The East Carolinian, December 4, 1980






�he Sast Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol
.55NoT fyO �
8 Pages
Thursday, December 4, 1980
Greenville, North Carolina
Circulation 10,000
Crime Wave Hits Hill
B PAUL COLLINS
Nf�s tdilnr
Seventeen separate incidents of
theft have been reported to the
Campus Police as the result of a
crime wave that hit College Hill dur-
ing the Thanksgiving break.
Various amounts of stereo and
television equipment were taken
from 12 rooms in Jones, two in
Aycock and one in Scott, according
to Lt. Johnny Rose of Campus
Security.
In other incidents on College Hill,
an undetermined amount of money
was removed from 13 machines in
Aycock's basement gameroom. and
three Greenville residents were ar-
rested and charged with the theft of
throe bicycles
The equipment removed from
rooms in Jones was found in the
northeast stairwell by Mike
Winslow, a second floor resident.
He discovered $6,070 worth of
equipment on the landing between
the ground and first floors when he
returned Sunday at 1 p.m.
"When I drove up, the stairwell
door was locked, so 1 went around
to the front Winslow explained.
"When 1 found the stuff 1 went and
got Hec Ramsey (Jones resident ad-
viser), and we took the stuff to the
counselor's office
The two found 26 pieces of equip-
ment, according to Ramsey. "There
were speakers, receivers, a color
television � all kinds of stuff he
said.
"1 found a stereo in the hall on
the second floor and two sets of
speakers sitting in front of the hall
adviser's door on the third floor
Winslow said.
Three flags valued at $45 were
also taken and have not been
recovered.
The Campus Police have no
suspects or witnesses, according to
Rose. "We surmise that the
unknown person or persons who
entered the rooms stored the equip
ment in the stairwell with the pur-
pose of removing it later he said.
Rose said that the method of en-
try is unknown at this time.
Equipment worth $2,720 was
stolen from Aycock and Scott and
has not yet been found, according to
the police.
A stereo and television worth
$1,900 were taken from Jack Givens
and Art Hinton of 307 Aycock. A
turntable, receiver, cassette deck
and color television were removed
from the room according to Bryan
Rhodes of 312 Avcock.
Two speakers, valued at $260,
were taken from Frank Averett of
308 Aycock. Stereo equipment
worth $560 is also missing from a
room in Scott.
All the incidents occured some
time between 6 p.m. Wednesday
and 1 p.m. Sunday, Rose indicated.
"We don't really know who did
it, or when" Rose said. 'T hate to
guess because you just can't tell
about these things. We don't know
if it was professionals or not. We do
surmise that the incidents are
related.
"All the equipment was of high
quality, and we feel like whoever did
it went through and picked it out
The gameroom break-in was
discovered by a security officer on a
routine check at 11:10 p.m. Satur-
day, Rose said. Entry was made
through an unsecured window on ,
the north side of the building.
Virginia Stancil of Stancil Music
Company, which owns the
machines, said that the amount of
money taken was minimal because
the machines had been emptied
prior to the Thanksgiving break.
"They just popped the locks off,
so there was not even much damage
done to the machines she said.
Three men were arrested Wednes-
day night for allegedly stealing three
bicycles from College Hill.
In an unrelated incident, Campus
Police arrested a juvenile Friday
night for allegedly taking a bicycle
from behind Greene Dorm.
Rose indicated that a considerable
amount of larceny is common dur-
ing a break. "This is primarily due
to the small number of people on
campus. This increases a thief's op-
portunities he said.
Rose also indicated the police
coverage of College Hill was the
same as during a normal week.
"After all he said, "our people
have to have off for the holidav
too
Asked why College Hill was hit
much more frequently than the rest
of campus, he said, "We figure the
Hill is more accessible because Col-
lege Hill Drive is a through street
and also because of 10th Street, 14th
Street, Elm Street and Rock Springs
Road.
Both Rose and Chief Francis Ed-
dings urged students to take their
valuables home with them during
breaks. "We just do not have
enough people to cover
everything Eddings said.
Campus Drug Abuse
A major research study on the alcohol and drug
consumption patterns of the students and employees
of East Carolina University has been completed ac-
cording to Jerry F. Lotterhos, Chairman of the
E.C.U. AlcoholDrug Education Committee.
The studv was an outgrowth of interest in this area
going back to 1978. At that time an Alcohol Drug
I ak Force was appointed by the Administration to
study the alcohol drug consumption patterns and
make recommendations as to the university's respon-
sibilities" in this area of concern.
The study was designed by members of the Task
i t(, measure several aspects fif 'he FCTJ com-
munity use of alcohol and drugs. These included
utilization patterns of alcohol and drugs as well as
negative consequences occurring around such use. A
formal sampling of all students was done bv a sampl-
ing o! classes scheduled during the 1978 spring
semester.
All employees within the university were surveved
using the same survev instrument used tor students.
A total of 64M students and 790 employees returned
the voluntary survev.
The collected data is reasonably representative of
the campus with the exception of a slight
underepresentation of freshmen and of males. The
confidence level of a sample this large is over 95.
The studv was completed to provide an objective
standard on which to evolve positive and appropriate
program responses to alcohol drug issues within our
community and to set a baseline of information
around which future program efforts might be
evaluated.
The utilization patterns of the various drugs in the
campus community are alcohol and marijuana. The
use of the major illegal drugs appears to be relatively
small, especially in terms of habitual or addictive use,
as the dailv use of such druns is minimal.
Negative Side Affects Missed class due to hangoverPercentage , Of Students Experiencing 27, Percentage Of Employees Experiencing .7
Received lower grade due to drinking90
Had trouble with university administration30
Nauseated and vomited4322
Driven a car after drinking5241
Involvec in accident81.3
Involved in fight after drinking82
Had a "blackout-while drinking4010
Criticized by a date because of drinking132.5
Damaged a personal relationship because of drinking123
Engaged in sexual ac-
tivity under the in-
fluence of alcohol
which I regreted
26
Local Citizens' Group Launches
Fight To Make Pitt County Dry
Anti-liquor forces, attempting to The county referendum would
thwart efforts to secure liquor by give voters the opportunity to
the drink in Greenville, launched a outlaw the sale of liquor in Pitt. The
campaign Monday to dry up Pitt Greenville vote deals only with the
County. question of allowing the sale of mix-
The Concerned Citizen Commit- ed drinks within the city limits,
tee of Pitt County opened their at- Hudson accused the commis-
tack on the county's $4 million sioners of being pro-liquor because
alcoholic beverage control system the board had approved a request
by asking the county commissioners for a countywide mixed-drink
to authorize a referendum on liquor referendum last year. "We made a
sales. The board postponed action sensible, legal appeal he said,
on the request until after Feb. 17, "We weren't given the same con-
when Greenville will vote on the sale sideration
of mixed drinks. The commissioners said it would
The Rev. Van Dale Hudson, a not be fair to hold a county referen-
Greenville minister and spokesman dum on the same date as the city's
for the committee, said liquor op- vote.
ponents would try to force a Liquor by the drink was rejected
referendum by securing petitions in the countywide vote in June 1979,
signed by 20 percent of the county's although a majority of voters in
registered voters. Greenville and Grifton favored it.
The upcoming vote in Greenville,
���i�WBS����� which was requested recently by the
f TKa IneirlCk City Council, was made possible bv
Wll I llw lllOivrc a new state law.
���������������������i" Hudson said he believed the
negative vote in the county referen-
Announcements2 dum and in a ,973 statewide
Campus Forum 4 referendum on mixed drinks in-
Classifieds . . 6 dicated support for a dry county.
Editorials 4 e sa'd Quor opponents would
Features 5 concentrate their efforts on
Sports 7 eliminating the ABC system as a
way of fighting the mixed drink
vote.
State officials said elimination of
the county ABC system would pro-
hibit all liquor sales in Greenville,
despite the outcome of the mixed
drink referendum, because the li-
quor stores operate on a county
basis. A separate ABC system in
Greenville could be established if a
referendum authorized by the
General Assembly resulted in a
favorable vote.
Bill Hester, administrator of the
state Board of Alcoholic Control,
said he did not know of a case in
which a county ABC system had
been eliminated through a referen-
dum. Such a vote in Pitt County
would wipe out one of the largest
and most profitable systems in
Eastern North Carolina, he said.
According to state records, the
Pitt County system had $4.3 million
in sales for the fiscal year ending last
June. The system provided $768,299
in state taxes and about $42,000 for
local alcoholic rehabilitation pro-
grams.
In addition, the system had a pro-
fit of $564,688 which went to local
government. Hester said the county
probably would have to make up the
loss of that revenue from other
sources.
Photo ny JON JORDAN
Stolen Stereo Equipment Found In Jones Dorm
Christian Group Wins The Right
To Meet On Missouri Campus
KANSAS CITY, MO
(CPS)�John Williams recalls the
two and one-half years that his
group, called the Cornerstone Cam-
pus Organization, was not allowed
to hold meetings on the campus of
the University of Missouri-Kansas
City.
"We were hurting says
Williams, founder of the Christian
fundamentalist group. "We
couldn't spread our message to
students. It was terribly frustrating.
All we wanted to do was spread the
teachings of Jesus Christ
Williams will at last get his
chance. The 8th U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals has ruled that university
officials violated Cornerstone's
freedom of speech when they barred
it from using campus facilities.
The court decision, according to
various legal and religious
spokesmen, might open all campus
doors to religious groups around the
country. Though an apparent ma-
jority of colleges permit religious
groups to use campus facilities, a
significant number of them keep the
groups out for fear of blurring the
delicate separation between church
and state.
"Most universities will change
their regulations regarding religious
groups predicts Jim Smart, Cor-
nerstone's lawyer. "Schools will do
it on their own. They won't even
want to risk lawsuits
Lee Boothby of Americans
United for the Separation of Church
and State agrees. He thinks the
Missouri decision will encourage
religious groups to sue to gain access
to college facilities.
The decision might even start a
new wave of on-campus religious
activity. Jane Nelson, a lawyer for
the Great Plains Legal Society, says
allowing groups to practice in col-
lege buildings will generate even
more interest in the organizations.
"First of all, it will make things a
lot easier for these groups Nelson
ventures. "They won't have to pay-
off-campus rent, which can be very
costly, and there won't be as many
transportation problems. But the
main thing is the likely possibility of
acquiring more walk-ons, people
who wouldn't join but just happen-
ed to walk by
The decision, Boothby adds, "is
not binding at other districts, but
it's impact will have considerable
weight across the country
The controversy in Kansas City
began when Cornerstone routinely
applied to use university space in
January. 1977. Though the group's
application had been accepted
without complication since 1973, in
1977 university officials rejected it
because Missouri's constitution
bans using state resources to
"advance a religious cause
Cornerstone countered that ad-
ministrators, by invoking the con-
stitutional restriction, had violated
the religionists' guarantees to
freedom of speech and equal protec-
tion.
"It just wasn't fair that other
groups were allowed to have their
meetings on campus while we
couldn't Williams contends. "All
we wanted was a forum like
everyone else
A lower court ruled last spring
that Cornerstone couldn't have its
forum on-campus. The U.S. District
Court in Kansas City said "that in-
fringement, if any, of the group's
free exercise of rights was justified
by a compelling state in-
terest�Missouri's long history of
separation of church and state
Now the Court of Appeals has
overturned that verdict. The three-
judge panel ruled that "allowing
religious groups to hold meetings on
school grounds would no more com-
mit the university to religious goals
than they are now committed to the
goals of groups like the Young
Democrats and the Young Socialist
Alliance, "which also use school
facilities
"Quite frankly cedes university
lawyer Jackson Wright, "I was very
surprised bv the ruling. It just isn't
right
Wright says that the state ap-
propriates money for the university
to operate its buildings, so that af-
fording religious groups free office
and meeting space in the buildings is
tantamount to subsidizing them.
Wright, moreover, notes "the
university is worried about all these
fringe cult groups doing the same
thing. All these crazies would have
meetings here
But Boothby, who says his group
is seriously concerned that fun-
damentalist groups like the Moral
Majority have endangered the
separation of church and state,
believes that giving Cornerstone
campus space doesn't threaten the
separation principle.
"Giving them space is the
minimum amount of sponsorship
on the part of the university
Boothby says. "It's not nearly the
same thing as handing actual funds
over to them
Cornerstone's Williams is relieved
by the court decision. "I finally felt
that justice was done
The University of Missouri,
however, has asked the U.S.
Supreme Court to review the case.
Though Cornerstone will get to
use campus facilities at least until
the Supreme Court makes its deci-
sion, Boothby says "a ruling from
the Supreme Court would be a big
precedent. It would settle once and
for all a lot of the questions sur-
"ounding the role of religious
groups on college campuses.
The only other pending case is at
Western Washington University in
Bellingham, Wa. Administrators
there also denied a campus religious
group access to college facilities, but
university lawyer Stewart Allen is
confident the Missouri case won't
influence his.
Yarbrough Assumes Title
POLS Head Named
Dr. Tinsley E. Yarbrough,
teacher, writer and researcher in
constitutional law and judicial and
legislative politics, has been named
chairman of the Department of
Political Science at East Carolina
University.
"With his background and
research capabilities, we are ex-
tremely fortunate in having so-
meone of Dr. Yarbrough's caliber
assume the chairmanship of this
department Dr. Angelo Volpe,
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences, said.
Yarbrough, a native of Decatur,
Ala has been acting chairman of
the political science department for
almost two years following the
resignation of Dr. William F. Trout-
man, who returned to teaching
duties in the department. A search
committee conducted a nationwide
search before choosing Yarbrough,
an ECU professor since 1976. He
joined the faculty as an assistant
professor in 1967.
"He had done such an excellent
job as acting chairman that he
emerged as the clear choice Volpe
said.
Yarbrough holds his PhD from
the University of Alabama where he
obtained his bachelor's and master's
degrees. His MA thesis was on the
famous Alabama jurist Frank
Johnson and his role in civil rights.
Yarbrough's PhD dissertation
was "Fair Trial versus Free Press:
Trial Publicity and Procedural Due
Process
He is the author of numerous ar-
ticles and of a forthcoming book,
"Judge Frank Johnson and Human
Rights in Alabama being publish-
ed by the University of Alabama
Press.
He holds honorary memberships
in Phi Beta Kappa, Pi Sigma Alpha
political science fraternity and Phi
Alpha Theta, honor society in
history.
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough





! HI EAS1 CWROl IN1AN
DECI MBI K4. 1980
Announcements
JOBS NEEDED
inmates at the Maury Correc
t.onal Facility are looking tor Obs
Many inmates have been recom
mended tor work release but iobs
aren't available it you Have one to
otter or know ot one please call
756 9324
PRISON VISITS
Many ECU students have joined
v.uiy Correctional Facilities
Thursday nighl visiting program
K) p.m. 9:00 p m
Ca' pooling a� � up is
available It's I ' I �� �� '
mospftere �rtd � �ole tor all
Let s not (oi Bel these lonely people
�� � . i . i
� 124
CIC FEFLLOWSHIPS
Until February I 1981 prospec
live applicants trom outside In
diana may call loll fret between
9 00am and S 00pm ESTIor m
formation or application forms
The number is (800) 457 4420
Now m its fourth year, the CIC
Fellowships Program in the social
sciences makes awards in an
'hropology BC0 D '
geography history, poll! ll
science psyihology and
sociology
Th ��� ��
availabk h
torafes m
histoi�
literal
I.ngi � � !
i-s fellowships are
Sent? seeking doc
studies art
ompara t i ve
igtish German.
jsu philosophy
religion Romance languages and
Slav
FINANCIAL AID
. on
IT 10 10
11 ons

Auditon
�VI fm
MUSICIANS
Aud lions for all mu!
h' nv; sen pstei per'o �
a eberJ
1 00 3 00 at f'etcher Must
Center
Non �
ludil ' '� '
lor nformation
students, see
teachers Audition
eng.n,
chen
,0' cuM
natural
s and
int lude
. ences
LaCROSSE
a oe h
ng'o
.pr.nc
meeting of the
.acrosse Club
1 ,n room 104 Ot
�- � speaker
- the .�
a � 'to play in
PI KAPPA PHI
T he h'
A
.ome par
Kapps
iquiries concerning
�elds
SIGMA TAU DELTA
S 9tra Tau Delta National
Fnojist Honor Society will hold
its Decembei n eeting on Thurs
day I '� 4. at 7 30 p m mSpi
129 Indu ' � new members
and election ot new 1981 officers
a precede a slide sound show by
Karen Blansfieid on Greece To
day and Yesterday
SNA
� � . � . � , . � � . I the tan
semester ot " � � ' tent
Nurse s Assoc ation will be held on
Wednesday Dec 3 1980 at 7 00
p m m the nursing auditorium
Carol Cox will present a film on in
cest a" � a be followed by a
� s ussion D- �a -ic lot gift cer
� .1 ati a I eld Members
and non nrH ,n attend
CAROLING
Menoenhall S'udent Center in
.tes everyone to come and hear
"e songs of Chr.stmas presented
. �� � r , hoi h ' " �
ID ' � � � voore
JEWISH STUDENTS
RESIDENCE STAFF
Applications are now being
received by the Department of
Residence Life for Resident Ad
visors tor Spring Fall Semester
Any full time student who has
reserved a residence hall room
and has an overall average of 2 0 is
eligible to apply Information and
application forms can be obtained
from a Residence Hall Director or
the Residence Lile Office, 214
Whichard Building
N.CS.L.
The North Carolina Student
Legislature will hold their weekly
meeting on Thurs Dec 4 at 7 00
m Mendenhall Student Center in
room 221 We would like to see all
members at this meeting Note.
Have you started your research on
the Bil Topics?
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
General College students plann
ing to declare physical education
as a maior during the spring
semester should report to Mmges
Coliseum at 11.00 a m . Wednes
day December 10 for a motor and
physical fitness test This test is
required of all students prior to
declaring physical education as a
maior Report m athletic attire
that will permit running, lumping,
etc Additional information is
available concerning the test by
dialing 757 6441
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A service ot Holy Communion
win be celebated on Tues Dec 9th
a1 5 30 p m at the chapel m the
Methodist Center, 501 E 5th St
iacross trom Garrett) all students
and faculty welcome The Rev
Bill Hadden, Jr , Chaplin, a
ate the service
TEAM HANDBALL
CLUb
The ECU Team Handball dub
will meet Tuesday afternoon
December 9 at 4 30 in 104
Memorial Gym Plans for the 1981
season, including h ; � A'es'
Point and New York C . a
discussed at Iti � � . I � � , lub
will field both worm
lean s, and i �� � �
. �� to parl
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
INTERNSHIP
Sophomores, lumors and seniors
currently enrolled in a North
Carolina I oilege or North Car olma
residents attending an out ot state
college have until February 2 to
apply for the Institute of Govern
ment Summer Internship Pro
gram m state government
Twnetyfour students wil be
selected by an advisory commit
tee to participate in a living
learning internship in North
Carolina state government
directed by the Institute of
Government The Institute ot
Government Interns will work
from May 26 through August 7
Students will work 40 hours each
week in a responsible position in a
state department, participate in
evening edui afional seminars and
be paid approximately JI30 per
week
Students interested m the pro
gram should secure a broc hure an
nounong the program and a State
of North Carolina application form
from ther college or university
placement II � r local Job Ser
vice of
Students interested n the In
stitute ot Government program
should ma-i an application to the
Institute of Government, Knapp
Buildmu 059A, The University of
North Caroina, Chapel Hill, North
Carolina 27514 by February .
1981
Applicants will be accepted
without respect loraci � � olor
national origin - � g � han
dicap
Lili JOl i student of East
Carolina ersity set � 1 is a
Institute of Government intern in
state government dur,nq the sum
mer of 1980
The Happy Store
Open 24 Hour
C heck Lathing Cardi
for Faculty and Student
Amoco.Visa.M.C
ARMY NAVY STORE
Backpacki, ��!$. �otner.

