stay
(UPI) - Gov. James
B. Hunt Jr. had a
smooth ride to his re-
election last fall, but he
will hae to endure
some bumps at his in-
augural ball Friday
night.
The ball will be held
at Reynolds Coliseum
on the North Carolina
State University cam-
pus, but there are no
plans to remove speed
bumps on streets
leading to the facility.
A minor Hap occur-
red four vears aso at
Hunt's first inaugural
when the speed bumps
were removed and later
replaced � at a cost of
$800 � in order to pro-
vide the governor and
other dignitaries a
smooth ride to the ball.
"No, no, no said
Doris G u p t o n , a
spokesman for the state
Department of
Transportation, when
asked if the DOT had
been asked to remove
the speed bumps this
year.
Prices Rising
C ontinued From Page 1
Scholarship Committee
for use in the general
scholarship fund.
Distributed profit is the
money that would go to
the owners or
shareholders in a
private business
This arrangement is
set up by state law, and
recently the store has
contributed approx-
imately $45,000 per
year to the fund, accor-
ding to manager Joe
Clark.
With prices virtually
the same at both stores.
some students have
sought alternative
means of obtaining
books. Many students
have eliminated the
middle-man by buying
and selling books
among themselves. A
number of dorms hold
book co-ops in an ef-
fort to save students
money.
"Why should we pay
more than we have to
for books?' said
sophomore Scott
Burnette. "It seems like
we're already paying
enough for them
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MflMGESBLVD. SUITE 206
white males � will be
in short supply in the
coming years. In fact,
the absolute number of
all high school
graduates in 1985 is ex-
pected to be 15 percent
lower than 10 years
earlier.
In the engineering
field, where supply and
d e m a n d tended t o
"roller coaster" ovei
the vears. enrollments
are surging once again.
For example, in 1979,
junior-year enrollments
were 80 percent greater
than in 1973, and some
62,IKK) to 67,000 new
engineering bac-
calaureates are ex-
pected annually in the
nation during the
Eighties.
Dr. Galambos shows
that the demand for
these engineers should
remain strong in the
near future, but she
questions whether the
annual supply of new
engineers can be main-
tained. Many public
engineering schools
already are at peak
capacity, and it is dif-
ficult to rapidly shift
facult) and other
resources to h i g h -
demand programs. In-
deed, faculty shortages
in engineering are
alreadv reported. With
the starting salaries
c o m m a n d ed b
engineers, there is little
incentive for students
to pursue graduate
study for an academic
career, or for Ph.D's to
choose college teaching
careers.
In the nation and in
the South, demand for
engineers is expected to
outpace supply as the
pool of 18-to-21 year
olds begins to decline.
The many specialists
who cross over to
engineering from other
high technology fields
may help fill engineer-
ing jobs. But, the
overall balance of the
nation's technical man-
power may be adversely
affected because the
physical sciences, com-
puter science, and other
high technology fields
are experiencing shor-
tages of their own. Dr.
Galambos suggests that
industry may resolve
the impending shortage
of engineers by shifting
engineering
technologists into
engineering positions.
Yet such a shift would
only produce another
shortage in the produc-
tion and maintenance
areas where such
technologists are now
deployed.
Another possible
constraint on the supp-
ly of engineers and
engineering faculty is
that the number of
students who constitute
the potential supply
base includes a growing
enrollment of foreign
students, many of
whom are expected to
return home after
receiving their degrees.
The SRFB report notes
that in 1978 in the
South, over one-third
of all engineering doc-
torates were awarded to
foreign students.
She �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Is Now Accepting Applications
For Cartoonists And Reporters
Only those who can spare the necessary amount of time to do a good
job need apply. These positions require a significant amount of input
and attention to the reponsibilities that come with the job.
CARTOONISTS
We are looking for people who have the exceptional ability to draw
caricatures in a way that conveys a particular thought and viewpoint
with satire and wit.
Applicants for cartoonist positions should bring samples of their
work.
R E
O R
E R
We are seeking students who are knowledgable and have a grasp of
basic journalistic writing techniques. Students who have completed
Journalism 2100 andor higher level journalism courses are preferred.
Assignments will include hard news writing, news feature writing, beat
reporting, sports writing, news analysis, investigative reporting, etc
Successful and productive reporters will be considered for promotion
to higher editorial positions later in the semester. Good work as a
reporter will lead to promotion to positions as assistant editors and
desk editors.
Applicants for reporting positions should bring samples of their
previous writing. Samples should be of journalistic writing only; no
essays, term papers, or poetry.
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE NEWSPAPER OFFICE
FROM 5 -6 p.m. ON MONDAY, JANUARY II, 1981.
PRISON VISITS
Many ECU indents have lonco
Maury Correctional Facilities
Thursday mght v.Siting progra'r
We go trorr 7 30 p m 900pm
Car pooling and pick UP S
available it's a triendiy at
mosphere and enjoyable tor all
Let's not tor get these lonel y people
during the Hoi'dar Season Can
7S6 9324
RESIDENCE STAFF
Applications are now
received by the Dept of Re)
Life tor Resident Advisors tc
mg Fan Semester Any full I n
student who has reserved a
residence hal! room and ha
overall avg of 2.0 is eligible to ap
ply information and applical
forms can be obtained from a
Residence Hall Director or
Residence Life Office, 214
Whichard Bidcj
STUDENT UNION
POSITIONS
Appiica'ions o'p Deng a:i:ep'ea
'or Coffeehouse Chairperson and
committee members immediate
i� P- : tp) cations Mi me Stu
dent union O' re Room 234 in
Mendenhall Student Center Call
757 Mil Fxt 2)0
SPRING BREAK TRIP
The Student union Travel Com
m.ttee has planned two trips dur
mg Spring Break One is tc Forl
Laudfrciaie Fior.da and the other
s a Fort LauderdaleBahamas
Cruise Pr,res include transpor'a
tion, hotel accummodat'ors and
the cru'S For more information
go hy Mendenhall Central T .
Otf.ce or call at 757611 Ft
Lflu : Quad
not. � oo Double hotel
room J309 00 Ft Lauder
dale Bahamas Cru.se Quad
hotel room g. quad ur 1499 00
Double hole' room & qoad ' �
1549 00
INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED
instructors are needed '
several short term oeiJ.rin.o ,
workshops or courses '��� �'�
Crafts Center a' Menoe' I
dent Center The areas tor �
instructors are needf
darkroom teohn.ques ,ew
siikscreen Graduate or f
year art students or an �
has sufficien' knowtedge K 'ear'
a course m y Of 'he are; �
tioned, may con'ac' Tan �. �
Crafts and Recreat.on D �
Mendenhall 757 6'
EARNING
A new program foe
Learning Eff in� , �
fereo by Dr George
begmn.ng Jar 14 1981 Then a
mo groups Or"
Mon and Wed at 1.00 ;
� . � .
and Thurs at 1 00 p m �
A' gi ' �'��
avaiiabH � -
dance s vOior"ar,
�� atioi � � i . rea
KOH-I-NOOR RAPID0GRAPH
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3076 sp7 7 pen set
containing (00,0,1,2,212,3 & 4)
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Wright Building
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I Ml I AS I K l IN1AN
JAM H 8, 1S�K 1
Newspaper Endorsements Carry Little Weight
Continued I rom Pao� I
V
J o
"sthatcn state's newspapers. lessor of journalism at
jvasendon Studies of the effec- the University of North
only the Concord tiveness of editorial en Carolina, found that
I he dorsements have shown editorial endorsements
them to be only slightl) and election results
helpful to a candidate
in a close race.
W hi Cai tei and
re expected
it is noi
thai the
si ol the
In a 1967 study,
Maxwell McCombs,
i! an assistant pro
were only loosely cor
related. He concluded
that "endorsements are
only one factor in the
variables that explain
political behavior
Judge To Order Testimony

a
' s A h
Oa I's lawyers
lid I . iin lias refused
. them the names.
' Ol Adams,
I . is accused by
foi POWs of col
iting with the
b wearing then
m, carrying a
tpon and helping
trd ovei and
ite American
soners in a scnes of
imps in South
nam during the mid

tttorneys
Gai '� ood was
n ane b torture
mi that,
with emo
. instability sooted
u n h a p p y
ood, caused him
pi the ideals and
the Vietong
' "become a
tnamese "
e conlend
�'�'in 1 Knu
UM Study Indicate
Extensive Cheating
)
rm, whereas
� Midw j a
' ance were
to shear on
ol the ;
�no I fib suggests, Or.
said, "thai dil
�s' - ferent tpes oi people
they were given an op are attracted to dif-
� mi types ol situa
and that motiva
- enhanced when
pe pie are in situations
� with the type
n the a
Pei tion in-
in part result
� lividuals with
tii i � seleci
� which
will expose
-�re n ves.
selest
i n stimulus con-
I hey do
: � ite their en-
�nmeni to make it
compatible with
�wn preferences,
needs, traits,
at til udes. and
ll a en sties
1


