The East Carolinian, December 9, 1980






iEast (Eandtntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol. 55 NoM 4H
I
12 Pages
Tuesday, December 9, 1980
Greenville, North C arolina
Circulation 10,000
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Fleming Dormitory Basement
. . . Officials Miss Potential Hazard
Former Beatle
Shot To Death
B HTODAVILA
I PI ufl Whirl
N!Vv YORK (I PI) - former Beatle John
Lennon was shot and killed in front of his
Manhattan home Monday night.
Police said Lennon, 40. was shot three times
about II p.m. EST and died in the emergency
room at Roosevelt Hospital. His wife Yoko Ono
was with him when he died.
police spokesman said a suspect was
custody but had no other details of the shooting.
"This was no robbery the spokesman said ad-
ding that lennon was most likely shot by a
"cuckoo
A witness to the shooting, Sean Strub. said a
man in his mid-30s with "almost a smirk on his
face" gunned down the singer as Lennon, his wife
.md several other people walked into the Vestible
Dl the Dakota, the building on Manhattan's West
Side where the 1 ennons lived.
Strub said residents of the apartment building
old him the man had been seen in the vestible for
riours before the shooting
"He just walked out and shot him Strub
�.aid. He described the man as white with dark
tair and wearing a leather jacket.
An employee at Roosevelt Hospital said doc-
Mrs "worked like cra" over the singer but
could not save him.
"There's blood all over the place the worker
said.
Lennon. who celebrated his 40th birthday on
Oct. 9, had just released an album. "Double fan-
tasy which he made with his wife in what was to
be a comeback tor the couple.
The album's cover shows I ennon and Miss
Ono standing in front ol the Dakota, a luxury
cooperative apartment building where
"Rosemary's Baby" was filmed.
1 ennon, who became one of the most famous
musicians in the history of rock and roll while he
was with the Beatles, made his last Beatle album.
"Abbe) Road in 1969.
He was the most irreverent member ol the
hand, which also included bassisi Paul McCart-
ney, guitarist George Harrison and drummer
RingO Starr.
lennon was born Oct. 9. 1940. in England's
northern industrial seaport of I iverpool, 'he son
oi ,i portei fathei who deserted the famiij
John was 3.
When his lather surfaced once Lennon reached
stardom, 1 ennon slammed the door m his face.
He later recalled. "I don't feel as if 1 owe him
anything. He never helped me. 1 got there b
myself.
Lennon attended secondary school in Liver-
pool and then went on to I iverpool College ot
Art. where he married a classmate. Cynthia
Powell.
They were later divorced and in 1969 1.ennon
married Miss Ono. a Japanese-American artist,
who was pregnant.
1 ennon later said, "We went to Paris on our
honeymoon, then interrupted our honeymoon to
get married on the Rock of Gibraltar
lennon joined with McCartney in 1961 and
played in Liverpool and Germany. Harrison and
Stair joined them later the same year to form the
combo that became known as the Beatles.
Along with McCartney, Lennon wrote more hit
songs than an) popular composer in modern
history.
The collaboration ended abruptly when the
group disbanded in 1971 amid talk of tailing out
between 1 ennon and McCartney in addition to
recriminations against the management of their
recording company.
Doctor Contests Law;
Grows Pot In Yard
MA NT TO�Dr. Gordan Piland
says the current laws governing the
medical use of marijuana are un-
just, and he is willing to go on trial
to test those laws
Dare County sheriff's deputies
and State Bureau of Investigation
agents arrested the 33-year-old Hat-
teras Island doctor Aug. 10, while
he was working at the Hatteras
Kopec Service
To Be Held
A memorial service will be held
Thursday for Geoffrey Robert
Kopec, who died Sunday, Nov.
31 of a gunshot wound to the
head
Kopec, 20, was a sophomore at
East Carolina from Chapel Hill.
The service will be conducted
at 5 p.m. in room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center by
the Rev. Stewart LaNeque.
Kopec is survived by his
parents, Dr. Richard J. Kopec
and Mrs. Pauline Cutchall
Kopec; a sister, Mrs. Pamela
Grimball; and a brother, Douglas
Richard Kopec.
Island Clinic.
The authorities said Piland grew
about 111 marijuana plants in the
front yard of his home in Hatteras
Village, a community of about 700
people on the Outer Banks.
Piland has been charged with
possession of more than 50 pounds
of marijuana and conspiracy to
manufacture a controlled substance,
both felonies. If found guilty, he
could receive a maximum five years
in prison on each charge.
The doctor was scheduled to go
on trial next Monday in Dare Coun-
ty Superior Court. But Piland's at-
torney said Monday that the trial
has been delayed until the February
term.
Piland admits he grew the mari-
juana. He argues that the law under
which he was arrested is unjust.
The marijuana, he said, was
grown for therapeutic reasons. He
said the law allows physicians to
prescribe marijuana under certain
conditions, but it does not allow
them to possess it without comply-
ing with a number of federal regula-
tions.
"If a law is unjust it should be
challenged he said recently.
"Every time a person is tried, the
person is on trial and the law is on
trial. We must try the law
Piland, who graduated from the
U.S. Naval Academy and the
Bowman Gray School of Medicine
in Winston-Salem, said he used
marijuana to treat cancer patients
for side effects of chemotherapy
and to relieve glaucoma patients'
eye pressure.
"We are faced with a law telling
us we can treat with marijuana, but
there is no law telling us how to get
it to Hatteras Piland said.
Marvin Blount, Piland's Green-
ville attorney and a former Superior
Court judge, agrees the case could
test the law. The case, he said, goes
to the heart of "how far does a
physician's responsibility go
On The Inside
Announcements2
Campus Forum4
Classifieds11
Editorials4
Features6
Sports10
Dorm Basement Hides
Potential Fire Hazard
B PAUL COLLINS
Boxes are piled everywhere.
Mounds ol cancelled checks and an-
cient personnel records abound.
Dusty light bulbs dangle from the
ceiling and wires are strung from
one side ot the room to the other.
Is this some forgotten storage
room in some abandoned building'
No, it's the basement ol the east
wing of Fleming Dorm and could
represent a potential fire hazard.
The bulk of the boxes stored in
the basement contain old business
office records, according to Julian
Vain wright, East Carolina's
business managei.
"It's old records that we are try-
ing to get inventoried Vainwright
said. "We're required to keep cer-
tain records tor certain lengths of
time.
"It is a bad situtation and we
hope to have some relief soon.
We're in the process of working on
it right now. taking inventory. I
don't know as I can give an exaci
date on when the removal will be
completed
Vainwright -aid that the records
have been stored in Fleming for at
least 15 years and will probably be
moved to the library. "It's a situa-
tion that is going to be improved.
We have already, started the pro-
cess
Does the storage oi these records
in 1 len �se a fire hazard'?
"Yes, to soine degree said E I
IL-alth and Safety Officei rthur
Colcough. "Sure, it will catch fire it
someone tick - .1 match to it.
According to C oleough, the ceil-
ing that sepatates the basement
from the first flooi is constructed ol
a tire-proof material, and the base-
meni is completely isolated from the
rest ot the building ' 1 he two are
not connected b am stairway
Colcough did sa thai the Photo
Supreme Court
l ab, which is also housed in the
same wing of the basement, would
almost certainly burn if the stored
documents caught fire.
"This is not a good situation he
stated, "but I do not think the peo-
ple living there are in jeopardy
I ven if the basement caught fire
there would be 20 or 30 minutes tor
them to get out. Besides, paper
doesn't burn as easily as everyone
thinks it does. It would take a
tremendous amount of heat to reach
the upper floors or damage the
structure of the building
Some of the residents ot Fleming,
which houses 175 women, were not
so sure. Karen Rountree, a second-
floor resident, said, "Maybe our
nickname 'Flaming Hell' will really
come true. I just hope I have all my
stuff out
"Something needs to be done
about the wiring or the boxes down
there complained Bernita Simons,
a sophomore who lives in Fleming.
"Our lights have gone out about
ui tunes this year, and we can on-
I) cook during certain hours. I feel
like since :ie dorm is so old they
could at least fix the downstairs
Indeed. Fleming was opened in
1923 and has not undergone any
major renovation.
There are plans, however, to
renovate Fleming and neighboring
Gotten within the next tour years.
according to Director of Housing
Dan W ooten.
"The changes will be ot the same
type done in Jarvis and will include
the wiring he said "Until then we
must impost, limitations upon the
Use ot electrical appliances
Wooten noted that the loss of
power was due to overloaded cir-
cuits and was seen primarily at the
beginning of the semester when a
large numbe! oi cieii ic tans were in
use. "Fleming is just not wired to
take rare of as much of a load as
some ot the other residence halb
The overloading of circuits does
not present a fire hazard, Colcough
indicated. He said. "That's the pur-
pose of the circuit switching off �
to prevent a fire
"There is no electrical problem as
far as I'm concerned he stated.
Wooten said he could not com-
ment on the safety of the situation
because he was not that familiar
with it. "I hate to seem so vague on
the subject, but it is something that
has never been discussed.
"Since I have been associated
with the university the business of-
fice has had the use of that room
he concluded.
Periodic inspections of all dorms
and buildings on campus are made,
Colcough said. "I do make inspec-
tions at least once a year � com-
pletely. 1 also have a person go
through once a month to check
things like fire extinguishers. There
is no regulation to prohibit this (the
situation in the basement).
Colcough said that the city fire
department has no jurisdiction in
the matter, but the people from the
office ot the state insurance com-
missioner do inspect the buildings
each year.
He points to cooking in the dorms
as the real fire haza. d since the
rooms were not designed for it.
"With beds and books and drapes
you're always near something com-
bustible
C oleough indicated he would not
reccornend rewiring the dorms for
cooking due to the great expense
and instead would prefer to see
cooking eliminated in dorm rooms.
"It's a safety hazard and a health
hazard, too
Wooten indicated that cooking in
ms would not be eliminated
unless an alternative could be pro-
vided.
Gov't Limits Upheld
WASH INCHON (I PI) I he
Supreme Court Monday let stand a
ruling upholding government limits
for exposure to airborne lead, but
granted the lead industry a partial
stay from complying with other
rules coveting occupational ex-
posure to the poison.
The justices refused to hear an ap-
peal bv industries that the En-
vironmental Protection Agency
standards set the exposure level tor
airborne lead without evidence there
was a "significant risk of harm to
health
The Clean Air Act requires the
EPA administrator to establish a
"national primary ambient air
quality standard" for lead. It calls
foi "an adequate margin ot safety
to protect the public health
The standard, set Oct. 5. 1STS,
was imposed in addition to earlier
agency regulations designed to con-
trol lead in automobile exhaust.
When concentrated in the body,
lead can cause anemia, kidney
damages, brain damage and death.
In the other lead case, the court
granted a partial stay to the lead and
lead recycling industries from an ap-
peals court ruling upholding the Oc-
cupational Safety and Health Ad-
ministration standards for exposure
to lead in the workplace.
In other action today, the court:
� Agreed to consider whether
Montana may impose a severance
tax on coal mined in the state. Utili-
ty companies claim the tax � passed
on to customers as higher rates �
could presage a bid by coal-rich
states to "exact tribute" from
energy-poor states.
�Said it would review the Ohio
obscenity conviction of Hustler
magazine owner Larry Flynt.
� Accepted for argument a
dispute over whether Texas state
courts have jurisidiction to hear
cases filed under the federal Outer
Continental Shelf Lands Act.
� Reversed, over one dissent, a
ruling by California's highest court
requiring a hearing to determine the
acceptability of conditions in
another stale's prison system before
returning a fugitive prisoner to that
state.
In the OSHA lead case, industry
groups said a high court stay would
not endanger workers since the in-
dustry will continue to meet the ac-
ceptable exposure level. The govern-
ment disputed this, arguing for im-
mediate curbs on exposure on "a
deadly poison with many industrial
uses
In a two-page order, the high
court blocked from going into effect
provisions providing for compliance
by engineering and work practice
controls and the use of respirators
when other controls are not suffi-
cient.
The court said that "during the
period of the stay, employers shall
provide a powered, air-purifying
respirator in lieu of the respirator"
specified by OSHA when the
"physical characteristics" of the
employee make the specified
respirator "inadequate for his or
her protection
ECU Students Enjoy Warm Temperatures Between Classes
I





I Ml I AS C AROl IN1AN
DI (. I MB! Ry. I�M0
Announcements
TEAM HANDBALL
CLUB
The cCU Team Hanaoan Club
meet Tuesday afternoon
December v. a' 4 30 m 104
Memorial Gym Plans for the 1981
Season including trips to Acs'
Point and New York City vi.
discussed at this time The club
will field both women's and men's
ns and all interested students
ar invited to Pd' t i ipate
SPORTCLUBCOUNCIL
December meeting of the
ub Council will be
� �'
i A
I
latiwi
inition an
� � � � �
SHARING LIFE'
nber 4tl it 7 3
ALLIED HEALTH
Health I H