a Field Deck. Flight Snorkel �
Jackets. Peacaati. Parkas.
Shoes. Combat Boots. Plus.
i sot S. Evans Street

EXPERT STYLING
FOR BOTH MEN
AND WOMEN
BY APPOINTMENT
ONLY
SHIRLEY'S
KUT & STYLE
301 EVANS ST. MALL
MDMGES BLD. SUITE
M�W
Sell It Faster
Through
Classified Ads
Call 757-6366 for information
Pfaza
-Hut
Special Offer
0
FREE I
PIRATE BEER MUG
With Any Large Pizza
At Pizza Hut
2601 East 10th St.
OFFER GOOD ONLY WHILE SUPPLY LAST.
752-4445
SAAD'SSHOL
REPAIR
I I irandf V i
, �
Qua
Repai
ATTIC
' NMc,ut
Thur GOOD HUMOR
GOOD HUMOR
� WHEELS AND
THRUSH
So.PENDULUM
' -SNOW
INSTRUCTORS
NEEDED
instructors are needed to Iracn
several short term beginning level
workshops or courses for the
Crafts Center ,it Mendenhall Stu
dent Center The areas tot which
instructors are needed are
darkroom techniques, iewelry and
silkscreen Graduate or fourth
year art students, or anyone who
has sufficient knowledge to teach
a course in any of the areas men
tioned may contact Tana Nobles
Crafts and He reation Direi tor at
Mendenhall �, 6�n
"SHARING LIFE"
The Fountain of Lite Christian
Fellowship will sponsor a program
entitled. Sharing Life on Thuis
m� December 4tn at ; 30 p m
The proqram aiI be in room 244 of
the Mendenhall Student Center
1 here will be music drama
speakers and a rmnistr. ti H �
deal Come sti.e �� " � evening with
us and discovei
how to share life
ALLIED HEALTH
The Allied Health Profesions
Admission Test will be offered at
East Carolina University on Satyr
day, January 17 1981 Appiu al
blanks are to be completed an'i
mailed to the Psyc hotogical Corp
304 East 45th Street Ni n 1 -
NY 10017 to arrive by December
20 1980 Application blanks are
also avaHble at the Testing
Center. Speight Build ng Room
105. East Carolina Un.ver �,
DANCE
A vi ksl ' .���'
choreographed I , � � u11y
� �� � �
Un � '
ami Si� �
s !
' I �
r a r y b rt � '
modern da'
ECU dani. e students
. ' .
8 15
GMAT
��' �
i ot
� i '
� I K
inks are 1
� � � '
� .

'9890 �p
' �
105
SOULS
SO ' � � '
m Thursday. Deci
Pieasi .

Centi
ECU SURF CLUB
met'
? 00pm - -
Bf
BKA
Hanki
ana F lance I iterruiv a
its Dec. em Lei n eeting on
Dei . � :�' Woom 221
esi speaker
s. be Mr I
v igei ol Wheal First
All interested
members and noi are
invited ' ��
The Happy Store
Open 24 Hours
Cheap Cane Prices
Beer,Wine.Mixers
Amoco.Visa.M C.
EXCEPTIONAL
MANAGEMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
CURRENT
OPPORTUNITIES
nuclear engineenqq
business management
aviation law.nursmq
WE OFFER
.starting salary up to
$17,000,increases up to
$26,000 in 4 years
30 days paid vaction
annually
fully financed graduate
programs
superior family health medical school scholar
plan ships
more responsibility and intelligence
leadership opportunities civil engineering
world wide travel and shipboard operations
adventure
prestige and personal
growth pontential
MOST LIBERAL ARTS MAJORS ARE ELIGIBLE
The NAVY OFFICER INFORMATION TEAM will
be on campus Dec.2,3,4,outside of
the Campus Bookstore If you are interested
in arranging an appointment or taking the
Navy Officer Aptitude Test
call 1 800 7568 Toll Free
FREEWATER
Maryland
D.Cs
Hottest Rock
Attraction
'The most amazing playlisl in town,
eluding material by Bonnie Raitt. E I
Dylan, Otis Redding, Hank X
George Jones, Jackson Browro
Martin Mull. Still, they're best knov
loved for an imitation ot thr Greatful U-
mvincing enough to pass a Memon
Guitarist Dave Jacobson sounds more like
Garcia than Garcia has in years. �( ity
Paper, Ba Itimore.
FriSat. Nites
Dec 5-6
,
i
. m
r i
TRY OUR
NEW LEANER ROAST
BEEF SANDWICH
Lots of folks make roast beef sandwiches.
But nobody makes em like Hardees'new Leaner Roast Beef.
Tender, tasty juicy, leaner-than-ever roast beef fresh from the oven-
sliced thin and piled high on a sesame seed bun. It is really something else.
GET TWO
BIG ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES FOR $1.99
Please present this coupon before ordering. One coupon per cus-
tomer, please. Customer must pay any sales tax. Not good in com-
bination with any other offers. Offer good only at participating
Hardee's. ���
narderc
BEST EATIN'ALL AROUND
COUPON EXPIRES 2 M 80
$