1
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Ot O"

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OFFICIAL NORTH CAROLINA STATE INSPECTION STATION
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
FGOOdriCh Coggins Car Care
756-5244
320 Wtst Bntnilli II
OPW MT r�' Sft P" iae am 1-hpji
I li5:3l PJ
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. � �m s ft SERVICE
2H 3ft
will support their
claims that Garwood
remained behind in
Vietnam because the
North V iet n a m e s e
refused to release
prisoners who were in-
sane or suffered severe
physical mutilation.
" I he people who did
become profoundly
men tails ill were
segregated and not
repatriated because the
North Vietnamese did
not want the world to
know that prisoners
had been mistreated
t h e d e 1 e n s e s a i d
Wednesday.
1 estifying tor the
defense Wednesday
were Mar Speet C tab-
tree of Covina, Calif
(iarwood's childhood
s w e e (heart w h o
psychiatrists hav e
described in earlier
testimony as "the only
positive thing in his
vouth
and are by no means
the deciding factor.
A survey of other
research on editorial
endorsements bears out
McCombs' findings.
As John Robinson ol
the University ol
Michigan Department
of Journalism writes,
almost m understate-
ttient. "newspaper
editorials cannot be us
ed as predictive tools
The most effective
editorials seem to be
those that support a
candidate whose views
seem to differ with the
newspapers These are
called by researchers
"unpredictable" edits,
and they tend to have
more impact on the
election An example
might be the endorse-
ment ol a Democratic
candidate by a paper
generally thought to be
conservative.
Perhaps the most
significant aspeel oi
this fall's NCPA en-
dorsement survey was
the number of
new spapers choosing
not to endorse can-
didates. Fewer than
halt of the state's
dailies made en
dorsements this year.
Mam ot the editors
surveyed felt thai
oteis ought to be able
to decide lot
themseKes w ho to vote
for, and that it was nol
the role of the
newspapei to make that
decision for them
Othei editoi s feel un-
comfortable with en
dorsements because
they can be per. cued a
linking the paper with a
particular party or can
didate. s Phillip
Geyelin writes in I he
Editorial 1'agc, edited
by the Washington
Post Writers' Croup,
"it puts a bin;
stickei on the
masthead. It may even
have the effect of pmn
ing a campaign buti
on the newspapei
political reporters .
coloring, however in
directly and insidious-
ly, the political repor
ting in tile news section.
It invites the readers to
look for bias and
motive, at a time when
readers are all too in-
clined to do that " In
'� 'ttharolina, even
more than in the rest nf
the nation, most editor s
appear unwilling to
give readers thai invita
tion.
I Northarolina
papers are owned hv
Freedi
New spapers group,
which has a formal
poli mist endors-
ing candidates. I he
('�� ' wia (razette, New
S in Journal
Kinsion Daily free
Press, Jacksonville
Daily News and the
Burlington Daily
limes New in owned
by Freedom, and thus
made no endorser
Ihe Fastarolmian
-
-
- � �' .
�� � �����.
-� emmj � �. . .
ATTTIC
FriSat. The
Pedstrians
Sun. No Vacancy
and Footsball
Ovation Rec. Artist Tour. 6:00
R0BLnndh?�ff0n Tues 3 PM
Dd IQ s- o (in the Phoenix Room)
h o4 thM adve-tttw)
llwns la rmquirmd to b� '�dtly
avallabl toe a�l� In Men Kroqae Sav-on
� �c�pi aa apclflcally notaO in thia ad If w� do
run out of an Itom w� wt'l oHc you your choca ot al
comparabia Ham ��h�n avallabla. reflecting tha a�ma aavinga or al
tiinchKk which will antitia you to purchaa tha adv�niad Item at tha
adverttawl prlca within 30 daya
Items and P'ices
E'tective Thurs . Jan 8
thru Sat Jan 10 1980
19f
Copyright 1981
Kroger Savon
Quantity Rights Reserved
"
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Kroger Sav-on
has everythinp
you need!
MADE FRESH IN OUR STORE
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MT. DEW,
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AVONDALE
Chunk
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KROGER
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6V2-Oz.
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NONE SOLD
TO
DEALERS
OPEN 7 AM TO MIDNIGHT
MON
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OPEN SUNOAY
9 AM TO 9 PM
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
Phone 756-7031





QUf� �aat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
V. HRIS L!( HOK, i.ene'ul tanaiee'
Paul Lincke, ���� t,r uhm Paul Collins, seaio,
Jimmy Dhpree, e�� Chari es Chandler ��&&��
Anita Lancaster, fnkmm mm David Norris, Ft�eo,
Dave Severin, ���,�� mm
.
Januar 8. 181
Opinion
Page 4
Liquor Vote
Mixed Drinks Revenue Benefits All
On February 17 Greenville will
again have the opportunity to vote
on liquor by the drink. It will pass,
we hope.
In June of 1979 there was a
county-wide vote and the issue was
defeated by a very slim margin.
Voters within the city limits voted
two-to-one in favor of liquor by the
drink in that election. Unfortunate-
ly, the voters in little towns like
Winterville were able to tip the
balance in favor of the dry forces.
This time its a new ball game,
however. Only voters who reside
within the city of Greenville will be
allowed to vote. Considering that
Greenville residents voted over-
whelmingly in favor of it last time
there is little doubt that it will pass.
Liquor by the drink will provide
many benefits to the Greenville
community. The quality of life will
be ereatlv enhanced. More and bet-
ter rebiaui dill.
.it lv
IC cUiii
munity. That is probably the most
noticeable benefit aside from the tax
revenues.
Tax revenue generated by the sale
of mixed drinks benefits all in the
society, including those who wish to
force their archaic morals on others.
The increased cost of the liquor-per-
drink adds to the prohibitive quality
of the system. This should certainly
pacify our prohibitionist neighbors.
The night life took a definite up-
ward turn in Chapel Hill, Raleigh,
Greensboro, Charlotte, Wilmington
and all the other towns that voted in
liquor by the drink.
Despite the emotional and
rhetorical charges that have been
made by some members of the
clergy, there will not be imminent
death and destruction if this passes.
Families will not break up, there
won't be drunk drivers at every in-
tersection, and there will not be any
wholesale moral decay.
To hear some of these Neander-
thal, holier-than-thou preachers you
would think that all the world's pro-
blems were rooted in alcohol. Did
not Jesus partake wine?
The economic and social benefits
cannot even bin to be calculated.
A more cosmopolitan atmosphere
would prevail, Greenville would
finally move "Uptown
We encourage every faculty and
staff member to vote in this referen-
dum and support liquor by the
drink. Students who are registered
to vote should also be sure to turn
out. The "university vote" will be
crucial to the passaage of LBD.
TZ �TRIKERc) ARE
SMUTTING DCVIN MORE
FACTORIES-
DAMN
UNICNg THO&E
GREEDY S.O.E:&
VIILL DE&TROY ThE
Free enTerPRi&e
SYSTEM!
ft
�e .2
c
IN PULAND.
LIKE 1
ALWAYS SAY,
IT'S NICE To SEE.
THE WCRK1N6 MAN
gTANpiNG UP
For UiS Rights!
THAT'S THE
SPIRIT OF
CAPITALISM
ttC
c