�� ��
� �
VorK

'
SPRING BREAK TRIP
The Student union Travel Com
miftee has planned two trips dur
ing Spring Break One is to For
Lauderdale, Florida and the
is a Fort Lauderaaie Bahamas
Cruise Prices include transporta
tion. hotel accommodations ana
the cruise For more inform il
go by Mendenhall Central Toe
Office or call at 7V 611 F1
Lauderdale Fior.oa Trip Quad
hotel room S2I9 00 Dc �
room S30� 00 Ft cauder
Bahamas Cn Quad
hotel room & quad cabin V499 00
Double- hotel room & quad ubm
54� AC
GAY COMMUNITY
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity Mill hold its weekly
g Tuesdsy Dec 9th at 5 00
ioth v it me i �� �
GMAT
- .
ECU FRISBEE CLUB
BAHAMAS CRUISE
� �
-

A LECTURETTE
ti

ttl U!
' �
week we be having
I the Si � �� ' nank. God
. � � n week;
� . ' . Bl . your
� �. � a I bevera
MID EXAM JAM
� k I
I irty on Dtv 11
.s �. . �, pes � �
ann
e held in the
' � It ' �� � rom
NORFOLK, HERE WE
COME
be a 'r,p to Norfolk
� w a Fnaaynight dance w tl
'�� British Isles Dancing Group
�.rested in
mor- - 'on or ius' I ride 1
Norfolk v jones at
N.C S L
Nortl ai rta Student
� ody
'
live N
1981, we w

'

N
GREENVILLE
UTILITIES
INTERNSHIP
Sophomores ;uniors anj seniors
current enroned in a North
Carolina idiege or North Carolina
residents attending an out ot I
college have until February 2 to
apply tor " I ' tute ot Govern
ment Summer internship
gram m state govern
Twnety four stude' '
����
learning int n North
� Olina s'a'e govern" .
directed by the Insl '
Governm. I " ' � ,1 ' ��� of
Government Interns will work
from May 26 throuy'
Students . . � - i �
week in a responsible pos hort in a
state depai tment, : at
evening educationa sand
be paid appro if . SU0 per
���
Si . �� ' lerested i the pro
gi,i"
nou' I the
of North Ca
from the egi . � � I.
placement office or loca
� i .
Studen �� �� , in
litute of Govi iran
should ma ,v
institute ot Government Knapp
Building fj59i ' ' � �
North Caroma Chap H K.
Carohna. 27514 by February .
1981
Applic an's wil � � I epted
without respect 1 ior
national origin
'ohnson a studi '
Carolina Un.y, � ' .
Institute of Govern-
stati : . � lut ng tile -
"pi of 1980
STUDENT UNION
PRESIDENT
��. �' � � �
. -
UniO- . � � -� � � � �� � 191
school yeai ��'� �' " II be
� 16 1981 and
it the IV


the office
A
H
-
� - V-
'
CHRISTMAS CAROLS
� � � '
- �
ibol for
weekda '5pm
CIC FEFLLOWSHIPS
� � I � : �
���� � '
'
9 00 " I
. ,pj
A4

i
� � � ,
'
I ' � . '
an studies it'
� parai .?�
������ � . ' �� rmai
Sophy
� Roma � . � �� and
Slavic lane,
. �� �
11 i c S and
. rveering rogr-r include
� � mistry . biologic ai scien �
agricultui � . I . c s
and gee log i a I ! ei � ��

specific subfields
Allied Health
Preps Students
Because of a partner-
ship between com-
munities oi eastern
North Carolina and
1 as; Carolina Universi-
ty, health services have
reached a level which
"represents a milestone
in the history of this
region says (. I
( hancellor Thomas B.
Brewer.
"We have worked
together and achieved a
highly interdependent
health care system
Brewer told a Beaufort
County Farm City
Week breakfast
meeting.
"Positive relation-
ships and cooperation
are the key attributes of
this progress he said.
"We shall remain com-
mitted to this partner-
ship to continue our
task of bringing the
best possible quality of
life to all of the people
of this region
Brewer traced 20
yews of ECU programs
in the healing sciences,
beginning with
establishment of the
School of Nursine m
I960. "Since that
time he said, "great
strides have been made
in bringing modern
medicai delivery to
eastern North
Carolina
The School of Nurs-
ing has developed "into
one of the largest and
best programs in nurs-
ing in the Southeast
United States he
said.
The School of Allied
Health and Social Pro-
fessions, authorized in
1968, has graduated ap-
proximately 2,300 pro-
fessionals in physical
therapy, rehabilitation
counseling, medical
technology, occupa-
tional therapy, en-
vironmental health,
community health
education, medical
records administration,
in speech and hearing,
and also in fields of
social work and correc-
tional science, he said.
This, Brewer said,
"represents a signifi-
cant resource for this
region
INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED
mstruc tc �
il short fei bee
wot ksh i �
Crat's Center a' Mendenhai! S'u
dent Cen'er '