SOULS
eting
4 1980
m ting
ie Cultural
SURF CLUB
ii Club
ev 4 at
oenhall
eid All
ER
$
tuun. in-
iitt. Bob
ill
en
and
fead
like
Gtv
Marine Prosecutors
Reveal New Details
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 4, 1980
CAMP LEJEUNE
(UP1) � Marine Corps
prosecutors have
revealed a new detail of
the mysterious cir-
cumstances surroun-
ding the disappearance
of Pfc. Robert R. Gar-
wood more than 15
years ago in Vietnam.
Pvt. John Geill, the
last U.S. servicemen to
see Garwood before he
fell into enemy hands,
has told naval in-
vestigators he en-
countered Garwood in
a DaNang bar around
dusk on the day he
disappeared in
September 1965, pro-
secutor Maj. Werner
Hellmer said Wednes-
day.
At the time of Gar-
wood's disappearance,
Geill told superior of-
ficers the last time he
saw Garwood was in
the Marine compound
oustide DaNang. He
said then Garwood told
him he was going on an
authorized Jeep driving
mission.
The disclosure mark-
ed a shift in the trial as
attorneys battled over
testimony concerning
Garwood's disap-
pearance, which began
a 14-year ordeal behind
enemy lines in Viet-
nam.
Until Wednesday,
the court-martial had
centered on testimony
from former POWs
who encountered Gar-
wood in several jungle
prison camps from
1966 to 1969. They
have accused him of
joining the Viet Cong,
carrying a weapon,
standing guard over
prisoners and assisting
the enemy in interroga-
tions and indoctrina-
tions.
The Happy Store
'Open 24 Hours
Bud.Schlitx
Strolu.Miller Kegi $37.00
Pony Kegs$19 00
12oz����� $8.99
Garwood, 34, of
Adams, Ind is the on-
ly Vietnam-era ser-
viceman to be tried on
charges of collabora-
tion with the enemy.
Hellmer said Geill �
subpoenaed to testify-
when the case resumes
next week � changed
his story when he spoke
to investigators last
year.
Defense attorneys
spent much of Wednes-
day seeking to block
testimony from two of
Garwood's former
commanding officers
whom prosecutors said
believe Garwood was
on an unauthorized
absence when he disap-
peared .
Garwood contends
he was captured during
a gun battle with two
dozen Viet Cong after
he became disoriented
and strayed down a
lonely road while on a
mission to pick up an
intelligence officer.
Former Marine Lt.
Charles Buchta, an of-
ficer in the motor pool
where Garwood work-
ed as a driver, testified
Garwood would not
have had to lease the
Marine compound in
order to pick up the in-
telligence officer. He
said Garwood would
have had to go 200 to
400 yards from the
motor pool to reach the
intelligence section
headquarters.
Lt. Col. John A.
Studds said his in-
vestigation led him to
believe that Garwood
was not on an authoriz-
ed mission, but did not
elaborate.
TEACHERS WANTED!
Positions available for
college seniors with
bachelors or graduate
degree in Math, Physics,
Chemistry, or Engineering.
( U.S. citizenship under the
age of 29) Teaching
graduate level courses
at the Navy Nuclear Power
School in Orlando, Fla.
Complete benefits
package including
the oppertunity to
pursue an advance
degree
I
Send transcript or call
Lt. Russ Jowers
Nuclear Programs officer
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, NC 27609
l-800-662-7FifiR
Starting Salary
$18,000 and Projected
salary after 4 yrs $27,000.
zz
y
' S
, ���� �
THE
GREAT
RING
EXCHANGE.
(Or How To Get Your College Ring For Less.)
Trade up. Trade in. And save. Because
ArtCarved offers you the unique opportun-
ity to trade in your 10K gold high school ring.
You can save up to $90 on the college ring of
your choice. And ArtCarved offers twenty
different styles from which to choose.
Get ready for The Great Ring Exchange.
You can't afford to pass it up.
IRT(7IRVED
COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizing your ability to achieve.
The Official
ECU Class Rings
Dec. 4-5
10-4pm.
Student Supply Store Lobby
Wright Bldg.
$10
f fcposit required. Master Charge r Visa H11 pied
� 1980 ArtCarved College Rings
PLAID WOVEN SHIRTS
in Assorted Styles � Plaids
ONLY $7.98
ALSO
COWL-NECK
SWEATERS
� 100 Acrylan Acrylic
� Tan,Grey,Black,Navy.
� Red,White,Cream and More
� Sizes S,M,L
$11.98 Values
NOW ONLY $6.90
Downtown Evans St.Mall ph. 752-8965
D.A. Kelly Carolina Ea.t Mall Ceenville
ph. 756-8242
KAPPA SIGMA
AFTERNOON DELITE
at the
ATTIC
55$ QWmp!) 25
�'�-��
n. m i �&.?





QUre East (Earoliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
VHRIS Lit HOK, Oeneral Manager
Terry Hlrndon, nm� ���� Lisa Drew, ,��,� M��,
Jimmy Duprlf, ifcuimiaw Paul Collins vfWlWlM
David Severin, (�lu�;��, ifcww Charles Chandler, v ,��
Anita Lancaster, rmdMM ��� David Norris, a�,� &&�,
December 4, I WO
Opinion
Page 4
WZMB Analysis
Rumors Proven To Be False
The controversy over WZMB this
semester deserves a final analysis to
clear the air and set the record
straight.
The long-awaited radio station
has been a topic of major concern
and much discussion among
students this semester. The issue
dominated the pages of this
newspaper for over a month, with a
hefty dose of comment on this
editorial page.
Many rumors ran back and forth
through the grapevine about what
had happened, who did what, and
who didn't do something.
The East Carolinian made some
errors of judgement and fact in
some of these editorials because we
moved somewhat hastily, and
before our facts were verified, to go
to press.
Rumors bounded back and forth
that John Jeter, the founder of
vr-7�r. y � ' ' � f rcecj to
resign as advisor to the station. We
ran a column on the editorial page
that stated such was true. We stand
corrected.
John Jeter was not forced to
resign, nor was he fired. He resign-
ed voluntarily of his own accord in a
dispute with General Manager Glen-
da Killingsworth. Killingsworth felt
that Jeter was overstepping his
bounds as advisor and approached
the media board with her com-
plaint. The board met to allow both
Killingsworth and Jeter to air their
views and to listen to comments.
When Jeter came in to address the
board, he presented them with a
prepared written resignation.
Many have insinuated that the
media board was to blame for the
delay in getting the station on the
air. Such is not the case.
The delay is because of the failure
on the part of a contractor to deliver
the equipment that the station needs
to go on the air.
It has been alleged that Kill-
ingsworth has not been a good
manager and petitions were cir-
culated that indirectly called for the
media board to fire Killingsworth
and re-appoint Jeter as general
manager.
Whether or not Killingsworth has
been a good manager cannot be
judged at this point. She deserves
the chance to prove herself one way
or the other. Premature criticism
does not serve any constructive pur-
pose.
It could be argued that perhaps
Killingsworth should have listened
to Jeter more. At the same time it
must be remembered that she was
and is the general manager and is
entitled to the opportunity to
develop her own policies and pro-
cedures.
Now that the dust appears to have
settl d on this issue we can all see
the entire situation with more clarity
and objectivity.
At the least, it can be said that
Jeter's supporters, including this
newspaper, were overzealous, and
overracted.
Jeter built a solid foundation for
the radio station and labored
tirelessly to get it on the air. Now it
is up to Killingsworth to finish the
task. The station's management
deserves the support of the student
body and of all factions who have
been involved in the WZMB situa-
tion.
Killingsworth and all of those
concerned with the best interests of
ECU and the station are dedicated
to the same purpose. That purpose
is to provide the students and the
university community with a good
student-operated radio station for
the listening enjoyment of all.
The East Carolinian is fully sup-
portive of everyone's efforts in the
pursuit of this goal.
SARGBJHERES A
GUY OUT HERE HITH
A LONG BEARD, IN A
FREAKS SUIT,SMOKING
SOMETHING OUT OF A
FUNNY PIPE. I'M
GONNA RUN HIM IN!
THC �A57 CAROLINIAN
Marijuana Enforcement Unequal
The subject of marijuana regula-
tion is a political hot potato,
especially in conservative North
Carolina.
Unfortunately it has been used as