V
�Iejn'
feQft r-TVffcWfi
Nuclear Devastation
B DAVID ARMSTRONG
Imagine a place where no birds sing,
where streets are drenched in black rain,
and wildflowers, their growth stimulated
by intense radiation, bloom in cruel beauty
even as human beings wither by the
thousands. A macabre science fiction
scenario? No, this is history � Hiroshima
in 1945, in the aftermath of an attack with
a single primitive atomic bomb.
What would be the consequences of an
all-out war with advanced nuclear weapons
in which half a dozen nations were flinging
the world's 16,000 nuclear weapons back
and forth? Would our side "win"? Would
we, as some of President-elect Ronald
Reagan's advisors are assuring him, sur-
vive a nuclear war and go on to rebuild the
country bigger and better than ever? What
would life be like if we did make it through
the fighting?
Those questions were addressed in a re-
cent two-day symposium on the medical
consequences of nuclear war, held in San
Francisco by Physicians for Social Respon-
sibility and the Council for a Liveable
World Education Fund. The unanimous
conclusion of eighteen experts � including
scientists, physicians and retired military
officers � was that the survivors of such a
conflict would envy the dead.
Howard Hiatt, dean of the Harvard
School of Public Health, pointed out that
most medical doctors would be killed in-
stantly in an atomic explosion, and most
hospitals destroyed. Those doctors that
survived the bombing, facing ultra-high
radiation and nearly-depleted medical sup-
plies, would have to work 20-hour days for
15 days to see survivors for a maximum of
15 minutes in a city the size of San Fran-
cisco. The wounded would suffer from
radiation sickness, blindness from looking
at the blast and deafness from hearing it.
They would lack transportation, com-
munications media, food and water, and
would be beset by hordes of insects better
able to withstand radiation. Unlike
Hiroshima, which was rebuilt with aid
from the outside world, devastated cities
would not be reclaimed; there would be no
outside world.
In light of these facts, the very thought
of surviving an all-out nuclear war � the
almost inevitable result of what might
begin as a limited nuclear exchange � is a
pathetic delusion. It makes the drills that
schoolchildren routinely ran in the fifties
� dive under your desk, hands over your
head, eyes shut, wait for three bursts on
the air raid siren signalling an all-clear �
seem like exercises in madness. Ditto for
backyard fallout shelters, a fad of the early
sixties, which, according to one speaker,
would probably serve as ovens in which
people taking refuge would be baked in the
extreme heat of an atomic explosion.
r-Campus Forum
Alumnus Supports Grapplers
Upon discovering that East Carolina
University (ECU) was dropping its
NCAA Wrestling Program, thousands
o students, alumni and supporters have
become deeply concerned. Now, I must
ask why the sport is being dropped?
Is not wrestling one of the worlds sic)
oldest and best forms of competition? Is
this sport not popular in the Olympic
games? Is this not a sport that takes
more dedication and sacrifice than most
others? Have not the ECU wrestling
teams oi the past compiled and (sic) im-
pressive over-all won-loss record and
consistantly beaten the States and
Carolinas?
1 think one can find the answer to
thses questions to be YES. Wrestling is
surely one oi the worlds (sic) oldest
sports, probably originating more than
3,000 years B.C. Even greek (sic) legends
explain the popularity of wrestling
among ancient heroes, and just as the
lighted torch was brought from the
plains of Olympta in Elis, Greece more
than 2,500 years ago, so was Olympic
wrestling.
This sport surely takes more sacrifice
than most other sports, and I can per-
sonally vouch for that. I have par-
ticipated in organized basketball,
baseball, football, track, the wild and
crazy games of rugby and wrestling, and
no other sport can compare to the sport
now on the verge of ECU extinction. As
a recent newspaper article reported, the
ECU Wrestling Program compiled an
"impressive 86-10-3 dual meet record"
from 1966 through 1976. "During that
period. East Carolina never lost to any
Atlantic Coast Conference team
With wrestling so popular in junior
high schools, high schools and small col-
leges, it is going to be a disgrace that a
growing university such as ECU will not
be a participant, and especially at a
period when ECl is striving to become
equal to the teams of the AC C . Just
think how the previous and present
wrestlers must feel that los 10 to 2c
even 60 pounds to devote their time and
talents to ECU. Also, think oi' that
could have been ECU Olymian wrestler,
that will never be!
ATTENTION: Let's go ECU sup-
porters, let your voices be heard as the
sounds of war are heard, for this is
WAR!
OSWELL 1 . Mel AMB. JR.
1980 ECU Alumnus
Prisoner Responds
I want to thank you very much for
printing my letter in your paper. I have
met some really wonderful people from
it, so thanks again.
Would you run this poem in your
paper for me when you have the space. I
just want to thank everyone who took
their time to drop a line to say they care
I write poems all the time so I just
thought maybe you would run this one
for me. Thank you for the tune you look
to print my last letter.
A Special Thanks
This is a special poem,
to all of you out there.
Who look ihe precious time
to let me know you care.
Your many, many letters
brighten up my day.
So I want to thank each oj you,
in this special way.
Way the power oj God be with you,
A smile be on your face.
When they free me from this prison,
I know I'll find my place
KVR1 P RAYNER
Federal Prison
Ashland, Kentucky
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joyner Library.
Tor purposes of verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature oj the authorfs). I etters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neatly printed. Ml let-
ters are subject to editing for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at-
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
i ia s.
Helms Addresses Major Issues
B Sen. JESSE HELMS
WASHINGTON � A few weeks back,
the editor of one of North Carolina's
largest daily newspapers sat down and
turned out an editorial declaring that I lack
compassion for the poor. His editorial
distorted my often-stated conviction that
the food stamp program, for example,
should be confined to the truly needy.
By manipulating facts and figures, he
sought to convince his readers that there is
very little abuse and fraud in the food
stamp program. He was not successful �
at least with dozens of his subscribers who
clipped the editorial and mailed it to me
along with their own comments about
what they themselves have personally
witnessed.
Still, such misleading journalism is not
helpful in trying to bring under control the
runaway federal programs and their ex-
plosive cost to the taxpayers.
ANOTHER � Another big-city
newspaper in North Carolina contrived a
threat from a New York Congressman that
he would fight the tobacco program if 1
persisted in my efforts to trim food stamp
spending. For three days, headlines in
newspapers across North Carolina pro-
claimed that I had placed the tobacco pro-
gram in peril.
The other newspapers had picked up the
original story from the Raleigh paper.
Nobody checked with me until the contriv-
ed story had run its course.
I suppose a great many North Caroli-
nians still tfo not know that the Con-
gressman from New York called me, and
assured me that he had no intention of
Tighting the tobacco program. He told me
that the Raleigh newspaper had contacted
him and given him a false account of what
1 had actually said about the food stamp
program. When he learned what 1 had
said, he agreed with me � and promised
his help in trying to limit the program to
the truly needy.
HEAT � Harry Truman once said that
those who can't stand the heat ought to
stay out of the kitchen. I agree with that. I
knew, when I ran for the Senate, that 1
would be subjected to attacks and criticism
by the liberal editors of big-city
newspapers in my own state, and
elsewhere. This doesn't bother me per-
sonally. It does bother me that some
editors may be doing great harm to the
political process, and to the cause of zood
government.
At one time or another, I think 1 have in-
vited most of the editors in my state to call
me if they have questions about something
I have done or said. I have yet to receive an
inquiry from any of the editors to whom I
have extended the invitation. One editor.
in fact, published an editorial declaring
that I am a "rude" and "crude" man
because I commented that I would not be
intimidated by the threats of a northern
congressman, and because I suggested that
the tobacco program is not in any peril.
FOOD STAMPS � I mention all of
this, not to pick a fight with the editors
who constantly publish their criticism of
me, but to suggest again that they may
want to call me occasionally and consider
both sides of the disagreement � whether
it be in connection with the food stamp
program or anything else.
Meanwhile, I am convinced that most
North Carolinians want me to do what 1
have been doing to reduce the cost oi
government. And since the food stamp
program is at issue now, 1 would mention
that just four years ago, this one program
alone cost the taxpayers $5.7 billion. For
the current fiscal year, it will cost nearly
SI 1 billion � an increase of 90 per cent in
"our years.
The eligibility requirements for the pro-
gram are so loose that one out oi every
seven Americans todav is eligible for free
food stamps.
I've prepared a somewhat detailed state-
ment about the program, and my goals to
limit it to the truly needy. If you would like
a copy, drop me a note
I TOLD YOU TO KEEP YOUR WIDE TfEg.
TOLD You TO gAVE THE WIN6HP&.
TOLD YOU TO TOcbcb THE BElHJoTtgmS.
BuT, No! YoV Thought the democrats
WOULD BE J IN POWER FoREvER!
i
I
.