darkroor

to tea
a COurs. irty of
�,
Crafts
RESIDENCE STAFF
Apr
by " i Dep en1
for Sprii

EPISCOPAL WORSHIP

� ��
at 5 30 �' �� � hapi n tl

(across from Ga� ��
and fa '� m
Idl � ' �:
elebrate the serv �
FOR
FAST
EASY
MONEY
THROUGH
PRISON VISITS
Many ECU students have lomeo
Maury Correctional Facilities
Thursday n.ght visiting program
Ai go from 7 30 pm 900pm
Car pooling and P'ck up is
� 'able it's a friendly at
mosphere and enioyabie for an
� s not forget these lonei y people
during the Holiday Season
�(24
FINANCIAL AID
There II be a meeting on
nesda December 10 tc
� bute fianciai aid applications
and to disseminate information
concerning tmani .a1 aid for the
1981 82 school ear The meeting
will be conducted in W gl I
Auditorium at 4 00 p m
aii finarn il n ; ents who win
be applying for I il aid next
ted to attei I
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
legi stodeni , �
- - � phy � - : ation
as � � � � � � i the spi
'�;��
Coliseum at 11 00 a n y.
da, December 10. to' a n lor and
physical fitness lest '� I
r 'o
� -ducation
i i � ithlel attire
�� itw . nit 'unninci jumping,
� ��.� is
able com en ��
dialing 'S? 644'
STUDENT UNION
POSITIONS
Ape �' � � . � pied
fo' Coffeehouse Chairperson and
committee members immed '�
ly Pick up appit ations in the Stu
dent Union OH'Ce Room 234 in
III S'udent Center Can
7$' 661' I ,� 210
JOHN EAST
�aft ot Mendenhall S'udent
Center the Student Government
Asso .ation the Student Iji
and the officers of the faculty cor
dialiy invite you to attend a recep
tion honoring Senator eiei ' and
Mrs John East on Wednesday
Dec 10 from 7pm 8 30 P m The
reception will be held in the multi
purpose room of Mendenhall
JOBS NEEDED
inn .? the Maury Correc
il Fa are oot � ;obs
Man. �'� I ' � en recom
mended for wort but jobs
aren t available ' � neto
offe' - � . an
7S6 9324
The Happy Store
Open 24 Hours
Ask about
v irl. It Up
Art k VisoM C
10th & Evans St
7S2 8772
Have we
got a job for you!
. e got talent, we want to see I ftnd th
� � the world at The Old
� . ' BuschGardens, inWilli,
Dur : ir 1981 �"� idition T king I
more )i lancers. i
��� � insa
.
Show of f)
� � . � �
� et sho� . �
. �'� I with theaddil
�� . � . . ��� ' :
. urs
You work witl � � � � � tali I i I
.� � . eatii
ji � . � ei � �
let ready I -��i :
Audition date �w�
NC f
' 4 �
East Carolina Univ.
A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall
� � the world
CSJH&
ountry
DUSCH GARDCNS
WILUAMSOUrVG va
Art and Camera
�i 6 S.otan he St
Jk)un l(,Un
�$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$�
� KODACOLOR 8
JJJ Developed and Printed
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-tfiV
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4
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KODACOLOR
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f
CA
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Slide
FILM DEVELOPING
36 EXPOSURE
KODACHROME
AND EKTACHROM
PROCESSING Oik
The East Carolinian
1925
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fionns tSr � �drm v�t and tr fdn
6� dunnf ttv ummrr
fhr bast (4rolirun i thf otfiral
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ithf nptmr, Kates
Buurw 5 ft
All thm ! v�Hv
i�rand rla� ��ir P��d �' (rfppnville.
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Ifv tHd Sou Huildjrw ir rr� -�mpu of
ECl Cwnfc, N.(
Ithphm 77-6i66. 6 �67 609
20 EXPOSURE
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AND EKTACHROME
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LOW, LOW PRICES ON
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I
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLIO
Each ot that advarllMd ttamt it r�qutr�d to b� rvadlly �vallabt for sale at or
bale the adverlleed prkce in each ASP Store except aa specifically noted
in this ad
PRICES GOOD THRU WED DEC. 10 IN
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER
RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
Highway 264 By-pass
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Greenville N.C.
v-
EXCLUSIVE AT A&P
Beautiful Diane
him
This Week's
Feature Item
Dinner Plate
r
50 COUPON
n
79
c
each
LIMIT ONE
WITH THIS
COUPON
eP
Save 50c on Pkg. of 2
Diane China
Salad Plates
GREENVILLE NC
GOOD THRU SAI DEC 13 IN ALL A4H STORES
INNC (SC EXCEPT AIKEN & BEAUFORT SC
I
I
675 j
J A&P QUALITY HEAVY WESTERN GRAIN
DamaLaa Cut Free ,ntO -
Doneiess �? y�k
Strip Steaks
N.Y. Strips
14-16 lb
avg. wt.
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r ROUND
SSTEAK
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DIC EMBER 9, 1980
I
ECU Supplies North Carolina Administrators
More than 25 per
cent of the
superintendents of
public school systems
in North Carolina and
more than 22 per cent
of the principals are
products of East
Carolina University's
graduate program in
education administra-
tion and supervision, a
Mud shows.
I n many cases,
especially in eastern
North Carolina, the
percentages are much
greatei.
In the Cumberland
Count) school district,
for example, 45 of the
55 principals are ECl
graduates. In the
Kinston and Lenoir
County districts 16 of
the 20 principals arc
from the ECl pro-
gram.
In Wayne County
and Goldsboro schools.
22 of the 30 principals
are from ECU. In
Robeson County,
Lumberton, Fairmont,
Red Springs and Fair-
mong 20 of 44.
"This study shows
the impact of East
Carolina University on
the public schools
throughout the state of
North Carolina says
Dr. William C. Sander-
son, chairman of the
Department of Educa-
tional Administration
and Supervision, ECU
School of Education.
Sanderson, who co-
authored the report
with Prof. Keith C.
Hudson, said another
significant point is that
"we have had a tremen-
dous impact in the
community colleges,
non-public schools and
school systems outside
the state oi North
Carolina
lso, among the
ECU graduates not in-
cluded in the study, one
is assistant State
Superintendent of
Public Instruction,
three are directors of
N.C. Regional Educa-
tion Centers, one is the
executive secretary of
the North Carolina
School Boards Associa-
tion.
"Many o f our
graduates occupy
prestigious positions
outside the state's
public school systems
Sanderson said.
"Each year we send
about 10 students to
other universities that
award doctoral
degrees. They are not
included in this study.
We also have many
graduates employed in
the university system
throughout North North Carolina
Carolina employee pay records
The primary mission for the 1979-80 school
of the department is to year, was concerned
provide certified ad- only with the quan-
mimstrators and super-
visors for the public
schools of the state.
"The puyrpose of this
study was to determine
whether this mission is
being accomplished
Sanderson said.
The study, based on
titative aspect of
employment of ECU
graduates in the state's
public schools.
Of administrators,
the study showed that
graduates of the pro-
gram with Masters of
Arts in Education or
Educational Specialist
degrees occupied 37 of
145 school superinten-
dent posts, 69 of 249 or
27.7 per cent of the
associateassistant
superintendent jobs,
456 of the 2,033 prin-
cipal positions. In addi-
tion, 157 ECU program
graduates were
employed as school
supervisors but the
total number of people
holding these positions
was not determined.
The findings did not
include irregular cer-
tification. Historically,
one third of students
enrolled received ir-
regular certification
rather than a degree.
"It is reasonable to
assume that many cur-
rently employed ad-
ministrators and super-
visors received
graduate certification
through this depart-
ment, although they arc
not included in this
study Sanderson
said.
m -MR Tt r ,Xi Vf. xrS T&i3 &&t?8 3S- '�& r,1' r7ir?L
VI ,
New Aids Join
Meyer's Staff
Two new aides have
joined the a d-
ministrative staff as
assistants to the Vice
Chancellor for Student
Life.
I ucinda Wright and
John Gardner have
been named as
issistants to Dr. Elmer
I Meyer Jr.
W right � a teacher,
linguist and Peace
Corps eteran � will
advise Student Govern-
ment legislative com-
mittees, coordinate a
student organization
manual, develop
leadership programs
students and super-
use services for foreign
students over 25 years
old. She will also
undertake respon-
sibilities regarding off-
campus housing for
students and services
for commuter students.
Gardner's duties will
include budget develop-
ment, management of
information systems
for the division and
coordination of ac-
counting and auditing
policies and pro-
cedures.
Gardner recently-
received a Master of
Business Administra-
tion degree from ECU
and has been a teaching
assistant in the ECU
School of Business
economics department.
Gardner, an en-
vironmentalist, linguist
and veteran of the U.S.
Army, also received an
undergraduate degree
in environmental health
from ECU in 1978 and
studied Russian and
Polish at Ohio State
University.
Wright also has ex-
tensive linguistic ex-
perience. She has
degrees in language
from Bates College,
Middlebury College
and Indiana University.
She is presently a doc-
toral candidate at
UNC-Chapel Hill.
Wright was an in-
structor of Spanish and
Italian and taught
English for foreign-
born at ECU from 1969
until 1975. She
previously taught at In-
diana University, in
Florida public high
schools and in Madrid,
Spain as a private
tutor.
She served in the
Peace Corps from 1962
until 1964 as an English
teacher in Colombia.
During his army ser-
vice, Gardner was a
Polish linguist and
radio intercept
operator.
Workshops Explore
Classroom Reasoning
B MARC BARNES
H I Nrw. Burr�u
Educating the young
may be easier if
teachers understand
how children think,
and workshops will
soon be held across
North Carolina to
teach teachers more
about powers of
reasoning as applied to
the classroom setting.
Co-sponsored by the
science education
department at East
Carolina University
and the N.C. Depait-
ment of Public Instruc-
tion, the workshops
will focus on a style of
teaching developed by
California educator
Robert Karplus.
"It will help teachers
come up with ideas on
how they can modify
their teaching says
ECU science education
chairman Dr. Floyd
Mattheis. "Most secon-
dary school science
teachers have not been
exposed to this
before
Basically, tne
workshops are intended
to teach teachers to use
objects the students can
see and handle to teach
science. This is a depar-
ture from the straight
lecture method.
I King concrete ob-
jects to teach abstract
concepts takes into ac-
count the student's
undeveloped reasoning
abilit, Mattheis says
Mattheis said several
factors, such as
development of the
brain during early
adolescence as well as
the student's experience
might lead to a concrete
level of comprehen-
sion. The student might
be able to memorize
certain scientific con-
cepts without truly
understanding them.
Understanding is in-
creased, he said, when
the student can work
with materials he can
see, handle and
manipulate.
Bill Spooner, a
science consultant with
the Department of
Public Instruction said
that concepts cannot be
effectively memorized.
"Driving is a con-
cept he said. "But
you have to experience
it. You can't just read
about it in a driver's
manual
All schools in the
state which have grades
7-12 were recently mail-
ed a brochure describ-
ing the workshops.
"We hope we'll have a
lot of responses, but
it's too soon to tell
Mattheis said.
dk Tufer Unique and
Carolina east mall fgreenville � �
No matter what your budget is for Christmas shopping
this year the Wine and Cheese Shop has something
nice for everyone on your list
For your beer drinking friends a carton of their favorite
import makes a fine gift and is sure to bring a smile
Whether it's Bock or Bavarian. Ale or Australian we've
got it m stock and we'll even gift wrap it too1
Uncommon Gifts
Some lucky person on your Christmas list will find out
why the English stop what ever they are doing at Tea
Time Make up a little basket of Tea. Biscuits and
Jams or Preserves and we will wrap it up holiday
style
Imported Beers
Hemeken. Holland
Hemeken Special Dark. Holland
Becks Beer Light. Germany
Dortmunder Union. Germany
Bitburger Germany
St Pauli Girl Beer. Germany
St Pauli Girl Beer (Dark) Germany
Dinkel Acker West Germany
AsahiBeer. Japan
Stemlager New Zeland
Gumess Stout. Ireland
Harp Lager. Ireland
San Miguel Manila. Philippines
Bass England
Foster's Lager Australia (Cans)
Foster's Lager. Australia
Moosehead. Canada
Molson Canadian, Canada
Molson Golden Canada
Tuborg Gold. Denmark
Tea
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 4
carton of 4
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
carton of 6
Twinings
Spiced
Russian Caravan
Gunpowder Green
Lemon Scented
English Breakfast
Irish Breakfast
China Black
Crabtree and Evelyn
Camonile
Rose Hip
Peppermint
Formosa Oolong
Biscuits
Cheese as a presenP Of course1 During the nohday
season when there is so much entertaining going on.
stop by our shop before going to a dinner party at a
friend's house and pick up some of our delicious
cheeses But watch it. they're addicting!
Huntley-Palmers
Lemon Puff
English
London
Rahlsen
Hunting Gift Assortment
Bartons
Viennese Butler Cookies
Century Cookies
Cadeaux Assortment Tin
Cheese
Smoked Gouda
Gouda (Plain and Salt Free)
Edam
Provolone
Ricotta
Roguefort
Parmesan
Old Fashioned Cream Cheese
Chocolate Cream Cheese
StrawPerry Cream Cheese
Cold Pack Cheese Blue Cheese
Cream Haverti (Plain)
Sharp Chedder
Yankee Ambrosia
Bne
Cheeseballs
Party Trays
Preserves
3 37 1b
2 991b
3 061b
5 77 1b
3 52 lb
4 491b
3 67 1b
2 47 1b
3 921b
3 921b
2 54lb
2 891b
2 991b
3 OQlb
5 991b
4 99lb
Crabtree and Evelyn
English Country Damson
English Greengage
English Rhubarb and Fig
French Blueberry Fruit
3 69 4 oz
3 00 4 oz
3.00 4oz
3 00 4 oz
3 25 4 oz
2 75 4oz
3 00 4 oz
2.25 1 35oz
.2.25 2.6oz
2 25 1 8oz
2 30 1 9oz
1 20 4 4 oz
11.00 17 6oz
5 99 6 2oz
1 8 00 5 2 oz
5 00 14oz
4 99 lb
3 50 9 oz
3 75 9oz
3 75 12oz
4 75 12oz
Wines are Winners
Whether its our favorite bubbly or just some good
dnner wine you'll be well remembered at the pop of
the cork We have so many different types and kinds of
wine that you can find one to fit any budget They
make great presents at dinner parties as well'
Wine
Champagne
Cuvee Dom Pengnon
G H Mumm Extra Dry
Henkell Extra Dry
Paul Masson Extra Dry
Chateau Laurent N Y Cold Duck
French
Chateau La Rose � Tnntaudon 1975
Simard Saint � Emilion
Baron de Luze Red Bordeau
Chateau � Figeac St Emilion 1973
Pouilly Fuisse 1976 Solutre
Sichel Chateauneuf � Du � Pape 1976
Italian
Bolla � Bardolmo
Antmori Soave
Martini and Rossi Asti Spumanti
German
Meinnck Braun Rhemhessen 1975
Scholass Eltz Sp a tlese 1975
R L Piesporter Michelesgerg Kabmeft
CaHfomla
Robert Mondavi Chenin Blanc 1979
Suffer Home Zmfandei
Bennger Chardcnnay
Sterling Vineyards Sauvignon Blanc
49 50 19 25 9 36 6 10 3 50
7 73 10 44
4 58 12 96 20 25 9 13
3 51 5 40 9 50
12 49 8 89 4 79
Jetty
Having a parr We can help feed that hungry crew
with a delicious assortment of Imported ana Domestic
Cheeses. Cheeseballs. Spreads Beef Sticks and
Crackers Our trays are made on the premises only
hours before you are ready to serve them
Large Tray � Serves approximately 15 to 20 hungry
good time people
Medium Tray � Serves approimately 12 to 15 hungry
holly hail deckers
Pepper Patch
Spring Onion
GeleeD'oil (Garlic)
Pepper
Gift Packs
For that extra special present select from our variety
of gourmet gift packs With such goodies as caviar
escargot. imported sardines imported and
domestic cheeses and of course wines from all over
the known world
if you prefer we will create a Special gift pack on
the spot wrapped m a decorative cellophane and
Holiday bow
Remember that there is a 10 discount on all gift
packs prepared from now til Christmas
Small Tray
carolers
Serves about 10 to 12 hungry joyful
Priced according to cheeses chosen
17i r
XSA