an emotional appeal by some politi-
cians at election time, notably the
attorney general and other high
ranking state officials.
The laws that deal with marijuana
are in many cases antiquated. The
system of justice is a farce when it
comes to dealing with pot and other
drug related offences. Penalties are
not uniform.
Last year over a dozen ECU
students were arrested in an under-
cover drug investigation here on
campus. Some of them went to
prison. Yet a Greenville police of-
ficer who was indicted for posses-
sion of four tons of pot was aquit-
ted of the charges and never spent
one day in jail. Is that Justice?
Drug laws are the classic case of
the cure being worse than the il-
lness. We do not condone the break-
ing of the law, or the use of hard
drugs such as heroin. However,
marijuana is not an addictive or
destructive drug.
With scientific evidence sketchy
as to the effects of the use o' this
drug, it is not our intention to en-
dorse its use. At the same time,
however, it is not the place of the
penal system to randomly and selec-
tively enforce the existing statues.
It is fortunate that on this campus
the police are not preoccupied with
finding out who's smoking a joint.
The campus police have a good
policy with regard to enforcing drug
laws. Three years ago Mr. Joe
Calder told this newspaper that it
was his policy to seek out and find
those persons who sell hard drugs.
He further stated that he did not
believe it was worth exerting the
manpower and effort to seek out
and arrest students who smoke pot.
This is a very reasonable and wise
policy.
North Carolina, indeed the entire
nation, needs to take a long hard
look at how the judiciary deals with
drug offences. Laws need to be
revised, restrictions relaxed, and
penalties made more uniform.
One must really wonder why
murderers, rapists, and thieves
often get probation and suspended
sentences while high school and col-
lege students are given hard times in
our state's brutal penal system. It is
a sad state of affairs.
Campus Forum
Former Manager Praises Staff
1 must admit that 1 didn't expect a
farewell column when I resigned as
general manager, and 1 certainly didn't
plan to write anything similar myself.
But 1 must thank all the people who
made any progress of the newspaper
possible, as well as those people who did
the day-to-day, behind-the-scenes work
that gets The East Carolinian to press
twice a week and pays the bills.
You don't see all their names on the
masthead (that's the thing in the upper
left-hand corner of page four) or on the
byline of a story, but that doesn't mean
they aren't important. I won't waste
space by listing their names � they
know who they are � but 1 have to give
them all credit for their dedication to the
paper. We kind of adopted a motto in
the office, and it truly fits: "Long
hours, low pay, hard work, great com-
pany To all my friends, THANKS.
I'd also like to remind students o' the
service that the ECU student newspaper
provides for the campus, the most ob-
vious being a source of news for only
three cents per issue. Some of the other
benefits for students are: training in
journalism, advertising, business, com-
puter typesetting, commercial art and
graphics; providing more than 50paying
jobs for those who might otherwise be
ineligible for financial aid; obtaining
modern working conditions for future
newspaper employees; and ensuring an
open, uncensored medium for debate on
important issues.
And while I'm rambling on
The News and Observer and UNC-
Chapel Hill are vehemently against a
communications major at ECU, and
rightly so. Chapel Hill has a journalism
school which receives millions of dollars
from the state and alumni; ECU has an
under-funded journalism minor with
about 40 students. With a communica-
tions major, ECU would run Chapel
Hill out of business in practical jour-
nalistic training. It would also eliminate
the shortage of qualified personnel The
East Carolinian has always suffered.
The fight will be uphill but well worth it.
Again, thanks to all those who make it
happen. And please support (and
criticize) your student newspaper � it's
really the only thing at the university
that's yours.
-30-
R1CHARD GREEN
Senior, English
Former General Manager
Minges Causes Em harassment
1 was disappointed and embarrassed
by the total lack of preparation of
Minges Coliseum for the Nov. 28 ap-
pearance of the Harlem Globetrotters.
In the Nov. 25 East Carolinian
"Opinion" column "Minges Upgrad-
ed it was stated that "new seats add
class and give Minges more than just a
high school gym aura. In past seasons
Minges resembled little more than a
huge high school gymnasium
I praise Dave Odom's efforts to
upgrade Minges but due to an in-
operative scoreboard and other faulty
equipment (one net hanging by a single
thread during warm-ups and again by
the end of the game) Minges was far
from impressive. The facilities would
not even compare to most high school
gyms.
1 was embarrassed for ECU who
desperately needs good publicity and an
increased attendance rate if Minges ever
hopes to establish the same professional
atmosphere as ACC gyms.
I doubt that many of the fans who
paid six-fifty a seat were impressed or
encouraged to return and watch our
Pirates in action. If ECU plans to
upgrade its image, we must promote
such an image one-hundred percent of
the time.
ROY F. JORDAN
Junior, Business
Surfers Appreciate Support
The recently formed ECU Surf Club
has been working very hard these past
few months becoming organized, for-
mulating ideas, and developing goals.
Tuesday, November 11 we sponsored
a happy hour at Pantana Bobs. We
would like to take this time to thank all
of you who supported us. We would also
like to thank the members of this club;
the participation was almost one-
hundred percent. Everyone worked very
hard and through this hard work we feel
the happy hour was extremely suc-
cessful. President Mike Monahan has
been very dedicated to starting and for-
ming a successful surf club and he was
very impressed with the enthusiasm of
all the members. Everyone gave
everything they had and it's this dedica-
tion that is making the ECU Surf Club
as successful as it is.
This Saturday, November 22 the last
team competition will be held in
Wrightsville Beach, N.( . In the first
contest we participated in we placed
third; the second was cancelled due to
the lack of waves. The team is really
looking forward to this upcoming con-
test. We will hopefull) be taking two
teams oi twelve. Anyone who is in-
terested in going should attend a meeting
Thursdav. November 20 at 7:00 in room
248 Mendenhali.
Once again, the ECU Surf Club
thanks you for your supporl and hopes
that it will continue.
Mike Monahan
Junior, Geology
Columnist (alls Writer
Well 1 guess it's time to eat some
words. Patrick O'Neill did indeed call
me last Thursday evening. We met last
Friday and had coffee at Sambo's. We
found that other than our differences in
politics we have much in common We
both ride motorcycles in the winter
which means we're both about half
crazy and we both grew up on 1 ong
Island.
Isn't it great that we live in a country
where two people can exchange political
views in a newspaper and then meet in a
restaurant and exchange an idea on how
to help people and not even discuss our
political differences.
I must sav I misjudged Mr. O'Neill
(actuallv 1 didn't, if you want someone
to do something (within reason of
course) tell them thes won't and usually
they will). He is really a verv nice per
son- JOHN! CADWELL
Greenville, N.C.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points oj view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old South
Building, across from Joynet Library.
For purposes oj verification, all letters
must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced, or neath printed. All tet-
ters are subject to edit inn for brevity,
obscenity and libel, and no personal at
tacks will be permitted. Letters by the
same author are limited to one each 30
da vs.
c
A
Sat
M u j
ri
Or a (
It i
sour
and
tier
blended
toge
ther
preserve
dan
played
elen
R
with
roll
-
tation, wi