I
i HI AM t KOl IN1AN
Features
JANUARY 8, 1981
Page 5
History Of ECU To Be Written
H Mil 1 AM K.SHIRES
Ml m� Bureau
When an official histor) oi I asi
C arolina t niversit) is written, it will
be the fulfillment of a dream of
Miss I mma I Hooper, the inn
lad who was "unofficial" historian
o! the institution's first 60 years.
It was a blushing Emma Hooper
who. a yeat before her retirement
atter M years on the faculty, receiv-
ed a kis- on st:c tor having penned
a moving historical pageant to mark
the school's Golden Anniversary.
It was 1 mma Hooper who, dur-
' ing English com
pos; tnd encouraging literary
pre. full) collected
and documents
whii 'iicw would be invaluable
some da in reconstructing East
i. a - I) yeai s
ci occasions, she was
asked i e the histor) herself,
and ned in Greenville for
two yea i retirement working
on the at her own expense.
Bv thei - as 70. But after going
"home" to Memphis, lenn in
1961 i foi another 10
- stopped her.
Now Miss H 92 years old
has donated to the
university her voluminous and
treasured papers, including an un-
finished 1,300-page narrative, in the
hope that finally a history will be
completed and published.
"I wish there were more 1 could
do to expedite the plan for comple-
tion of a history on the founding
and development of the university
Miss Hooper says.
ECU, in turn, has commissioned
a faculty historian. Dr. Mary Jo
Bratton, to research and write an of-
ficial one-volume history to be com-
pleted in 1982, coinciding with the
75th anniversary of ECU's foun-
ding.
Chancellor Thomas B. Brewer
has assured Miss Hooper that "your
contribution to this momentous
project will be suitably com-
memorated upon publication of the
book.
Professor Bratton said Miss
Hooper's manuscript and her other
materials will be "of great value" in
assembling the history.
"In the absence of university ar-
chives, the initial work in preparing
a history of East Carolina has in-
volved the discovery, location and
identification of various records
Or. Bratton said.
When shipped here. Miss
Miss Kmma 1 Hooper (left), a facult member for 34 years, has donated
her papers and manuscripts, records and documents to East Carolina
I niersit for preparation of an official historv of the university to be
published in 1982. The Mork will be researched and written by Marv Jo
Bratton (right), an ECU history professor.
Hooper's papers tilled two large
boxes � 15 cubic feet � and in ad-
dition to the manuscript history in-
cluded original papers, drafts,
notes, clippings, printed materials
and other related papers. These
have now become the propertv of
ECU and are being arranged and
will be maintained permanently in
the university's Manuscript Collec-
tion.
Miss Hooper meanwhile is being
kept informed of progress of the
project through university officials
and friends. She lives in Memphis
(at Wesley Highland Manor, a
geriatric high rise) with a sister, Lot-
tie, who is 97 years old, and a
brother, Ervin, who is 87.
She was born in Mississippi and
graduated from Mississippi State
College for Women (MSCW) at
Columbus, Miss and taught school
in Mississippi. In 1924 after com-
pleting her master's degree in
English at the University of
Virginia, she joined the faculty of
what then was East Carolina
Teachers College under its first
president. Dr. Robert H. Wright.
She remained on the faculty
under five presidents, for 34 years,
making her home in faculty apart-
ments in Ragsdale Hall where she
stored her collection of historical
documents in a trunk.
In 1958, however, Miss Hooper
wrote another, entitled "East
Carolina Spade: To Serve a four-
episode pageant based on her
records and documents. It was
presented on May 3 and 4, 1958,
and when Miss Hooper was called to
take a bow, she was given a hug and
kiss by the president, Dr. John D.
Messick. Friends recall that she
blushed shyly.
The spade described in the
pageant was the one used by Gov.
Thomas J. Jarvis when ground was
broken for the first six campus
buildings in ceremonies on July 2,
1908. The original spade, now a
piece of ECU memorabilia, was sav-
ed from discard by Miss Hooper's
long-time friend, Agnes Barrett of
Greenville, who also assisted Miss
Hooper's salvage of many papers
and records. Mrs. Barrett served as
secretary to several East Carolina
presidents and as secretary to its
Board of Trustees.
She recalls that when an ad-
ministration of a president changed
or a new Board of Trustees came in.
many old records were marked to be
thrown away. However, she stored
them in the trunk of her car for Miss
Hooper's use.
About a year ago, Miss Hooper
wrote to Agnes Barnett that her
heart was "full of gratitude for all
you have done She was so en-
couraged, she wrote, that "I began
again my long-held incomplete
history of the first sixty years of
East Carolina University I am sit-
ting now in the midst of what I am
trusting will � I'm afraid to use to
the word too soon � will be the
history

0
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"
Chance Meeting
Soviet Geologist Visits Friend
�pBi�� � ?
JTcv
- - 'V i
A n Old Flame
Resembling an old-fashioned bomb, this flare burns near the site of ome repair work on campus.
Musical Hit All That Jazz:
Semester's First Free Flick
light at
. Mendenhall Stu-
11 ndrix T'hcatre, the
! ilms Committee
with Bob
"All That
b) student ID
Mendenhall
Membership Card.
an awful lot ot
i hat la Direc-
� ; i- been accused ot
in genius to egotism
lit) t self-indulgence
ness. I hat's all right:
iible reaction to this
'table movie is a
people want ratings: is
Grea I ail ' Awful'7 One
e's many, showbiz take-offs
'All I hat Jazz" is a W review
rates movies on a tour ballon
1 osse's film is in tact about a
who can ide how many
tons to give his own disordered
who doesn't know how to come
to terms with himself. "All That
lazz" i n us, reckless, sub-
tle, ton, embarrassing: how do
you sum up these colliding, con-
tradictor) qualities in one rating?
Despite I osse's disclaimers, "All
I ha? la" is probably the most
kedly autobiographical movie
ever made, and that's a crucial part
� Its here, Joe Gideon
(Roj Scheider), is a famous
.rapher director in his early
I man who's reached the
overload point nf too much work,
women, booze, cigarettes, uppers
and increasing doubts about the
value ot his entire life.
Gideon is editing his film about a
comic, while rehearsing a new
Broadway show in which his ex-
wife, Audrey (Leland Palmer), is
starring. At the same time, he's try-
ing to be a reasonable father to his
12-year-old daughter, Michelle
(Erzsebel Foldi), trying not to hurt
his girlfriend Kate (Ann Reinking)
too much, and trying to get into the
leotards of as many girls as possible,
especially Victoria's (Deborah Geff-
ner).
All this jazz is too much; Joe suf-
fers a heart attack and undergoes
open-heart surgery. These events
echo fosse's own life; he was editing
his film "Lenny" and rehearsing his
Broadwav show "Chicago starr-
ing his ex-wife, Gwen Verdon, when
he had a serious heart attack that
resulted in open-heart surgery.
Fosse is using his own life, his own
consciousness, to explore the
psychological and moral territories
of bad faith and inner conflict.
"Ail That Jazz" has another
dimension, a fantasy realm presided
over by Angelique (Jessica Lange), a
mvstenous figure in white who
represents Joe Gideon's final com-
euppance; she is death seen as
Woman, whose beauty and power
have always been at the center of
Joe's (and fosse's) life and art.
With this Felliniesque dream-
figure, Gideon revisits his past; we
see the 14-year-old Joe at the cheap
Burlesque joints where he was a kid
dancer, studying Latin backstage
and being sexually teased by the
vulgar but desirable strippers.
This, too, comes out of Fosse's
own life; these childhood ex-
periences made him deeply am-
bivalent about show business, about
dancing, about women, about art
and sex and desire and love and
glory and filth. Some have dismiss-
ed "All That .la" as an egotripp-
ing, public catharsis, but Joe Gi-
deon becomes a representative
figure of our time, a man more
honest than most in his self-doubt,
self-questioning, self-loathing, self-
love.
By Will 1AM A SHIRES
K Sr�s Burrau
Ihev worked together last sum-
mer beside an icy blue lake rimmed
by high mountains in far-off Outer
Mongolia and formed a friendship
that reached around the globe.
And then, by chance, they came
together again this Christmas season
and reminisced before a freshly-
trimmed tree in the warmth of a
Greenville home � Last Carolina
University geologist Stan Riggs and
Russian scientist Andrei llyin.
While llyin was here on a brief,
unscheduled visit, he and Riggs
toured the phosphate mining and
processing complex of Texasgulf
Inc at Aurora, N.C and marveled
at the contrasts from last summer in
Mongolia.
Mongolia's phosphates occur in
very hard .rocks of Pre-Cambrian
geologic age, perhaps 600 million
years old, and in a region which,
although spectacularly beautiful, is
almost inaccessible.
North Carolina's phosphate
deposits occur in relatively young
Miocene age sands, between 13 and
17 million years old, which can be
scooped with a shovel.
"I'm greatly impressed llyin
said. "I'm impressed by the abun-
dance and location, and by the
technology of the many processes
and products. It is truly im-
pressive
Riggs and llyin met for the first
time last June when Riggs, a
member of a team of world scien-
tists studying the earth's phosphate
deposits, visited the Soviet Union.
Their adventure into remote Central
Asia began in Moscow.
"I had heard of Dr. Riggs, of
course said llyin, research
geologist of the Institute of
L ithosphere, Moscow. "I had read
his works. But I had never met
him
Via the Trans-Siberian railway,
the scientists traveled to Ulan Bator,
capital of the Mongolian Soviet
Republic, and thence to the pic-
turesque Lake Khubsugul region, a
zone of mountain taiga at about
6,000 feet elevation, reachable only
by primitive and muddy trails.
"It is one of the most spectacular
spots I have ever seen says Riggs.
"Incredible beauty
llyin was executive secretary for
the field seminar in which 40
geologists and staff engaged in
geological mapping and explora-
tions in Mongolia. Half of the
dozen lecturers were from the Soviet
Union and half from other coun-
tries. Some developing nations were
also represented.
"We put together a super good
trip llyin said. "It was a difficult
trip to make, but it was well
organized
The geological project is spon-
sored by the International
Geological Correlation Program
and UNESCO. Earlier studies were
conducted in Australia and in
February the geologists will go to
the lower Baja peninsula in Mexico
and next November to India.
llyin came to the United States in
connection with publication of the
seminar proceedings last summer.
While in New York, arrangements
were made and permission granted
for his trip to Greenville and the
Pamlico River phosphate operation.
The Soviet Union has phosphate
reserves bat imports large quan-
tities. A contract with U.S. tycoon
Armand Hammer of Occidental
Petroleum Co. provides for ship-
ment of a million tons of Florida
phosphates to the Russian port of
Odessa. The same ships bring liquid
ammonia to the U.S llyin said.
In the Khubsugul Lake region of
Mongolia, the geologists lived for
two weeks in tents. While in the
field, they drove jeep-like vehicles
which often became stuck in the
mud from thawing permafrost.
Mongolian riders on shaggy ponies
delivered food to the camps and
then would laugh at the plight of the
scientists trying to pull vehicles from
muddy ruts.
"Do you remember the sound of
our hammers on those rocks?"
Riggs asked llyin at an ECU geology
departmental Christmas party. "On
those very old, very hard rocks, it
was a sound like you've never heard
before
But for a little while, Riggs and ll-
yin remembered hearing the ring
and reverberation of a hammer
striking rock in far-off Mongolia.
Southern Cooking:
Real Good Eatin'
Roy Scheider appears in a fantasy sequence in All That Jazz, this weekend's
Free Flick. The moie shows in the Hendrix Theatre at 5,7 and 9 pm this
Fridav and Saturday.
"I wanna go home. Lord, 1 wan-
na go home agin Every time I
bite into a Big Mac or another
deluxe everything-but-the-kitchen-
sink pizza, I long to be back in
mama's kitchen.
Even when we travel and end up
in one of those coat and tie places
where the waiters don't speak
English and we munch out on beef
Wellington or some sort of crazy
crepes I still wanna go home.
Roast duck, braised lamb, and
cherries jubilee make yankees and
scalawags (southerners who act and
think like yankees) froth and foam
at the mouth. But friends, let me tell
you what good eaan' really is
You get up in the morning (at my
house, that's when little brother
comes in and says "mama says its
time to get up and eat) and smell
that country ham frying and you
hear the biscuit pan sliding in the
stove. Throw in some fried apples, a
couple of fried eggs, some good
milk gravy (or a little redeye, if you
prefer) and some blackberry
preserves and any native southerner
Robert
Swaim
thinks he has died and gone to
heaven. The hell with eggs benedict
and hash browns. Oh, by the way.
don't forget the grits.
Now that's eatin If your grand-
daddy could cure hams like mine,
could then you know what I'm talk-
ing about.
When dinner time (also known as
lunch to those of foreign persua-
sion) rolls around promptly at
noon, you can generally count on a
hefty plate or two of some
delicacies.
Pork and poultry are the
mainstays of a true North Caroli-
nian's diet. Dinner time might pro-
duce tried chicken or maybe some
See SOUTHERN, page 6, col. 7





P THEgAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8, 1981
LeAUitHb 6�jt Cou.eGe mr Hp lwy
By Plvip Aloft fits
Southern Cooking:
Real Good Eatin'
Vacation Ends, School Starts
By DAVID NORMS
imam f-ditor
When it rains, it
pours. As soon as you
get through Christmas
and New Year's Day,
it's time to travel back
to school and start
another semester.
I had a hard time
packing the stuff I
wanted to take back
with me to school. Part
of the trouble was
packing books I'd
taken home that 1
thought I was going to
read over the holidays
School Of Art
Plans To Hold
National Show
The School of Art,
East Carolina Universi-
ty, announces a juried
national competition
for original works of
paper including draw-
ings, watercolors,
prints, photographs,
mixed media and hand-
made works on paper.
The deadline for en-
try of three slides for
the competition is Jan.
16. Accepted entries
must be received bv
March 2.
Entries should be
submitted to: ECU Na-
tional Competition:
Works on Paper, East
Carolina University
Museum of Art, Fifth
Street, Greenville, N.C.
27834. Entry fee for up
to three slides is $10.
Up to $7,000 will be
provided by the co-
sponsoring ECU
School of Medicine for
purchase awards.
Juried entries will be
displayed in a show
March 23-April 12 at
the ECU School of Art.
Juror for the com-
petition will be Edward
B. Henning, Chief
Curator of Modern Art
at the Cleveland
Museum of Art.
Cleveland, O h i o.
Richard H. Laing,
Dean of the School of
Art, said up to 3,000
entries are anticipated
prior to jurying.
It will be the first
such national competi-
tion conducted by the
School of Art, Laing
said. "We are en-
thusiastic about it and
the potential to come
down to really good
works for the show,
and purchase Laing
said.
Auditions Held
For Getting Out
Ml Nr�,Burr�u
Auditions for the
East Carolina
Playhouse production
of Marsha Norman's
award-winning Off
Broadway drama,
"Getting Out will be
held on Monday and
Tuesday, January 12
and 13. Auditions will
be conducted in the
Studio Theatre at 7:30
p.m. each evening.
"Getting Out" con-
tains roles for 7 men
and 5 women. Audi-
tions are open to East
Carolina students,
faculty and staff and to
members of the local
community.
The play is about a
once violent young
women named Arlene,
and her first 24 hours
out of prison. Its main
character is played by
two actresses, each at
different stages of her
life. Arlene is the older,
newly rehabilitated
parolee and Arlie is the
original Arlene, the
young savage teenager
who commits murder
and is sent to prison.
While Arlene tries to
deal with her new life,
Arlie is exploding in-
side her, or � from the
audience's point of
view � all around her
on stage. Other
characters include Ben-
nie, a guard who quit
the prison service when
Arlene was released
and intends to go on
keeping her company;
Arlene's mother, a
violent, selfish woman;
Carl, her former lover
and pimp who wants
her back; and Ruby, a
neighbor who has also
been in prison and is
making the readjust-
ment to outside life.
"Getting Out" was
voted the best new play
in 1978 by the
American Theatre
Critics Association.
The ECU Playhouse
production is directed
by faculty member
Cedric Winchell. Per-
formances will be
February 18-21 and
23-28, 1981.
Visit
THE MUSHROOM
Hot A Special Gift For Someone Special
"Good thingi for gentle people"
On the Mall Downtown Greenville
some pleasant things,
too. One nice thing is
seeing all your old
school friends again,
and hearing about the
various Christmas ex-
periences everyone had.
My most interesting
experience of the entire
holiday season didn't
occur until I returned
to ECU. I found out
some friends from here
had tried to call me
over the holidays while
they were visiting my
town. They called the
operator and asked for
my number. The
operator insisted that
my family did not exist,
so my friends never
found me. (I think the
phone company has it
in for us.)
Most of the rest of
my vacation was fairlv
and never opened.
(After bringing them
back with me, I pro-
bably won't read them
this semester, either.)
I had only limited
space for bringing back
records, so I had to suf-
fer through the heart-
breaking task of
deciding which records
I was going to have to
leave at home. It's ter-
rible to get an album
for Christmas and then
not have room to bring
it back with you.
Although there are
depressing sights to be
seen in this post-
Christmas season (what
can be sadder than see-
ing dumpsters full of
brown Christmas trees,
shredded wrapping
paper and broken
presents?), there are
uninteresting. I had
planned to draw a
pastel picture of the
Christmas tree, since
the colors and patterns
of the lights inspired
me. By the time I found
my pastels and paper,
the tree had been
thrown out.
I had a strange
dream over the
holidays. In it, I was
thrown in jail, but the
jail they took me to was
ECU. I'm just glad I
wasn't having another
nightmare about being
back in high school.
I also saw a Partridge
family show with Far-
rah Fawcett in it.
Getting back to the
old routine of school
after the break is going
to take some adjust-
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ment. Sleeping until
one or two in the after-
noon will be difficult
without a very unusual
class schedule.
Continued from page 5
of that roast pork from supper the
night before. Of course, nobody can
sit down at the table without some
kind of bread. Biscuits and corn-
bread are usually the order of the
day, both at dinner and supper.
Now some greens, either collards or
turnips, will sit real nice with that
chicken or roast pork. Then, you
generally have one or two more har-
dy vegetables, like yams, blackeye
peas, fresh corn, or maybe some
fried okra. Top that off with some
real sweet ice tea and some cobbler,
peach, cherry, or blackberry.
UUUmmmGOOD.
Then with your coffee you might
have some banana pudding or pecan
pie. Follow all of this at the end of
the day with a good stiff bourbon
and water, or just plain bourbon if
you want, and maybe a touch of
blackberry wine for the ladies who
partake. Friends, that's what you
call high Iivin
Along about five or six o'clock,
it's time for supper, the last
hedonistic ritual of the day involv-
ing food. Supper is kind of a second
dinner since the foods for either
meal are interchangeable. You will
again have either biscuits or corn-
bread, if you're lucky. Then a baked
ham, pork chops, or maybe chicken
and dumplins (dumplins in the pied-
mont, pastry in the east) will be a
good starter. Macaroni and cheese,
pinto beans cooked with plenty of
side meat or fatback, stewed cab-
bage, and maybe some peas or corn
on the cob wili do you right.
Don't it make you wanna go
home?
STB ST.ATOX 11
tF THE SOUTHEAST
-V'7