POL K K L'
HOHET AWAPOS
tOUVL - ITALY
I vA fkatuu BWifc
A NN
-� fir IVN
BLANC
Monday Through Saturday
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5U?� Eaat (Earalfnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
V-HRIS LlC HOK , itenerut Manuet
TtRRY HfcRNDON. Dvtaorq) MwrtHMt LlSA DRLW , Cm '�"�
Jimmy Dupree, w�wmtw Paul Collins v�, ,��-
David Sevlrin, amna- ��� Charles Chandler, s� &&�
Anita Lancaster, ����, v�m David Norris, taami��w
December 9, 1980
Opinion
Page 4
U.S. Energy
Coal Is Best Alternative
Most nations of the world are
now facing an array of complex and
often confusing decisions that must
be made regarding energy. The
U.S often looked to as a leader in
so many international endeavors,
unfortunately seems to be fulfilling
this role again in the complexity and
confusion of its energy policies.
For several vears after the oil em-
bargo of 1973-74, the U.S. drifted
like a lost ship in a rising sea of
energy problems.
The need for coal to assume a
larger international role has never
been more clear. Coal, lignite and
peat account for about 47 percent of
the entire energy content present in
the recoverable reserves of all fossil
fuels in the world today.
Crude oil accounts for only 12
percent and natural gas for just six
percent. The remainder is in oil
shales and bituminous sands. There
is enough coal to fuel the current
v rid ' erg con umption rate for
hundreds of years.
Unlike oil reserves, which are
concentrated heavily in a few
geographic regions, large coal
deposits can be found worldwide,
from North America to Australia.
The total coal production of the
world was nearly 3.7 billion tons in
1976.
Reflecting the intensified explora-
tion for coal taking place in many
countries, the Conservation Com-
mission of the World Energy Con-
ference reported that the world con-
tains 12 percent more coal than it
had thought just a year earlier, and
18 percent more than it had thought
in 1974.
The primary opposition to coal
burning as a source of energy comes
from environmental groups and the
federal Environmental Protection
Agency.
Citing pollution and health fac-
tors, the federal government has all
but stopped coal burning and has
forced utilities to convert for the
most part to oil, which is in short
supply and is much more expensive.
Granted, coal does cause some
environmental problems. We are all
familiar with the situations in Birm-
ingham and Pittsburgh where it was
impossible for families living
anywhere near the steel mills to
spend anytime outside of their
houses because the air was full of
potash and soot.
However, we have reached the
point where the choice is clearly
whether to tolerate some pollution
and decrease our dependence on
foreign oil or eventually freeze and
starve to death in the dark.
A little potash and soot seem a
small price to pay in order for the
utility industry to be able to provide
electricity for the nation.
Coal is the only fuel that offers an
energy economy of plenty for
mankind for the forseeable future.
It is the one fuel that nature has laid
down :n sufficient quantity to com-
pensate for an understandable ig-
norance of economics and
geography.
The U.S. has not been the only
nation reluctant to make the hard
choices involved in reducing its con-
sumption of foreign petroleum, but
most other countries hae had fewer
options.
We Americans grew up accustom-
ed to the luxury of cheap and abun-
dant domestic oil and gas, in addi-
tion to our often overloaded coal
supplies. The idea of conservation
as a national policy, and the conse-
quences of a heavy loss of foreign
exchange for imported petroleum,
were alien to our experience.
Unless this nation turns toward
more coal production and eases en-
vironmental restrictions on coal, the
utility industry will be hard put to
continue to provide the nation's
demands for energy.
Coal is the only quick and ob-
vious solution to our energy pro-
blem.
ACCORDING- n( in
BREAK TO TflEfl VflCflTQN.
?vjl&i� FROM THE STAFF
'ySiPftJ1 JXikl&l-
CHRIS
r Campus Forum
Ficklen Plans Questioned
I read with interest Ken Kan's plan to
"increase the marketability" of Ficklen.
rhere were several inconsistencies in
Karr's plan. In the first place in a
capitalistic society prices usually in-
crease because demand rises tor a pro-
duct in shoi i supply.
I attended a couple of Pirate games
this year and 1 must confess I had little
- finding a seat and as tar as I
could tell 1 icklen set no records for at-
tendance this year.
Secondly, Karr alludes to the fact that
athletic tees are so much lower here than
at main of the other UNC schools and
the idea oi charging students would
ssibly" keep activity tees from ris-
ing. 1 would like to point out to Mr.
Karr that just last year we saw a healthy
increase in athletic fees that was suppos-
ed to solve the athletic department pro-
blems.
I would be willing to bet Karr the price
of two student season tickets that if his
proposal is enacted that next year about
this time the students will again be told
that their athletic fees are going up.
Thirdly, if this is a marketing plan and
Karr is a marketing director his
"timing" for this is nothing short ol
awful. East Carolina is coming off its
worst season in years.
The students here at ECU are as loval
as any I've ever seen and the idea of
repaying this loyalty in this way is
ridiculous. If Karr had waited to imple-
ment this plan when the Pirates go 9-2
and seats were at a premium it would
have made sense.
Finally, Dr. Elmer Meyer says it's
good that students should pay to get
reserved seats. In a deserted stadium Dr.
Meyer's statement will have a hollow
ring. I would hope ECU'S coaching stall
would fight this proposal so that it
doesn't lose its 12th man on the field.
DONALD PACK
MBA Program
Catholic Activist Day Eulogized
B PATRICK O'NEILL
On Monday December 1 most
newspapers throughout the country had a
fewTires calling attention to the death of
Dorothy Dd. Most readers had never
heard of her. That's noi unusual, even
main of her neighbors, on the lower east
side of Manhattan, never knew of Dorothy-
Da v.
A simple wooden box was her casket, on
it lav one ose. She was buried in an old
dress (she didn't own any new ones) faded
from numerous washings. In her hair was
the scarf she ovn wore. Simplicity was
her choice.
Dorothy never sought out recognition.
She was a gentle, great women�a thinker,
a writei. a believer. But most of all she was
an example. Dorothy believed in life�a
type o' life that recognized the basic
human needs of every person.
Perhaps she is best known as the co-
founder of the Catholic Worker Move-
ment. With a group o' friends she built a
movement that now includes forty houses
of hospitality thai service the needy from
coast to coast. Dorothy lived and died in a
Catholic Worker House in the Bowery sec-
tion of New York City. She chose this life
of voluntary poverty and daily service to
the poo: as her way of serving God.
The Catholic Worker also believed in
fighting a system that didn't allow people
to be human. They never accepted the
status quo and they always acted for
change. Dorothy was the leader of this
resistance.
Whether she was supporting conscien-
tious objection to World War II or
greeting a lonely alcoholic with a smile and
a cup of coffee: for 50 years she neer
wavered.
Dorothy Day was born in 1897 in
Brooklyn. New York City. In 1918, at the
age of 21, she spent 10 days in jail for
demonstrating outside the White House
with the suffragettes. This was her first o'
many arrests for acts of civil disobedience.
Throughout her life she took unpopular
stands. Washington Post staff writer Col-
man McCarthy said of Dorothy: "Her
protests against war, hunger, air raid
shelters, and civil defense drills were so fre-
quent that one municipal jail in New York
City had a Dorothy Day Suite
Dorothy touched many with her acts as
well as her writings. She was an ac-
complished journalist who freelanced for
many socialist newspapers in the 1920's.
Together with Peter Maurin, she began
publication of the Catholic Worker
Newspaper. The first issue was released in
1933 at the cost of a penny a copy. Today
the message and the price remain the same.
Her awareness and sensitivity grew from
her readings and associations. But her call
to action came from her long and inspec-
tive walks in slums and ghettos in Chicago
and New York. "From my earliest remem-
brance the destitute were always looked
upon as the shiftless, the worthless, those
without talent of any kind To Dorothy
they had value, she loved them.
Recognition of her work was ex-
emplified at her wake and funeral. J.F.
Stone, Cesar Chavez. Father Daniel Ber-
rigan, and Abbie Hoffman were all pre-
sent. Her most recent arrest was with Cesar
Chavez in California supporting the farm
workers.
Nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize
many times, she never won. Her politics
were considered too radical. In 1972 she
won Notre Dame's Lastare Medal. The
award recognized her for "comforting the
afflicted and afflicting the comfortable
Dorothy had a primciple of "gentle per-
sonalism On her eightieth birthday she
received a personal birthday card from
Pope Paul 1�V. She hung it on her bedroom
wall next to a handmade card made by one
of her barely literate housemates. She
reaped equal joy from both.
In recent years her poor health kept her
confined to her room much of the time.
She continued to write and see friends as
often as she could. She finally succumbed
to congestive heart failure, her daughter
and friends at her side. "She died very
peacefully they said.
Dorothy hoped that her work could
"bring about the kind of society where it is
easier to be good She suggested that this
be done through "little works She im-
pressed many of us with her little and great
works.
Groups, Candidates Shift Positions
J
Editor's Note: William Tyson is a senior
in the department oj Political Science. He
is originally from Philadelphia, Pa but
has spent the pai seven vears in Green-
ville.
B WILLIAM TYSON
Ronald Reagan moved from far right to
courting moderation in his stand on the
issues for political gains. In the past seven
or eight years Americans have seen many
revolutionaries and activists, left and right
wooing the center vein for political advan-
tages.
The Black Panther party moved from
radical left to revolutionary left to revolu-
tionaries working within the American
system to engender meaningful social
political changes for the downtrodden. Ex-
ample: organizing community programs
like schools, businesses and running party
members for political office. Bobby G.
Seale for Oakland California's mayor and
Larry Little for alderman in W'inston-
Salem is a fai cry from exhortations to off
public officials that didn't serve the true
needs of the oppressed community. "Off
the pigs "pick up the gun and put the
pigs on the run "right on, right on" as
well as "revolution is the only solution"
were the cries of the late 60's and early
70's.
The Panther move toward left center
stems from the fact that the disinherited
developed a severe case of stress and
rendered very little support for the party
programs. With its revolutionary slogans
and gun play the party had alienated itself
from the people. To get back in favor of
the populace the leadership changed such
words as pigs to policemen. Other changes
were courting public officials, wearing
suits and ties and going to church. The
church is the oldest foundation existing
where community organizing is concerned.
The leather jackets and guns were not
thrown away. They were put in the closet
for accessibility.
Black Panther Party community
organizing was discredited by police agents
within the organization. Then there was
Eldredge Cleaver who did harm to the par-
ty because he never moved from the far left
until he saw the light of God. Angela
Davis, an important black voice, never em-
braced the party programs. Her recent
drive for America's vice-presidency on the
Communist Party ticket shows that she is
still under the conviction that her organiza-
tion is the best thing for the oppressed
class.
I'm not sure where the party is political-
ly in 1980. My embrace of conservatism
and right-wing extremism wouldn't coin-
cide with their thinking. Conservatives and
radical right groups have always served as
an ingredient for Black Unity. Rosa Parks'
stubborness and Martin Luther King, Jrs
cry for justice all started when the govern-
ment blatantly disrespected the existence
of Black folks.
The recent Black Unity Conference here
in Greenville typifies the reaction of Blacks
all over America as we anxiously wait for
January 20th, 1981.
Until I'm better informed I'll always la-
ment that affirmative action and the
welfare system in its present state has done
more harm than good. They have been
tools to quiet the Black cry for unity and
respect.
We have nobody to blame but ourselves
for our state in life. We sold what land we
had, our bodies and souls to the man,
allowed him to divide and conquer us.
Drugs, racism, hatred, intimidation, are
just a few means used to split us a part.
I can't count the confrontations I've had
with other Blacks who threatened to blow
my brains out because, as they put it,
meaningful education and jobs is not the
road to take for the Black struggle.
Reflecting back on history class it comes
to mind how African tribes enslaved and
sold each other for economic and material
gain. I can also see Englishmen or
Spainards hiding behind the bush laughing
their behinds off.
From this, all I can say is that Blacks
and minorities didn't ask for the welfare
system or affirmative action, it was forced
on us because the Feds think they owe us
retribution.
James Brown had a number one hit
record 1968-69. "Say It Loud I'm Black
and I'm Proud Some of the lyrics are
"you don't owe me nothin just open the
door I'll get it fo myself
(

I
t





I Ml I SI l AROI INIAN
IMC I MBhR9, 1W0
la. II
it.
not the
Ties
?d and
material
imen or
aughing
Blacks
welfare
las forced
VG US
one hit
I'm Black
In ncs are
iopen the
I
Oswald Met With Russian Heads;
Hosty Breaks 17- Year Silence
DAI 1 AS (l PI)
1 wo months before the
shooting of President
John F. Kennedy, 1 ee
Harvey Oswald met in
Mexico Cit with the
kingpin of Russian es-
pionage and assassina-
tion in the Western
Hemisphere, said the
t HI agent responsible
t o t m onitori ng
Oswald's activities.
Hi caking a 17 yeai
silence, reined 1 Bl
ageni James P. Hosts
Jr. also said documents
aboul the Mexico Cit
meeting were secretly
removed b the I-HI
from Oswald's inteinal
security file in Dallas
hours aftei Kennedy
was shot.
In a copyi ight inter
view with the Dallas
Morning News, Hosts
said he was now talking
about the Oswald case
"because one of these
days they are going to
tve to face up and tell
the public the truth
Hosts said Oswald
met with Valeris V.
Kostikos in the Soviet
Embassy in Mexico Ci-
ty and he was prepared
to diop the bombshell
if the House Assassina-
tions Committee had
permitted him to testify
in 1978
Hosts said at least
foui documents about
the Mexico City trip by
Oswald were removed
from the Dallas file
during the afternoon of
the assassination. He
said they were taken
without his knowledge
while he was ordered to
go to the Dallas police
station where Oswald
was being interrogated.
Hosts said he did not
learn of Kostikov's
assassination and es-
pionage role until 1966.
But he said pre-
assassination informa-
tion from the FBI in
Washingon and other
government sources
svas enough to put him
on alert.
Hosts said he had to
eavesdrop on another
federal agency in Dallas
to get his first word of
Oswald's visit to the
Soviet embassy. He
said he sent an urgent
message to FBI head-
quarters one month
before the assassination
reporting the U.S. Im-
migration and
Naturalization Service
had received a com-
munication classified
"SECRET" from the
CIA in Mexico C its in-
dicating Oswald was at
the Soviet embasss
"The big thing sas
they didn't tell me
anything said Hosts.
"You can sets well sec
hoss the whole thing
could take on a dif-
ferent complexion if I
kness who he was talk-
ing to. IB I head-
quarters had it and they
sat on it
Hosts said he was
never supposed to have
known about the
docui ients and his FBI
superior became enrag-
ed when he indicated he
was asvare of the Mex-
ico Cits data on
Oswald.
Ci. Robert Blakey,
chief counsel for the
now defunct House
Assassinations Com-
mittee, contacted by
the Morning News, said
Hosty had "no new in-
formation to offer this
committee
But Blakey said he-
could not "deny or
confirm" Hosty's story
"because 1 am simply
not free to do so He
refused to comment on
why his committee's
report all but ignored
Kostikov, stating he
"cannot acknowledge
to you anything about
Mexico Cits
Supreme Court Refuses
American Indians' Case
The Happy Store
Open 24 Hours
Charge groceries,beer,wme
gas on M C .Visa.
or Amoco credit cards
10th & Evans St
752 877?
v ASH1NGTON
(i PI) � I he Supreme
c ouiI Monday refused
eai an appeal by a
group of American In-
iis m North Carolina
sho were criminally
psosecuted tor refusing
end their children to
�ol designated by
int) .
Bi axton C ha is and
� . - w ere indicted
and convicted in
Robeson Counts
violating the com-
pulsory school atten-
ice law in 1979 after
sent heir children
to Prospeci school,
whi( rmerly
been an ail Indian
school.
1 he school ones
were changed m lsTO
following implementa-
tion of a desegregation
plan developed by the
Department of Health.
I ducation and Welfare
that requires children
to attend the school in
the district where their
parents reside.
The counts school
system assigned the
children, who ranged
between ages 7 and 16,
to Oxendine school,
and when Chavis and
others declined to
transfer the children,
charges were brought
against them.
I lies argued t hat
they should be exempt
from the school's
boundary lines since
they were American In-
dians. The school
superintendent wrote
HEW officials asking it
an exemption could be
granted but federal of-
ficials replied that In-
dians were equally sub-
ject to the desegrega-
tion process.
It they were not.
federal funding �
about 10 percent of the
money for Robeson
Counts schools �
ssould be withheld, the
federal officials said.
When the children
showed up at Prospect
school at the beginning
of the 1978-79 school
year, the patents were
indicted and found
guilty by a jurs. Their
convictions were af-
firmed by the North
Carolina appeals court.
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PHONE: 756-8242