Ovei
musi
M .
late in
had ar- I
mea
gro-
ting ther
A
reg
day
our
record,
then as a
! his pai
homewo
Ti
It's an
ture on
thin. I
ECU, Ir
ing tbou
Student
is affec
students
t-or ml
manv m
myself, cl
mind wh
here at
times tm
the wall.
I think!
cold weal
the wal
place, esj
how har�
sit on th(
warm.
You ci
arm for
t

m





k.
y
3
and
in
ter
U��S,
TH� LAST CAROLINIAN
Features
DECI MHt K4. 19X0
Page 5
Cloggers To Hold
Annual Celebration
On Saturday, Dec. 6, the Roxy
Music, Arts and Crafts Center is
sponsoring the Fifth Annual Green
Grass Cloggers Day Celebration.
The event will begin at noon and
continue until 11:00 p.m.
Clogging is one of the only
original American forms of dance.
It is derived from a number of
sources, including African, English
and American Indian dances. Set-
tlers in the Appalachian Mountains
blended these different dances
together into clogging.
The Green Grass Cloggers got
together about ten years ago, to
preserve and spread this form of
dance. Since then, the Cloggers have
played in places ranging from
elementary schools to Carnegie Hall
and Lincoln Center in New York Ci-
ty.
In 1975, the Mayor of Greenville
set aside a day for the Green Grass
Cloggers, to bring attention to them
as an important cultural resource
for the Greenville area.
Other performers at the Clogger's
Day Celebration include:
The Jubilo String Band of
Philadelphia; Clay Buckner and
Friends of Chapel Hill; the Home
Town Boys of Greenville; Algae
Mae Hinton, an old-time guitarist
and Buck Dancer; Beverly Cotten,
visiting Artist, Pitt Community Col-
lege; and "Doc" Matthew Jr. Mor-
ris, an old-time medicine show har-
monica player from Greenville.
Other dancers include The Na-
tional Duet Clogging Champions
from Cary, N.C the Fiddle Pup-
pets, cloggers from Maryland; the
Hemlock Bluff Cloggers from Cary,
N.C and the Croatan Dancers,
Souix Indian group from North
Carolina.
A film on the Green Grass Clog-
gers by David Balch will also be
shown.
During the afternoon, a number
of workshops will be held, including
such things as banjo and fiddle
music, the blues, clogging, square
dancing and round dancing. People
attending the Cloggers Day Celebra-
tion are invited to participate in the
workshops.
Tickets are $3.00 in advance and
$4.00 at the door. Some tickets are
on sale at the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Student Center. For
further information, call 752-4761.
Jack's Ark
Photo By RICHARD GREEN
If the weatherman foretasted 40 days and 40 nights of ram, Jack Lesemann would be a good neighbor to have
Lesemann, chief of the Army Corps of Engineers in Charleston, S.C is building a 40-foot trawler-yacht in his
back yrd. He started work in Fall 1978 and hopes to be finished by Spring 1981.
Record Fans Fall Into A Few Basic Stereotypes
By DAVID NORRIS
frilurr tdilor
It's hard to imagine life in college
without music, especially rock and
roll or one of its many offshoots.
Since my first taste of ECU at orien-
tation, when some jerk kept playing
the same side of a Bachman-Turner
Overdrive album for three days,
music has been a large part of my
everyday life.
Music addiction struck me pretty
late in life. When I started college, I
had about three albums. Today. I
measure my record collection in
gross tonnage rather than by coun-
ting them.
At first, 1 bought albums fairly ir-
regularly. Back in those good old
days, 1 thought five bucks was an
outrageous price to pay for a
record. I picked up one now and
then as a defensive measure against
those who lived in the dorm with
arsenals of gigantic speakers and
hundreds of loud albums, all of
which I usually couldn't stand.
You meet all varieties of music
fans at college. Many fall into a
nebulous category made up of peo-
ple who buy lots of records from
groups you don't really care about,
so you never pay much attention to
them. Other than that one lackluster
type, there are many fascinating
kinds of music fans abounding at
ECU.
The Beatlemaniac is one par-
ticularly interesting type of record
lover. A true Beatlemaniac has
every one of the Fab Four's albums,
dozens of books, posters and other
souveniers, plus an impressive
knowledge of Beatle trivia. They act
like the Beatles are dead and refuse
to listen to any of their solo efforts.
WM
Some of them actually believe that
"Paul is dead" stuff and think that
an imposter that looks like Paul Mc-
Cartney is singing with Wings now.
As for myself, I have some Beatle
stuff around, but mostly 1 listen to
other groups. Some of these groups
I listen to by my own choice; others
I listen to by the choice of the
"stereo fiends
A stereo fiend is a record lover
who somewhere along the line got
more interested in the turntable and
speakers than what was actually
playing on them. These people may
not even know the Beatles have
broken up, but can tell you all about
the merits and faults of every
speaker, turntable and receiver on
the market. (And, they will tell you
all about them if you don't hit them
with a brick to shut them up.)
Perhaps the best definition of a
Stereo fiend is someone who has
$1,000 worth of stereo equipment
for each album he owns.
The opposite is the record-
collecting fanatic. He has 1,000
albums for every dollar's worth of
stereo equipment that he owns. This
type of collector will buy an album
just to have it, without ever actually
playing it all the way through. He
often becomes a master of rock
trivia. If you ever want to know who
played drums for Herman's Hermits
or know the names o' each member
of the lour Seasons, he's the man to
sec.
"Ja snobs" arc a hard-to-get-
along-with bunch. While they may
put up with, say, Emerson, I ake
and Palmer for a short time, they
generally consider all rock music to
be garbage. That's not so bad, since
they are about 70 percent right, but
they lack the tact of not telling that
to rock fans. After all, how often
can you listen to someone continual-
ly telling you your favorite band is
terrible before violence results?
Some folks don't care much
about the music, but are experts on
record quality. They buy a record
on the basis of how it sounds and
not what kind of music it is. They
may have groups they like and not
buy the albums because of disliking
the way the company records and
packages the disc. 1 guess that's
understandable; I hate album covers
that fall apart after taking the
record out once or twice.
Other people care about the
music, but don't care about the
quality. They survive with a bat-
tered cassette player that plays
slightly too fast, giving the impres-
sion that Alvin and the Chipmunks
have a larger repertoire than is
generally suspected.
At the other end of the spectrum
are those who treat all their records
like valuable antiques, constantly
dusting and polishing them. They
are horrified at the thought of
anyone actually stacking records on
a turntable. If an album has any sort
of scratch on it, it is immediately
thrown out and replaced.
I got a copy of Pete Townsend's
new album for a buck because the
original owner said it popped once
on his stereo. I have yet to find a
pop anywhere on it, but the way I
take care of my records, there pro-
bably will be one, or ten, soon.
School Ponders New Name
Welcome To George 9s Old Lady 9s College
i
Photo By GARY PATTERSON
Taking A Break
This pair is enjoying a break from the everyday drudgery of classes and
homework.
In the increasingly-heated efforts
to "sell" campuses to high school
seniors deciding which college to at-
tend, administrators have given
away frisbees, flown planes with
advertising streamers over high
school football stadiums, hired
Madison Avenue advertising firms,
and purged catalogues (at Antioch)
of "anxiety-provoking words
Now there's a college recruiter
who wants to change his school's
name to make it more saleable.
Richard Warner, an assistant pro-
fessor who frequently recruits high
school seniors for Mary Washington
College, thinks the name "Mary
Washington" drives prospective
students away.
Warner claims both sexes want to
go to co-ed colleges these days, and
that "Mary Washington" just
doesn't sound co-educational. Con-
sequently, students do not even seek
information about the
school�which has had its name
since 1908�because they assume it
does not accept male applicants.
"I've sat alone at many college
nights at Virginia high schools he
recalls, "while many kids see our
name next to other women's schools
and go the other way. I've gone up
to them, and they say they thought
we only took women
Warner's name change proposal
has not gone unchallenged. Most
often, critics have accused him of
being sexist and insensitive to the
needs o' women in modern society.
So far, the school's librarian, Rudy
Weinbrech, has leveled the toughest
attack.
"This name change business flies
in the face of getting society to think
that women can do anything they
want to do Weinbrech told
Zodiac News Service. "Why change
the name simply because some men
don't like its sound. Sarah
Lawrence College and Notre Dame
University don't seem to have any
problems
Dudley Blodget, the admissions
director at Sarah Lawrence, says his
school's enrollment has not suffered
from its name, but he concedes
"there have been problems with
some students who were surprised to
find out that we are indeed co-ed
"But there's no way we're going
to change our name he predicts.
At Mary Washington, Warner's
hopes appear just as slim. JThe
school's Committee on College Af-
fairs has authorized a study to in-
vestigate its image at high schools
across the state. So far, Warner
says, those committee members
have been "quite surprised by what
they found But he admits there is
no serious talk of changing the
name.
And at that time, he thinks the
Mary Washington administration
will recognize the school's current
name as discriminatory.
Warner insists that "by giving the
impression that we're a women's
school we are discriminating against
men and women who want to go to
a co-ed school, but just don't know
that we are co-ed
He angrily dismisses accusations
that he himself is sexist by claiming
to be a strong supporter of women's
rights. "People who don't have any
facts on their side must use emo-
tion" in the name change discus-
sion, he adds.
Warner, however, refuses to sug-
gest any college names that might
make Mary Washington a first
choice for some. Some students
were not as shy. Among their pro-
posals were "George's Old Lady's
College "My Mother's Place
and "The College of Mary and Her
Son, George
Appalachian State
Rents Student Texts
The Wall: Focal Point Of Campus Life
ByMIKEHIGHSMITH
Sl�ff Writer
It's amazing how one little struc-
ture on campus can mean so many
things to so many people here at
ECU. That little structure I'm talk-
ing about is located in between the
Student Book Store and Rawl, and
is affectionately known by the
students as "The Wall
fror many people, the wall holds
many memories; and speaking for
myself, one thing that will cross my
mind when looking back at my stay
here at ECU will be all the good
times and many hours I've spent on
the wall.
I think it's kind of sad when the
cold weather takes over and turns
the wall area into a barren, desolate
place, especially wrrtn you think of
how hard it is just to find a place to
sit on the wall when the weather is
warm.
You can always tell when final ex-
ams for the fall semester are ap-
proaching: it's when you go out to
blow 10 minutes in between classes
and nobody is around outside to
talk to, except for a few eskimos
braving the cold.
Just like everything else, even the
wall has to succumb to the
onslaught of cold weather, and shut
down for a few months. But with
the changing of the seasons, before
you know it the wall will once again
be hustling and bustling with the
familiar sounds of conversation,
merriment, and activity.
It just gives you a little something
to look forward to.
The wall isn't just a masonry
structure built for students to sit on
and watch the traffic flow by. It
represents a place, an area where
people go to socialize and discuss,
relevant topics of the day, such as
which professors to avoid when pre-
registering, how badly you messed
up on that last test, and which con-
certs are worth seeing in the next
month.
On warm days, the wall is a
choice place to do a little homework
in the sunshine, and talk to friends
that occasionally pass by. It is a
place for groups of friends to gather
and discuss all the good parties that
will be happening this weekend. In
essence, the wall symbolizes a con-
versation forum for students that
have ten minutes to blow between
classes.
In the last four years I have
definitely gotten my money's worth
out of the wall.
I have taken naps on the wall, met
new friends on the wall, did group
projects on the wall, witnessed dog
fights, fist fights, and snowball
fights while sitting on the wall, tok-
ed a little enjoyment on the wall,
made weekend plans with friends on
the wall, made dates on the wall,
crammed for exams on the wall, ate
tons of junk food on the wall,
played my guitar on the wall, read
the newspaper on the wall, and most
recently I formed a new rock-n-roll
group with a friend on the wall.
(Our first tour doesn't start until
next spring.)
A couple of years back, while sit-
ting in my usual place, a fellow ran
past throwing joints to the people
sitting all along the wall; just my
luck, I didn't get one. That was the
same year that I heard of a streaker
that ran past the wall.
One of my more enjoyable and
memorable "wall moments" came
when Keith Berger did a short mime
act in front of Rawl, sort of a taste
of what he was going to do in his
show that night.
For you students that know of the
wall only a that brick thing in front
of the student store that you pass by
to and from class, stop by sometime
and consider the tradition that the
wall carries with it. Maybe you can
sit down for a few minutes and let
the wall make a few more memories
for you.
Renting textbooks to reduce stu-
dent costs is not a new idea � it's
been around for many decades and
enjoyed particular popularity dur-
ing the 1940s, when returning GI's
flooded the campuses. Over the last
20 years, however, faculty com-
plaints and administrative problems
led many schools to revert to a
straight sales system.
Today's economic climate is caus-
ing a renewed interest in textbook
rentals. Roby Tripplett, director of
student stores at Appalachian State
U heads a program that has been
successfully renting books for
almost 40 years, and says he receives
weekly inquiries from other schools.
While he's willing to explailn ASU's
program, Tripplett won't advise
every system to adopt rentals.
The biggest problem, he says, is
faculty resistance. A mandatory
rental system such as ASU's re-
quires a textbook to be used for
three years to recover initial costs,
he explains. Faculty members say
that restricts academic freedom and
forces them to use outdated
material. Tripplett believes more
careful textbook selection would
eliminate the need for a rental
system. "Students would be able to
re-sell their books more often he
says.
Faculty members also complain
that rentals prevent students from
building a personal library. Trip-
plett says he finds, however, that
many students keep their books,
particularly those in their major. At
ASU, students pay $22 50 per
semester for book rental. If they
want to buy all books, that amount
is deducted from the cost. Single
book purchases are discounted 25
percent, says Tripplett.
Many of the students keeping tex-
tbooks simply don't turn them in at
the end of the semester, and are bill-
ed through the ASU comptroller's
office before registering for the next
semester. Tripplett admits some
students default on those bills. "We
don't have too bad of a problem
here he says. "But I know other
rental programs where that's been a
major problem
The default rate also drives up the
cost of the rental program,
defeating its purpose, Tripplett
says. ASU students currently spend
$40 a semester on rentals and a few
paperbacks, he says, while at the U.
of North Carolina-Chapel Hill,
students pay $100 per semester on
average, but can recoup up to $50
on resale. "If you reach a point
where the rental system isn't saving
the students money � then it's not
worth it he says.
T