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rHL LAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 8, 1981
$ Donna Coleman
To Give Recital
This Tuesday
Ml Sf��Burnu
Pianist Donna Col-
eman of the East
Carolina University
School of Music faculty
will perform Charles
Ives's Second Piano
Sonata Tuesday, Jan.
13, at the Fletcher
Music Center Recital
Hall.
The program,
scheduled for 8:15
p.m is free and open
to the public.
The Ives second
sonata is not only the
Connecticut-born com-
poser's longest, but
also his "most am-
bitious and most
demanding work for
the piano noted Ms.
Coleman.
The sonata's subtitle,
"Concord, Mass
1840-60 suggests in
musical sounds the
spirit and character of
N cw E n c 13 n d
Discarded after the end of Christmas festivities, this tinsel-decked tree brings xrons.enpnt i;
holidav cheer to a dumpster.
Pholo h ION IORIHS
Decorated Dumpster
philosophy, with each
movement named for a
major writer of the
period. Ives wrote the
work between 1902 and
1915, but continued to
revise it until its
publication in the early
1920's.
An active champion
of Ives's music, Ms.
Coleman performed
the Ives First Sonata
for Piano in Alice Tully
Hall, Lincoln Center, a
program sponsored by
the Rockefeller Foun-
dation.
During the past year
she also performed solo
concerts and lecture-
recitals in Croton-on-
Hudson. N.Y Tar-
ry town, N.Y. and at
UNC-Chapel Hill.
She will continue
performing and lectur-
ing this year at various
U.S. campuses, with
emphasis upon Ives and
other contemporary
American composers.
Pianist Donna coleman of the ECU School of Music faculty will perfrom Charles Ives' Second Piano
Sonata Tuesday, Jan. 13 at 8:15 pm in the Fletcher Music Center Recital Hall.
Seventeen Evening Courses Offered
H I St�� Burriu
A total of seventeen
courses will be offered
on weekday evenings
through East Carolina
University College dur-
ing spring semester.
The courses include
freshman, sophomore
and junior-senior level
classes in English com-
position, business ad-
ministration.
In Praise Of Vacations
Some Thoughts On Being Out Of School
B MIKKHK.HSMUH
M�ff V.rtlrr
Thank Cod for vacations! The are the best
wa to release all those pent up tensions that tend
to build up after a semester full of such fun things
as tests, reports, projects, homework, quizzes,
oral presentations, and static from pi rs.
Much of this anxiety is the direct result of the last
two weeks of the semester, when the days seem to
get much shorter and final exams aie imminent.
This is the time of the year when students are busy
rushing to accomplish what they have put off un-
til the last minute, like finally getting down to
reading those 15 chapters t exam in two
days. I'm not aware of an studies that have been
made on student procrastination, but at exam
time it is highly visible here at 1I
I'm inclined to believe that more ulcers are
caused by final exams than b an other activity
that can be imagined. Another majoi anxiety
ducer at the end of the semester are those in-
famous oral presentations. Pm not too familiar
with the other departments, but I've noticed that
many Business professors seem to be obsessed
with assigning group presentations to be given on
the last couple days of the semester, as if we
didn't have enough on our minds to drive us
crazy. It seems to me that they consciously do
that to us so that they can get out oi having to
give us lectures on those days. I've also noticed
that no matter how well prepared 1 am tor the
presentation, my mind will go blank as soon as I
step in front of the class
I love to sit on the wall and watch the facial ex-
pressions of students around exam tune. Faces
which were once full of optimism and content are
replaced with zombie-eved, almost panic-stricken
expressions. Sometimes it is almost difficult to
carry on a decent conversation with someone
whose only train of thought lies in trying to pull a
D average up to a B. 1 have learned from previous
experience that it is little benefit to do last minute
cramming for an exam, you miss a lot of great
parties by having to bury yourself in the books.
I'm sure that everyone is familiar with pulling
those famous "all nighters where you study
continuously through the night and go straight to
the exam without getting any sleep. I've only pull-
a couple oi those, since I found that I can
make it up until about two hours before test time,
when it becomes all I can do just to keep from
passing out. All nighters tend to mess up your
equilibrium, and it takes about two days to get
back to normal.
Which brings me to the joy of vacations after
the agony of exams. I would like to shake the
hand of the person who invented the vacation.
Without vacations, we would be a hyper, irritable
race of human beings; and the word "relaxation"
would not be a word in our vocabulary.
Different people tend to spend their vacations
in different ways. Some people like to travel
around, spending money and sightseeing.
Although that sounds very nice, it has always
been too expensive for me to do. Other people
like to 'ravel to a certain place and stay there for a
while, like spending a week in Florida. These peo-
ple either have buku bucks to blow, or they have
friends on the beach that will put them up (or put
up with them) for a week. A less expensive means
of enjoying a vacation lies in going camping in the
mountains, or rock climbing. This form of
recreation appeals more to the nature-loving type
that enjoys being in the great outdoors. As for
myself, I would rather participate in this activity
during the warmer weather, such as Spring Break,
and use the cold weather vacations for spending
some time with the family and old high school
buddies.
Vacation breaks are the only time I get to spend
more than just a weekend back in Fayetteville to
catch up on the latest developments of my old
high school gang. It seems that every time I make
it back home, another one of my friends got mar-
ried, or thrown in jail, or joined the army. I've
noticed that when I go back home, no matter how
much things have changed on the surface, my
high school friends that stayed in Fayetteville
after graduation are still doing and saying the
same things we did and said five and six years
ago. I keep trying to tell them that there is more
to life than talking about cars, drugs, girls, and
going to get more beer.
The first few days back home are the best. My
parents are glad to see me and I even get to sug-
gest a menu of my favorite dinners for my mom
to prepare, to sort of get me back in Un i v
the home cooking that I've been missing for a few
months (she has got to be the greatest cook in the
world, or so my taste buds have been telling me).
Also, when it comes time to head back to Green-
ville, I tend to clean the cupboards and
refrigerator bare of all food that isn't nailed
down. My mom has come to expect this, so for
the past couple of years she has provided me with
frozen stuff to bring with me back to Greenville;
such as frozen homemade TV dinners, froen
spaghetti sauce, vegetables, and other foods that
will give me a taste of home away from home.
Floyd G. Robinson
Jewelers
Greenville's
SEIKO Watch Headquarters
Diamonds Loose and Mounted
Gold-Filled, Sterling,
and 14K Gold Jewelry
Cash Paid for Diamonds and Gold
Dealers for J.O. Pollock
Fraternity & Sorority Jewelry
Floyd G. Robinson
Mike Robinson
Valerie Harris Jo Sparrow
Phone 758-2452
Independent Jewelers
A
O. for $2.00 f
Arby's Roast Beef Jj
Sandwiches 9
-X?is2�
I
11 r
IIN - vald with any

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for $2.22
by's Beef N
heddar
andwiches
-imit one coupon per customer Valid through f
.5
m
K0H-I-N00R
Drawing Set
y
s
m
6 "Compass
4V2 "Compass
6 "Divider
Ruling Pen
and Parts
$19.00
Available First Day Of Class, Jan. 12 At:
Studekt Supply Store
Wright Building
Owned ond Operated by Eost CoroHno Unrverjrty
psychology,
geography, history,
mathematics, art ap-
preciation, economics,
sociology, health,
music appreciation,
political science, ac-
counting and speech.
University College
classes are open to full-
time and part-time
students, and are
especially designed for
working adults unable
ARMY MAW STORE
BiCkMcm � IS Bomh�r ?
Field, Occk. Flight Snorkel �
Jackets. PhcmIi Parkas.
S�ts. CiJRfcat "
is s -
to attend daytime
classes.
More than 100 addi-
tional evening classes
are offered through the
regular campus pro-
grams, on Monday-
Thursday evenings.
Further information
about University Col-
lege courses is available
from the Division of
Continuing Education,
Erwin Hall, ECU,
Greenville, N.C
telephone 757)6324.
SAAD'SSHOI
1 i Grande -w
758-1228
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Mm order J2 00 lOS. Delivery charge
Orders over J20.00 Delivered Free
r
J.BS ISLAND
SEAFOOD
1
Serving the finest selections from the sea
prepared "island" style. Raw, Steamed, Bak
ed and Broiled to your delight.
East 10th Street Rivergate Shopping Center
Greenville 752 1275
Open Tuesday
thru Sunday
BEVERAGES SERVED 4:30
till Midnight � Dining
from 5:30 p.m. till 10:30 p.m.
?.
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Menu
Sot valid with any other coupm Valid mh, paniapannAK - �
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12" cheese $3.85
16" cheese $5 60
Domino's Deluxe
5 items for the price of 4
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12" Deluxe $6 85
16" Deluxe $10.20
The Vegi
5 items for the price of 4
Mushrooms. Olives.
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and Double Cheese
12" Vegi $6 85
16" Vegi $10 20
Additional Items
Pepperoni
Mushrooms
Ham
Onions
Anchovies
Green Peppers
Olives
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Ground Beef
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Double Cheese
Extra Thick Crust
12" pizza75 per item
16" pizza $115 per item
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Our drivers carry less
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Limited delivery area
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� i m � iMweMRv 8 w pweBi n "v
� � �





Ill 1 sl i. Ki 11
Sports
i-
��
I
Giant-Killer Pan Am Here Saturday
Pirates Down UNC-W, Host Power
B CHARLES CHANDLER
sport E4ifcH
Fresh from a big 72-64 victor) al
UNC-Wilmington, the East
Carolina basketball team now faces
the task ot hosting national power
Pan American on Saturday, follow-
ing a home matchup with rejuvinanl
I N( Asheville tonight (Thursday).
I he win over Wilmington was
paced by newcomer Charles
Watkins, who tallied 21 points, and
junioi David I nderwood, who add
ed 19 1 orward Mark Mel aurin was
the only other Pirate in double
figures, scoring 12
E I head coach Dave dom said
the win wa
rl
ne
Pii a "It's always tough to play
at W ilmington h "W e put a
lot ot emphasis on the game
bee; its timing, it could be the
on
. the f;
I
n the
thai th
ning
I w a s v e r
pla dun,
"We
' e
-
Morris Harerove Rebounds
win. "I: was by fai the best full
game we've played this year
I tie Pirates, now 5 6, host IV
Asheville tonight. Asheville is 6-6
but has lost several close games,
namel) a mere seven-point setback
to perenial power I ;N( -Charlotte.
Odom is quite familiar with one
o! Asheville's prime weapons, 6-10
center Pat Jolley. dom recruited
Jolley to Wake forest several
seasons ago but the big guv decided
just bet ore the season began
isfer, and now stars foi
Asheville.
Following the Asheville game,
odom Pirates will face giant-killer
Pan merican in Minges Coliseum
Saturday i. - ' ' 1 ipol I time is
0 p.m.
Pan m, 8 4, had a torrid streak
m December in which the club pull-
�' a number of surprising
els.
()n 1 ecembei is. Pan Am went
to New Mexi o State and came away
a 77-73 win, ending a 2game
' - eak for NMSl
followed two day
len Pan An; dow ried W k
N A to irnamem team a
b a 83-82 ma:
State is now 9 1, a ith the
. against Pan Am.
P ' n was aKo very im
sive in the Rainbow Classic in
tic Coastonference
Clemson won the Journey
Pan Am i
e
Pan Am opened the tout ne ��
a 7! 70 w Mai
quette and then li I lawaii,
79 75, in the semi finals. I lie i
then came ba � I 15th-
ranked Indiana in th
game, 66-60
1 hough the t I in
the event. Pan An Ken dree;
6-9 center-forward, vn led the
tourney's MVP. i 1 20
points and til
the tournamei
"I've ' it in
the country tha n at
: Round Iw draft'
(dom noted. "Hi go in
Round ():
For the sea
20 7 po
game iua
cond leading
average
New w;
Pirates with a:
Mel aurin
avei .
'
E

was las! se 1'

club th

"Pe :


w r


Lady Bucs Impressive
In Holiday Tourneys
B J1MM DuPKM-
��'� ���� athletic
consolation Rley, had I tones
"We were very, very i d with tributed 11 to the Pirate ettort.
the defense tl 1 asi arolina' l �pe of a
:
.



.
"Out
. . a as
.
k foi Hei. '
"I ide 11 he Lad a
addulai
� ' 1 '�� keted the t ina. . 75 66 v icto: Decen
nECl point1 ht . Pirates' next adventi
via . � � Andi ii.Next Week:
. '
n u- inten U a
nst Indiana He: ' ime and she le � ic tal1 through an pei iup with Massachusettswith ECU Athletic Din tor ken Karr will ap-
: . - the endth an ss 64 victory behind Kathypear in a two-part feature
Denkler continued to shine ffe . the I ady Pirate 75 i the Polish National team in 1 semifinals, as she scored 2Riley's season-high 31 tnd Sam lories' 25. 1 he 1 ady Pirates ha hei . . ing Nor! rn in thebeginning Tuesday. Dr. karr will a sonu the controversial matters
1 grabbed 14 rebounds.that have arisen in the
I he 1 ady Pirates earned a hard-win with Deishort period been
76- 75 o ei time icto Wesl (viding late heroics. Denkler I 12;at ('I
I ndenvood Sets
Pirate
Coaches
Resign
i a
Ed Emor a need I
staff, Jim (
1 re-
ippointing 4
he-
er :
Kathy Riley Puts One I p
�r 11 y

ed .
on.
�' These two coaches have re
their positions
ortunities
"We wish them h
and appree i
our program
working
Neither ot the I ��
ed, but it is believe
is interested in bec
coach.
1 mory as know
"Henry se
I asi
Emon said. "1 d I �
what he'll do now b
- aspira
tach somed
Emory sa
probably remain
area and gel into bit
No successoi s foi ! v:t v a
lions hae bee
Newcomer Watkins A Gift For Odom
Have a nice C hristmas? II nobody
else did there is one man on the
It campus that most certainly
had an enjoyable holidav.
I hat man is Pirate hea ket-
ball coach Dave Odor His
came in the form of a young man b
the name ot Charles Watkins.
Watkins will almost surely be a gift
Odom may never forget and will
Odom
always treasure.
Watkms entered school at ECU
tor the current spring semester on a
basketball scholarship. I he 6 3 New
Orleans, 1 a native had jusi finish-
ed a fout yeai tenure in the I' S.
Marine C orps before em oiling here.
What Watkms has done in his
first four games as a Pirate seem to
indicate that his careei at EC U will
be one to be remembered for a long
time.
Watkins saw his first action in the
I Imitv Classic on December 2.
H !allied nine points and two re
bounds in 21 minutes of playing
time in the team's 80 loss to Iowa
State.
In the tourney's consolation game
against Brown, Watkins got ins first
starting call and tallied 14 points in
25 minutes.
I he Pirate ame ba k aftei two
losses in the tournament to claim
wins over Campbell and I N
Wilmington. In those two games
Watkins scored 22 and 21 points,
respectively. He played most of
both contests and now leads the
team in scoring with a 16.5 average
Watkins, 24 years ol age. adds
much-needed maturity to the
Pirates. His smooth style will awe
many an opponent this season.
"Charles really has done amaz
mglv well Odom said. "Heck, he
has played in more games than he
has practices. He's not in step with
the team vet He and the other
players are still feeling each other
out. I guess you could say lie's get-
ting on-the-job training
Odom noted that Watkms has a
growing reputation His name is ap-
pearing more and more frequently
in some of the state's top
newspapers. A Raleigh columnist
called him a "real prize tor Dave
Odom
Ot course, one should not become
too excited at the recent exploits of
Watkins He still has much to go
through. As his reputation grows,
so will the intensity of opposing
players defending him.
No doubt, though, Watkins has
enormous potential. One long-time
1I fan called him "potentially the
Charles
Chandler
-
best thing Easl Carolina basketball
has ever had
I he question ol whether Watkins
can continue his exploits and reach
such potential will begin to be
answered this Saturday night when
the Pirates host national power Pan
American.
1 CU's January 24 meeting with
N.C. State takes on a new look with
the Pirates' signing of Watkins. The
ECU newcomer will most likely be
matched up against State star guard
Sidney I owe I hat duel could be a '
dandy.
When Pat Dye left East Carolina
last winter and became the head
football coae ng,
speculation grew oul west that the
formet Pir; te n ei u i did not y
to stick with theowboys vei long.
Well, that speculation turned into
reality over the holidays as Dye
resigned his post al Wyoming and
landed the hea il uburn.
Dye was available foi the Auburn
iob because he only committed
himself to the Cowboys foi one
season He planned to continue to
sign with W yoming on tl s. it
is believed
Dve, 48 18 1 in sv seasons at
I i U and 6-5 at Wyoming last vear.
now has one ol the op coaching
positions in the country He has a
four-year comtas' al uburn and
will earn approximately $600,000
during that span.
Many of Dye's I c I assistants
will accompany him to the Alabama
school. Frank Orgel. defensive
coordinator under Dve and a Clem-
son assistant this past season is go-
ing, as are former ECU aids Wayne
Hall and b bbv Wallace
It is also rumored thai tormer
I . I offensive cooi
Kupec, currently an N.C S
will go to Auburn
1 he naming of formei 1
tant Ai Kincaid to replace D
Wyoming also speaks M
formei Pirate stafl.
Kincaid served foi
under Dve as quarterback coa
Dye





I HI I AM AKOI IN1AN
JANUARYS, 1981
ter
,r

I
Kl dtiard Barry Wrightlears I ane
ECU Grappler Is
Wilkes Champion
H1
K
II 1 1 AM

Chri
Butch Re
Will
w .1 s
ning
Mill.
I hi
lament,
heduled foi
2' was moved
�9 and
powers as Missouri, the
tourney's champion
and Nebraska, the
runner-up. Other teams
participating included
Ohio Stale. Perm State.
I ehigh and
Bloomsburg State.
The seven ECU
wrestlers did not fare
well, as all were
defeated in the first
round except foi
Revils.
"Butch has been
wrestling very well
Oishi said. "His op-
ponents in this tourna-
ment were ver big and
verj good
Revils. ranked fifth
in the nation in his
weight class, defeated
Burt Matucci oi Tren-
Swimmers Return To Action
By JIMMY DuPRKK
Editor
It's been quite a
while since East
Carolina's swimming
teams took to the water
in competition, but the
rest � if you can call it
that � comes to an end
tonight for the men and
Saturday for the
women. The Pirates
host Maine at Minges
Natatorium tonight at
7:00, while both ECU
squads host Ap-
palachian State Satur
day at 1 p.m.
"Maine alwavs has a
good team says
Pirate head coach Ray
Scharf, "but we've
seemed to get by them
most of the prior
meets. They always
give us a good meet.
The divers will hopeful
ly give us some points.
Under the cir-
cumstances, we ate
looking for the third
places
1 he men are still
looking tor their first
win ot the season after
a pair of pre-hohdav
defeats, while the
women will be looking
to improve on their 2-1
record.
"In the past,
(Appalachian State)
has not been that
strong stated Scharf.
" 1 hev have a new
coach tins year, Jim
kcllv. I hey went 10 4
last year, but I have to
sav 1 have not seen
much on them "
The teams have gone
through a rigorous
training program over
the past few weeks, but
Scharf admits there are
still some who haven't
reached peak condi-
tion. He says, though,
that the team is ready
for the remainder of
the schedule.
"1 think we have, for
the most part (gotten
into condition)
Scharf ays. "There are
still some that are lagg
mg behind, but they'll
come around. We've
had a lot of sickness,
mostly colds and such.
We'll be going double
workouts up to the day
of the meet
The Lady Pirates will
not have the services of
Ail-American Susan
Hanks after she had to
have a knee operation
over the break. The
sophomore from
Hickorv is one of four
returning A11 -
Americans from a vear
ago.
A total ol n men
swimmers posted quali-
fying tunes for the
Pastern Inter :ieg;ate
Swimming and Di
Championship; ai
recent South ,
live
Jnv itationa I
women's relay
posted natioi
tying times al the
Relavs
te im�
quali-
Sampson Leading In THE EARLY
Scoring, Rebounding
PREPARE FOR
ton State tor the
193 -pound champion-
ship. The win improved
his season record to
12-0.
Even though Oishi
said the rest ot" the team
didn't do too well, he
was fairly pleased with
the performance oi
freshmen left 1 eaf at
118 pounds. Tony Mit-
chel at 134, and An-
drew Hefner at 16
"All their opponents
were highly-seeded
Oishi pointed out.
Oishi stressed the
competition in the
alwavs tough Wilkes
Open. "Bill Hill
(former ECU great)
never won this tourna-
ment.
O R I ENSBORO
(UPI) Virginia
center Ralph Sampson,
averaging 20.6 points
and 12.2 rebounds a
contest, is the top
scorer and rebounder in
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference m statistics
released Wednesdav.
Gene Banks of Duke
is second with a 19.2
scoring average.
Maryland's Albert
King and Buck
Williams are third and
fourth King with an
18.8 point pet game
average and Williams
averaging 18 points.
King was the AC C
scoring champion last
season.
frank Johnson ot
Wake forest, who did
not play last season
because of a leg injury,
is tied with Virginia's
Jeff 1 amp for the fifth
highest scoring posi-
tion. Both are averag-
ing P.6 points per
game.
Sampson took over
the rebounding lead
from Williams, who i:
averaging 11 re-
bounds a game James
ort h v of North
Carolina, who sat out
much of last season
aftei breaking his
ankle, is the league's
third leading rebounder
with nine rebounds a
game.
Maryland's Greg
Manning, the con-
ference's best free
throw shooter last
season, leads m that
categorj again this
season. Manning
made 38 out ol 42 free
throw attempts
Clem son's
Gilliam is second in
tree throw accuracy,
making 34 ot 38 at-
tempts.
Sidney 1 ow e ot
North Carolina State
leads the league in
assists, averaging 9.2 a
game. Johnson is se
cond with seven assists
a game.
In team statistics.
Wake forest is the
league's top scoring
club while Virginia has
the best defensive
statistics.
I he Demon Deacons
ate averaging 86.9
points a game. Virginia
is giving up onlv mi
poin me.
S u i p r i s i n g 1 v ,
Georgia lech is the
league's third best
defensive club, giving
up 62.6 points a game.
C iei gia rech is 3-8 tor
the season and is the
onlv C club with a
� besl
t : ,ii -hooting
club, hitting .551 of its
shots. Clemson has the
best tree throw pel sen
tage at 41.
W ake 1 oresl has the
best scoring margin in
the league. I he Demon
Deacons are averaging
24.2 points more than
opponents. Clemson
leads m rebounds per
game with a 40 7
average.
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Our December Book Buy Back Bonanza has produced the largest
used textbook inventory in the history of the U.B.E. We've got 50
more used texts in our store than in Jan. of 1980.
Check Downtown First for all your books and supplies.
SHOP EARLY FOR BIGGEST
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Extended hours 8:00am - 9:00pm Mon.
Jan. 12, Tues. Jan. 13.
FREE PEPSI'S ALL DAY TODAY
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.





Title
The East Carolinian, January 8, 1981
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 08, 1981
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.100
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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