THE FASTCAROI INIAN
Features
IM I MMI K v.
Page 6
A Little Romance
j Comes To Camp
A Little Romance, a film directed by George Ro Hill is this weekends free flick, sponsored by Student
Committee. The movie is showing Krida and Saturday at 5, 7, and 9 p.m. From left to right are Thel
nard, Laurence Olivier and Diane Lane.
I nion Film
onions Ber-
Lauren is a 13-year-old
American, Daniel is also 13 and
French. That these star-crossed
adolescents are the most touching
and intelligent silver-screen lovers o
the season may tell us something
about the state of adult romance in
recent movies.
But George Roy Hill's A Little
Romance does not require
backhanded compliments. This
engaging celebration-of-life will be
shown this Friday and Saturday
night in Mendenhall Student
Center's Hendrix Theatre at 5. 7,
and 9 p.m. Admission is by ID and
activity card for students and
Mendenhall Student Center
Membership Card for faculty and
staff. The film is sponsored by the
ECU Student Union Films Commit-
tee.
In its sweet, witty and modestly
sentimental way, A 1 ittle Romance
With Crime
Advice For Protecting Your Apartment
Editor's Note: This article continues
a series of advice for students living
off-campus. This series is made
possible through the efforts of your
S(, 4 'residential C ahinet.
Keeping our guard up means a
lot more than simply laying out
money for expensive locks and the
like Experts think of security as a
"program" which includes hard-
ware, routine procedures, and large
doses ot common sense. Following
is a checklist you can use in blocking
out your own security program.
You can get a good idea of the
quality o a lock by judging the
amount of material used in its con-
struct ion. If a lock has a
"dead-bolt" or "dead locking
latch that's in its favor.
Close the door and see if it rat lies.
Give it a good shove and try to force
it.
If the door has glass, it should
also be equipped with double
cylinder locks. These are locks
operated from inside as well as out.
The door hinges should be inside.
If they're on the myone
can pull out t ,s and.
viola! instant enti .
If you have an inside room that
can be locked, so much the better.
It's a good place to store valuables
when you're away.
Immediate!) report any burned-
out hallway bulbs, lost kevs. or faul-
ts locks to your landlord.
Invest in insurance to cover per-
sonal property losses and keep
securities or papers that can't be
replaced in a bank box.
Have your valuables marked with
an engraving pen for quick iden-
tification purposes. Monogram and
etch your social security number in
both a visible place (to discourage a
thief from taking it) and in an in-
conspicuous place (to help identify
it if stolen).
When going out, lock your apart-
ment and leave a lamp burning and
the radio playing.
If you're going away for more
than a day or two, stop all regular
deliveries (newspaper, mail, etc.).
The Post Office will hold our mail
until you return.
If when you enter your apartment
you believe that you've been robb-
ed, don't play, Sam Spade and rush
in to check things out. The intruder
might still be there Co to a
neighbor's, call the police, report
the break-in, and have them send
over an officer.
When the officer arrives, let him
or her into the apartment ahead of
ou and check to make sure that no
one's there. Then begin your own
complete survey, taking care not to
disturb potential evidence, such, as
fingerprints, damaged or ransacked
See ADYICF. page 7, col. 4
delivers the romantic frissons that
many star studded, would-be
blockbusters of the heart lumber in
vain to achieve.
1 auren (Diane I ane) is the brainy
daughter o rich Americans living in
Pans. DanielI helonious Bernard),
the equally brainv son of a taxi
drivei. is a movie-mad kid who's
learned English from old
Hollywood flicks. I hey meet, ap-
propriately, on a set, where
Lauren's flighty, oft wed mother
(SalK Kellerman) is pursuing a
fatuous director (David Dukes).
I heir class and national differences
are qtikklv erased by their intellec-
tual common ground (they share an
extraordinary loathing for
Holderlin's poetry), and though
I auren's snobbish mother tries to
destroy their budding romance, they
ingeniously outfox her.
To achieve their ultimate roman-
tic goal a kiss under the legendary
Bridge o! Sighs in Venice - they
enlist the crafty assistance of a
distinguished old gentleman named
Julius (Laurence Olivier), who is
not. n turn- out. quite the man he
see
The bare hones ot this rather trite
storv doesn't begin to suggest the
fresh, loving details with which Hill
and writer Allan Burns flesh out
their tale. Hill (Butchaid and
the Sundance Kid. I he Sting) may
have picked ip a tew tricks from
I rut taut, but lie is also returning to
the charming comic mode o his
own The World ot Henry Orient,
which tirst demonstrated his knack
for treating adolescence without a
trace o! condescension.
(): pa cocious lovers
must have seemed too good to be
true. incarnated bv 1 ane and Ber-
nard they are I to be resisted.
Bei nard, .�. . . pini sized
Belmondo, plays Dame! with an
easy, street-wise charm. 1 ane, who
was recruited from Elizabeth
Swados's Runaways, plays I auren
with an understated, simple
elegance that is particularly magical:
she seems a distillation of the ovei
privileged, slightly bruised
American child into its purest, least
affected form. And Ashbv Semple
as tier gangling, gushing confidante,
Natalie, makes a perfect, hilarious
compliment.
There are also some great can
by David Dukes, as the vulgar film
director, and Broderiwk Crawford,
as himself. Indeed. Romance is
awash in cinematic jokes and asides:
Hill laces the action with references
to Hollywood lore, his own past hits
and Truffaut's Antoine Dome!
movies. The film's portrait ot young
love may be touching, but its most
moving moments celebrate love ot a
different kind: the passion that
movie professionals, both young
and old. have for their craft.
The adults in the film have a great
deal i) trouble keeping up with the
two youngsters. Arthur Hill plays
the same understanding stepfather
he did in I he Champ, but here he
has a chance to bring the Jiara
to hte. Sally Kellerman, as Lane's
snotty mom. lias her first comic
field day since M A s H v.
told by Hill that she will so
to move from posh Pan- to pi
Houston. Kellerman greets the :
with a wild-eyed speechle
borders on the truly mad.
Even I ord Olivi - w I
a shamelessly th
nonetheless natural performance �
is in constant dangei
scene- stolen Bui then evei I
the otl ips a fi
their a A � atl
A sentimental c �nstru
but A I ittle Romance earns
tion. With its coi
oi Rom : Juliet, it be i
sophisticated table about innoc
and romantic heroism battling
survive in a world that won't King
tolerate such grand illusions
Christmas9 True Meaning: Presents
B DAVID NORMS
fr�iurrA fdiior
Christmas has to be the most
wonderfully crazy time of year.
When else does everyone join in a
clawing, maddening, bankrupting
rat race to shop for presents for
other people? And what other holi-
day gets millions of athiests to
celebrate the birth of Christ?
But, this article is not about the
amusing follies of humanity during
the Christmas season. Instead, it's
about the true, underlying meaning
of this wonderful holiday �
presents.
Christmas presents are a really
handy thing to get. Without them, it
would be necessary for each of us to
go out annually and buy for
ourselves a year's supply of tacky,
ill-fitting clothes and useless pieces
Essay Contest
Announced
The Department of English is
pleased to announce the sixth an-
nual Paul Farr Memorial Essay
Contest.
The Essay Contest will be con-
ducted according to the following
criteria:
The contest is open to all regular-
ly enrolled undergraduate students
taking courses in the Department of
English during 1980-81 school year.
The essay should be work done
for an English course since the
deadline of the last contest, March
21, 1980. It must be submitted with
a short letter of recommendation
from the instructor of the course for
which it was originally written. A
student may submit more than one
essay.
AH essays must be typed double-
spaced on typewriter paper and
enclosed unfolded in large manila
envelope. Neither paper not
envelope should bear the name of
the writer. The writer should include
his name, address, and telephone
number on a separate sheet of paper
attached to the essay by a paper clip.
Also included in the envelope
should be the recommendation of
the instructor. All envelopes should
be addressed to Dr. David Sanders,
Chairperson, Student Services Com-
mittee, and should be given to one
of the secretaries in the English of-
fice.
See ESSAY, page 9, col. 1
of junk to clutter up our homes.
Presents also add something
tangible to the customs of the
Yuletide season, which is mostly
heavy on drama and decoration.
Take away gifts, and what have you
got? A tree in your house and
maybe some candy canes.
I think Christmas is nicer when
you are a kid. Children have a way
of being innocently greedy, especial-
ly at this time of year.
Also, Christmas was much more
exciting when 1 was a kid. The entire
month of December was saturated
with happiness and anticipation just
because of that one special day. I us-
ed to mark off the days and hours
until Santa's visit on calendars.
I was especially nice too, because
I knew Santa was watching every
move I made. I imagined a complex
control room like those that
monitored the space flights back
then, full of little elves at the TV
screens tracking every kid in the
world and making entries in a
logbook.
Although 1 had that Orwellian vi-
sion of how Santa kept tabs on us
children, I never did figure out how
he could put presents for three
billion people in one sleigh, much
less deliver them in one night. 1
think he'd have to start in July and
make several trips, no matter how
magic he was.
That stuff 1 mentioned about
tacky, ill-fitting clothes had its
beginning in a communications gap
between Santa and myself. My
parents believed in shopping early.
August or September. 1 made up my
final Christmas list in November or
December.
So, what I asked for and what I
got were two entirely different
things. No matter how plainly 1
wrote out my list, or how many
times I saw Santa Claus in some
shopping center and carefully told
him what I wanted, I always got
other stuff. It was looking to me like
the old boy wasn't too bright and
got my orders mixed up with so-
meone else's.
On the positive side, after a day
or two, half the stuff I got was
broken and the rest was so much fun
that I didn't worry about the mixup.
I just hoped the kid who was break-
ing all of my presents was having a
good time also.
Giving presents was also fun but,
despite what people say, not as fun
as getting them. One person I
always made sure to send a preseni
to was my dog.
Dogs probably don't understand
why there's a tree in the house and
socks hanging from the mantle, but
they understand being given a
delicious rubber toy to chew on and
tear up. I he nice thing about dogs k
that they are easv to buv presents
foi
Another thing about dogs is their
curiosity about other people's
presents. Unlike people, who
carefully peel back the Scotch tape
from the wrapping and gently peek
inside, a dog eschews subtlety. He
simply rips the wrapping (box and
part o the present as well) into
shreds and analyzes the wreckage.
You have to admire a dog's honesty,
even if you don't want him 'tanging
around your presents alone.
Our local postman had the unf
tunate habit o leaving large
Christmas packages on the ground
in the general vicmitv of our
mailbox. Our neighbors w
kindly bring the package up the hiii
to our house, after their dogs were
through inspecting whatever it was
we had almost gotten for Christmas.
1 was always a pret'y inefficient
shopper at Christmas time. It seem-
ed like I kept finding more stuff that
I wanted than stuff that I thought
other people wanted.
This year, I haven't really done
Christmas shopping. Well. I've
spent time shopping, but all 1 found
was a couple o' books I wanted and
an album I'd been looking for since
last year. I'm beginning to think I
should have stocked up on ashtrays
while I was taking ceramics.
Green Grass Cloggers
Photos by JON JORDAN
Last Saturday, the Roxy Music, Arts and Crafts Center sponsored the Fifth Annual Green Grass Cloggers Day
Celebration. Events of the day included performances by the Green Grass Cloggers, plus other dancers and musi-
cians, as well as workshops for banjo and fiddle music, clogging, square dancing and round dancing.
Brum
ridini
S
SI
the S
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ca
tri
fO
I
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I Ml I ASI C AROI INIAN
Dl C , MB! KY, ISWi
Advice For Protecting Your Apartment
Continued from page 6
property or objects lett by the looter.
The officer will ask you to file a report with as
complete a list as possible of everything missing.
You'd do well to keep an itemized list of makes,
models, serial numbers, and all valuables and ap-
pliances.
To avoid possible complications in filing in-
surance claims, it's a good idea to go one step fur-
ther and have your valuables photographed. Take
pictures now and send them to your parents or
Friends for safekeeping. Then, in case you're rob-
bed, you can enclose the photos when you send in
the claim papers.
I here's a good chance that the police will send
a detective to follow up the initial investigation.
He or she will ask a lot of questions, so be pa-
tient. And keep in mind that the detective may
also want to fingerprint your apartment.
Next, contact the landlord, especially if it was a
faulty door lock or defect in the security system
that contributed to the break-in. Ask to replace
the lock and or take further precautions to assure
better security for the entire building.
If you have a tenant's insurance policy that
provides similar coverage, report the losses to
AjyVt"T76S
your agent and have them send you claim papers.
I-ill them out as soon as you receive them. P o-
vide lull information models, makes, serial
numbers, plus physical descriptions, replacement
values and youi photographs.
The Case For
Tenants Insurance
A common assumption ot main tenants is that
their belongings are protected from theft and fire
under the owner's insurance. This is frequently
not the case. I nfortunately, too many tenants
don't find out until it's too late. This is to ac-
quaint you with the provisions of a typical te-
nant's insurance policy.
Most tamilv homeowners' policies cover you
even it you are "oil the premises but
sometimes thev set limits, (heck to see if you're
covered bv youi family's policy and what the
limit is. (Students living in dormitories are not
covered bv the University. It you're not covered
by your parents' polic) you can take out a policy
on your o n.)
Like auto insurance, an agent might not under-
write a policy for you because of the risk involv-
ed. Character does play a major role in the
agents' decision and even the area in which you
hve can make a big difference 1 it is classified as a
high crime area.
Main agents will not underwrite policies for
more than one person if they are unrelated,
because the risk of theft and accidents are higher
and because previous students have ripped them
oil.
Inrder to get the best deal, look in the Yellow
Pages tor an independent insurance agent,
because they represent several companies from
which thev can probabiv find the best deal foi
you.
A
Photo by GARY PA1
Bram
riding
I isseher of
a unkrvcle.
Sense Of Balance ttS
Scolt Dorm shows his unusual talent for juggling while �? �-S�T
Student Discount Promoter
Slow Start, Still Hopeful
Champaign, ill
figure studio owner Jim
( lark though! he'd
found the perfect pro-
d'jst foi an economj
minded college student
y: a $10 d
count club membership
that would save its
holders up to $300 at
local shops.
The club was named
the Student Buck Dis
count Club, and was
greeted enthusiastically
bv Clark's fellow mer-
chants, I hrough stu-
nt newspaper ads,
( lai k hoped to sell
5,000 :ket? to the
34,000 I . ol Ellin
students.
1 ike other s who'v e
ventured into student
discounts, however,
Clark was d i sa p -
pointed. Alter three
weeks, lie sold fewei
than 50 memberships
jnd was forced to cut
the cost to $5 in hopes
ol generating more
business.
:f�ven in tough
ec�njmic times, stu-
deojfdiscounts remain a
rikv business. Some,
like the "exas A&M I .
ggie Buck discount
coupon book, are suc-
cess! ul as ,i sei v ice bv
the student govern-
ment, but aren't in-
tended to make money.
( me of the more suc-
cessful discount pro-
grams now being of-
fered is the National
Student Discount
Corp . , curie:
available only to
students at four
irginia school - and
North lexas State I
NSDC seeks on-
v am pus sponsorshi p,
otc and sells
a $25 discount
giants its holdei 25 to
50 as:oss-the board
saings at some 300 to
400 local stores. 1 he
NSDC program is pro-
ving attractive even to
schools like North
fexas Stale, which has
seen other discount
programs fail, say s Stu-
dent Association Presi-
dent Steve Playei.
hi- mm imi - - ii inn
" e've been burned
too main times bv
companies thai come in
and promote this stuff
then leave you with
a ng ' a dvertisers
wondering what hap-
pened says Player.
1 he reason we went
with tins company is
because thev have a dif-
ferent approach
NSDC signs up the
merchants at no cost
other than the dis-
counts, promotes the
cards and gives S3.50 of
the S25 to the student
government or spon-
soring organization,
says Player. " 1 he main
thing he adds, "is
that thev don't gel any
of the money until
they've performed the
serv ices
NSDC Director
v ayne hopes eventual-
ly to form a national
network of discount
plans so that the stu-
dent cards can be used
across the country and
not just in one area. At
this point, he admits.
the NDSC is not a
money-maker. "But
given the enthusiasm of
the merchants and the
schools, I thmk it can
be he say s. "We're in
us for the Ions run.
ot
-hort haul
BUDGET
EYEWEAR
95
l omplrtr
SlnqU
Vision
ln ludes 1 pnses and Frames
f-reeTirulnPlastu
High Prescription Additional
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for the holidays.
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more reasons why
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8
!HI t AM KOI IM W
1)1 i I MM K -v. imn
Leitsirjo, Iwr CoiLicc. thc titoo (AMi
BV f)JiO f)of�t
I'M 60106 TDTTiif PcTSHOp
TO b�T SOhA( fooo po
THE flH�$ub iAOr0te)t
o
lAJHAT DO THf V FAT,
T
Pcakiut- sorrel
Seviior JftoHU Announced
cors
Fraternities Help Student Grades
According To Oregon Study
The Happy Store
Open 24 Hours
liniature Bottles of Wine
ror Christmas Stockings
eg 8, . l
I . ns Si
. B772
David B. Watts of
Raleigh, a senior stu-
dent in the ECU School
of Art, will be having a
show ot art works in
the Baptist Student
Union from De
12 IS.
I he exhibition is to
include graphic art
works which utilize col
Of key, cut papei, ink,
off-set press, and silk
screen; photograph) in
black and white; gun.
prints, and photo silk
he
hk
Annual
! raternit) lite may not
House" aftei all
In fact, joining a fraternity jusi may be the best
way to study and insure graduation, according to
Moi; is 1 emay . director of Oregon suite I nivei si-
ty's Counseling and Testing Center.
1 emay recently completed a study at that cam-
pus which shows that 54 percent of the freshmen
who joined fraternities in lt)"4 graduated, while
only 44 percent of non-fraternity freshmen receiv-
ed their degrees.
Lemay is not quite sure what causes the
discrepancy, but speculates it may K I .
personal ties usually developed between stude
at fraternities.
"Students pledging to fraternities
having good friendships earlier than most
pie Lemay says "These friends the ouickh
make help them get ovei early rough spots as tar
us studying is concerned
I emav's report comes as no surprise to Jack
Anson, executive director oi the National In-
trafraternity Council in Washington. Anson says
he's been telling people for years that fraternities
are the best places on campus to get work done.
"Unlike many other things on campus, frater-
nities have goals, ideals and principles winch
discipline students to studv -nson insists.
' "here's a brotherhood there, a real concern for
the progress and advancement ol each student
carries ovei into the classrooms
losi important, Anson says, is that this report
encourage students reluctant to pledge
fraternities because oi its "party image" to make
al step. "They can learn and have fun at
same tune he adds.
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infortnat��n call all 0S1S
(toll ' traa ngmtar
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MONDAY-THURSDAY
Oyster Plate3.95
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Crab Cakes1.85
THURSDAY
Popcorn Shrimp2.95
screens. Illustrations in
pencil, goache, and col-
ored pencil, mixed
media paintings and
ceramics will also be in-
cluded.
Wa! is a candidate
tor a B 1 A in Com-
munication Arts with a
minor in drawing.
He is a n active
member oi design
associates, and the sun
oi Barbara and Alvin
W. Us.
s. � -
Sandy Wilcox, a
senior in the l
School ol Art vull
exhibiting a show
her art works in
Jenkins from D
12-18
I lie show ' '� in-
clude coloi woodcuts,
lithographs and mi
media paintings
Wilcox is a candi
tor a B.A. in prii
ing.
She is the daui
ol Mr s. R
Willcox.
MERRY
CHRISTMAS
ECU

t

rrorn
All The Folks
At
APPLE RECORDS
THANKS
FOR MAKING THIS
OUR
BEST YEAR EVER
Buy
B4CF

BONANZA
AT THE
ECU
U.B.E.

A
i
-
PK!
A
Use the cash you get for
your textbooks to buy Christmas
merchandise at 20 off.
Includes all merchandise in
our store except textbooks.
Sale begins Tuesday Dec.
9th thru Thursday Dec. 18th.
Do your Christmas shopping
Before you go home!
m
-
(,
S
H
Sportswear
ECU novelties
Knapsacks
School supplies
Teaching Aids
Dictionaries
U.B.E
528 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Rem
Can
Bv Ml
U
i
Essa
w
T
F

?

I
-�





i in ik �i im w
K I MBI K i 8(J
Remembering New Names
Can Sometimes Be Hard
K MIM HK.HSMM M
.
o yourself and then oul
1 nk of a fi lend ith
md it to ielate
i way, w hen you
youi friend's
t will come to youi
i potential!)
d doesn'i work I
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Vfter you ii �meone,
a me d w n on a
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with where you
avbe a few of then

theii cla
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to pick up
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Essay COntest Announced
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Shi uld



.

MU� fjU-
WED Ladies Nite
With ALLEN
THURALLEY CATS
FRIDYNAFLO
SPECIALS ALL
WEEK LONG
fU'
� id wilder.
aUtk
SONDRA LOCKE
o
Merry Christmas
From The Staff Of The East Carolinian
SPORTSWOKLD
COLLEGE NIGHT
Tuesday Night
6:30-10:00
Bring I. D. and
G�t In For Only 11.25
AccuCopy
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D
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thru Sat Dec
QYf
Before, During &
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Kroger Savon
has everything
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MELLO YELLO OR
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11-Oz.
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9 �M TO 9 PM
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Phone 756-7031





rut i si i koiii w
L! t 1 MBI K v. 1980
Page 10
Four Foes Go Bowling
Battling The Champs?
ECU football learn in action
Ph.Ho h, (. K I'M UksOS
Mcl.aurin Sets
Relay Team
Takes Fifth
In Penn Meet
B
WILLIAM
VELVERTON
Maff V riter
Even though his mile-relay team
of Keith Clark, Craig Rainey,
Carlton Bell and Tim Sephas finish-
ed fifth at the All Conference Track
Meet in Bethlehem, Penn Sunday,
ECU coach Bill Carson found out
something about this year's squad.
"I thought at the beginning o
this year that this mile-relay team
might be better than last year's
Carson said, referring to the 1979
squad that finished third in the Na-
tionals held in Detroit. "It just
depends upon how fast the young
people mature. The potential is
there
Gone from last year's mile relay
team are Otis Melvin. who
graduated and Stan Curry, who
didn't return to school. Both were
All-Americans last year, along with
sophomore Shawn Laney, who
heads this year's squad. Laney
didn't participate because of
sickness, but would have led off,
Carson said.
Carson took two mile-relay teams
to Pennsylvania, including the one
that finished fifth with a time of
3:21.4 and another squad consisting
of Ray Dickerson, Doug Jackson,
Charles Watkins and Johnny Wig-
gins.
The ECU coach said the meet was
primarily a preparation for future
dual meets. "Coaches bring their
people to run them and then look
them over to see how their relays
would be set up in January Car-
son explained.
Although one relay team finished
behind Farleigh Dickinson,
Athlete's Alliance, Seton Hall and
Morgan State, Carson was pleased
with the efforts of Rainey, Bell and
Watkins.
"Bell's a fighter; he's got to do
it Carson pointed out. "We know
that Rainey will be very good and
Watkins will be good also
Carson said he wasn't disap-
pointed in his relay teams' perfor-
mances, but pointed out he has to
do a better job coaching. "A lot of
work's got to be done Carson
said, "and it's up to me to do a bet-
ter job with these kids
against Florida
national champs
State, possible
Everyone interested in football in
the Greenville area knows that the
ECU gridders finished the 1980
campaign with a disappointing 4-7
mark. One major reason for that
record is the fact that four of those
losses came to teams that will be
playing in post-season bowl games.
In addition, the Pirates fell to
Eastern Kentucky, a team that will
be in post-season play in the Divi-
sion I-AA ranks and will be seeking
a second consecutive national title.
Pirate opponents headed to bowls
include Southern Miss
(Independence Bowl), North
Carolina (Bluebonnet Bowl),
Miami, Fla. (Peach Bowl) and
Florida State (Orange Bowl).
As a matter of fact, when the
teams are through bowling the
Pirates may well have plaved both
the 1980 Division I-A and I-AA na-
tional champs.
Eastern Kentucky, of course, is
challenging for the I-AA title while
Florida State is very much in the
Charles
Chandler
race for the I-A crown.
The Seminoles, 63-7 victors over
the Pirates, are currently ranked se-
cond nationally, trailing only
number one Georgia.
Georgia (11-0), is headed to the
Sugar Bowl to face Notre Dame
(9-1-1). Should the Irish win that
game, and that is certainly a
possibility, then FSU would have
the national title in their own hands.
The Seminoles (10-1) face fourth-
ranked Oklahoma (9-2) in the
Orange Bowl on New Year's Day. A
win over the potent Sooners coupled
with a Georgia loss would almost
surely give Florida State the crown.
But, Georgia must first be beaten.
The Independence Bowl, which
the Pirates played in in '78, was
almost the setting for a game featur-
ing two Pirate opponents. Southern
Miss already in, Southwestern Loui-
siana had a shot but lost it wher the
club fell to eventual bowler
McNeese State in the last game of
the season.
North Carolina's Tar Heels, 31-3
winners over the Pirates, travel to
the Bluebonnet Bowl to face Texas
on New Year's Eve. With a win the
llth-ranked Heels should move into
the final top ten.
The final Pirate bowling oppo-
nent, Miami, plays m the season's
last bowl game, the Hurricanes'
matchup with Virginia Tech in the
Peach. Bowl set for Jan. 2.
The above information lends
foundation to the tact that this
year's schedule was the toughest in
ECU historv. With injuries and '79
graduation losses takmy their toll,
the Pirates were not able to greet the
games with the confidence and suc-
cess that may have been present in
past seasons.
The 1981 football schedule will
not be released for some while but it
is known that Pirate fans will have
at least one "name" team to watch
in Ficklen Stadium.
Miami will come to Greenville,
bringing what will prohablv be a
nationally-ranked team to Pirate
COuntry.
Other teams on the schedule in-
clude '80 repeaters North Carolina,
Duke and N.C. State.
Pirate grid coach Ed Emory is in-
volved m a fierce recruiting war tor
the services of Laurinburg's massive
ot tensive lineman. Greg Quick.
Quick is a big 6-5, 260-pounder
that Emory calls a "real blue-
chipper
The Pirates are reportedly em
broiled m a battle with Clemson and
Georcia for Quick's service
Despite Ragged Showing
ECU Downs Berry
B CHARLES CHANDLER
Sports I clll.if
rhe Easl Carolina men's basket-
ball team overcame a ragged perfoi
mance to gain a 75-53 win over
little-known Berryollege last night
(Monday).
1 reshman guard Barry Wright
and junior David Underwood led
the way foi the Pit ales, scoring 12
points apiece.
1 he two teams committed an
amazing total of 53 turnovers bet-
ween them in a game that was
neither pretty nor well-played.
The visiting Vikings plaved most
of the game conservatively, using a
weaving offense to keep the game
close.
"I don't think Berry plaved this
game to win it EC I head coach
Dave Odom said following the af-
fair, "Thev plaved to keep it close
Despite the game's dullness, the
Pirates were never in any danger.
ECU took a 2-0 lead on a Mark
Mel aurin jumper at the outset and
never trailed, a 2-2 tie being the
closest the visitors came to the
Pirates
ECU went into the locker room at
the half with a 36-24 lead and in-
creased it to as much as is in the se-
cond halt (at 48-30) before a late ex-
plosion made the final margin 22.
Over the game's final 54 seconds,
ECU connected on four o five free
throw attempts and outscored Berry
8-2.
Besides Wright and Underwood,
the only othei scorei in double
figures foi the Pirates was Mel am
ing, w ho finished with 1 1.
The guard combination of Willie
Robinson and Jim Owen led the wav
for the Vikings, the two getting 17
and 16 points, respectfully.
I he two teams shot similarity
from the floor, the Yikes hitting
51.2 percent and the Pirates 51 per-
cent.
"I his was a very tough game for
us to prepare tor Odom noted.
"We didn't know what to expect.
Heck, we didn't know if they would
show up becuase that got here late
Despite the game's lack of excite-
ment, Odom called it a "good ex-
perience" toi his young club.
"Oui guvs arc a day older, a day
more experienced he said. "A
part of both life and basketball is
adjusting to different situations
The Vikings used a one defense.
something that Odom said was a
plus factor for the Pirates.
"1 was glad to play against the
zone finally the second-year men-
tor said. "We needed that. We'll
sure see it more down the road
With his Pirates safely secured ot
a 3-1 record, Odom set his sights on
Saturday night's trip to College
Park, Pa. to face powerful Penn
State. Despite the fact that his club
will be a big underdog, Odom says
stranger things have happened.
"I'm ready to go on the road
against a tough opponent he
claimed. "I will coach to win at
Penn Slate. It's not unthinkable
that we could win. Maybe I'm crav
but I reallv think we can win up
there
The Penn State game opens up a
stretch for the Pirates in which thev
will face, m addition to the Nittanv
I ions, Detroit, Iowa State, and
possibly Duke, before January 1.
"This is one of the real tough
stretches in our schedule Odom
said. "We could end up playing five
very, very good teams. How we
come out will tell us all alot about
this ballclub
Ph hi . KN l'IIIKM l
Mike Gibson Pulls I)on Rebound
Campbell The Victim
Lady Pirates Ease By, 75-66
B JIMMY DtiPREE
Managing t dilitr
Despite a barrage of mistakes
which almost cost them their fourth
win of the young 1980-81 season,
the Lady Pirates of East Carolina
toughi oil a rally by the Camels o
Campbell University to claim a
"?5-66 victory Monday in Minges
Coliseum.
ECU led 36-33 at the end of the
first half, but the Camels capitalized
on Pirate turnovers with Melvarie
Watson and Sharon Williams
leading their second-half surge.
Watson's five fool jump shot less
than three minutes into the final
half, gave Campbell the lead for the
first time since the 7:05 mark of the
opening stanza.
ECU's Heidi Owen followed with
a jumper from the free throw line to
put her squad back on top. From
there, the momentum shifted and
the Camels trotted to a 48-44 lead
on a Watson field goal with 11:54
remaining on the clock.
ECU All-American candidate
Kathy Riley sat out the entire first
half and only came into the game
with 10:49 till the final buzzer, but
the talented senior forward made
the most o' her playing time,
bucketing an assist from center
Marcia Girven and going on to tally
19 points in the closing minutes.
East Carolina head coach Cathy
Andruzzi termed Riley's failure to
play in the first half a "disciplinary
matter and added that Riley "
didn't deserve to start. You have to
earn the right to start on this team.
She did, however, earn the right to
play in the second half
Riley showed her determination
on both ends of the floor, scoring 14
points in the final 4:31 of the game
connecting on five of seven field
goals and nine of 12 tree throws on
the night, while collecting four fouls
for her scrappy defensive perfor-
mance.
In the early going, though, it was
Pholo t� (,H PMIIKMIN
Girven Fires One Up
a pair ot offensively unheralded
Lady Pirates who carried the burden
of leadership. Girven, a senior from
Woodbridge, Va. and Owen, a
senior forward from Staten Island,
N.Y providing the scoring boost
due to Riley's void and also that ot
junior forward Sam Jones. Jones
grabbed 10 rebounds for ECU, but
fell far short of her seasonal average
of 16.8 points as she struggled free
for five on two of nine from the
floor and a lone free throw.
Girven connected on nine of 15
field goal attempts and one of two
from the charity line for 19 points,
while Owen chipped in five of eight
from the floor and one of two from
the line for 11. Girven also grabbed
a game-high 13 rebounds.
Williams earned top scoring
honors on the night with 20 points
for the Camels, while teammates
Watson and Ronda Muller con-
tributed 12 each.
"We didn't play good at all
lamented Andruzzi, whose Pirates
now stand at 4-1 including a loss to
nationally second ranked Old Domi-
nion. "We were just glad to come
out of it with a W. We were just out
of it mentally.
"We're looking forward to hav-
ing the next 10 days off during ex-
ams and then come back to get
ready for the Carolina Christmas
tournament (Dec. 18-20 in Chapel
Hill). They haven't had a Friday
and Saturday off since August; they
need it, I need it, we all need it
Over the holidays, the Lady
Pirates will participate in the
Queens Tournament in New York
Dec. 27-30, and then embark on a
journey to the "sunshine state" as
they face the University of Florida,
Stetson and Florida State January 5,
6 and 8 respectively.
I
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heat
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FOI
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Phol� h, (,R PUIIIISIN
Kathy Riley Sets T� Receive
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I Ml t AST CAROLINIAN
DEC EMBER 9, 1980
11
Jj
1
6
Dooley Out,
Dye Still In
At Auburn
MHl JRN, Ala
il PI)� The search for
.i new uburn football
coach continues amid
reports that Georgia
c oach nice Dooley
accepted the Auburn
job but onl so he
could ma neuei
himsell into a bettei
contraci at Georgia.
Charles "Mister'
ith, an Auburn
I 'niversity trustee, said
Monday that Dooley
accepted an Auburn of-
fer and then used the
deal as a wedge to bei
his Georgia con-
tct.
"It is my opinion
tt Dooley had given
us a commitment
said the trustee. " I hat
i- aKo the opinion ol
several membeis ol the
board 1 hen he used
ubuin University as
instrument to get a
contia at cieoigia
Aftei talking with.
ubui n official
Doole turned down a
reported
$225,000-a-yeai otter
last Wednesday to
return to his alma
matei as head football
coach and athletic
director.
"He (Dooley) had
accepted at one time
because the terms ol
the contract were set
said Smith. "He set the
standards of the con-
tract 1 hen. he got the
boost ov e i at
Georgia
Dooley has pre ious-
1 denied c h ar ges
similar to Smith's.
Smith, a Mon-
tgomery businessman,
announced last month
he would bring up a
motion at the Nov.
board meeting to fire
Auburn Coach Dime
Barfield. Bar field
resigned last wel
Meanwhile, t he
chairman of a special
search committee said
Monday thai selecting a
new Auburn coach is
0
Gymnasts Fall
ECU'S Annie Loeschke
"a ei n pi ivate matter
and the media should
not speculate on who
will eel the job.
Morris Savage, a
Jasper lawyei and
formei Auburn too!
ball player, criticized
published and broad-
cast reports about the
coaching vacancy. say
ing it could hurt some
coaches who are nol
candidates fot the job.
Savage, a membei o!
the university board ol
trustees, told the lull
board during a regulai
meeting that the search
committee is still inter-
viewing prospective
candidates.
"We will not com-
ment on speculation
he said. " The proposi-
tion ot hiring a man
who is in the profession
ot coaching football. Ol
any other profession
foi thai matter, is a
very private matter.
"While main aie be-
ing considei ed and only
one can be selected, the
careers, livelihood and
families o everyone ot
these men who have
been mentioned are in-
volved said Savage.
" 1 hei e is no stoi v at
this time
It was icpoiled Mon-
day thai six candidates
have emeiged as the top
contenders foi the job,
which was vacated
when Hat field resigned
undei fire from school
presidenl Dr. Hanlv
I underburk and the
board of trustees.
The six, according to
t he Mont gomei v
Advertiser, are St
1 ouis Cardinals assis-
tant Billy Atkins,
1 mim Bellard of
Mississippi State. Dick
C rum of North
Carolina. Auburn
assistant Alex Ciibhs,
John Mackovic ot
Wake forest and Pat
Dye of Wyoming (and
formerly of EC U).
Savage said the com-
mittee is aware that it is
working against a
Saturday deadline
w hen Southeastern
Conference schools
may begin signing foot-
ball recruits.
By
CANDICE
MATTHEWS
Mufl VVnlrr
Despite some fine
performances by the
I ady Pirates, ECU's
women's gymnastics
team fell to a strong
N.C. State team Friday
night in their first home
meet, 108.2 - 103.
Performing before a
record crowd of about
500, the I ady Pirates
made few mistakes,
completing 85�'o of
their routines cleanly.
The Wolfpack gym-
nasts, performing more
difficult routines, made
more mistakes than the
Pitate gymnasts. Due
to new rule changes,
however, the deciding
factoi in this meet was
level of difficulty and
not the number ot
mistakes.
I he final score is no
indication of the
outstanding perfor-
mances made by ECU'S
gymnasts. On the vault,
EC I claimed first, se-
cond, and third places,
with Kathv McNeinev
scoring an 8.25, Louise
Mathews scoring an
8.15, and Elizabeth
Jackson receiving a 7.6.
Susan Lawrence also
performed well, tying
for fourth with a 7.5
On the uneven bars,
Claudia Hauck earned
third place with a 6.65.
Elizabeth Jackson and
Wendy Meyer also con-
tributed fine routines,
receiving scores of 6.3
and 6.2, respectively.
On the balance
beam, Elizabeth
Jackson took third
placd with a 7.00, and
Kathy McNerney
claimed fourth with a
6.3
Claudia Hauck, us-
ing jazzy, contem-
porary music, earned
fourth place in the
floor exercise with a
score of 6.25.
"The girls performed
up to their full poten-
tial said ECU coach
Jon Rose. "Coach
Weston and 1 are very
pleased with the team's
attitude and perfor-
mance
The next meet for the
Pirate gymnasts is
January 16 in Minges
Coliseum against Rad-
ford and William &
Marv.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Techn.cs SA S00 60
am SL 230 fuNy automatic
turntable with Empire 2000 E" III
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid $1100,
best otter Call 752 8860 ash tor
Graham
FOR SALE Sharp black and
h T v
A
ib
SURFBOARD �
Call 752 8276
FOR SALE Used bumper pool
table, with balls and cues Price
negotiable Call 523 2703 after 500
p m
FOR SALE New NihKo NO ?�0
metal cassette deck Sendust
heads S27S Call 758 �775 between
5 00 and 7 00 p.m , ask for Peter
FOR SALE: 1973 MGB, new paint.
new top clean Must sell to buy
new car il�5. Call 756 8722
FOR SALE RCA 4 channel scan
ner hi lo telescoping antenna,
fle�ible antenna, battery charger,
rechargable batterys, carrying
ca�e with clip lockout switches.
auto mannual scan $75 Umstead
oH.ce 757 6052
FOR SALE W79 Jeep CJ 7 E�
cellent condition extras $5950
Day 75' 6052 mght 975 2266
Washington)
FOR SALE JVC KD '0 Stereo
Cassette Deck Eight months old
E�celient Condition $250 new
.ell for $150 Call 757 4674
FOR SALE womans one speed
b.cycle Encellent condition $45
Call 752 2576 Lock included
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of gold and silver Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E 5th St 758 2127
HURRY Time running out but
perfec' Christmas g.ft offer still
open' Spec.ai student prices $10
cancatures $20 and up portraits
personalned T shirts done too!
Professional portrait service since
1976 Call John Weyler 752 5775
ANYTHING YOU CAN WRITE
A' can write better Typing pro
otread.ng editing Write Right
7 56 9946
MULTI MEDIA MAKERS
Greenville's newest creative art
service has a special Christmas ot
fer 8�10 pen and ink portraits or
characatures of your favorite per
son for only $15 Suitable for
framing A unique gift idea' Tak
,ng orders until Dec 5, get your
order m now by calling 752 4277
Mon Fn between 3 00 p m a"d
6 00 p m
NEED A RIDE North' Going
thru Virginia West Virginia. Ohio
and on to Indianalalong I Tt
Leaving Friday morning Dec 19
If interested call Dr Chenowefh
7$7 6000 or 7S8 1627
LOST: Four Barrel Carburetor
758 5082
SUSAN Now that you are finally
getting out of this place There is
one thing we always want you to
remember EFB! Tammy Betsy.
and Ann
CONGRADULATIONS
SCOOTER Were proud that
you ve turned your one trick pony
into a two trick horse Signed
Saddle Tramps
MARK BAKER You still owe me
$10 for the soccer ball you popped'
S C
WILL DO TYPING in my homi-
Medical terms Dissertations
Resumes. Thesis Please can
756 5337 after 6 00. will do light
bookkeeping
ELIZABETH Thanks tor the
Christmas presents Looking for
ward to spending the holidays with
you We re going to ski like hell'
Merry Christmas I love you
Chns
THANKS Martha and Cindy tor
the elves and cookies Bill
McDaniel and Check the Checks
CONGRADULATIONS To
Deborah, Martha, Mary. Angela.
Gmny, Deidre. Gail. Keith, Lew.
Doug. Bob, Mike and Chuck for a
iob well done From Bob and
Woody
VERN Thanks for the Football
Jersey! Cuj wul be thrilled
Geep
Mrs Clark and Debbie have a
Merry Christmas
FROM ALL OF US A1THEEAST
CAROLINIAN to all of you HAVE
A HAPPY AND SAFE HOLIDAY
WARNING Super Friday is com
ming Jan 16th Get Ready
after 6 00 p m
FEMALE GRADUATE STU
DENT Needs roommate to share
two bedroom apartment or house
Call 758 0255
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEED
ED to share two bedroom apart
merit $75 rent plus ha'l utiiit.es
Call 758 2116
APARTMENTS FOR RENT one
bedroom $"�s two bedroom $245
Call 7i r'S
WANIfc Female roomma '
share half rent and expenses.
Preferably young professional or
mature studious minded Call
756 6056 afler 6 00 p m or 823 6031
ext 212 during day
FOR RENT Nice two bedroom
apartments with heat and water
furnished Call 756 1050
ROOMMATE WANTED Share
two bedroom apartment one mile
from campus $135 rent Call
- S-i Ol WRQR attef 10 00 p m
-o'
across
Memorial from Westend Shopping
Center Call 756 5303
APARTMENT FOR RENT Half
mne from campus two rooms kit
chen and bathroom $H5 month
756 8926
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share two bedroom
apartment at ViHage Green
Beginning next semester Call
752 5570
FOR RENT Priva' I KMm ClO�e
tocni-us II
752 4006 after 12 00 noon
ATTENTION
TELEPHONE
CUSTOMERS
FOR RENT
ONE OR TWO Female room
mates needed by January l Call
758 0838 after S 00pm
GRADUATE or responsible
female roommate desired for a
two bedroom apartment close to
campus Available mid
December Call 758 1636
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed
to share a spacious apartment at
Langston Park walking distance
to campus Great place for next
semester Extras are included in
the rent Don t m.ss this chance
Ask for Leilie, 7S2 7651
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed
to share two bedroom apart
ment.inear campusl $75 month
plus ' j utilities Upperclassman
preferred Available anytime
Call 758 4527
ROOMMATE WANTED Halt
rent and utilities Call 756 9733 In
Winterville
ROOMMATE WANTED To share
iwc bedroom duplex located at
2506 B E 3rd Street Rent is 87 50
per month, plus half utilities Call
758 7724
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED Wilson Acres, private
room, ! j rent and utilities Jenny
or Susan 752 2719
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Bedroom bath den and kitchen
Modern facilities Call 752 3020
If you are leaving school at
semester's end, be sure to
notify Carolina Telephone �
758 9111 to disconnect your
service. If you desire to
change the responsibility to
your roommate, be sure the
roommate signs a contract
assuming the responsibility.
This will requre a visit to
our business office. Your
current bill should be paid at
disconnection time.
THIS IS FOR YOUR
BENEFIT
Mill Outlet Clothing
264 By-Pass
Across From Nichols
JUNIOR SHIRT-MAKER DRESSES
KAHK1,PLA1DS.STRIPES
SPECIAL BUY LADIES BLAZER
WOOL BLEND
MENS FLANNEL SHIRTS
SMMEDLGAMD X-LG.
MENS SKI SWEATER!
Open 9:30-6:00
MoriSat.
26.95-29.95
59.95
GOLD BEADS
r ) Everyday
Low Prices
DIAMONDS
Pendants Earrings Rings
(Color & Diamond Combinations)
ELECTRONICS
Stereos Tape Players
Calculators Clock Radios
Stereo Stands
HOUSEWARES
Toastmaster � GE Sunbeam
Kitchen Tools Blenders Cookware
PHOTO
Canon Minolta
Pentax � Kodak � Vivitar
PERSONAL CARE
Hair Curlers � Blowdryers
Sunlamps Curling Irons
Make Up Mirrors
SILVER CRYSTAL CLOCKS
TYPEWRITES SMOKE ALARMS
FIREPLACE ACCESSORIESBABY GOODS
SPORTING GOODS
J.D. DAWSONCO.
TURN YOUR OLD GOLD INTO CHRISTMAS CASH
Avaiiaoie
All Day
Every Day
Open
11A.M9P.M.
Sun-Thru Thurs.
11 A.M10 P.M.
Fri.&Sat.
4
I
patin'y
Ste&r
�rfo
il �
A
3005 E.
10th Street
Greenville, N.C.I
(Beside Hastings Ford)
Take Out
Service
Available
758-8550
Fast & Easy Delicious Lunches
Jhicken Filet Sandwich
Bakad Potato or Franch Frlea
Diet Plate
4 Oz. Chop Sirloin
Cottage Cheese & Fruit
Old Fashion Cheeseburger
No Potato
Chllds PlaW
4 Oz. Chopped Sirloin
Baked Potato or French Fries
Toaat
$169
Steerburger
Baked Potato
or French Frtaa
Banquet
& Party
Facilities
Available
Steak Sandwich
Plain. Peooers & Onions
Mushroom Gravy, CI)OQ
Baked Potato or M
French Fries
. r-t r- s � A I e NO TAKE OUTS ON
LUNCH SPECIALSt-UNCHEONSPEC.ALS
Monoav And Wednesday
Beef Tips
$229
Tueaday Ana ihursaay
Chop Sirloin
89
8 0z
Luncheon Specials Served With Baked Potato or French Fries h Toaat,
30 Item Delicious Salad Bar
1 - r

fa
I
I





12
im i m c koi ii w
'I I MMI KM, ISK(

The Fearless Football Forecast
Special Bowl Games Selections
INDEPENDENCE BOWL, Dec. 13
McNeesc Malt-10-1) s Southern Miss (8-)
GARDEN ST ATI BOWL, Dec. 14
Na (8-3 s Houston (6-5)
HOLIDA1 BOWL, Dec. IV
sMl (X-) s Kriham ONRg (10-1)
I AM.I-KINK BOWL, Dec. 20
Maryland 8-3 vs Florida (7-4)
HIM A BOWK, Dec. 26
Penn Stale (9-2 vsOhio state (9-2)
II l I Or FAME BOWL, Dec. 27
rkansas(r-5� s I ulanc 7-4
LIBERTY BOWL, Dee. 27
Purdue (8-3) s Missouri (8-3)
M N HO UK, Dee. 27
Mississippi St. (9-2) s Nebraska (9-2)
GATOR BOWL, Dee. 29
Pitt (10-1) vs South Carolina (8-3)
HI I I BONN! I BOWK, Dec.31
V Carolina (10-1) vs Texas (7-4)
COTTON BOW I Ian. I
Manama (9-2) vs Baylor(10-1)
OK N(.I BOW I .Jan. 1
I lorida stale 10-1) s Oklahoma (9-2)
ROM BOWL, Jan. 1
Michigan (9-2) s Washington (9-2)
SI CAR BOW I Jan. 1
Georgia (11-0) s Notre Dame(9-1-1)
PIH BOW I .Jan. 2
Virginia lech (8-3) s Miami. Ha. (8-3)
vv I
Sell It Faster
Through
Classified Ads
Call 757-6366 lor information
The
Kappa Sigma
5th ANNUAL
Christmas Party
Tuesday Nite - 8:30 1:00
December 9, 1980
Prizes Gifts and Surprizes for Everyone
And a special visit from Saint Nick himself
DON'T
Miss Out On The Fun and Festivities
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY DEC.10-
SATURDAY DEC.13
BILL LYERLYBAND
Doors Open 9:00pm Music Starts 9:30pm
Wednesday
Ladies Free
Men $2.00
Thursday
Ladies $1.00
CHARLES CHANDLER Sports EditorIKKK IIKKNDON Advertising ManagerIIMM DuPREE Managing Editorhi N SMITH K( I Ml)
Southern MissSouthei n MissSou! hei ii Miss.
HoustonNavyVnNa
BYlBY ISMIB I
FloridaFloridaM.tr landi
(hio Stale(hio Statesi. mio Sta
ArkansasAtkansasAi kansas
MissouriPurdueMissoui iPut
NebraskaNebraskaNebraska
PittI'll!South C arolinaPitt
N. CarolinaN. ('arolinaN. arolinaN Cai
AlabamaBayloiAlabamaAlal
Florida StateFlorida St.Florida SiFl
MichiganMichijMichiganMi
Notre DameorgiaNotre Dame �� Da
MiamiMiamiMiami
W f- -m
m
mm
STUDENT UNION
las1 ikKtcmu tfN.�iiv
The Happ Store
Open 24 Hours
Bud � �.
" ' NAiller Kegs $37 00
' � "� . -00
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Kockwood Stables
Horteback Riding

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BETWEEN
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752 1015 TOM
or NANCY
ABORTION
The Fleming Center has been here for you since 1974.
providing private, understanding health care
to women of all ages at a reasonable cost
Saturday abortion hours
Free pregnancy tests
Very early pregnancy tests
Evening birth control hours
The Fleming Center we're here when you need us
Call 781-8680 in Raleigh anytime.
THE FLEMING CENTER
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PRICES ARE UP!
TEACHERS WANTED !
Positions available for
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FOR JfWILtY, VAIUAILES ANYTHiNC
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Lt. Russ Jowers
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1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
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PAYING ON THE SPOT
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YOMRPBOnsSIONAL PERMANENT DIAUR





Title
The East Carolinian, December 9, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 09, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.99
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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