I HE EAS1 C AROl INIAN 1K I MB1-R 4. 1980
LeAttM About CotLCUrm tfap Wai
B RwiO AWif
7v G0r)6 our o�irvf viiajp
If YOUTHAiK THAT'S 6)p.
I'M CourOTiOGTH DVS
UMTIL SUMMER WCPTlOol
Fellowship Meets
Classifieds
FOR SALE
FOR SALE Technics SA 500 60
wans SL 230 fully automatic
lurntabU-with Empire 2000 E" Ml
Phase Linear speakers
Aluminum antennae Paid SU00
bist Otfei Can '52 8860 ask tor
Graham
SNOW SKIS K2 244 MID 170's
444 Soloman bindings Caber
tntr boots and poles All equip
It brand new! Askmq S330 for
ig Call or come by and
.� i i Auto Parts inc
FOR SALE US Divers aluminum
!ank J valve back pack Calypso campus
J Requ'ator with case Used one
� s 00 p m
FOR SALE B a .in rug S16
h.gh �� wit pad S30
FOR SALE Na.v blue !968 Volvo
vnei that is willing to
I" interested call
NEED A RIDE North' Goinq
thru Virginia West Virq.nia Ohio
and on to Indianalalong I 11
Leaving Friday morning Dec l�
It interested call Dr Chenowcth
7 57 6000 or 7 58 162 7
FOR RENT
ONE OR TWO Female room
mates needed by January 1 Call
758 0838 after 5 00 p m
GRADUATE or responsible
female roommate desired for a
two bedroom apartment close to
Available mid
December Call 758 1636
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed
to share a spacious apartment at
Lanqston Park walking distance
to campus Great place for ne�t
semester Extras are included n
the rent Don t miss this chance
Ask for LeJhe 752 7651
FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed
to share two bedroom apart
ment (near campus) S75 month
plus 'j utilities Upperclassman
preferred Available anytime
Call 758 4527
ROOMMATE WANTED Half
rent and utilities Call 756 9733 In
Winterville
ROOMMATE WANTED Tosharc
two bedroom duple located at
2506 B E 3rd Street Rent is 87.50
per month plus half utilities Call
758 7724
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
CLASSIFIED ADS CAN BE PUR
CHASED AT THREE LOCA
TIONS
Student Supply Store Lobby MWF
10 00 11 00, TTH 1! 00 12 00
East Carolinian Office MTTH
4 00 5 00 WF 2 00 3 00
Student Organization Booth
(Mendenhall! MWF 12 00 1 00
TTH 11 00 12 00
The Fountain of Life
Christian Fellowship is
sponsoring a Program-
Sharing Night tonight
in Room 244
Mendenhall at 7:00
p.m. The purpose of
the program is to let the
campus know ahout the
Fellowship, and let the
members get together.
The Fellowship's
choir, which has per-
formed at other univer-
sities around the slate,
will perform during the
program.
The Fountain of Life
Christian Fellowship
was begun about three
years ago and has
around sixty members
now.
Meetings are held
every Wednesday night
at 7:00 in the Afro-
American Cultural
Center. The meetings
are very informal, ac-
cording to the group's
president, S h e 11 o n
Barnes. He explains the
organization as "a
bunch of people who
get together and love
the Ford
(Presenting our Designer Diamond Collection.)
��
A ArtCai ved �
A' (Iran tatic m wo -liege ring o ncept f r won
r in lOKand 1 IK gold. On display only
the ArtCarved representative is on rani;
C.iulom Crafting
and Repair
Original Handcraftetl Jewelry
in Silver and Gold
120 E. 5.t.
(,rr entitle, .( S7834
Buying and Selling
Gold and Silver �nd Coini
758 2127
The new Designer Diamond Collection,
reflecting the importance, value, and rare
beauty of genuine diamonds, is an
ArtCarved innovation.
This collection is also available with a new
diamond substitute. Cubic Zirconia, which
creates the same dazzling elegance for less
'���

Sfc.
WCTIRVED
COLLEGE RINGS
Symbolizing vow abilitx to .
DESIGNER
I). 1AA7)
COLLECTION
FOR iii f Stereo Poer Amp
�.am DC ?o25KHi ilSOcall
'S: 7817 ash to- Ai
FOR SALE Sharp black and
le 10 men T Great shape
electric guitar amp and
. abmel Has two 12 inch
Call Alan 7S8 9790
SURFBOARD 6 1 Wave S�S
52 MM
FOR SALE Used bumper pool
rti Dais and cues Price
Call 523 2703 after 5 00
p rn
PERSONAL
CUSTOM CRAFTING and repair
of goid and silver Buying and
selling of gold and silver by Les
Jewelers 120 E ith St 7S 2U7.
HURRY Time running out but
lecl Christmas gift offer still
open1 Special student prices 510
cancatures i?0 and up portraits
led T shirts done too'
. � since
� Meylei r$J 5775
ANYTHING tOU CAN yVRITE
write better. 1 vpmg pro
� nq Write Right
01A VAKERS
a � " � art
l j pe lal Cni istmas of
a�' 0 pen and ink portraits or
,u.�ures of your favorite per
'or only S'5" Suitable tor
� fjminq A unique gift idea ! Tak
mg orders until Dec 5 get your
order in now b calling 752 4277
Mon Fn between 3 00 p m and
A�OHT!ONll�TO
iWlWIIKOf1
fRIONANCY
Si7�00 "�! HtcHttfve"
preoancy teit. bfrtf con
trot, artd problem prt�in
cy covnaatirvg Cor rvrmar
intortnattori can �12 0SJS
(toll tr�� nvmbtr
� hO �J1 Sail between �
A M i P M weekday�
It aletffc Weren't
Heel OrtMia'ten
? 17 e�r feta St.
for students who want to do better
HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR GRADES
� do better on your test
� make better use of your time
� plan for the grade you want
a new 2-hour class from S.E.E.
Two Classes: Dec. 8 or 9 7-9pm.
Limited Enrollment Call 756-5128 Evening
Dec. 4-5
Student Supply
Store Lobby
Wright Building
$10

'WANTED GOLD"
DON'T GET
RIPPED OFF1
WE
PAY
TOP
DOLLAR
�CLXSSRINQS
�WEDDING BANDS
�BRACELETS
�DENTAL GOLD
ANYTHING GOLD
ANYTHING MARKED
10K, 14K, 18K A 24K
ALSO UNMARKED
6 00 p m
l.D. DAWSON CO
A gift from Arby's
that will last you & your
family a lifetime!
SKI
intergrecn
R E AT I
YOURSELF TO A
GREAT
VACATION
IN A VIP CON-
DOMINUM AT
40�o DISCOUNT
BETWEEN
DEC.21 AND
JAN.I CALL
752-1015. TOM
or NANCY
VISIT
THE MUSHROOM
FOR THE SPECIAL CHRISTMAS
GIFT
Get your holiday snapshots,
slides or movies developed when
you buy a specially priced
soft drink at Arbys!
Evans St.
Mall
Downtown
Greenville
l
I
V more
reasons why
you and I
love Arbys.
Hours.
Mon Sat. 11:30
Fri Sat. 5:00 11:00
Sun.Thurs,
5:00 10:00
CASUAL DRESS
TAKEOUTORDERS
706 S. Evans St.
Greenville
758 0707
ALLYOU
CAN
EAT PASTA
EVERY
SUNDAY
AND MON-
DAY
NIGHT
$3.95
WITH THIS COUPON
ITH THIS COUPON
Arby's Junior r
Roast Beet Ufa
Sandwiches W
Otter valid thru
January 31. 1981
at all participating
Arby's Limit one
coupon per customer
lid
otter.
(960 ft io c
Otter valid thru
January 3V1981
at ail participating
Arby's Limit one
coupon per customer
per visit Not valid
with any other otter
COUPON
2 Arby's r u
Roast Beet L-L
Sandwiches � �
$2��!
er visit Not valid M
nth any othc o"e J
� !hru
ary 31 1981
coupon pe
oe
ARBY'S IN FAYETTEVILLE
� N.Skibo across from
Cross Creek Mall
ARBYS IN GOLDSBORO
� N. Berkeley Blvd. m
Ashley Plaza
ARBY'S IN JACKSONVILLE
� Lejeune Blvd. across
from Tarawa Terrace
ARBYS IN GREENVILLE
� E.Greenville Blvd. m
Greenville Square
1 rw appearance of this advertisement
in i he Paraglide does not constitute an
endorsement by the Department of Defense
for the products and services advertised
rh (
B
G
In
B
� er
M .
1 �

I i

M
onl

M
CH

novk
��
I

Bn V

seas v

national
Minges
convincifl
Pir.
Onl
the mate
in doinni
Ton
S 34-pouri
Vinc� B
The
Jan
pour
nelly bv
ronia
n the spc
ECU Al
Revils is
the '
t





Sports
Karr Proposes Students Buy Tickets
kijn�iim)ik
Jm
Bobcats
Get H in
In Route
i
ODU Nips
Lady Bucs
u
m
4$, $
Wednesday nights me. (Photo b (,ar
Patterson)
Wrestlers Fall
�� "WiT MMBOMHi JMH
ECV-ODU Battle Scenes
I 11 I II R

'
Vim Jones ires
K.jihv Kil�- 1oes
oat li iuii ii! K.tv es





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 4, 1980
' WWr
Swimmers Back
After Week Off
Pirate Natators Return To Action
Tracksters To Compete
Che Hast Carolina
track team will compete
in the l ehigh Invita-
tional this Sunday in
Bethlehem, Penn-
sylvania. Pirate coach
Bill Carson ill enter
only two mile relay
teams in the competi-
tion.
"I'm going to try
splitting the kids up
Carson said. "I'm not
going to use our best
tour together. We're
using Lehigh to set up
tor out first couple of
meets
On one team will be-
All-Americans Shawn
Leaney and Carlton
Bell, along with Craig
Rainy and Tim Cephas.
The second team will
feature Keith Clark.
Doug Jackson, Ray
Dickerson and Charles
Watkins.
Two members of last
year's nationally-
ranked mile relay team
have graduated but
Carson feels this year's
team may eventually be
better.
"I really think by the
time we go to the na-
tionals this team will be
better he said. "Tim
Sephas will be better
than Otis (All-America
Melvin). The main
thing is that Craig
Rainey must become as
good as Stan Curry
(All-American).
"Shawn and Carlton
were on the team last
year and they have im-
proved. There will be a
lot of competition but I
look for us to place
again
emtek
Spurts I (tili
After an idle week,
the East Carolina swim
team will be traveling
to State College, Penn-
sylvania Friday and
Saturday to compete in
the Penn State Relays.
Pirate coach Ray
Scharf said his men's
team would probably
be a bit weaker going
into the Relays than
had been believed in the
pre-season.
"We're weaker after
a number of our guys
quit the team Scharf
said. "Kelly Hopkins
quit earlier and this
week our top freestyier,
Scott Ross, quit
Scharf said he had
not seen or heard from
Ross this week and did
not know why he had
left the team, but said
the loss was a big one.
"It's most disap-
pointing Scharf said.
"It hurts the team
anytime something like
this happens
Regardless, Scharf
says his men's team is
working hard preparing
for the weekend's com-
petition.
"We've had some
hard knocks and pro- I
blems but the guys are '
giving it their all. While
we may not be as strong
as we had planned, we
still look for some good
times at Penn State
Scharf said the ECU
women's team, which
has already posted nine
national qualifying
times, was getting
stronger.
"We had a few girls
sick for a while he
noted, "but we're back
to 11 girls now and will
take eight to Penn
State
Also competing in
the Relays will be na-
tional powers such as
West Virginia,
Syracuse, Pittsburgh,
host Penn State, North
Carolina, N.C. State
and Rutgers.
BUY, SELL,
AND TRADE
In The
CLASSIFIEDS
Pirate Gymnasts
Host N. C. State
The East Carolina
gymnasP.cs team will
pla a welcoming roll
Friday night when it
hosts N.C. State at
7:30.
The Wolfpack gym-
nasts will be competing
in their first-ever meet
as State only entered
the sport into its
athletic program this
season. Formerly an in-
tramural club. State is
now a NC A1AW
Divisori I competitor.
"They're bra n d
new noted Pirate
coach Ton Rose.
"From all I've heard 1
understand they have
some good kids,
though. 1 expect them
to be a fine team
ECU freshman stan-
dout Nan George will
miss the meet
The Happy Store
Open 24 Hour
Savin Copies 5
81 ;xl 1 or Legal Size
Amoco, Visa, M.C.
H
r
en
o.
Prizes Doors Open
Contest At 8piTI.
Surprises
New Wave- lc. 4
Rock'n Roll
Dance Contest
Reduced Beverage Prices
Throughout The Nite
Prize For Best Costume
204 E. 5th St.
Across From
Newby's Sub Shop
Open Til 9:30 Nightly
THIS WEEK'S SALE ALBUMS
ALL CURRENT RERLEASES
$8.98 list for S5.99 Rod Stewart REO Speedwagon Ari-osmitk John Lennon Allman Brothers$9 98 list for $6.99 Steely Dan $15.98 list for $10.99 Bruce Springsteen $13.98 list for $9.99 Honeysuckle Rose
Al Stewart Linda RonstadtEagles $11.98 list for 9.99
$7.98 list for $4.99Heart
Emerson,Lake & Palmer
Rockpile
ALL SMOKING
ACCESSORIES
UP TO 50SOFT
UNTIL
CHRISTMAS
I APPLi; RECORDS T-SHIRTS
!
'REG. $4.50 NOW $5jrWIJH COUPON
We Buy Used Albums
GOLD BEADS
Good Everyday
Low Prices
ELECTRONICS
Stereos Tape Players
CalculatorsClock Radios
Stereo Stands
DIAMONDS
Pendants Earrings Rings
(Color & Diamond Combinations)
HOUSEWARES
Toastmaster � GE Sunbeam
Kitchen Tools � Blenders � Cookware
PHOTO
Canon Minolta
Pentax � Kodak � Vivitar
PERSONAL CARE
Hair Curlers Blowdryers
Sunlamps Curling Irons
Make Up Mirrors
SILVER CRYSTAL CLOCKS
TYPEWRITES SMOKE ALARMS
FIREPLACE ACCESSORIESBABY GOODS
SPORTING GOODS
J.D. DAWSONCO.
TURN YOUR OLD GOLD INTO CHRISTMAS CASH
READING DAY EVE
ECU FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
PRESENT A NIGHT OF
ROCK N ROLL
WITH
THE DEEP SOUTH'S PREMIERE SHOW ROCK
BAND
MM WW
A- A
AT THE
I
TUES DEC. 9th
Rock FM
ATTIC
TUES. DEC. 9th
8:30 O'CLOCK
LOOK FOR V2 PRICE COUPON IN TUESDAYS
EAST CAROLINIAN
In Conjunction With
Green Grass doggers Day
THE RATHSKELLER
Prroudly Presents
A Weekend Of Celebration
4

LS
Dec. 4th.
Thursday Nite:
Wayne and Charlie
and Friends
Blue Grass Jam
Always Different
Always Pleasing
9-
:�
AND
Dec. 7th.
Dec 5th.
Friday Nite
The Horseshoe
Hot Shots
Old Time
Foot Moving Music
A SPECIAL SUNDAY
OPENING OF THE
Dec. 6th. RATHSKELLER
Saturday the ,
RATHSKELLER tor
is proud to present Downtown Greenville
THE RATHSKELLER
H
�&
c
e
752 136
&
.
-v
o� Doors Open At 8:00 for
"Old Time Music"with a Hard Driving
Rythem and Unbridled Excitement
GOLD & SILVER
PRICES ARE UP!
If you need monty for fall clothes or football tlcktU, now It a
good tlma to sail your gold and silver valuables. And here s a
good way to get EXTRA CASH!
SELL YOUR
CLASS RINGS
TO COIN & RING MAN
$
Almost everyone his i high school or college class ring
they don't wear anymore. Chick your dresser drawers
and bring your class ring into Coin & Ring Man. We're
your professional buying service and we guarantee you
fair prices and good service.
Ml PAY CAfM ON-THI iROT
F01 JlWtilY, V AlUAIUSMYTHIRG
MAtKIDI0K - I4K - UK.
S COLD $
� imc$ � aicKucis � watckis � mamows
� CUSS IMCS � WfHOK IAMS � BIRTAl
COLS � IIACIUTS � ItOOCMS � IMMITS
CHAINS � LICHTHS - CU� LINKS � AUIMCS
PAYING ON TM SPOT
CASH OR ITIMS MAtKID
STIRLING SILVER
RIOARMISt Off CONDITION
� COFFEE SERVICES � GOBLETS
� RINGS � SPOONS � TRAYS � KNIVES
� FORKS�NECKLACES�BRACELETS
� FRANKLIN AND HAMILTON MINT
MERCHANDISE �
$
� �� -4���t, a
& RING
Of �V SALES CO ��
401S.EVANSST. .�.�s��w-wu
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
?
i





Title
The East Carolinian, December 4, 1980
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 04, 1980
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.98
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57306
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy